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Encyclopedia > Hastings
Borough of Hastings
Hastings
Shown within East Sussex
Geography
Status: Borough (1888) (Inc. St Leonards, Hollington, Ore and Bo Peep)
Region: South East England
Historic County: Sussex
admin. county: East Sussex
Area:
- Total
Ranked 338th
29.72 km²
Admin. HQ: Hastings
Grid reference: TQ 82 10
ONS code: 21UD
Postcodes: TN34, 35, 37 and 38
Demographics
Population:
- Total (2006 est.)
- Density
Ranked 276th
86,100
2897 / km²
Ethnicity: 97.0% White
Politics
Hastings Borough Council
http://www.hastings.gov.uk/
Leadership: Leader & Cabinet
Executive: The council is currently 'hung', with 14 Conservative, 12 Labour, 5 LibDem members and 1 Independent.
MP: Michael Foster

Hastings is a large town and local government district in South East England, in the county of East Sussex. It is best known for its connection with the Battle of Hastings 1066, which actually occurred north of the town at Senlac Hill; the battle is commemorated today in the town of Battle. Hastings was one of the Cinque Ports, but its significance as a port declined after the 19th Century and its main industry became fishing. It still has the largest beach-based fishing fleet in England. From a fishing port it became a watering place and finally a seaside resort in Victorian times. Look up hastings in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x800, 11 KB) Summary Description: A blank map of the United Kingdom, with country outline and coastline; contact the author for help with modifications or add-ons Source: Reference map provided by Demis Mapper 6 Date: 2006-21-06 Author: User... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... map File links The following pages link to this file: Hastings Categories: GFDL images ... East Sussex is a county in South East England. ... Look up Borough in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For the toll-free telephone number see Toll-free telephone number Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Although part of the Borough of Hastings, and an ancient parish in its own right, the area that became known as St Leonards-on-Sea was only laid out in the 19th Century in its present form by James Burton as a place of elegant houses designed for the well... Hollington is a local government ward and area in the north of Hastings, East Sussex. ... Ore in Sussex is a small urban area on the outskirts of Hastings that contains a small shopping centre and the Hillcrest school and community centre. ... West St Leonards West Marina, also known as West St Leonards and as Bo Peep is a large area of Hastings bordering the area of St. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... South East England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... The historic counties of England are ancient subdivisions of England. ... Sussex is a historic county in South East England corresponding roughly in area to the ancient Kingdom of Sussex. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to administrative counties of England. ... East Sussex is a county in South East England. ... Area is the measure of how much exposed area any two dimensional object has. ... This is a list of districts of England ordered by area. ... To help compare sizes of different geographic regions, we list here areas between 10 km² (1000 hectares) and 100 km² (10,000 hectares). ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The Office for National Statistics coding system is a hierarchical code used in the United Kingdom for tabulating census and other statistical data. ... For other uses, see Density (disambiguation). ... The figures are mid-year estimates for 2005, unless otherwise stated, from the Office for National Statistics [1]. See also: List of towns and cities in England by population - List of English counties by population - List of ceremonial counties of England by population - List of English districts by area - List... The United Kingdom is divided into four parts, England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... This is a list of MPs elected in the UK general election, 2005 to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the United Kingdom general election, 2005, arranged by constituency. ... See also Michael John Foster, MP for Worcester Michael Jabez Foster (born February 26, 1946) British politician He is the Labour Member of Parliament for Hastings and Rye Michael Foster was born in Hastings, East Sussex and attended the local Hastings Secondary School for Boys and the Hastings Grammar School... Non-metropolitan districts or commonly Shire districts are a type of local government district in England. ... South East England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... East Sussex is a county in South East England. ... Combatants Normans supported by: Bretons (one third of total), Flemings, French Anglo-Saxons, the Þingalið Commanders William of Normandy, Odo of Bayeux Harold Godwinson † Strength 7,000-8,000 7,000-8,000 Casualties Unknown, thought to be around 2,000 killed and wounded Unknown, thought to be around 4... Events January 6 - Harold II is crowned September 20 - Battle of Fulford September 25 - Battle of Stamford Bridge September 29 - William of Normandy lands in England at Pevensey. ... Location within the British Isles Battle is a small town in East Sussex, England, about 5 miles (8 km) from Hastings, and the site of the Battle of Hastings, where William, Duke of Normandy, defeated King Harold II to become William I. Battle Abbey takes its name from the town... Flag of the Cinque Ports Formally, in Kent and Sussex there are five Head Ports making up the Confederation of the Cinque Ports, often pronounced as the anglicised sink ports, and meaning five ports (cinque in French means five and ports is to be connected to the Italian word porto... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish by hooking, trapping, or gathering. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her ascension to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ...


The Borough of Hastings includes St Leonards-on-Sea and has at times been promoted as "Hastings and St Leonards". For postal purposes the western part of the Borough, included in postcode districts TN37 and TN38, has "St Leonards-on-Sea" as its post town, the post town of "Hastings" being confined to postcode districts TN34 and TN35. Although part of the Borough of Hastings, and an ancient parish in its own right, the area that became known as St Leonards-on-Sea was only laid out in the 19th Century in its present form by James Burton as a place of elegant houses designed for the well... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ...

Contents

History

For the history and etymology of the place name see Hastings in Wiktionary.


Excavations in local caves have revealed flint arrowheads and Bronze Age artifacts, and excavations of Iron Age forts on both the East and West Hills have shown that the area has been settled for thousands of years. It is possible that the settlement was already a port when the Romans arrived in Britain. The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ...


The main interest in Hastings for the Romans was the presence in Wealden rocks of iron ore which was worked at many sites. The largest of these, at Beauport Park, employed up to one thousand men and is considered to have been one of the largest in the Roman Empire. Little now remains of the industry, which may well have been the victim of coastal erosion. For other uses, see Iron (disambiguation). ...


The town of Haestingas (referring to the Anglo-Saxon tribe called the Haestingas) is mentioned in documents from the eighth century that refer to "Hastingacaestre", showing that a castle existed here under their time. A royal mint was established there in AD 928 during the reign of Athelstan. Their port was possibly situated at what is now the western end of the town at Bulverhythe. For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... http://www. ... The Haestingas, or alternatatively Heastingas or Hæstingas, were one of the tribes of Anglo-Saxon Britain. ...


A key work is Historic Hastings[1] by a former curator of Hastings Museum.


The Norman invasion

Main article: Battle of Hastings

William the Conqueror made his headquarters in the castle on his arrival in England. The Battle of Hastings was fought eight miles north at Senlac Hill, now in the town of Battle. The battle took place on the 14th of October after William had landed on the coast between Hastings and Eastbourne at a site now known as Norman's Bay. During the battle William defeated and killed Harold Godwinson, the last Saxon King of England, and destroyed his army thus opening England to the Norman conquest. After the conquest, William built a castle at Hastings, as depicted on the Bayeux Tapestry, probably using the earthworks of the existing Saxon castle. Combatants Normans supported by: Bretons (one third of total), Flemings, French Anglo-Saxons, the Þingalið Commanders William of Normandy, Odo of Bayeux Harold Godwinson † Strength 7,000-8,000 7,000-8,000 Casualties Unknown, thought to be around 2,000 killed and wounded Unknown, thought to be around 4... Location within the British Isles Battle is a small town in East Sussex, England, about 5 miles (8 km) from Hastings, and the site of the Battle of Hastings, where William, Duke of Normandy, defeated King Harold II to become William I. Battle Abbey takes its name from the town... The Bayeux Tapestry (French: Tapisserie de Bayeux) is a 50 cm by 70 m (20 in by 230 ft) long embroidered cloth which depicts the events leading up to the 1066 Norman invasion of England as well as the events of the invasion itself. ...


Hastings as a port

By the end of the Saxon period, Hastings had moved eastward near the present town centre in the Priory Stream valley, whose entrance was protected by the White Rock headland (since demolished). It was to be a short stay: Danish attacks and huge floods in 1011 and 1014 motivated the townspeople to relocate to the New Burg in what is now the Hastings Old Town valley, founded in 1069. View of Hastings Old Town from the East Hill Hastings Old Town, is an area in Hastings considered by many as a place of historical importance and a tourist attraction. ...


In the Middle Ages Hastings became one of the Cinque Ports; Sandwich, Dover, and New Romney being the first, Hastings, and Hythe followed, all finally being joined by Rye and Winchelsea, at one point 42 towns were directly or indirectly affiliated to the group. Flag of the Cinque Ports Formally, in Kent and Sussex there are five Head Ports making up the Confederation of the Cinque Ports, often pronounced as the anglicised sink ports, and meaning five ports (cinque in French means five and ports is to be connected to the Italian word porto... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... , Dover is a major channel port in the English county of Kent. ... Map sources for New Romney at grid reference TR0624 New Romney is a small seaside town in Kent, England. ... Hythe (pronounced ) is a small coastal market town on the edge of Romney Marsh, in the District of Shepway (derived from Sheep Way) on the south coast of Kent. ... , Rye is a small hill top town and civil parish in East Sussex, England, on the River Rother, and at the western edge of the Walland Marsh, part of the Romney Marshes. ... Winchelsea is a small town in East Sussex, England, between the High Weald and the Romney Marsh. ...


In the 13th century much of the town was washed away by the sea. In 1339 and 1377 the town was raided and burnt by the French, and seems then to have gone into a decline. As a port, Hastings suffered over the years from the lack of a natural harbour. There were many attempts to create a sheltered harbour, and while in 1897 the foundation stone was laid of a large concrete structure, there was insufficient money to complete the work and the "Harbour arm" remains uncompleted. It was partially blown up to discourage possible use by German invasion forces during World War II. The fishing boats are still stored on and launched from the beach. (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Combatants England Flanders France Genoese mercenaries Castilian mercenaries Commanders Robert Morley, Various others Hugues Quiéret, Nicolas Béhuchet Strength Varied 40-70 ships The English Channel naval campaign of the years 1338 and 1339 saw a protracted series of raids conducted by the nascent French navy and numerous privately... // Events January 17 – Pope Gregory XI enters Rome. ...


Geography

Hastings town centre and the Memorial from an old postcard
Hastings town centre and the Memorial from an old postcard
Hastings town centre in 2005
Hastings town centre in 2005

Hastings is situated where the sandstone beds, at the heart of the Weald, known geologically as the Hastings Sands, meet the English Channel, forming tall cliffs to the east of the town. Hastings Old Town is in a sheltered valley between the East Hill and West Hill (on which the remains of the Castle stand). In Victorian times and later the town has spread westwards and northwards, and now forms a single urban centre with the more suburban area of St Leonards-on-Sea to the west. Roads from the Old Town valley lead towards the Victorian area of Clive Vale and the former village of Ore, from which "The Ridge", marking the effective boundary of Hastings, extends north-westwards towards Battle. Beyond Bo Peep, the western end of Hastings is marked by low-lying land known as Glyne Gap, separating it from Bexhill-on-Sea. Download high resolution version (963x612, 160 KB)Hastings town centre and the Albert Memorial. ... Download high resolution version (963x612, 160 KB)Hastings town centre and the Albert Memorial. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Hastings_town_centre_present. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Hastings_town_centre_present. ... Red sandstone interior of Lower Antelope Canyon, Arizona, worn smooth due to erosion by flash flooding over millions of years Sandstone is a sedimentary rock composed mainly of sand-size mineral or rock grains. ... A weald once meant a dense forest, especially the famous great wood once stretching far beyond the ancient counties of Sussex and Kent, England, where this country of smaller woods is still called the Weald. ... For the Thoroughbred racehorse of the same name, see English Channel (horse). ... View of Hastings Old Town from the East Hill Hastings Old Town, is an area in Hastings considered by many as a place of historical importance and a tourist attraction. ... Although part of the Borough of Hastings, and an ancient parish in its own right, the area that became known as St Leonards-on-Sea was only laid out in the 19th Century in its present form by James Burton as a place of elegant houses designed for the well... Ore in Sussex is a small urban area on the outskirts of Hastings that contains a small shopping centre and the Hillcrest school and community centre. ... Location within the British Isles Battle is a small town in East Sussex, England, about 5 miles (8 km) from Hastings, and the site of the Battle of Hastings, where William, Duke of Normandy, defeated King Harold II to become William I. Battle Abbey takes its name from the town... Little Bo Peep is a character from a nursery rhyme and the title of that rhyme. ... Glyne Gap is a strip of marshland that separates the conurbations of Hastings and Bexhill-on-Sea, which abrubtly end on either side. ... Bexhill-on-Sea is a town and seaside resort in the county of East Sussex, in the south of England. ...


The sandstone cliffs have been the subject of considerable erosion in relatively recent times: much of the Castle was lost to the sea before the present sea defences and promenade were built, and a number of cliff-top houses are in danger of disappearing around the nearby village of Fairlight. Fairlight is a village in East Sussex, England within Rother district, three miles to the east of Hastings. ...


The beach is mainly shingle, although wide areas of sand are uncovered at low tide. The town is generally built upon a series of low hills rising to 500 feet above sea level at "The Ridge" before falling back in the river valley further to the north.


The town also has a large Victorian park, Alexandra Park. Alexandra Park Alexandra Park is public park located in Hastings, East Sussex in the UK. It was originally planned out by Robert Marnock and occupies approximately 109 acres of the town. ...


Like many coastal towns, the population of Hastings grew significantly as a result of the construction of railway links and the fashionable growth of seaside holidays during the Victorian era. In 1801 its population was a mere 3,175; by 1831 it had reached over ten thousand; by 1891 it was almost sixty thousand, and the 2001 census reported over 85,000 inhabitants. Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her ascension to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Local government

Hastings was a borough by 1086, and gave its name to the Rape of Hastings, one of the six Rapes or administrative districts of Sussex. Look up Borough in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Events Domesday Book is completed in England Emperor Shirakawa of Japan starts his cloistered rule Imam Ali Mosque is rebuilt by the Seljuk Malik Shah I after being destroyed by fire. ...


As a borough, Hastings had a corporation consisting of a "bailiff, jurats, and commonalty". By a Charter of Elizabeth I in 1589 the bailiff was replaced by a mayor. For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ... This article is about Elizabeth I of England. ... Events Rebellion of the Catholic League against King Henry III of France, in revenge for his murder of Duke Henry of Guise. ...


With the reform of English local government in 1888, Hastings became a County Borough, in other words responsible for all its local services, independent of the surrounding county, and long had its own police force. County borough status was abolished by the Local Government Act 1972 in 1974, and it became a district within the non-metropolitan county of East Sussex. For the toll-free telephone number see Toll-free telephone number Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... The Local Government Act 1972 (1972 c. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... A shire county or non-metropolitan county in England, is a county level entity which is not a metropolitan county. ...


Hastings returned two Members of Parliament from the fourteenth century to 1885 since when it has returned one. A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... (13th century - 14th century - 15th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 14th century was that century which lasted from 1301 to 1400. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Suburbs and wards

The town is split into 16 electoral wards[2], which are in four areas: A ward in the United Kingdom is an electoral district represented by one or more councillors. ...

  • Central
Castle, Braybrooke, Silverhill, St Helens
  • East Hastings
Old Hastings, Ore, Tressell, Baird
  • South St Leonards  
Central St Leonards, Gensing, Maze Hill, West St Leonards
  • North St Leonards
Ashdown, Conquest, Hollington, Wishing Tree

Central is a local government area in the town of Hastings, East Sussex, England. ... Braybrook Is an area of Hastings, East Sussex. ... Named after the 18th Century farm that once stood there, Silverhill Junction in Hastings is where the A21 road to London crosses the main road to Battle. ... St Helens is a village suburb of Hastings, East Sussex located on the ridge between Hollington and Ore. ... East Hastings Is a local government area of Hastings, East Sussex. ... View of Hastings Old Town from the East Hill Hastings Old Town, is an area in Hastings considered by many as a place of historical importance and a tourist attraction. ... Ore, a former village, is now part of the urban area of the town of Hastings in East Sussex. ... Tressell is an area and local government ward of Hastings, located next to the town centre. ... Baird is a local government ward and area of Hastings near the town centre. ... South St Leonards is a Local Government Area in Hastings, East Sussex, United Kingdom. ... Central St Leonards is a district in the St Leonards-on-Sea area in the Borough of Hastings, East Sussex. ... Gensing is a local government ward and district of the St Leonards area in Hastings, East Sussex. ... Maze Hill was a village in East Sussex near West Marina and St Leonards on Sea. ... West St Leonards West Marina, also known as West St Leonards and as Bo Peep is a large area of Hastings bordering the area of St. ... North St Leonards is a Local government area in the Borough of Hastings, East Sussex, England. ... Ashdown is a suburban village in the St Leonards-on-Sea area in the Borough of Hastings, East Sussex. ... Conquest is a local government ward and area of the borough of Hastings, East Sussex. ... Hollington is a local government ward and area in the north of Hastings, East Sussex. ... Wishing Tree Is a Suburban area of Hastings Located on the ridge near St Leonards on Sea and Hollington This East Sussex-location article is a stub. ...

Buildings

"Net shops"
"Net shops"

The most important buildings from the late medieval period are the two churches in Hastings Old Town, St Clement's (probably built after 1377) and All Saints (early 15th century).[3] Download high resolution version (2226x1273, 695 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2226x1273, 695 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... View of Hastings Old Town from the East Hill Hastings Old Town, is an area in Hastings considered by many as a place of historical importance and a tourist attraction. ...


On the beach near the Old Town are the so-called "net shops", said to be unique to Hastings, but similar huts can be found in Whitby — these are wooden constructions, weatherboarded and tarred, of various shapes and sizes, used for storage. The buildings were built tall and narrow to avoid payment of ground tax. The huts were never used for net drying; this is a popular misconception: nets were dried on the beach or on the piece of land known as the Minnis. , For other uses, see Whitby (disambiguation). ...

Pelham Crescent and St Mary in the Castle, with the castle ruins above
Pelham Crescent and St Mary in the Castle, with the castle ruins above

Not much remains of Hastings Castle due to cliff erosion, apart from an arch of the chapel, some walls, and underground dungeons. Download high resolution version (2262x1403, 891 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (2262x1403, 891 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... After landing here in 1066, William Of Normandy ordered a fortification to be built, one being Pevensey Castle and the other was Hastings. ...


In Medieval times the town featured a Priory, dedicated to the Holy Trinity. Remains of this were found when the old cinema was demolished and a supermarket built on the corner of Cambridge Gardens; these remains have been preserved and buried under the site. The area that was Priory Meadow Cricket Ground and latterly Priory Meadow Shopping Centre is the location of the Medieval Harbour, which was "lost" after several storms blocked the entrance. The area is still below sea level and prone to flooding. Priory Meadow sign above the entrance to the Centre Priory Meadow Shopping Centre is a shopping centre in Hastings, East Sussex, England. ...


In front of the castle is an elegant Georgian terrace, Pelham Crescent, at the centre of which is the classical church of St Mary in the Castle (its name recalling the old chapel in the castle above) now in use as an arts centre. The building of the crescent and the church necessitated further cutting away of the castle hill cliffs.


For many years the traffic intersection at the town centre was marked by "The Memorial", a clock tower commemorating Albert the Prince Consort, subsequently demolished, following an arson attack in the 1970s. A prince consort, generally speaking, is the husband of a Queen regnant, unless he himself is a king. ...


For many years the commercial centre of the town was divided by concrete barriers separating pedestrians from vehicles. The 1990s saw pedestrianisation of significant parts of the commercial heart of the town, restricting vehicle access to service vehicles only at all times.


The bathing pool at St Leonards-on-Sea was regarded in its day as one of the best open-air swimming and diving complexes in Europe, but it closed some years ago, having become part of a holiday camp. The area is still known by locals as "The Bathing Pool", which confuses some visitors as no pool exists. Although part of the Borough of Hastings, and an ancient parish in its own right, the area that became known as St Leonards-on-Sea was only laid out in the 19th Century in its present form by James Burton as a place of elegant houses designed for the well... Holiday camp, in Britain, generally refers to a resort with a boundary that includes accommodation, entertainment and other facilities. ...


The most notable recent architectural changes have been;

  • Demolition of the 1930s railway station and its replacement by a glass and steel structure opened in 2004
  • Construction of the University Centre Hastings.[1]
  • Demolition of the Marlborough Hotel, Warrior Square and its sympathetic replacement with a new health centre and sheltered housing.

The new station building at Hastings Hastings railway station is a piece of shit in Hastings in East Sussex, England. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... University Centre Hastings is a University centre located in Hastings, East Sussex. ...

Fishing

Two of Hastings' beach-launched fishing fleet with part of Old Town and East Cliff Railway in background
Two of Hastings' beach-launched fishing fleet with part of Old Town and East Cliff Railway in background

Until the development of tourism, fishing was Hastings' major industry. The beach launched fishing fleet, based at the Stade, remains Europe's largest and has recently won accreditation for its sustainable methods. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 712 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1532 × 1290 pixel, file size: 504 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 712 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1532 × 1290 pixel, file size: 504 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish by hooking, trapping, or gathering. ...


Steve Peak's book on the fishing fleet, is a work of scholarship and affection, available from the town's museums. The opening paragraph gives a flavour of the subject:

"The Hastings fishing industry has a long and unusual history. Fishing boats similar to those used at Hastings today have worked from almost the same beach under the Hastings cliffs for at least 400, and quite probably 600 or more years. Despite the exposed landing site the Hastings fleet has survived many difficult times because the town lies next to one of Britain's most prolific fishing grounds, Rye Bay."[4]

Hastings being no longer a port, fishing vessels have to be registered at Rye, and thus bear the letters "RX". , Rye is a small hill top town and civil parish in East Sussex, England, on the River Rother, and at the western edge of the Walland Marsh, part of the Romney Marshes. ...


Lifeboats

Hastings lifeboat being towed back to beach by its tractor after a public demonstration run during Old Town Week, 2005
Hastings lifeboat being towed back to beach by its tractor after a public demonstration run during Old Town Week, 2005

Hastings RNLI lifeboat station, established in 1858,[5] currently operates a Mersey class offshore lifeboat, as well as a D class inshore rescue boat.[6] The offshore boat is launched from a carriage which is driven into the sea, and the boat is towed back up the beach on its return, by a caterpillar-tracked tractor waterproofed so that it can operate almost completely submerged. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 458 pixelsFull resolution (1704 × 975 pixel, file size: 383 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 458 pixelsFull resolution (1704 × 975 pixel, file size: 383 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... RNLI Lifeboat at Calshot Spit The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a charity dedicated to saving lives at sea around the coasts of the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. ... For the 1944 movie, see Lifeboat (film). ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... </nowiki> Rear sprocket of a Leclerc tank Track of a Leclerc tank U.S. M60 Patton tank. ...


Visitor attractions

Hastings Pier and beach in the Winter
Hastings Pier and beach in the Winter
Hastings Pier at sunset
Hastings Pier at sunset

Opposite the pier is the White Rock Theatre which mainly stages traditional seaside light entertainment shows. North of this and a little way inland are a 25m public swimming pool and leisure centre at Summerfields. This also has the Hastings Museum and Art Gallery, law courts, police and fire stations nearby. Download high resolution version (1846x1200, 583 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1846x1200, 583 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,024 × 768 pixels, file size: 999 KB, MIME type: image/png) View of Hasting Pier from low tide. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,024 × 768 pixels, file size: 999 KB, MIME type: image/png) View of Hasting Pier from low tide. ... White Rock Theatre is a medium scale touring venue owned by Live Nation situated on the seafront in the south coast town of Hastings. ... Hastings Museum and Art Gallery is a museum and art gallery located in, Hastings, East Sussex. ...


Near the castle ruins, on the West Hill, are "St Clement's Caves", partly natural, but mainly excavated by hand from the soft sandstone. St. ...

The East Hill Lift: one of the two funicular railways in Hastings
Marine Court
Marine Court

There are a miniature railway, fairground rides and amusement arcades catering for tourists near the Fishmarket. The fishmarket includes the striking net shops, fisherman's museum and Hastings Sea Life Centre. Fishing boats are likely to be drawn up on the beach and there is a lifeboat station. Nearby is Hastings Old Town with a number of buildings dating from the earliest days of the town[citation needed]. There are two funicular railways, known locally as the West Hill and East Hill Lifts respectively. Slightly inland is the small Stables Theatre, which shows mainly local productions and acts as an arts exhibition centre. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 449 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (800 × 1067 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 449 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (800 × 1067 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 285 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 285 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... This article needs cleanup. ... View of Hastings Old Town from the East Hill Hastings Old Town, is an area in Hastings considered by many as a place of historical importance and a tourist attraction. ... Duquesne Incline, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania with full length parallel tracks A funicular, also called funicular railway or inclined railway, inclined plane, or in England a cliff railway, consists of a system of transportation in which cables attach to a tram-like vehicle on rails to move it up and down a... The West Hill Cliff Railway (called locally the West Hill Lift) is located in Hastings, East Sussex. ... Looking at East Hill Cliff Railway from the bottom of the cliff East Hill Cliff Railway (called locally the East Hill Lift) located in Hastings, East Sussex opened on August 10, 1902. ...


To the east of the town is the Hastings Country Park. This is an area of 2.67 km² of lightly wooded and open land extending from Hastings approximately 3 miles (5 km) along the cliff tops to Fairlight. Fairlight Road Car Park Hastings Country Park was formed in 1974 and covers 660 acres east of Hastings in England. ... This article is about the demo/warez group. ...


Another family pool with wave machine and water slide is situated at Glyne Gap, on the coast mid-way between Bexhill and Hastings. Glyne Gap also sports a bowling alley and shopping centre.


There is a small Odeon cinema in Hastings, however there are plans to renovate an area known as the 'Priory Quarter' in the town centre, plans include large office spaces, retail units and a new large multi screen cinema. Odeon Cinemas is the largest chain of cinemas in the United Kingdom. ...


There is also a yearly carnival, and Old Town Week during August, a beer festival in Alexandra Park, a Seafood and Wine Festival in the Old Town and an International Chess Congress. During Hastings week held each year around the 14th October the Hastings Boroughs Bonfire Society stages a torchlight procession through the streets, beach bonfire and spectacular firework display. In 2007 the World Crazy Golf Championship was held at the Adventure Crazy Golf Course. The Old Town Week is a yearly summer event celebrated in Hastings old town, in East Sussex, in the South East of England, Great Britain. ... Hastings Beer and Music Festival is a four-day event, formerly three, which takes place in Alexandra Park, Hastings. ...


The Saxon Shore Way starts at Gravesend, Kent and traces the coast as it was in Roman times as far as Hastings, 163 miles (262 km) in total. // Kent 802AD Kent - NASA satellite 2005 The Saxon Shore Way starts at Gravesend, Kent and traces the coast as it was in Roman times (note the changed coastline around Romney Marsh) as far as Hastings, East Sussex, 163 miles (262 km) in total. ... Gravesend is a town in northwest Kent, England, on the south bank of the Thames, opposite Tilbury in Essex. ... For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... “km” redirects here. ...


It has been recently named 2nd worst place to visit, much to the disdain of locals (same reaction when the town was included into 'Crap Towns' book. Blackpool came in at first place.


Transport links

Hastings is linked to London by two railway lines. The shorter is the former South Eastern Railway (SER) route to Charing Cross via Battle and Tunbridge Wells, opened 1852, and the longer is the former London, Brighton and South Coast Railway (LBSCR) route to Victoria via Bexhill, Eastbourne and Lewes. There is also the Marshlink Line via Rye to Ashford where a connection can be made with Eurostar services to France and Belgium. The town currently has four railway stations: from west to east they are West St Leonards station, St Leonards Warrior Square, Hastings, and Ore. West Marina station (on the LBSCR line) was very near to West St Leonards (on the SER line) and was closed some years ago. New stations have been proposed. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The London and Greenwich Railway (LGR) and the Canterbury and Whitstable Railway (CWR) in East Kent were the earliest railways to serve the then county of Kent: eventually both became parts of the South Eastern Railway (SER). ... Charing Cross Charing Cross railway station is a central London railway terminus. ... Location within the British Isles Battle is a small town in East Sussex, England, about 5 miles (8 km) from Hastings, and the site of the Battle of Hastings, where William, Duke of Normandy, defeated King Harold II to become William I. Battle Abbey takes its name from the town... , Royal Tunbridge Wells (often called simply Tunbridge Wells) is a Wealden town in west Kent in England, just north of the border with East Sussex. ... The LB&SCRs coat of arms, displayed above the entrance to Gipsy Hill railway station. ... Victoria station in London is a London Underground and National Rail station in the City of Westminster. ... Bexhill-on-Sea is a town and seaside resort in the county of East Sussex, in the south of England. ... For other places with the same name, see Eastbourne (disambiguation). ... This is about Lewes in England. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... , Rye is a small hill top town and civil parish in East Sussex, England, on the River Rother, and at the western edge of the Walland Marsh, part of the Romney Marshes. ... , The town of Ashford lies on the River Great Stour, M20 motorway, South Eastern Main Line and Channel Tunnel Rail Link railways, in the borough of Ashford, located just south of the North Downs, in Kent, England. ... This article is about high-speed trains between London and Brussels / Paris. ... West St Leonards railway station is on the Hastings Line in East Sussex, United Kingdom, and is one of four stations that serve Hastings. ... St Leonards Warrior Square railway station is one of four railway stations serving Hastings in East Sussex. ... The new station building at Hastings Hastings railway station is a piece of shit in Hastings in East Sussex, England. ... Ore railway station serves Ore in East Sussex. ...


Hastings is linked to London by the A21 trunk road. There have been improvements in this road over the years, notably bypasses for Sevenoaks, Tonbridge, Pembury and Lamberhurst, but the dual carriageway stops well short of Hastings. Long-term plans for a much improved east-west route and a Hastings bypass were abandoned in the 1990s, but a new road to Bexhill-on-Sea was announced in 2004 to relieve the congested coastal route (A259). The A21 is a major road in England running from Lewisham in southeast London to Hastings, East Sussex. ... Bypass routes are a type of bannered highway usually used when the main route of the highway goes through a town and an alternate route of the same highway goes around the highway. ... For other uses, see Seven Oaks (disambiguation). ... Tonbridge is a market town in the English county of Kent, with a population of 31,600 in 2001. ... , Pembury is a large village in the county of Kent in the south-east of England, UK, with a population of around 6000. ... Lamberhurst is a village on the borders of Kent and East Sussex, although the parish was, at one time, in both counties. ... This early German Autobahn uses a dual carriageway design. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Bexhill-on-Sea is a town and seaside resort in the county of East Sussex, in the south of England. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The A259 is a major road in England, running along the south coast parallel to the A27 road. ...


Hastings had a network of trams from 1905 to 1929. The trams ran as far as Bexhll, and were worked by overhead electric wires, except for the stretch along the sea-front from Bo-Peep to the Memorial, which was initially worked by the Dolter stud contact system. The Dolter system was replaced by petrol electric trams in 1914, but overhead electrification was extended to this section in 1921. Trolleybuses rather than trams were used in the section that included the very narrow High Street, and the entire tram system was replaced by trolleybuses in 1928–1929.[7] This article refers to public transport vehicles running on rails. ... Further information: electric bus A trolleybus (also known as trolley bus, trolley coach, trackless trolley, trackless tram or simply trolley) is an electric bus powered by two overhead wires, from which it draws electricity using two trolley poles. ...


Maidstone and District bought the Hastings Tramway Company in 1935, but the trolleybuses still carried the "Hastings Tramways" logo until shortly before they were replaced by diesel buses in 1959, following the failure of the "Save our trolleys" campaign. The town is now served by Stagecoach buses on routes that cover Hastings and extend to Bexhill, Eastbourne and even Dover. The Maidstone & District Motor Services Ltd were a bus company based in Maidstone, Kent. ... Stagecoach Group plc (LSE: SGC) is a leading international transport group operating bus, train, tram, express coach and ferry operations. ...


Economy and culture

View of houses from the East Hill Lift top entrance
View of houses from the East Hill Lift top entrance
View of houses from the East Hill Lift top entrance at night

Hastings has long been known as a retreat for artists and painters. For example, the pre-Raphaelite painters including Dante Gabriel Rossetti and William Holman Hunt admired the town for its light and clear air. In the 19th century the towns became prosperous on the basis of the tourist trade from London and the Midlands. With the rise of international tourism away from traditional English holiday resorts its prosperity has declined substantially. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (914x604, 394 KB) Photo taken by myself in June 2005 at Hastings. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (914x604, 394 KB) Photo taken by myself in June 2005 at Hastings. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Hastings_night. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Hastings_night. ... Dante Gabriel Rossetti (May 12, 1828 - April 10, 1882) was an English poet, painter and translator. ... William Holman Hunt - Self-Portrait. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century &#8212; 19th century &#8212; 20th century &#8212; more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Tourist redirects here. ...


There is no immediately clear reason why Hastings should suffer from disadvantage when compared to, for example, its large neighbour to the west, Brighton. It has a very attractive setting, many very fine houses and a remarkably conserved Old Town, and contains within its Borough boundaries a major cliff top country park. It has a well documented depth of history. Its principal drawbacks are the considerably longer commuting times by rail to London, poor roads and a lack of local employment. For other places with the same name, see Brighton (disambiguation). ...


Hastings is officially regarded as a deprived area, with high unemployment rates, and as such has qualified for redevelopment grants from central government and EU sources. Hastings railway station has been rebuilt and further development on the original railway yard site is now in progress. This was originally intended to include a new building to bring together further educational services in Hastings. The University Centre Hastings (UCH) has been created to provide higher education in the town for the first time. (Hastings College of Arts and Technology and University Centre Hastings). Redevelopment of the area is hampered by the split administration of the combined Hastings and Bexhill economic region between Hastings and Rother councils. It is thought by some that the relatively poor road and rail infrastructure surrounding Hastings has ensured its ongoing isolation and has long been thought to be a major factor in its economic downturn since the 1970s. University Centre Hastings is a University centre located in Hastings, East Sussex. ...


Sport

The Hastings Half Marathon is becoming well known around the country, being voted the best race of its kind three years running, and has become known as the unofficial 'Great South Run'. With numbers increasing every year, in 2007 the race had around 4,500 entries. The Hastings Half Marathon is an event that takes place every march around the streets of Hastings. ...


Hastings is home to one senior football club, Hastings United, formerly Hastings Town, who play in the Isthmian League Premier Division and use The Pilot Field as their home ground. Hastings used to be home to St. Leonards and Hastings United, both folding due to financial problems. There are also many other football clubs in Hastings that play in the East Sussex Football League, such as Hollington United and Hastings Rangers. Hastings United FC are a semi-professional English football club who currently play in the Isthmian League Division One South. ... The Isthmian League is a regional football league covering London and South East England. ... The Premier Division is the top division of the Isthmian League. ... The Pilot Field is home to Hastings United, who play in the Isthmian League Division 1 It has a capacity of 4,050 and has an impressive main stand to the side of the pitch which seats and covers spectators. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Hastings United Football Club was a professional football team based in Hastings, East Sussex. ... The East Sussex Football League is a football competition based in England. ...


Motorcycle speedway racing was staged at The Pilot Field in 1948 and 1949. The team, known as the Hastings Saxons, raced in the National League Division Three. The team race jacket featured a capital H but the mascot was a gentleman dressed as a Saxon complete with sword and shield. The team featured many riders who had raced at Eastbourne in 1947. Notable 'Saxons' were Wally Green, who went on to race for West Ham in the First Division and be runner up in the 1950 World Final, Jock Grierson and Ken Middleditch. The track faced vociferous local objection and was closed following a court case. Most of the track has been covered by concrete to allow football fans to get closer to the football pitch used by Hastings United, however some of the track still exists around the pitch. The Pilot Field is home to Hastings United, who play in the Isthmian League Division 1 It has a capacity of 4,050 and has an impressive main stand to the side of the pitch which seats and covers spectators. ... Hastings United FC are a semi-professional English football club who currently play in the Isthmian League Division One South. ...


The Central Cricket Ground, where Priory Meadow Shopping Centre now stands, was Hastings' centre of cricket. The ground frequently hosted Sussex county cricket matches. The last Sussex match to be held on Priory Meadow was against Kent in 1989, which Sussex lost, prior to the development of the new shopping center. The old cricket ground also hosted tennis tournaments, and was the start of the Hastings marathon when the race first started. The town's premier cricket venue is now Horntye Park Sports Complex, home of Hastings Priory. Priory Meadow sign above the entrance to the Centre Priory Meadow Shopping Centre is a shopping centre in Hastings, East Sussex, England. ... Sussex field against Derbyshire at Hove on 24 April 2005 The Arthur Gilligan stand at Hove The Pavilion at Hove Crowd leaves the County Ground at Hove Sussex County Cricket Club is one of the 18 major counties which make up the English domestic cricket structure, representing the historic county... Horntye Park Sports Complex sports complex and conference centre located in Hastings, East Sussex. ... Hastings & St. ...


Hastings is home to two rugby clubs, Hastings & Bexhill and Cinque Ports Rugby Club. Hastings & Bexhill play their home matches at William Parker Sports College and play in Division Four of the London Rugby Union League. Cinque Ports play in the Sussex Rugby Union League and play at The Grove School. The Cinque Ports RFC Crest // Cinque Ports Rugby Football Club is an English community rugby union club who will play in the Sussex rugby leagues in the 2007/2008 Season. ... The William Parker Sports College, formerly known as Hastings Grammar School, and later as William Parker School, is a secondary school in Hastings, East Sussex in the United Kingdom. ...


Hastings' only hockey club is South Saxons, who play and train on the towns only Astroturf surface at Horntye Park Sports Complex. The Astroturf is also used for other sports such as football. Hastings Athletics Club is the only athletics club in the Hastings & Rother Area, and uses the running track at William Parker Sports College, the only running track in the area. Horntye Park Sports Complex sports complex and conference centre located in Hastings, East Sussex. ... The William Parker Sports College, formerly known as Hastings Grammar School, and later as William Parker School, is a secondary school in Hastings, East Sussex in the United Kingdom. ...


Noted residents

Former Residents

Bust of John Logie Baird in Helensburgh. ... Kevin Ball (born Hastings, United Kingdom, 12 November 1964) is a former professional footballer and since 6 March 2006 has been acting as caretaker manager at Sunderland A.F.C. for the rest of the season, where he had previously been Assistant Academy Manager. ... Sunderland Association Football Club is a professional football club, based at the Stadium of Light in Sunderland, Tyne and Wear, in North-East England. ... Gareth Nason Barry was born February 23, 1981 in Hastings, England. ... Aston Villa redirects here. ... First international  Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Biggest win  Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Ireland; 18 February 1882) Biggest defeat  Hungary 7 - 1 England (Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954) World Cup Appearances 12 (First in 1950) Best result Winners, 1966 European Championship Appearances 7 (First in... Blackwell was commemorated on a U.S. postage stamp. ... Barbara Leigh Smith Bodichon (8 April 1827 - 11 June 1891) was an English educationalist, artist, and activist for womens rights. ... Full name Girton College Motto - Named after Girton Village Previous names The College for Women (1869), Girton College (1872) Established 1869 Sister College Somerville College Mistress Dame Marylin Strathern Location Huntingdon Road Undergraduates 503 Graduates 201 Homepage Boatclub Girton College lies on the extremity of Cambridge Girton College was established... Suffragette with banner, Washington DC, 1918 The title of suffragette (also occasionally spelled suffraget) was given to members of the womens suffrage movement, originally in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Titanic (disambiguation). ... The Old Bailey. ... Jo Brand (born Josephine Grace Brand 3 May 1957, Hastings, East Sussex) is an English comedienne. ... Thomas Brassey (1836-1918) was a British politician. ... John Bratby (1928 - 1992) was a British painter who founded the kitchen sink style of art that was influential in the late 1950s. ... George Frederick Bristow (1825 - 1898) was an American composer. ... The Hastings Rarities affair is a case of putative ornithological fraud. ... James Burton (1761–1837) was a builder and developer, responsible for large areas of Bloomsbury and the houses around Regents Park in London. ... Decimus Burton (30 September 1800 - 14 December 1881) was a prolific English architect and garden designer, particularly associated with projects in the classical style in London parks, including buildings at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and London Zoo, and with the layout and architecture of the seaside towns of Fleetwood... Richard DOyly Carte Richard DOyly Carte (May 3, 1844 – April 3, 1901) was an English theatrical impresario during the latter half of the nineteenth century. ... Dame Catherine Ann Cookson DBE (27 June 1906 – 11 June 1998) was an English author. ... Harry H. Corbett on the right with Hercules the horse. ... Aleister Crowley, born Edward Alexander Crowley, (12 October 1875 – 1 December 1947; the surname is pronounced // i. ... John Digweed John Digweed (born January 1, 1967 in Hastings, England) is a British DJ and record producer. ... It has been suggested that noogenesis be merged into this article or section. ... Empress Eugénie Doña María Eugenia Ignacia Agustina de Palafox y Kirkpatrick, Countess de Teba, who became Empress Eugénie [1] [2] [3] (May 5, 1826 – July 11, 1920) was Empress Consort of France (1853-1871), the wife of Napoleon III, emperor of the French. ... Harry Furniss (1854-1925) was an English artist known for drawing caricatures. ... Simon Fuller (born May 17, 1960 in Hastings, England) is one of the most important figures in the entertainment business in the world. ... The Spice Girls were a British vocal girl band. ... David Andrew Gemmell (August 1, 1948–July 28, 2006) was a popular UK fantasy writer and occasional historical fictionalist. ... Portrait of Grey Owl (1936), by Yousuf Karsh. ... Sir Henry Rider Haggard ( June 22, 1856 &#8211; May 14, 1925), born in Bradenham, Norfolk, England, was a Victorian writer of adventure novels set in locations considered exotic by readers in his native England. ... Andrew Jefford (born 1956) is an English journalist, radio presenter and author of books on wine. ... Billie-Jo Jenkins was a 13-year-old girl from East Sussex in the United Kingdom who was murdered on 15 February 1997. ... Sophia Louisa Jex-Blake (1840 – 1912) was an English physician, teacher and feminist. ... Sheila Kaye-Smith (4 February 1887 – January 14, 1956) was an English writer, known for her many novels set in the borderlands of Sussex and Kent in the English regional tradition. ... Steve Kinch is the current bass guitar player for Manfred Manns Earth Band. ... Cock-A-Hoop Manfred Mann was a British R&B and pop band of the 1960s, named after its keyboard player, who later led the successful 1970s follow-on group Manfred Manns Earth Band. ... Hazel OConnor (born 16 May 1955 in Coventry, England) is a British singer and actress. ... Barry Dransfield is an English folk singer, fiddler, cellist and guitarist. ... Desmond Wilkinson Llewelyn (September 12, 1913 – December 19, 1999) was a Welsh actor, famous for playing the fictional character of Q in the James Bond series of films. ... 007 redirects here. ... Geoff Love lived on Commercial Street and has a plaque dedicated to his memory outside his old house. ... George MacDonald (December 10, 1824 – September 18, 1905) was a Scottish author, poet, and Christian minister. ... John Martyn (born Iain David McGeachy on September 11, 1948 in New Malden, Surrey, England) is a British singer-songwriter and guitarist. ... Categories: People stubs | 1804 births | 1881 deaths ... For the Arrested Development episode, see Whistlers Mother (Arrested Development episode). ... Suggs Suggs (born Graham McPherson on 13 January 1961 in Hastings), is a British singer, best known as a vocalist of the popular second wave ska band, Madness. ... Paul Merton (born Paul Martin 9 July 1957[1]) is an English actor, deadpan comedian and writer, who is best known as a panellist on the BBC TV show Have I Got News for You and Radio 4s Just a Minute, as well as Channel 4s Whose Line... Terence Alan Milligan KBE (16 April 1918–27 February 2002), known as Spike Milligan, was an Irish comedian, writer, musician, poet and playwright. ... Photo by Phil Payne - Nov 1999 George Monger was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... , Lucknow ( , Hindi: लखनऊ, Urdu: لکھنؤ, ) is the capital city of Uttar Pradesh, the most populous state of India. ... An engraving titled Sepoy Indian troops dividing the spoils after their mutiny against British rule gives a contemporary view of events from a British perspective. ... Marianne North (October 24, 1830 - August 30, 1890), English naturalist and flower-painter, was born at Hastings, the eldest daughter of a Norfolk landowner, descended from Roger North. ... Kew Gardens is the name of several places: Kew Gardens is a commonly-used name for the Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew, London, United Kingdom Kew Gardens is the name of a park in The Beaches neighborhood of Toronto, Ontario, Canada Kew Gardens is also the name of a neighborhood... Portrait of James Murray as a young man by Allan Ramsay (1742) (Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh) James Murray (Ballencrieff, East Lothian, Scotland, 21 January 1721– 18 June 1794 Battle) was a British military officer, whose lengthy career included service as colonial administrator and governor of Quebec. ... Titus Oates. ... The Popish Plot was an alleged Catholic conspiracy. ... Jaine Grace Omorogbe (born 20 September 1971 in Newcastle upon Tyne) is an English model and actress, perhaps best known as Rio on ITV1s Gladiators, who is now a TV presenter and motorcycling journalist. ... For other uses, see Gladiator (disambiguation). ... Coventry Kersey Dighton Patmore (July 23, 1823 - November 26, 1896) was an English poet and critic. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was a group of English painters, poets and critics, founded in 1848 by John Everett Millais, Dante Gabriel Rossetti and William Holman Hunt. ... Fiona Pitt-Kethley is a British poet, novelist, travel writer and journalist. ... Henry Handel Richardson (Ethel Florence Lindesay Richardson), born in 1870 in East Melbourne, Victoria, was an Australian author. ... Alex Sanders is an American politician from the state of South Carolina He is the former chief judge of the South Carolina Court of Appeals and former President of the College of Charleston. ... David Edward Sutch (or Screaming Lord Sutch) (November 10, 1940 – June 16, 1999) was an English musician, politician and maverick. ... The Official Monster Raving Loony Party (OMRLP) is a United Kingdom political party that was founded by musician and anti-politician Screaming Lord Sutch in 1983. ... Robert Tressell was a pen name used by Robert Noonan (April 17, 1870–February 3, 1911) for his novel The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists. ... James Edward Anthony Tyler (October, 1943 in Bristol – 28 October 2006 in Hastings, East Sussex) was a British writer who authored several books and wrote for Macworld and MacUser. ... MacWorld magazine (April 2004) Macworld is a monthly computer magazine dedicated to Macintosh products. ... MacUser, 27 May 2005 MacUser is a fortnightly computer magazine published by Dennis Publishing Ltd. ... PC Pro is a computer magazine published monthly in the United Kingdom by Dennis Publishing. ... Computer Shopper is a magazine published monthly since 1988 in the UK by Felix Denniss company, Dennis Publishing Ltd. ... Winifred Wagner, born Winifred Williams (June 23, 1897 - March 5, 1980) was born in Hastings, England. ... Bayreuth Festspielhaus, as seen in 1882 The annual Bayreuth Festival in Bayreuth, Germany is devoted principally (but not exclusively) to performances of operas by the 19th century German composer Richard Wagner. ... Thomas Attwood Walmisley (1814 – 1856) was an English composer and organist. ... The Wardian case, the direct forerunner of the modern terrarium (and the inspiration for the glass aquarium), was invented by Dr. Nathaniel Bagshaw Ward (1791-1868), of London, in about 1829 after an accidental discovery inspired him. ... Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ... (William) Hale White (December 22, 1831 - March 14, 1913) known by his pseudonym Mark Rutherford was a British writer and civil servant. ... Michael Howard Yardy (born November 27, 1980 in Pembury, Kent) is an English cricketer from Pembury in Kent. ... Sussex field against Derbyshire at Hove on 24 April 2005 The Arthur Gilligan stand at Hove The Pavilion at Hove Leaving the County Ground at Hove Sussex County Cricket Club is one of the 18 major county clubs which make up the English domestic cricket structure, representing the historic county... Paula Yates Paula Yates (24 April 1960 - 17 September 2000) was a British television presenter, best known for her work on cult TV music show, The Tube. ...

Current Residents

Shayne Burgess (born June 1, 1964 in Hastings) is an English darts player who is one of the few examples of players that has switched from the British Darts Organisation to the Professional Darts Corporation and then later back again. ... The Professional Darts Corporation (PDC) is a professional darts organisation, established in the United Kingdom during 1992 which split from the officially-recognised British Darts Organisation. ... Mark Davis is a snooker player from St. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Steve Furst is a a comedian. ... This article is about the British TV show Little Britain. ... Jaine Green is an award winning UK documentary maker and former stand-up comedienne. ... Claire Hamill was born in Middlesbrough in northern England, and has been in the music business since she was 17. ... Alex Lester (born Walsall, West Midlands, 11th May 1956) is a British broadcaster who presents the weekday overnight/early-morning programme on BBC Radio 2. ... BBC Radio 2 is one of the BBCs national radio stations and is by far the most popular station in the UK, reaching some 27% of the available audience in 2006[1]. It broadcasts throughout the UK on FM radio between 88 and 91 MHz from its studios in... The name Christopher Priest can refer to: Christopher Priest, British writer of science fiction Christopher Priest, American writer of comic books also known as Jim Owsley Categories: Disambiguation ... Milan Rai is a British peace campaigner who was arrested in October 2005 on the steps of a London war memorial, the Cenotaph, for refusing to cease reading aloud the names of civilians by then killed in Iraq following its most recent war, alongside fellow activist Maya Evans. ... Neil Razor Ruddock (born 9 May 1968 in Wandsworth, London) was an English footballer, playing as a central defender. ... David Tibet (born David Michael Bunting, 5 March 1960) is a British apocalyptic folk musician and artist who founded the music group Current 93, of which he is the only constant member. ...

Hastings in Film & TV

  • Foyle's War. See also here (TV, 2002 onwards). Also here.
  • Grey Owl (1999)
  • I Want You (1998)

Foyles War is a detective television programme created by screen-writer and author Anthony Horowitz, and commissioned by ITV after the long-running detective series Inspector Morse came to an end in 2000. ...

Town twinning

Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Satellite image of part of the Rhine-Meuse delta, showing the Island of Dordrecht and the eponymous city (7) Dordrecht (population 119,649 (2004)), or in English: Dort, is a city in the Dutch province of South Holland, the third largest city of the province. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... The church in Schwerte Schwerte is a city in Germany, located in the Bundesland of North Rhine-Westphalia, in the Ruhr area. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... Oudenaarde (French Audenarde, English sometimes Oudenarde) is a municipality in Flanders, one of the three regions of Belgium, and in the Flemish province of East Flanders. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Béthune is a city and commune of northern France, sous-préfecture of the Pas-de-Calais département. ...

See also

The Hastings Embroidery was commissioned by Group Captain Ralph Ward and made by the Royal School of Needlework in 1965 to celebrate the 900th anniversary of the Battle of Hastings. ... The Hastings Half Marathon is an event that takes place every march around the streets of Hastings. ... Hastings United FC are a semi-professional English football club who currently play in the Isthmian Football League Division One, known as the Ryman League. ... Hastings Writers group was established in 1947, and is one of the longest-running writers’ groups in the country. ... The Helenswood Girls School, is a secondary school in Hastings, East Sussex in the United Kingdom, and has achieved specialist Arts College status. ... The William Parker Sports College, formerly known as Hastings Grammar School, and later as William Parker School, is a secondary school in Hastings, East Sussex in the United Kingdom. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... View of Hastings Old Town from the East Hill Hastings Old Town, is an area in Hastings considered by many as a place of historical importance and a tourist attraction. ... Winkle Island is at the heart of Hastings Old Town in East Sussex, England, in the United Kingdom. ...

External links

The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ...

References

  1. ^ John Manwaring Baines FSA, Historic Hastings. F J Parsons Ltd, Hastings, 1955 and 1963
  2. ^ Hastings Online - ward information
  3. ^ Nairn, Bryan, and Pevsner, Nikolaus, The Buildings of England: Sussex, Page 119. Penguin, 1965
  4. ^ Peak, Steve, Fishermen of Hastings - 200 years of the Hastings Fishing Community. 1985
  5. ^ http://www.hastingslifeboat.org.uk/History.html
  6. ^ http://www.rnli.org.uk/rnli_near_you/east/stations/HastingsEastSussex/fleet
  7. ^ Robert J Harley, Hastings Tramways. Middleton Press 1993. ISBN 1 873793 18 9.

Coordinates: 50.85634° N 0.58589° E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
CASDE | Hastings -- Adams County (1343 words)
It was this crossing of two railroads that resulted in the rapid growth of the town, and in 1873, when the "Hastings Journal" was established, it immediately advocated that the county seat be moved to "the new town." This precipitated a fight that continued until a vote was called in 1877.
Hastings College was established in 1882 by Alexander, Wigton, and Heartwell under the auspices of the Presbyterian Church.
Hastings was declared a critical housing area as 6,000 military men and 3,000 families arrived.
Hastings (3692 words)
Hastings was foaled in 1893 at the farm of Dr. J.D. Neet near Versailles, Kentucky.
Hastings, the result of the union of the handsome, chestnut Spendthrift and the weedy, ill-tempered Cinderella, was a brown colt with a star on his forehead and more than his fair share of his dam's disagreeable personality.
Hastings was buried in an unmarked grave on the Nursery Stud property, as were The Ill-Used and St. Blaise before him.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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