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Encyclopedia > Hebrew Theological College

Hebrew Theological College

Logo of Hebrew Theological College
Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Established 1922
School type Private
Location Skokie, Illinois, USA
Rosh Yeshiva Position currently not filled
Chancellor Rabbi Jerold Isenberg
Enrollment 130 high school
40 men's college
200? women's college
Campus Urban
Website www.htc.edu

The Hebrew Theological College, also known as Beit HaMidrash LaTorah, also colloquially known as "Skokie Yeshiva," is a private university located in Skokie, Illinois. It was chartered in 1922 as one of the first Modern Orthodox Jewish institutions of higher education in America, and is therefore also one of the oldest Jewish institutions in the United States outside of the New York area. The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... This is a trivia section. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Rosh yeshiva (Hebrew: ראש ישיבה) (pl. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Crowded Shibuya, Tokyo shopping district An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... This is a trivia section. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... Modern Orthodox Judaism (or Modern Orthodox or Modern Orthodoxy; sometimes abbreviated as MO or Modox) is a movement within Orthodox Judaism that attempts to synthesize traditional observance and values with the secular, modern world. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... NY redirects here. ...

Hebrew Theological College's primary purposes are to prepare students for the assumption of formal roles as educators, as well as to train eligible students to meet the requirements and demands of rabbinic ordination. As its secondary purpose, Hebrew Theological College endeavors to provide its students with broad cultural perspectives and a strong foundation in the Liberal Arts and Sciences to facilitate a creative synthesis of general and Jewish knowledge. In so doing, the College also provides an excellent background for the pursuit of advanced professional training... [1]

Contents

Semicha (Hebrew: ‎, leaning [of the hands]), also semichut (Hebrew: ‎, ordination), or semicha lerabbanut (Hebrew: ‎, rabbinical ordination) is derived from a Hebrew word which means to rely on or to be authorized. It generally refers to the ordination of a rabbi within Judaism. ... Culture (Culture from the Latin cultura stemming from colere, meaning to cultivate,) generally refers to patterns of human activity and the symbolic structures that give such activity significance. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... Synthesis (from the ancient Greek σύν (with) and θεσις (placing), is commonly understood to be an integration of two or more pre-existing elements which results in a new creation. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Organization

The yeshiva consists of a Bet Midrash, a Rabbinical School, the Bellows Kollel, and the Fasman Yeshiva High School. The college is composed of the Bressler School of Advanced Hebrew Studies and the Kanter School of Liberal Arts and Sciences. All students complete a Bachelor of Arts in Judaic Studies through the Bressler School, with the option of a second major through the Kanter School. This article is about the Jewish educational system. ... A yeshiva (Hebrew, pl. ... Rabbi, in Judaism, means a religious ‘teacher’, or more literally, ‘great one’. The word Rabbi is derived from the Hebrew root word , rav, which in biblical Hebrew means ‘great’ or ‘distinguished (in knowledge)’. Sephardic and Yemenite Jews pronounce this word ribbī; the modern Israeli pronunciation rabbī is derived from a... A kollel (Hebrew: כולל; a gathering/collection [of scholars]) is an institute for advanced studies of the Talmud and of rabbinic literature for Jewish adults, essentially a yeshiva which pays married men a regular monthly stipend or annual salary (and/or provides housing and meals) to study Judaisms classic texts... Fasman Yeshiva High School, also known as Skokie Yeshiva, or simply the Yeshiva to its students and to members of the Chicago Jewish community, is the single-sex high school division of Hebrew Theological College in Skokie, Illinois. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... A B.A. issused as a certificate Bachelor of Arts (B.A., BA or A.B.), from the Latin Artium Baccalaureus is an undergraduate bachelors degree awarded for either a course or a program in the liberal arts or the sciences, or both. ...


The men's program leads to a B.A. with a focus in Judaic studies and specifically Talmud, with second majors offered in Business, Computer Science, and Psychology. The women's program, located on a separate campus at the Blistein Teachers Institute for Women, offers Judaic Studies majors in Bible, Hebrew Language, and Jewish History, with dual majors available in Business, Computer and Information Sciences, Education (including Elementary and Special Education), English and Psychology.


The university is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. Accreditation is a process by which a facilitys services and operations are examined by a third-party accrediting agency to determine if applicable standards are met. ... The North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (NCA) is one of six regional accreditation organizations recognized by the United States Department of Education. ...


History

The school was founded in the city of Chicago in 1921 by Rabbi Chaim Tzvi Rubinstein and Rabbi Saul Silber. Rabbi Rubinstein (1872-1944) was an alumnus of Volozhin Yeshiva who arrived in America in 1917. Rabbi Silber (1876-1946) was a pulpit Rabbi in Chicago and served as president of the school for the first twenty-five years. [1] Nickname: Motto: “Urbs in Horto” (Latin: “City in a Garden”), “I Will” Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country United States State Illinois Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... The Volozhin Yeshiva, also known as the Eitz Chaim yeshiva, was a yeshiva situated in Volozhin, present-day Belarus in the 19th century. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ...


Rabbi Nissan Yablonsky, an alumnus of Slabodka served as the first Rosh Yeshiva for the first few years. He was followed, after his untimely death, by Rabbi Chaim Korb. [2] Rabbi Chaim Kreiswirth served as Rosh Yeshiva from 1947 to 1953. [3] Rosh yeshiva (Hebrew: ראש ישיבה) (pl. ... Rav Kreiswirths sermon at the laying of the foundation stone of the old-age home in 1955 Rav Kreiswirth in later life A fraction of the mourners at the Ravs funeral in Israel HaGaon Harav Chaim Kreiswirth (1918-2001) served as the longtime Chief Rabbi of Antwerp and... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Throughout the history of Hebrew Theological College its leadership has been shared by its Rosh Yeshiva and its Chief Executive Officer, formerly known as the President, currently known as the Chancellor. The founding president was Rabbi Saul Silber (1922-1946). He was followed by Rabbi Oscar Z. Fasman (1946-1964) and Rabbi Simon G. Kramer (1964-1970). Rabbi Kramer dismissed Rosh Yeshiva Rabbi Chaim Zimmerman and hired Rosh Yeshiva Rabbi Aaron Soloveitchik. Under his stewardship Hebrew Theological College reached its greatest enrollment, with approximately 300 students in the high school and 200 in the college. For a time in the early 1970s Hebrew Theological College was left without a president, and was controlled by a lower level executive administration. After differing with this administration there on certain key issues, Rabbi Soloveitchik left this post in 1974 and began his own Yeshiva as the Rosh Yeshiva of Yeshivas Brisk in Chicago, which claimed to be an American incarnation of the Brisk yeshivas and methods. Although for a short time both institutions flourished, they ultimately both suffered decline. Yeshiva Brisk currently exists as an very small program and as a synagogue, while Hebrew Theological College has failed to increase enrollment for many years, despite various attempts. Rabbi Aharon Chaim Zimmerman was one of the leading rabbis of the Post-War generation. ... Rabbi Ahron Soloveichik;(May 1, 1917 - October 4, 2001) was a scholar of Halakha and a Rosh Yeshiva; known especially within circles of Orthodox Judaism. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... The Soloveitchik dynasty of rabbinic scholars and their students originated the Brisker method of Talmudic study, which is embraced by their followers in the Brisk yeshivas. ...


The institution moved to Skokie (a northern suburb of Chicago) in the early 1960's.


Faculty

The current faculty of Hebrew Theological College:

  • Rosh Hayeshiva – Position currently not filled
  • Mashgiach of the Beis Medrash – Rabbi Yirmiyahu Neuman
  • Dean (men's division) – Rabbi Michael Meyers
  • Dean(women's division) – Dr. Esther Shkop
  • Assistant Dean (women's division) - Dr. Rita Lipshitz (nee Tresley)
  • Principal (high school) – Rabbi Moshe Wender

Rosh yeshiva (Hebrew: ראש ישיבה) (pl. ... Mashgiach ruchani (or Mashgiach, (Hebrew: Spiritual supervisor/guide) is a title that usually refers to a rabbi who has an official position within a yeshiva responsible for the non-academic areas of yeshiva students lives. ...

References

  1. ^ Wein, Berel (1990). Triumph of Survival, 334. ISBN 1-57819-593-4. 
  2. ^ Wein, Berel (2001). Faith and Fate, 100. ISBN 1-57819-593-4. 
  3. ^ Wein, Berel (1990). Triumph of Survival, 434. ISBN 1-57819-593-4. 

Berel Wein is an American-born Orthodox rabbi, scholar, lecturer, and writer. ... Berel Wein is an American-born Orthodox rabbi, scholar, lecturer, and writer. ... Berel Wein is an American-born Orthodox rabbi, scholar, lecturer, and writer. ...

See also

  • Bar-Ilan University – a Tel Aviv based university which aims "to blend tradition with modern technologies and scholarship, and teach the compelling ethics of Jewish heritage to all".
  • Lander College - a New York City based college, combining Torah study with secular, university study, based on an outlook of Torah u-Parnassa ("Torah and livelihood").

Yeshiva University is a private Jewish university in New York City whose first component was founded in 1886. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Modern Orthodox Judaism (or Modern Orthodox or Modern Orthodoxy; sometimes abbreviated as MO or Modox) is a movement within Orthodox Judaism that attempts to synthesize traditional observance and values with the secular, modern world. ... Torah Umadda (Hebrew: תורה ומדע, Torah and secular knowledge) is a philosophy of Modern Orthodox Judaism, concerning the interrelationship between the secular world and Judaism, and in particular between secular knowledge and Jewish knowledge. ... Bar-Ilan University (BIU, אוניברסיטת בר-אילן) is a university in Ramat Gan, Israel. ... Tel-Aviv was founded on empty dunes north of the existing city of Jaffa. ... The Lander College for Men (LCM) is a private, mens honors division of Touro College located in Kew Gardens Hills, New York, known for its programs in accounting, biology, computer science, political science, and rabbinical ordination. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Jerusalem College of Technology (JCT), (Hebrew:בית הספר הגבוה לטכנולוגיה בירושלים), is a religious Orthodox Jewish academic college in the Givat Mordechai neighbourhood of Jerusalem. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ...

External links

  • Hebrew Theological College
  • Blog entry on origins and early years of Chicago Jewish Institutions
  • blog entries by an alumnus: part one, part two, Third and fourth parts, Fifth and sixth parts

 
 

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