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Encyclopedia > Harvard University
Harvard University

Motto: Veritas (Latin)
Motto in English: Truth[1]
Established: September 8, 1636 (OS), September 18, 1636 (NS)[2]
Type: Private
Endowment: US$35.6 billion[3]
President: Drew Gilpin Faust
Staff: 2,497 non-medical, 10,674 medical
Undergraduates: 6,715
Postgraduates: 12,424
Location: Cambridge, MA, USA
Campus: Urban, 380 acres (1.5 km²)
Colors: Crimson     
Nickname: Crimson
Mascot: John Harvard (unofficial)
Athletics: NCAA Division I Ivy League
41 varsity teams
Website: www.harvard.edu

Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S., and a member of the Ivy League. Founded in 1636 by the colonial Massachusetts legislature,[2] Harvard is the oldest institution of higher learning in the United States. It is also the first and oldest corporation in North America.[4] Harvard University is a university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. Harvard may also refer to: John Harvard (clergyman), a clergyman after whom Harvard University is named John Harvard (politician), the Lieutenant-Govenor of Manitoba Harvard College, the undergraduate division of Harvard University Harvard Square, a square in Cambridge, Massachusetts surrounding the... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1636 (MDCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1636 (MDCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity,[1] as opposed to public universities. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Catharine Drew Gilpin Faust (born September 18, 1947[1]) is an American historian and academic administrator, currently dean of Harvards Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and president-elect of Harvard University. ... This article is about work. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-City Council  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - Total 7. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... This article is about the unit of measurement. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... For other uses, see Crimson (disambiguation). ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... John Harvard Statue in the Harvard University Yard. ... Harvard University Mascot Logo http://www. ... NCAA redirects here. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-City Council  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - Total 7. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... The colonial colleges are nine institutions of higher education chartered in the American Colonies before the American Revolution (1775–1783). ... For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ...


Initially called "New College" or "the college at New Towne", the institution was named Harvard College on March 13, 1639, after a young clergyman named John Harvard—a graduate of England's Emmanuel College, Cambridge (a college of the University of Cambridge) and St Olave's Grammar School, Orpington in the UK—who bequeathed the College his library of four hundred books and around £750 (which was half of his estate). The earliest known official reference to Harvard as a "university" occurs in the new Massachusetts Constitution of 1780. Harvard Yard Harvard College is the undergraduate section and oldest school of Harvard University, a private university in the United States, founded in 1636 by the Massachusetts legislature. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 14 - Connecticuts first constitution, the Fundamental Orders, is adopted. ... Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ... John Harvard Statue in the Harvard University Yard. ... of the Emmanuel College College name Emmanuel College Named after Jesus Christ (Emmanuel) Established 1584 Location St Andrews Street Admittance Men and women Master The Lord Wilson of Dinton Undergraduates 500 Graduates 100 Sister college Exeter College, Oxford College Website Boat Club Wesite Emmanuel front court and the Wren... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the most prestigious universities in the world. ... St Olaves and St Saviours Grammar School for Boys (also known as St Olaves, St Olaves Grammar School, or simply Olaves) is a selective boys secondary school in Orpington, England. ... For the breed of chicken see Orpington (chicken). ... The Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the fundamental governing document of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ...


During his 40-year tenure as Harvard president (1869-1909), Charles William Eliot radically transformed Harvard into the pattern of the modern research university. Eliot's reforms included elective courses, small classes, and entrance examinations. The Harvard model influenced American education nationally, at both college and secondary levels. Eliot also was responsible for publication of the now-famous "Harvard Classics", a collection of "great books" from multiple disciplines published by P. F. Collier and Sons beginning in 1909 that offered a college education "in fifteen minutes a day of reading"; the collection soon became known as "Dr. Eliot's Five-Foot Shelf". During his unprecedentedly influential presidency, Eliot, a prolific book and magazine writer and widely traveled speaker in the pre-radio age, became so widely recognized a public figure that by his death in 1926 his name (and, not coincidentally, Harvard's) had become synonymous with the universal aspirations of American higher education. Prof. ... The Harvard Classics, originally known as Dr. Eliots Five Foot Shelf, was a fifty-volume anthology of works selected by Charles W. Eliot. ...


In 1999, Radcliffe College, founded in 1879 as the "Harvard Annex for Women",[5] merged formally with Harvard University, becoming the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Radcliffe College was a liberal arts womens college in Cambridge, Massachusetts, closely associated with Harvard University. ... The Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard is an educational institution in Cambridge, Massachusetts, one of the semiautonomous components of Harvard University. ...


Harvard's library collection contains more than 15 million volumes,[6] making it the largest academic library in the United States, and the fourth among the five "mega-libraries" of the world (after the British Library, the Library of Congress, and the French Bibliothèque nationale, but ahead of the New York Public Library).[7][8] Harvard has the largest financial endowment of any non-profit organization except for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, standing at $35.6 billion as of 2007. British Library main building, London The British Library (BL) is the national library of the United Kingdom. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... The new buildings of the library. ... The New York Public Library (NYPL) is one of the leading public libraries of the world and is one of Americas most significant research libraries. ... The following are lists of American institutions of higher education by endowment. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (B&MGF) is the largest transparently operated[2] charitable foundation in the world, founded by Bill and Melinda Gates in 2000 and doubled in size by Warren Buffett in 2006. ...

Contents

History

Harvard University is the oldest institution of higher learning in the United States (see: first university in the United States), founded 16 years after the arrival of the Pilgrims at Plymouth . Harvard College was established in 1636 by vote of the Great and General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and was named for its first benefactor, John Harvard of Charlestown, a young minister who, upon his death in 1638, left his library and half his estate to the new institution. The charter creating the corporation of Harvard College was signed by Massachusetts Gov. Thomas Dudley in 1650.[9] First university in the United States is a status asserted by more than one U.S. university. ... This article is about a particular group of seventeenth-century European colonists of North America. ... Nickname: Location in Plymouth County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Plymouth Settled 1620 Incorporated (town) 1670 Government [1]  - Type Representative town meeting  - Town    Manager Mark Sylvia Area  - Total 134. ... A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony Capital Charlestown, Boston History  - Established 1629  - New England Confederation 1643  - Dominion of New England 1686  - Province of Massachusetts Bay 1692  - Disestablished 1692 The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on... John Harvard may be: John Harvard (clergyman) (Massachusetts) John Harvard (politician) (Manitoba) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Birdseye view of Boston, Charlestown, and Bunker Hill between 1890 and 1910. ... Thomas Dudley (October 12, 1576–July 31, 1653) was a colonial magistrate who served several terms as governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ...


During its early years, the College offered a classic academic course based on the English university model but consistent with the prevailing Puritan philosophy of the first colonists. The College was affiliated with Congregationalist denomination. An early brochure, published in 1643, justified the College's existence: "To advance Learning and perpetuate it to Posterity; dreading to leave an illiterate Ministry to the Churches." Harvard's early motto was "For Christ and the Church." In its directive to its students it laid out the purpose of all education; "Let every student be plainly instructed and consider well that the main end of his life and studies is to know God and Jesus, which is eternal life. And therefore to lay Christ at the bottom as the only foundation of all sound learning and knowledge." For the record label, see Puritan Records. ...

Engraving of Harvard College by Paul Revere, 1767.
Engraving of Harvard College by Paul Revere, 1767.

The 1708 election of John Leverett, the first president who was not also a clergyman, marked a turning of the College toward intellectual independence from Puritanism. Harvard Yard Harvard College is the undergraduate section and oldest school of Harvard University, a private university in the United States, founded in 1636 by the Massachusetts legislature. ... For the song by the Beastie Boys, see Paul Revere (song). ... John Leverett (1662 - 1724) was an early American lawyer, politician, and educator. ...


In the 17th century, Harvard University established the Indian College to educate Native Americans, but it was not a success and disappeared by 1693.[citation needed] In the 17th century, Harvard University established the Indian College in order to educate Native Americans, but it was not a success and disappeared by 1693. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States and their history after European contact, chiefly in what is now the United States. ...

Eliza Susan Quincy's drawing of the September 1836 procession of Harvard alumni leaving the First Parish Meeting House and walking to the Pavilion. Eliza Susan Quincy was the daughter of Josiah Quincy, President of Harvard University 1829-45.
Eliza Susan Quincy's drawing of the September 1836 procession of Harvard alumni leaving the First Parish Meeting House and walking to the Pavilion. Eliza Susan Quincy was the daughter of Josiah Quincy, President of Harvard University 1829-45.

Between 1830 and 1870 Harvard became "privatized".[10] While the Federalists controlled state government, Harvard had prospered, but the 1824 defeat of the federalist party in Massachusetts allowed the renascent Democratic-Republicans to block state funding of private universities. By 1870, the politicians and ministers that heretofore had made up the university's board of overseers had been replaced by Harvard alumni drawn from Boston's upper-class business and professional community and funded by private endowment. The First Parish in Cambridge, a Unitarian Universalist church, is located in Harvard Square in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Josiah Quincy III (February 4, 1772 – July 1, 1864) was a U.S. educator and political figure. ... The President is the chief administrator of Harvard University. ... The label Federalist refers to two major groups in the history of the United States of America: (1. ... The Democratic-Republican Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison as the Republican party (not related to the present-day Republican Party) in 1792, was the dominant political party in the United States from 1800 until the 1820s, when it split into competing factions, one of which became the...


During this period, Harvard experienced unparalleled growth that securely placed it financially in a league of its own among American colleges. Ronald Story notes that in 1850, Harvard's total assets were "five times that of Amherst and Williams combined, and three times that of Yale.... By 1850, it was a genuine university, 'unequalled in facilities,' as a budding scholar put it, by any other institution in America — the 'greatest university,' said another, 'in all creation'".[11] Story also notes that "all the evidence... points to the four decades from 1815 to 1855 as the era when parents, in Henry Adams's words, began 'sending their children to Harvard College for the sake of its social advantages'".[12] Harvard was also an early leader in admitting ethnic and religious minorities. Stephen Steinberg, author of The Ethnic Myth, noted that "a climate of intolerance prevailed in many Eastern colleges long before discriminatory quotas were contemplated" and noted that "Jews tended to avoid such campuses as Yale and Princeton, which had reputations for bigotry.... [while] under President Eliot's administration, Harvard earned a reputation as the most liberal and democratic of the Big Three, and therefore Jews did not feel that the avenue to a prestigious college was altogether closed".[13] In 1870, one year into Eliot's term, Richard Theodore Greener became the first African-American to graduate from Harvard College. Seven years later, Louis Brandeis, the first Jewish justice on the Supreme Court, graduated from Harvard Law School. For people named Bigot and other meanings, see Bigot (disambiguation). ... Richard Theodore Greener (30 January 1844 – 2 May 1922) was the first African-American graduate of Harvard College and dean of the Howard University law school. ... Louis Dembitz Brandeis (November 13, 1856 – October 5, 1941) was an American litigator, Supreme Court Justice, advocate of privacy, and developer of the Brandeis Brief. ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ...

Nevertheless, Harvard became the bastion of a distinctly Protestant elite — the so-called Boston Brahmin class — and continued to be so well into the 20th century. The social milieu of 1880s Harvard is depicted in Owen Wister's Philosophy 4, which contrasts the character and demeanor of two undergraduates who "had colonial names (Rogers, I think, and Schuyler)" with that of their tutor, one Oscar Maironi, whose "parents had come over in the steerage."[14] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 479 pixelsFull resolution (981 × 587 pixel, file size: 59 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hul. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 479 pixelsFull resolution (981 × 587 pixel, file size: 59 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hul. ... The President is the chief administrator of Harvard University. ... Josiah Quincy III (February 4, 1772 – July 1, 1864) was a U.S. educator and political figure. ... Edward Everett (April 11, 1794 – January 15, 1865) was a Whig Party politician from Massachusetts. ... Jared Sparks (10 May 1789 - 14 March 1866) was a U.S. historian, educator, Unitarian minister, and president of Harvard University. ... James Walker (August 16, 1794 – December 23, 1874) was the President of Harvard College from 1853 to 1860. ... Cornelius Conway Felton (November 6, 1807 - February 26, 1862) was an American educator. ... Boston Brahmins, also called the First Families of Boston, are the class of New Englanders who claim hereditary and cultural descent from the English Protestants who founded the city of Boston, Massachusetts and settled New England. ... Owen Wister, author of the Western novel, The Virginian and friend of Theodore Roosevelt Owen Wister (July 14, 1860 – July 21, 1938) was an American writer of western novels. ...


Though Harvard ended required chapel in the mid-1880s, the school remained culturally Protestant, and fears of dilution grew as enrollment of immigrants, Catholics and Jews surged at the turn of the twentieth century. By 1908, Catholics made up nine percent of the freshman class, and between 1906 and 1922, Jewish enrollment at Harvard increased from six to twenty percent. In June 1922, under President Lowell, Harvard announced a Jewish quota. Other universities had done this surreptitiously. Lowell did it in a forthright way, and positioned it as means of combating anti-Semitism, writing that "anti-Semitic feeling among the students is increasing, and it grows in proportion to the increase in the number of Jews.... when... the number of Jews was small, the race antagonism was small also."[15] The social milieu of 1940s Harvard is presented in Myron Kaufman's 1957 novel, Remember Me to God, which follows the life of a Jewish undergraduate as he attempts to navigate the shoals of casual anti-Semitism, be recognized as a "gentleman," and be accepted into "The Pudding."[16] Indeed, Harvard's discriminatory policies, both tacit and explicit, were partly responsible for the founding of Boston College in 1863[citation needed] and Brandeis University in nearby Waltham in 1948.[17] Boston College (BC) is a private university located in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, in the New England region of the United States. ... Brandeis University is a private university located in Waltham, Massachusetts, United States. ...


Policies of exclusion were not limited to religious minorities. In 1920, "Harvard University maliciously persecuted and harassed" those it believed to be gay via a "Secret Court" led by Harvard President A. Lawrence Lowell. Summoned at the behest of a wealthy alumnus, the inquisitions and expulsions carried out by this tribunal, in conjunction with the "vindictive tenacity of the university in ensuring that the stigmatization of the expelled students would persist throughout their productive lives" led to two suicides. Harvard President Lawrence Summers characterized the 1920 episode as "part of a past that we have rightly left behind", and "abhorrent and an affront to the values of our university".[18] Yet as late as the 1950s, Wilbur Bender, then the dean of admissions for Harvard College, was seeking better ways to "detect homosexual tendencies and serious psychiatric problems” in prospective students.[19] Shield of Harvard University with the motto Veritas (truth) The Secret Court of 1920 was a secret tribunal convened in 1920 at Harvard University to rid the university of homosexuals. ... Lawrence Henry Larry Summers (born November 30, 1954) is an American economist and academic. ...


During the twentieth century, Harvard's international reputation grew as a burgeoning endowment and prominent professors expanded the university's scope. Explosive growth in the student population continued with the addition of new graduate schools and the expansion of the undergraduate program. Radcliffe College, established in 1879 as sister school of Harvard College, became one of the most prominent schools for women in the United States. Radcliffe College was a liberal arts womens college in Cambridge, Massachusetts, closely associated with Harvard University. ...


In the decades immediately after the Second World War, Harvard reformed its admissions policies as it sought students from a more diverse applicant pool. Whereas Harvard undergraduates had almost exclusively been white, upper-class alumni of select New England "feeder schools" such as Exeter and Andover, increasing numbers of international, minority, and working-class students had, by the late 1960s, altered the ethnic and socio-economic makeup of the college.[20] Nonetheless, Harvard's undergraduate population remained predominantly male, with about four men attending Harvard College for every woman studying at Radcliffe.[21] Following the merger of Harvard and Radcliffe admissions in 1977, the proportion of female undergraduates steadily increased, mirroring a trend throughout higher education in the United States. Harvard's graduate schools, which had accepted females and other groups in greater numbers even before the college, also became more diverse in the post-war period. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... A college application is something that you send to colleges and universities. ... About Phillips Exeter Photo of the Academy Building Phillips Exeter Academy (also called Exeter or PEA) is a co-educational independent boarding school located on 471 acres (1. ... Phillips Academy (also known as Phillips Andover or P.A. or simply Andover) is a co-educational University preparatory school for boarding and day students in grades 9-12. ...


Today, Harvard is considered one of a handful of the world's premier centers of higher learning. Despite occasionally weathering periods of reactionary sentiment over its long history, Harvard and its affiliates, in line with most American universities, are politically generally liberal (center-left); Richard Nixon, for example, famously attacked it around 1970 as the "Kremlin on the Charles". In 2004, the Harvard Crimson found that Harvard undergraduates favored Kerry over Bush by 73% to 19%, consistent with Kerry's margin in major eastern cities such as Boston and New York City.[22] While Harvard has sometimes been criticized as elitist and "hostile to progressive intellectuals" (Trumpbour), there have been both prominent conservatives and liberals who have attended the school. Republican President George W. Bush graduated from Harvard Business School and Democratic President John F. Kennedy and Vice-President Al Gore graduated from Harvard College. Today, there are both prominent conservative and prominent liberal voices among the faculty of the various schools, such as Martin Feldstein, Harvey Mansfield, Greg Mankiw, and Alan Dershowitz. Marxists like Michael Walzer and Stephen Thernstrom and libertarians such as Robert Nozick have in the past graced its faculty, but from within its gates the university prides itself on its fierce and unbending loyalty to the tradition of academic freedom and open and free speech that it has guarded on behalf of American education for nearly four centuries. This article discusses the history and development of various notions of liberalism in the United States. ... Nixon redirects here. ... The Moscow Kremlin (Russian: Московский Кремль) is a historic fortified complex at the very heart of Moscow, overlooking the Moskva River (to the south), Saint Basils Cathedral (often mistaken as the Kremlin) and Red Square (to the east) and the Alexander Garden (to the west). ... The Charles River from the Boston side, facing Cambridge and the main campus of Harvard University. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Harvard Crimson, of Harvard University, is the United States oldest continuously published daily college newspaper. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Harvard Business School, officially named the Harvard Business School: George F. Baker Foundation, and also known as HBS, is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Harvard Yard Harvard College is the undergraduate section and oldest school of Harvard University, a private university in the United States, founded in 1636 by the Massachusetts legislature. ... Martin Stuart Feldstein (born November 25, 1939) is an American economist. ... Harvey C. Mansfield, Jr. ... N. Gregory Mankiw Nicholas Gregory Mankiw (born February 3, 1958) is a macroeconomist. ... Alan Morton Dershowitz (born September 1, 1938) is an American lawyer and criminal law professor known for his extensive published works, career as an attorney in several high-profile law cases, and commentary on the Arab-Israeli conflict. ...


Recent developments

Destroyed by fire in the 1950s, Memorial Hall's ornate tower was rebuilt in 1999
Destroyed by fire in the 1950s, Memorial Hall's ornate tower was rebuilt in 1999

In March 2008, Harvard announced that no transfer applicants would be admitted for the next two academic years, in an effort to reduce overcrowding in the undergraduate residential House system. This controversial decision was announced after the academic year 2008-2009 transfer applications had already been submitted. Co-Master Mandana Sassanfar said that the House Masters have been discussing the issue of overcrowding since late 2007 and "decided it was more important to have enough housing for our own students first." This decision has been called "rash," “outrageous,” and “heartbreaking” by transfer applicants and others at Harvard.[23][24][25][26] Download high resolution version (1024x768, 301 KB) Memorial Hall at Harvard College This is the civil war monument that now serves as Sanders Theater and the Annenberg freshman dining hall Photo © 2004 Jacob Rus File links The following pages link to this file: Harvard University Image:Harvard college - annenberg hall. ... Download high resolution version (1024x768, 301 KB) Memorial Hall at Harvard College This is the civil war monument that now serves as Sanders Theater and the Annenberg freshman dining hall Photo © 2004 Jacob Rus File links The following pages link to this file: Harvard University Image:Harvard college - annenberg hall. ... Memorial Hall Exterior details Memorial Hall is an imposing brick building in High Victorian Gothic style, located on the Harvard University campus in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ...


In February 2007, the Harvard Corporation and Overseers formally approved the Harvard Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences to become the 14th School of Harvard (Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences). In his April letter Dean of Faculty of Arts and Sciences Jeremy Knowles said, "most of the net growth in the next few years will be in the sciences and engineering."[27][28] The President and Fellows of Harvard College (also known as the Harvard Corporation) is the more fundamental of Harvard Universitys two governing boards. ... The Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences (DEAS) is a unit of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University responsible for research, as well as undergraduate and graduate education in applied mathematics, computer science, engineering, and technology. ... The Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Science (HSEAS or SEAS), a school within Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS), serves as the connector and integrator of Harvard’s teaching and research efforts in engineering, applied sciences, and technology. ... Jeremy R. Knowles (1935-) is a Professor of Chemistry at Harvard University, was Dean of the Harvard University Faculty of Arts and Sciences from 1991 to 2002. ...


In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Harvard, along with numerous other institutions of higher education across the United States and Canada, offered to take in students who were unable to attend universities and colleges that were closed for the fall semester. Twenty-five students were admitted to the College, and the Law School made similar arrangements. Tuition was not charged and housing was provided.[29] This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ...


On February 21, 2006, president Lawrence Summers announced his intention to resign the presidency, effective June 30, 2006. His resignation came just one week before a second planned vote of no confidence by the Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Former president Derek Bok served as interim president. Members of Harvard's Faculty of Arts and Sciences, which instructs graduate students in GSAS and undergraduates in Harvard College, had passed an earlier motion of "lack of confidence" in Summers' leadership on March 15, 2005 by a 218-185 vote, with 18 abstentions. The 2005 motion was precipitated by comments about the causes of gender demographics in academia made at a closed academic conference and leaked to the press.[30] In response, Summers convened two committees to study this issue: the Task Force on Women Faculty and the Task Force on Women in Science and Engineering. Summers had also pledged $50 million to support their recommendations and other proposed reforms. Lawrence Henry Larry Summers (born November 30, 1954) is an American economist and academic. ... Derek Curtis Bok (born March 22, 1930) is an American lawyer and educator. ...


Drew Gilpin Faust is the 28th president of Harvard. An American historian, dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and Lincoln Professor of History at Harvard University, Faust is the first female president in the university's history.[31][32] Catharine Drew Gilpin Faust (born September 18, 1947[1]) is an American historian and academic administrator, currently dean of Harvards Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and president-elect of Harvard University. ... American history redirects here. ... The Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard is an educational institution in Cambridge, Massachusetts, one of the semiautonomous components of Harvard University. ...


In 2005 Harvard received a large donation from Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal for the development of research programs in Islamic studies.[33][34] The acceptance by Harvard and other universities of this and comparable donations has drawn criticism from some commentators and accusations that the donations are used to spread pro-Saudi propaganda.[35][36] HRH Price Alwaleed Bin Talal Bin Abdulaziz Al Saud HRH Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, born in 1955 and usually known simply as Prince Alwaleed, is a member of the Saudi Royal Family who has amassed an independent fortune through investments in shares and property. ... Islamic Studies is the academic discipline which focuses on Islamic issues. ... For other uses, see Propaganda (disambiguation). ...


Institutions

Harvard University campus (old map)
Harvard University campus (old map)

A faculty of about 2,400 professors serve as of school year 2006-2007, with 6,715 undergraduate and 12,424 graduate students. The school color is crimson, which is also the name of the Harvard sports teams and the daily newspaper, The Harvard Crimson. The color was unofficially adopted (in preference to magenta) by an 1875 vote of the student body, although the association with some form of red can be traced back to 1858, when Charles William Eliot, a young graduate student who would later become Harvard's 21st and longest-serving president (1869-1909), bought red bandanas for his crew so they could more easily be distinguished by spectators at a regatta. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (656x869, 611 KB) Summary Harvard University map (older, date unknown), Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (656x869, 611 KB) Summary Harvard University map (older, date unknown), Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Look up Faculty on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Faculty has several different meanings and can refer to: University faculty are the instructors and/or researchers of high standing at universities, as opposed to the students or support staff. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Look up Graduate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Crimson (disambiguation). ... The Harvard Crimson, the breakfast daily of Harvard University, was founded in 1873. ... Magenta is a color made up of equal parts of red and blue light. ... Prof. ...


The history of Harvard's color has been contested by Fordham University. Both schools were identifying with magenta and since neither were willing to use a new color, they agreed that the winner of a baseball game would be allowed official use of magenta. Fordham emerged the winner, but Harvard had reneged on its promise and continued using magenta. Fordham had adopted maroon because of this and claims that Harvard followed suit with its adoption of crimson.[37] Fordham University is a private, coeducational research university[3] in the United States, with three campuses located in and around New York City. ...


Although the officially stated color is crimson, the color actually used on sport uniforms and other Harvard insignia is, in fact, very different from crimson. Rather than a bright crimson, it is of a duller, darker hue, resembling that of ox blood. Binomial name Bos taurus Linnaeus, 1758 Cattle are domesticated ungulates, a member of the subfamily Bovinae of the family Bovidae. ...


Prominent student organizations at Harvard include the aforementioned Crimson and its rival the Harvard Lampoon, a noted humor magazine; the Harvard Advocate, one of the nation's oldest literary magazines and the oldest current publication at Harvard; and the Hasty Pudding Theatricals, which produces an annual burlesque and celebrates notable actors at its Man of the Year and Woman of the Year ceremonies, and the Harvard Radcliffe Gilbert and Sullivan Players, one of the premier Gilbert and Sullivan societies in New England which performs two operettas per school year. The Harvard Glee Club is the oldest college chorus in America, and the University Choir, the official choir of the Harvard Memorial Church, is the oldest choir in America affiliated with a university. The Harvard-Radcliffe Orchestra, composed mainly of undergraduates, was founded in 1808 as the Pierian Sodality (thus making it technically older than the New York Philharmonic, which is the oldest professional orchestra in America), and has been performing as a symphony orchestra since the 1950s. The school also has a number of a cappella singing groups, the oldest of which is the Harvard Krokodiloes. This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Harvard Advocate, the premier literary magazine of Harvard College, is the oldest continuously published college literary magazine in the United States. ... The Hasty Pudding Theatricals, known informally simply as The Pudding, is a theatrical student society at Harvard University, known for its burlesque musicals and for its status as the oldest collegiate theatrical organization in the United States. ... For other uses, see Burlesque (disambiguation). ... The Hasty Pudding Man of the Year award is bestowed annually by the Hasty Pudding Theatricals society at Harvard University. ... The Hasty Pudding Woman of the Year award is bestowed annually by the Hasty Pudding Theatricals society at Harvard University. ... Harvard Glee Club logo The Harvard Glee Club is a 60-voice, all-male choral ensemble at Harvard University. ... The Harvard University Choir, more commonly referred to as the University Choir or simply UChoir, is the oldest university choir in the nation and has been providing choral music in the Harvard Memorial Church for over 170 years. ... The Memorial Church of Harvard University, more commonly known as the Harvard Memorial Church (or simply Mem Church) was built in 1932 in honor of the men and women of Harvard University who gave their lives in World War I. Since then, other memorials have been established within it commemorating... The Harvard-Radcliffe Orchestra, or HRO, is the oldest symphony orchestra in the United States. ... The New York Philharmonic is the oldest active symphony orchestra in the United States, organized during 1842. ... Logo Founded in 1946, The Harvard Krokodiloes are Harvard Universitys oldest a cappella singing group. ...

The John Harvard statue in Harvard Yard is a frequent target of pranks, hacks, and humorous decorations, such as the colorful lei shown above. It is known as the Statue of Three Lies: it's not John Harvard, he wasn't the Founder, and the date's wrong.

Harvard has a friendly rivalry with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology which dates back to 1900, when a merger of the two schools was frequently discussed and at one point officially agreed upon (ultimately canceled by Massachusetts courts). Today, the two schools cooperate as much as they compete, with many joint conferences and programs, including the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, the Broad Institute, the Harvard-MIT Data Center and the Dibner Institute for the History of Science and Technology. In addition, students at the two schools can cross-register in undergraduate or graduate classes without any additional fees, for credits toward their own school's degrees. The relationship and proximity between the two institutions is a remarkable phenomenon, considering their stature; according to The Times Higher Education Supplement of London, "The US has the world’s top two universities by our reckoning — Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, neighbors on the Charles River."[38] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2377x1835, 861 KB)The John Harvard statue in Harvard Yard is a common target of pranks just like the rainbow lei around his neck. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2377x1835, 861 KB)The John Harvard statue in Harvard Yard is a common target of pranks just like the rainbow lei around his neck. ... John Harvard Statue in the Harvard University Yard. ... Harvard Yard in 1905. ... Woman wearing a lei and making the shaka sign Lei is a Hawaiian word for a garland or wreath. ... “MIT” redirects here. ... Founded in 1970, the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST) is one of the oldest and largest biomedical engineering and physician-scientist training programs in the United States and the longest-standing collaboration between Harvard and MIT. From the beginning, HST pioneered a new way of thinking... Cross-registration in United States higher education is a system allowing students at one university, college, or faculty within a university to take individual courses for credit at another institution or faculty, typically in the same region. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, also known as The Times Higher or The THES for short, is a newspaper based in London that reports specifically on issues related to higher education. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Harvard has produced many famous alumni, along with a few infamous ones. Among the best-known are political leaders John Hancock, John Adams, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy, and Pierre Elliott Trudeau; philosopher Henry David Thoreau and author Ralph Waldo Emerson; poets Wallace Stevens, T. S. Eliot and E. E. Cummings; composer Leonard Bernstein; cellist Yo Yo Ma; actors Jack Lemmon, Natalie Portman, Tommy Lee Jones, and Matt Damon; architect Philip Johnson, ex-Rage Against the Machine and Audioslave guitarist Tom Morello, Weezer singer Rivers Cuomo, Unabomber Ted Kaczynski, and civil rights leader W. E. B. Du Bois. Among its most famous current faculty members are biologists James D. Watson and E. O. Wilson, cognitive scientist Steven Pinker, physicists Lisa Randall and Roy Glauber, Shakespeare scholar Stephen Greenblatt, writer Louis Menand, critic Helen Vendler, historian Niall Ferguson, economists N. Gregory Mankiw, Robert Barro, and Martin Feldstein, political philosophers Harvey Mansfield and Michael Sandel, political scientists Robert Putnam, Joseph Nye, Samuel P. Huntington, Stanley Hoffman, and Torben Iversen, and scholar/composers Robert Levin and Bernard Rands. John Hancock (January 23 [O.S. January 12] 1737– October 8, 1793) was President of the Second Continental Congress and of the Congress of the Confederation, the first Governor of Massachusetts, and the first person to sign the United States Declaration of Independence. ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), often referred to as FDR, was the 32nd (1933–1945) President of the United States. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Name Pierre Elliott Trudeau Number Fifteenth First term April 20, 1968–June 4,1979 Second term March 3, 1980–June 30, 1984 Predecessor Lester Bowles Pearson Successors Joe Clark John Napier Turner Date of birth October 18, 1919 Place of birth Montreal, Quebec Date of death September 28, 2000 Spouse... Thoreau redirects here. ... Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, poet, and leader of the Transcendentalist movement in the early nineteenth century. ... Wallace Stevens Wallace Stevens (October 2, 1879 – August 2, 1955) was a major American Modernist poet. ... For other persons named Thomas Eliot, see Thomas Eliot (disambiguation). ... Edward Estlin Cummings (October 14, 1894 – September 3, 1962), popularly known as E. E. Cummings, was an American poet, painter, essayist, and playwright. ... Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ... Classic Yo-Yo album cover Yo-Yo Ma (馬友友 Pinyin: Mǎ Yǒuyǒu) (born October 7, 1955) is a world-famous French-Chinese-American cellist. ... John Uhler Lemmon III (February 8, 1925 – June 27, 2001), better known as Jack Lemmon, was a two-time Academy Award and Cannes Award-winning American actor and comedian. ... Natalie Portman (‎; born June 9, 1981) is a Golden Globe-winning, Academy Award-nominated Israeli-American actress. ... Tommy Lee Jones (born September 15, 1946) is an Academy Award-winning American actor and director. ... Matthew Paige Matt Damon (born October 8, 1970) is an American screenwriter and actor. ... 1933 Portrait of Philip Johnson by Carl Van Vechten Philip Cortelyou Johnson (July 8, 1906 – January 25, 2005) was an influential American architect. ... Rage Against the Machine, is an American rock band, formed in Los Angeles, California in 1991. ... For the bands self-titled album, see Audioslave (album). ... Thomas Baptist Morello (born May 30, 1964) is a Grammy Award-winning American guitarist best known for his tenure with the bands Rage Against the Machine and Audioslave, and as the acoustic artist The Nightwatchman, He was featured as one of 20 guitarists in Rolling Stone magazines The Top... William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (pronounced [1]) (February 23, 1868 – August 27, 1963) was an African American civil rights activist, leader, Pan-Africanist, sociologist, educator, historian, writer, editor, poet, and scholar. ... For other people named James Watson, see James Watson (disambiguation). ... Edward Osborne Wilson (born June 10, 1929) is an American biologist (Myrmecology, a branch of entomology), researcher (sociobiology, biodiversity), theorist (consilience, biophilia), and naturalist (conservationism). ... Steven Pinker Steven Arthur Pinker (born September 18, 1954) is a prominent Canadian-born American experimental psychologist, cognitive scientist, and popular science writer known for his spirited and wide-ranging advocacy of evolutionary psychology and the computational theory of mind. ... Lisa Randall at Harvard University Lisa Randall (born 18 June 1962) is a well-known American particle physicist, and the most cited high-energy physicist in the period 1999 to 2004. ... Roy Jay Glauber (born 1925) is the Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics at Harvard University. ... Stephen Jay Greenblatt (born November 7, 1943) is a literary critic, theorist and scholar. ... Louis Menand (first name pronounced lü-E) is a prominent American writer and academic, best known for his book The Metaphysical Club (2001), an intellectual and cultural history of late 19th and early 20th century America. ... Helen Hennessy Vendler (b. ... Niall Ferguson (b. ... It has been suggested that Pigou Club be merged into this article or section. ... Robert Barro Robert Barro (born 1944) is an influential macroeconomist and the Wesley Clair Mitchell Professor of Economics at Columbia University. ... Martin Stuart Feldstein (born November 25, 1939) is an American economist. ... Harvey C. Mansfield, Jr. ... Michael Sandel (1943-) is a contemporary political philosopher. ... Robert D. Putnam (2006) Robert David Putnam (born 1941 in Rochester, New York) is a political scientist and professor at Harvard University. ... Joseph Nye (born 1937) is the founder, along with Robert Keohane, of the international relations theory neoliberalism (international relations) developed in their 1977 book Power and Interdependence. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Robert D. Levin (b. ... Bernard Rands Bernard Rands (b. ...


Organizations

Harvard is governed by two boards, one of which is the President and Fellows of Harvard College, also known as the Harvard Corporation and founded in 1650, and the other is the Harvard Board of Overseers. The President of Harvard University is the day-to-day administrator of Harvard and is appointed by and responsible to the Harvard Corporation. The President and Fellows of Harvard College (also known as the Harvard Corporation) is the more fundamental of Harvard Universitys two governing boards. ... The Harvard Board of Overseers (more formally The Honorable and Reverend The Board of Overseers) is the second of Harvard Universitys two governing boards. ... The President is the chief administrator of Harvard University. ...


Harvard today has nine faculties, listed below in order of foundation:

Harvard Yard with freshman dorms in the background

In 1999, the former Radcliffe College was reorganized as the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. Image File history File linksMetadata Harvard_Yard,_Dudesleeper. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Harvard_Yard,_Dudesleeper. ... The Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences (also known as FAS) is the largest of the seven faculties that comprise Harvard University. ... The Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Science (HSEAS or SEAS), a school within Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS), serves as the connector and integrator of Harvard’s teaching and research efforts in engineering, applied sciences, and technology. ... Harvard Yard Harvard College is the undergraduate section and oldest school of Harvard University, a private university in the United States, founded in 1636 by the Massachusetts legislature. ... The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS) is the academic unit responsible for many post-baccalaureate degree programs offered through the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University. ... Harvard Division of Continuing Education The Division of Continuing Education and University Extension School is a part of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) at Harvard University responsible for various undergraduate, graduate, and non-degree programs that enroll approximately 20,000 students each year. ... Harvard Extension School (HES), one of the twelve degree-granting schools of Harvard University, was founded by university President A. Lawrence Lowell in 1909[1]. The school was originally an academic program designed to serve the educational interests and needs of the greater Boston community. ... The Harvard Summer School, founded in 1871, is the oldest academic summer session in the United States. ... Harvard Medical School (HMS) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Harvard School of Dental Medicine Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Harvard Divinity School is one of the constituent schools of Harvard University, located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in the United States. ... Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Harvard Business School, officially named the Harvard Business School: George F. Baker Foundation, and also known as HBS, is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... The Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD) is a graduate school at Harvard University offering degrees in Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Urban Planning and Design. ... Harvard Graduate School of Education The Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University, and is considered by many as one of the top education schools in the United States. ... Harvard School of Public Health The Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) is Harvard Universitys School of Public Health. ... John F. Kennedy School of Government The John F. Kennedy School of Government is a public policy school and one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Radcliffe College was a liberal arts womens college in Cambridge, Massachusetts, closely associated with Harvard University. ... The Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard is an educational institution in Cambridge, Massachusetts, one of the semiautonomous components of Harvard University. ...


Sports and athletic facilities

Harvard has several athletic facilities, such as the Lavietes Pavilion, a multi-purpose arena and home to the Harvard basketball teams. The Malkin Athletic Center, known as the "MAC," serves both as the university's primary recreation facility and as a satellite location for several varsity sports. The five story building includes two cardio rooms, an Olympic-size swimming pool, a smaller pool for aquaerobics and other activities, a mezzanine, where all types of classes are held at all hours of the day, and an indoor cycling studio, three weight rooms, and a three-court gym floor to play basketball. The MAC also offers personal trainers and specialty classes. The MAC is also home to Harvard volleyball, fencing, and wrestling. The offices of several of the school's varsity coaches are also in the MAC. Lavietes Pavilion is a 2,195-seat multi-purpose arena in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ...


Weld Boathouse and Newell Boathouse house the women's and men's rowing teams, respectively. The men's crew also uses the Red Top complex in Ledyard, CT, as their training camp for the annual Harvard-Yale Regatta. The Bright Hockey Center hosts the Harvard hockey teams, and the Murr Center serves both as a home for Harvard's squash and tennis teams as well as a strength and conditioning center for all athletic sports. Weld Boathouse with Harvard University buildings visible in the background. ... Yales Blade The Harvard-Yale Boat Race or Harvard-Yale Regatta is an annual rowing race between Yale and Harvard universities. ...


As of 2006, there were 41 Division I intercollegiate varsity sports teams for women and men at Harvard, more than at any other NCAA Division I college in the country. As with other Ivy League universities, Harvard does not offer athletic scholarships.[citation needed] In the United States and Canada, varsity sports teams are the principal athletic teams representing a college, university, or high school or other secondary school. ... A sport consists of a physical activity or skill carried out with a recreational purpose: for competition, for self-enjoyment, to attain excellence, for the development of a skill, or some combination of these. ...

Harvard's athletic rivalry with Yale is intense in every sport in which they meet, coming to a climax each fall in their annual football meeting, which dates back to 1875 and is usually called simply The Game. While Harvard's football team is no longer one of the country's best as it often was a century ago during football's early days (it won the Rose Bowl in 1920), both it and Yale have influenced the way the game is played. In 1903, Harvard Stadium introduced a new era into football with the first-ever permanent reinforced concrete stadium of its kind in the country. The sport eventually adopted the forward pass (invented by famous Yale coach Walter Camp) because of the stadium's structure. Image File history File linksMetadata Harvard_Stadium,_Dudesleeper. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Harvard_Stadium,_Dudesleeper. ... Harvard Stadium is a football stadium in the Allston neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Harvard Crimson, of Harvard University, is the United States oldest continuously published daily college newspaper. ... The Boston Cannons are a professional lacrosse team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Yale redirects here. ... The ball used in American football has a pointed oval shape, and usually has a large set of stitches along one side. ... Half-time festivities at The Game, Yale Bowl The Game (always capitalized) is a title given to several U.S. college football rivalry games, but most particularly the annual contest between Harvard and Yale. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... Harvard Stadium is a football stadium in the Allston neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. ... This article is about the American football coach. ...


Older than The Game by 23 years, the Harvard-Yale Regatta was the original source of the athletic rivalry between the two schools. It is held annually in June on the Thames river in eastern Connecticut. The Harvard crew is typically considered to be one of the top teams in the country in rowing. Today, Harvard fields top teams in several other sports, such as ice hockey (with a strong rivalry against Cornell), squash, and even recently won NCAA titles in Men's and Women's Fencing. Harvard also won the Intercollegiate Sailing Association National Championships in 2003. Yales Blade The Harvard-Yale Boat Race or Harvard-Yale Regatta is an annual rowing race between Yale and Harvard universities. ... A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Cornell redirects here. ... Squash racquet and ball Players in a glass-backed squash court International Squash Singles Court, as specified by the World Squash Federation Squash is an indoor racquet sport that was formerly called Squash racquets, a reference to the squashable soft ball used in the game (compared with the harder ball... This article is about the sport, which is distinguished from stage fencing and academic fencing (mensur). ... The ICSA National Championship Regatta is held once each year in May and is hosted by a member school of the Intercollegiate Sailing Association. ...


Harvard's mens' ice hockey team won the school's first NCAA Championship in any team sport in 1989. Harvard was also the first Ivy League institution to win a NCAA championship title in a women's sport when its women's lacrosse team won the NCAA Championship in 1990.


Harvard-Radcliffe Television has footage from historical games and athletic events including the 2005 pep-rally before the Harvard-Yale Game. Harvard's official athletics website has more comprehensive information about Harvard's athletic facilities.


Song

Harvard has several fight songs, the most played of which, especially at football games, are "Ten Thousand Men of Harvard" and "Harvardiana." While "Fair Harvard" is actually the alma mater, "Ten Thousand Men" is better known outside the university. The Harvard University Band performs these fight songs, and other cheers, at football and hockey games. Ten Thousand Men of Harvard is the most-frequently performed of Harvard Universitys numerous fight songs[1]. It was written by A. Putnam, class of 1918. ... Harvardiana was a periodical published in Cambridge, Massacheusetts by James Munroe and Co. ... Fair Harvard is the commencement hymn of Harvard University. ... For other uses, see Alma mater (disambiguation). ... The Harvard University Band (HUB) is the official student marching band of Harvard University. ...


Library system and museums

The Harry Elkins Widener Memorial Library.
The Harry Elkins Widener Memorial Library.

The Harvard University Library System, centered in Widener Library in Harvard Yard and comprising over 80 individual libraries and over 15 million volumes,[6] is considered the fourth largest library collection in the world, after the Library of Congress, the British Library, and the French Bibliothèque Nationale. Harvard describes its library as the "largest academic library in the world"[39] and prides itself for being the only one of the world's five "mega-libraries" to have open stacks.[7] Cabot Science Library, Lamont Library, and Widener Library are three of the most popular libraries for undergraduates to use, with easy access and central locations. There are rare books, manuscripts and other special collections throughout Harvard's libraries;[40] Houghton Library, the Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, and the Harvard University Archives consist principally of rare and unique materials. America's oldest collection of maps, gazetteers, and atlases both old and new is stored in Pusey Library and open to the public. The largest collection of East-Asian language material outside of East Asia is held in the Harvard-Yenching Library. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Harvard University Library system comprises about 90 libraries, with more than 15 million volumes. ... Old picture of the Widener Library. ... Harvard Yard in 1905. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... British Library main building, London The British Library (BL) is the national library of the United Kingdom. ... The new buildings of the library. ...


Harvard operates several arts, cultural, and scientific museums:

The Harvard University Art Museums are the Fogg Art Museum, which specializes in Western Art from the Middle Ages to the present, the Busch-Reisinger Museum, which specializes in art of Central and Northern Europe, and the Arthur M. Sackler Museum, which specializes in ancient, Islamic and Asian art. ... The Fogg Art Museum is the oldest of Harvard Universitys art museums. ... Portrait of Giovanni Arnolfini and Wife by Jan van Eyck (1434). ... The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was a group of English painters, poets and critics, founded in 1848 by John Everett Millais, Dante Gabriel Rossetti and William Holman Hunt. ... Adolphus Busch Hall is the former home of the Busch-Reisinger Museum (originally called the Germanic Museum). ... For other uses, see Sackler. ... The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology is a museum affiliated with Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... The Semitic Museum at Harvard University was founded in 1889, and moved into its present location at 6 Divinity Avenue in Cambridge, MA in 1903. ... Harvard Museum of Natural History complex The Harvard Museum of Natural History is a natural history museum on the grounds of Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... The Harvard University Herbaria (sometimes called The Botanical Museum) is a natural history museum devoted to botany. ... The Glass Flowers at Harvard, formally The Ware Collection of Blaschka Glass Models of Plants, is a famous collection at the Harvard Museum of Natural History in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... The Museum of Comparative Zoology, part of the Harvard University Museum of Natural History complex, was founded by Louis Agassiz in 1859. ... The Mineralogical and Geological Museum at Harvard is located on the grounds of Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts and is one of three museums which collectively comprise the Harvard Museum of Natural History. ... The Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts at Harvard University, in Cambridge, Massachusetts is the only building actually built by Le Corbusier in the United States, one of only two in the Americas. ... Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris, who chose to be known as Le Corbusier (October 6, 1887 – August 27, 1965), was a Swiss-born architect, designer, urbanist, writer and also painter, who is famous for his contributions to what now is called Modern Architecture. ...

Admissions

Harvard College accepted 7.1% of applicants for the class of 2012, a record low for the school's entire history. The number of acceptances was lower in 2008 partially because the university anticipated increased rates of enrollment after announcing a large increase in financial aid for 2008. For the class of 2011, Harvard accepted fewer than 9% of applicants, with a yield of 80%. US News and World Report's "America's Best Colleges 2008" ranked Harvard as the most selective undergraduate college in the United States, and second in rank of the best national universities (Princeton University ranked number one). [41] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ...


US News and World Report listed 2006 admissions percentages of 14.3% for the school of business, 4.5% for public health, 12.5% for engineering, 11.3% for law, 14.6% for education, and 4.9% for medicine.[42]. In September 2006, Harvard College announced that it would eliminate its early admissions program as of 2007, which university officials argued would lower the disadvantage that low-income and under-represented minority applicants are faced with in the competition to get into selective universities. [43] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Harvard also participates in the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU)'s University and College Accountability Network (U-CAN). Founded in 1976, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) is an organization of private US colleges and universities. ... The University and College Accountability Network (U-CAN) is a network planned to compare private colleges and universities across a wide variety of characteristics. ...


Campus

Map showing the architects and dates of construction for the buildings of the main campus near Harvard square, as of 2005. Information on other notable nearby buildings is also included.
Map showing the architects and dates of construction for the buildings of the main campus near Harvard square, as of 2005. Information on other notable nearby buildings is also included.

The main campus is centered on Harvard Yard in central Cambridge and extends into the surrounding Harvard Square neighborhood. The Harvard Business School and many of the university's athletics facilities, including Harvard Stadium, are located in Allston, on the other side of the Charles River from Harvard Square. Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, and the Harvard School of Public Health are located in the Longwood Medical and Academic Area in Boston. Harvard Yard in 1905. ... Chess players in Harvard Square in August of 2005 Harvard Square is a large triangular area in the center of Cambridge, Massachusetts, at the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue, Brattle Street, and John F. Kennedy Street. ... Harvard Stadium is a football stadium in the Allston neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. ... Allston is a diverse neighborhood in the city of Boston, Massachusetts with a population which includes Boston natives, students from neighboring Boston University, Boston College, MIT and Harvard and various ethnic groups such as Chinese, Vietnamese, Brazilian, and Irish. ... The Charles River from the Boston side, facing Cambridge and the main campus of Harvard University. ... Harvard Medical School (HMS) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Harvard School of Dental Medicine Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Harvard School of Public Health The Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) is Harvard Universitys School of Public Health. ... Longwood Medical and Academic Area (also known as Longwood Medical Area, LMA, or just Longwood) is a section of Boston with a high density of hospitals, colleges, and biomedical research centers. ... Boston redirects here. ...


Harvard Yard itself contains the central administrative offices and main libraries of the university, academic buildings including Sever Hall and University Hall, Memorial Church, and the majority of the freshman dormitories. Sophomore, junior, and senior undergraduates live in twelve residential Houses, nine of which are south of Harvard Yard along or near the Charles River. The other three are located in a residential neighborhood half a mile northwest of the Yard at the Quadrangle (commonly referred to as the Quad), which formerly housed Radcliffe College students until Radcliffe merged its residential system with Harvard. Each residential house contains rooms for undergraduates, House masters, and resident tutors, as well as a dining hall, library, and various other student facilities. Harvard Yard in 1905. ... Julio Pérez Ferrero Library - Cúcuta, Colombia A modern-style library in Chambéry A library is a collection of information, sources, resources, and services: it is organized for use and maintained by a public body, an institution, or a private individual. ... Sever Hall, east facade. ... University Hall, east facade. ... This is a list of dormitories at Harvard College. ... Harvard Yard Harvard College is the undergraduate section and oldest school of Harvard University, a private university in the United States, founded in 1636 by the Massachusetts legislature. ... The Charles River from the Boston side, facing Cambridge and the main campus of Harvard University. ... The Quadrangle, looking north toward Pforzheimer House. ... Radcliffe College was a liberal arts womens college in Cambridge, Massachusetts, closely associated with Harvard University. ...


Radcliffe Yard, formerly the center of the campus of Radcliffe College (and now home of the Radcliffe Institute), is adjacent to the Graduate School of Education.

Memorial Church

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (480x640, 151 KB) Summary Memorial Church, Harvard Yard. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (480x640, 151 KB) Summary Memorial Church, Harvard Yard. ...

Satellite facilities

Apart from its major Cambridge/Allston and Longwood campuses, Harvard owns and operates Arnold Arboretum, in the Jamaica Plain area of Boston; the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, in Washington, D.C.; the Harvard Forest in Petersham Mass; and the Villa I Tatti research center in Florence, Italy. The Arnold Arboretum is one of the worlds finest research arboretums. ... Soldiers Monument and First Church in Jamaica Plain Unitarian Universalist Jamaica Plain, commonly known as JP, is a historic neighborhood of 4. ... Dumbarton Oaks mansion. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Florence (or Firenze, Florentia and Fiorenza) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany, and of the province of Florence. ...


Major campus expansion

Throughout the past several years, Harvard has purchased large tracts of land in Allston, a walk across the Charles River from Cambridge, with the intent of major expansion southward.[44] The university now owns approximately fifty percent more land in Allston than in Cambridge. Various proposals to connect the traditional Cambridge campus with the new Allston campus include new and enlarged bridges, a shuttle service and/or a tram. Ambitious plans also call for sinking part of Storrow Drive (at Harvard's expense) for replacement with park land and pedestrian access to the Charles River, as well as the construction of bike paths, and an intently planned fabric of buildings throughout the Allston campus. The institution asserts that such expansion will benefit not only the school, but surrounding community, pointing to such features as the enhanced transit infrastructure, possible shuttles open to the public, and park space which will also be publicly accessible. Allston is a diverse neighborhood in the city of Boston, Massachusetts with a population which includes Boston natives, students from neighboring Boston University, Boston College, MIT and Harvard and various ethnic groups such as Chinese, Vietnamese, Brazilian, and Irish. ... This article refers to public transport vehicles running on rails. ... James Jackson Storrow Memorial Drive (usually referred to as Storrow Drive) is a parkway in the city of Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Charles River from the Boston side, facing Cambridge and the main campus of Harvard University. ...


One of the foremost driving forces for Harvard's pending expansion is its goal of substantially increasing the scope and strength of its science and technology programs. The university plans to construct two 500,000 square foot (50,000 m²) research complexes in Allston, which would be home to several interdisciplinary programs, including the Harvard Stem Cell Institute and an enlarged Engineering department. Engineering is the discipline and profession of applying scientific knowledge and utilizing natural laws and physical resources in order to design and implement materials, structures, machines, devices, systems, and processes that realize a desired objective and meet specified criteria. ...


In addition, Harvard intends to relocate the Harvard Graduate School of Education and the Harvard School of Public Health to Allston. The university also plans to construct several new undergraduate and graduate student housing centers in Allston, and it is considering large-scale museums and performing arts complexes as well. Harvard Graduate School of Education The Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University, and is considered by many as one of the top education schools in the United States. ... Harvard School of Public Health The Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) is Harvard Universitys School of Public Health. ...


Sustainability

In 2000, Harvard hired a full-time campus sustainability professional and launched the Harvard Green Campus Initiative (HGCI).[45] With a full-time staff of 25, dozens of student interns, and a $12 million Loan Fund for energy and water conservation projects, HGCI is one of the most advanced campus sustainability programs in the country. [46] Harvard was one of only six universities to receive a grade of “A-” from the Sustainable Endowments Institute on its College Sustainability Report Card 2008, the highest grade awarded.[47] The Earth Day flag includes a NASA photo of the Earth. ...


Notable student organizations

A longer list of Harvard student groups can be found under Harvard College. Harvard Yard Harvard College is the undergraduate section and oldest school of Harvard University, a private university in the United States, founded in 1636 by the Massachusetts legislature. ...

  • The Harvard Crimson is one of America's oldest daily university newspapers. Founded in 1873, it counts among its many editors numerous Pulitzer Prize winners and two U.S. Presidents, John F. Kennedy and Franklin D. Roosevelt.
  • The Harvard International Relations Council includes several famous student organizations, including the Harvard International Review, Harvard Model United Nations, and its Harvard National Model United Nations. The HIR has 35,000 readers in more than 70 countries, regularly features prominent scholars and policymakers from around the globe. HMUN is the oldest and most prestigious high-school-level Model United Nations simulation in the world, having begun as a League of Nations simulation in the 1920s. HNMUN is similarly the longest-running college-level simulation in the world and among the largest in the United States. The IRC has the most members of any Harvard student organization.
  • The Harvard Lampoon is an undergraduate humor organization and publication founded in 1876 and rival to the Harvard Crimson and counts among its former members Robert Benchley, John Updike, George Plimpton, Steve O'Donnell, Mark O'Donnell, and Andy Borowitz. This sporadically issued rag was originally modelled on the British magazine of satire, Punch, and has now outlived it, becoming the world's second-oldest humor magazine after the Yale Record. Conan O'Brien was president of the Lampoon during his last two undergraduate years. (The National Lampoon was founded as an offshoot in 1970 from the Harvard publication.)
The Harvard Lampoon "castle" with its characteristic rooftop ibis and its purple and yellow door
The Harvard Lampoon "castle" with its characteristic rooftop ibis and its purple and yellow door
  • The Harvard Advocate (founded 1866) is the nation's oldest college literary magazine. Past members include Theodore Roosevelt, T. S. Eliot, and Mary Jo Salter.
  • The Harvard Salient [12] is the campus's biweekly conservative magazine, whose past editors include many prominent conservative thinkers and journalists.
  • The Harvard Glee Club (founded 1858) is the oldest college choir in the country and the oldest men's chorus in the world; the Harvard University Choir is the oldest university-affiliated choir in the country; and the Harvard-Radcliffe Orchestra (founded 1808), technically older than the New York Philharmonic, though it has only been a symphony orchestra for about half of its existence. The Bach Society Orchestra of Harvard University is a chamber orchestra that is staffed, managed, and conducted entirely by students.
  • The Harvard University Band (founded 1919) is a non-traditional, student-run marching band, notable for being a scramble band. The Harvard Wind Ensemble, the Harvard Summer Pops Band, and the Harvard Jazz Bands also fall under the umbrella organization of HUB.
  • The Hasty Pudding Theatricals (founded 1844) is a theatrical society known for its burlesque musicals and annual "Man of the Year" and "Woman of the Year" ceremonies; past members include Alan Jay Lerner, Jack Lemmon, and John Lithgow.
  • WHRB (95.3 FM Cambridge), the campus radio station, is run exclusively by Harvard students out of the basement of Pennypacker Hall, a freshman dorm. Known throughout the Boston metropolitan area for its classical, jazz, underground rock and hip-hop, and blues programming, especially its reading period "orgies", when the entire oeuvre of a particular composer, orchestra, band, or artist is played without commercial break, sometimes for several days in succession, to give the station's DJs a chance to catch up on their studies before the semester's final exams.
  • The Harvard Undergraduate Council (UC), Harvard College's student government, is a prominent voice on campus on behalf of the student body. Though subject to criticism and scrutiny, the Undergraduate Council is regarded as one of the most active and professional of college student governments.
  • The Harvard Institute of Politics is a living memorial to President Kennedy that promotes public service among undergraduates by sponsoring non-credit courses and workshops and internships in the public sector.
  • The Phillips Brooks House Association (PBHA)[48] is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization serves as the umbrella organization for dozens of community service and social change programs at Harvard. PBHA has 1600 volunteers who serve over 10,000 people in the greater Boston area. Notable alumni include Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Roger Nash Baldwin, Robert Coles, and David Souter.
  • Harvard Student Agencies[49] is the largest student-run corporation in the world, with revenues of $6 million in 2006.[50]. Notable alumni include Thomas Stemberg, founder of Staples, Inc.
  • Harvard Model Congress is the nation's oldest and largest congressional simulation conference, providing thousands of high school students from across the U.S. and abroad with the opportunity to experience participatory American democracy first-hand.
  • The Harvard Foundation for Intercultural and Race Relations, founded in 1981, acts an umbrella organization for all cultural groups on campus. It seeks to create awareness about diversity at Harvard and facilitates intercultural and interracial dialogue and relations.
  • Canaveral Club, started by the 1890 College graduating class, is a gun and hunting club at Cape Canaveral, Florida, founded by C.B. Horton and George H. Reed of Boston.
  • Harvard/MIT Cooperative Society is a cooperative bookstore that includes undergraduates on its board of directors.
  • Veritas Records (named after the Harvard motto) is a student run record label founded by Dan Zaccagnino '05 and Matthew Siegel '05. To date, Veritas Records has released three full length compilation albums. One of the artists featured on the label, DJ Shiftee, went on to win the title of DMC World Supremacy Champion in 2007. Chester French, a band featured on the compilations, is now signed to Creative Artists Agency (CAA), the largest talent agency in the world. Mantis Evar is on the Board of Advisors for Veritas, and acts as executive producer and mastering engineer on many of the projects. Dan, Matt, and Mantis founded the social collaborative website Indaba Music, which launched in February 2007.

The Harvard Crimson, of Harvard University, is the United States oldest continuously published daily college newspaper. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... FDR redirects here. ... The Harvard International Review is a quarterly journal of international relations published by the Harvard International Relations Council, Inc. ... Harvard University runs Model United Nations simulations at both the high school and college-level. ... Harvard National Model United Nations or HNMUN is the longest running Model United Nations in the world and among the largest in the United States. ... A Model United Nations Conference in Stuttgart, Germany in action. ... 1939–1941 semi-official emblem Anachronous world map in 1920–1945, showing the League of Nations and the world Capital Not applicable¹ Language(s) English, French and Spanish Political structure International organization Secretary-general  - 1920–1933 Sir James Eric Drummond  - 1933–1940 Joseph Avenol  - 1940–1946 Seán Lester Historical... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Robert Charles Benchley (September 15, 1889 – November 21, 1945) was an American humorist best known for his work as a newspaper columnist and film actor. ... John Hoyer Updike (born March 18, 1932 in Shillington, Pennsylvania) is an American novelist, poet, short story writer and literary critic. ... George Ames Plimpton (March 18, 1927 – September 25, 2003) was an American journalist, writer, editor, and actor. ... Steve ODonnell (or Stephen, or Steven) may refer to: Steve ODonnell, television writer (Late Night with David Letterman, The Simpsons, Seinfeld) Steve ODonnell, television and film actor (The Comic Strip Presents. ... Andy Borowitz (born January 4, 1958) is a comedian and satirist who won the first-ever National Press Club award for humor. ... Look up punch in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Yale Record is the campus humor magazine of Yale University. ... Conan Christopher OBrien (born April 18, 1963) is an Emmy Award-winning American television host and comedian, best known as host of NBCs Late Night with Conan OBrien. ... January 1973 cover of National Lampoon National Lampoon was an American humor magazine that began in 1970 as an offshoot of the Harvard Lampoon. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (709x1003, 139 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (709x1003, 139 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Harvard Advocate, the premier literary magazine of Harvard College, is the oldest continuously published college literary magazine in the United States. ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Thomas Eliot, see Thomas Eliot (disambiguation). ... Mary Jo Salter (1954 - ) is an American poet, a coeditor of The Norton Anthology of Poetry [1] and is the Emily Dickinson Senior Lecturer in the Humanities at Mount Holyoke College. ... The Harvard Salient is a fortnightly publication of conservative opinion on the Harvard University campus of Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Harvard Glee Club logo The Harvard Glee Club is a 60-voice, all-male choral ensemble at Harvard University. ... The Harvard University Choir, more commonly referred to as the University Choir or simply UChoir, is the oldest university choir in the nation and has been providing choral music in the Harvard Memorial Church for over 170 years. ... The Harvard-Radcliffe Orchestra, or HRO, is the oldest symphony orchestra in the United States. ... The New York Philharmonic is the oldest active symphony orchestra in the United States, organized during 1842. ... The Bach Society Orchestra is Harvards premier chamber orchestra. ... The Harvard University Band (HUB) is the official student marching band of Harvard University. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... The Hasty Pudding Theatricals, known informally simply as The Pudding, is a theatrical student society at Harvard University, known for its burlesque musicals and for its status as the oldest collegiate theatrical organization in the United States. ... For other uses, see Burlesque (disambiguation). ... The Black Crook (1866), considered by some historians to be the first musical[1] Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ... The Hasty Pudding Man of the Year award is bestowed annually by the Hasty Pudding Theatricals society at Harvard University. ... The Hasty Pudding Woman of the Year award is bestowed annually by the Hasty Pudding Theatricals society at Harvard University. ... Alan Jay Lerner (August 31, 1918 – June 14, 1986) was an American Broadway lyricist and librettist. ... John Uhler Lemmon III (February 8, 1925 – June 27, 2001), better known as Jack Lemmon, was a two-time Academy Award and Cannes Award-winning American actor and comedian. ... This article is about the actor. ... WHRB is a commercial FM radio station in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Boston redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Kennedy family and its friends founded Harvards Institute of Politics (IOP) to serve as a living memorial to President John F. Kennedy shortly after his death. ... Phillips Brooks House Association (PBHA) is a student-run, staff supported public service/social action organization at Harvard College providing a variety of services to the Greater Boston community. ... 501(c)(3) is a provision of the US tax code that provides exempt status, for Federal income tax purposes, for some non-profit organizations in the United States (see 26 U.S.C. Â§ 501(c)(3)). The term refers to: Section 501. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... Roger Nash Baldwin (January 21, 1884 – August 26, 1981) was one of the founders of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). ... Robert Coles (b. ... For the Australian artist, see David Henry Souter. ... Harvard Model Congress is the oldest and largest congressional simulation conference in the world, providing high school students from across the U.S. and abroad with an opportunity to experience American government first-hand. ... This article is about the area of Florida. ... Co-op redirects here. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... In the music industry, a record label can be a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... A compilation album is an album (music or spoken-word) featuring tracks from one or multiple recording artists, often culled from a variety of sources (such as studio albums, live albums, singles, demos and outtakes. ... Creative Artists Agency (CAA) is a talent and literary agency which represents a vast array of actors, musicians, writers, directors, and athletes, as well as a variety of companies and their products. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ...

Notable people

Seventy-five Nobel Prize winners are affiliated with the university. Since 1974, nineteen Nobel Prize winners and fifteen winners of the American literary award, the Pulitzer Prize, have served on the Harvard faculty. The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ...

Further information: Nobel Prize laureates by university affiliation

The following list provides information on nobel laureates and their affiliation to academic institutions. ... The list of Harvard University people includes notable graduates, professors and administrators affiliated with Harvard University. ... The President is the chief administrator of Harvard University. ... This is a list of notable people who attended Harvard University, but did not graduate or have yet to graduate. ...

Harvard in fiction and popular culture

Harvard's central place in American elite circles has made it the setting for many novels, plays, films and other cultural works. For other uses, see Elite (disambiguation). ...


Love Story, by Harvard alumnus (and Yale classics professor) Erich Segal, the much-loved and -ridiculed tear jerker of 1970, concerns a romance between a wealthy Harvard pre-law hockey player (Ryan O'Neal) and a brilliant Radcliffe student of musicology on scholarship (Ali MacGraw). Both novel and movie are deeply imbued with Cambridge color.[51] One enduring Harvard tradition in recent years has been the annual screening of Love Story to incoming freshmen, during which members of the Crimson Key Society, the tour-giving organization on campus, make catcalls and other offerings of mock abuse. Other works of Erich Segal, The Class (1985) and Doctors (1988) also featured the leading characters as Harvard students. Love Story is a 1970 romantic drama film written by Erich Segal based on his 1970 best-selling novel, and directed by Arthur Hiller. ... Erich Wolf Segal (born June 16, 1937 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American author, screenwriter, and educator. ... Ryan ONeal (born Patrick Ryan ONeal on April 20, 1941 in Los Angeles, California) is an Oscar-nominated American actor. ... Alice MacGraw (born April 1, 1938 in Pound Ridge, Westchester County, New York) is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe award winning American actress. ... Erich Wolf Segal (born June 16, 1937 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American author, screenwriter, and educator. ... The Class is Erich Segals 6th novel, his best-loved work [], that came up in the year 1985. ...


Harvard has been featured in many U.S. films, including Stealing Harvard, Legally Blonde, Gilmore Girls, The Firm, The Paper Chase, Good Will Hunting, With Honors, How High, Soul Man, and Harvard Man. Since the filming of Love Story in the 1960s the university, until the summer of 2007 filming of The Great Debaters did not allow any movies to be filmed in campus buildings; most films are shot in look-alike cities, such as Toronto, and colleges such as UCLA, Wheaton and Bridgewater State, although outdoor and aerial shots of Harvard's Cambridge campus are often used.[52]. Legally Blonde filmed the area in front of Harvard's Widener Library but declined to use actual Harvard Students for extras because they were deemed to not be "Harvard enough" due to their non-preppy attire. The shot used extras dressed to look like "Harvard students" instead.[53] The graduation scene from With Honors was filmed in front of Foellinger Auditorium at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Stealing Harvard is a 2002 film, directed by Bruce McCulloch, about man who resorts to crime to pay for his nieces Harvard tuition. ... Legally Blonde is a 2001 comedy film starring Reese Witherspoon, produced by Marc E. Platt for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios and directed by Robert Luketic. ... Gilmore Girls is a long-running, Emmy Award winning, and Golden Globe nominated American television drama/comedy created by Amy Sherman-Palladino and starring Lauren Graham and Alexis Bledel. ... This article is about the 1993 film. ... The Paper Chase was a 1970 novel, as well as a 1973 movie based on the novel and a television series based on the movie. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... With Honors (1994) is a comedy-drama starring Joe Pesci and Brendan Fraser. ... See also: How High Soundtrack How High is a 2001 comedy film, directed by Jesse Dylan, which is a feature film debut for him. ... Soul Man is a comedy movie made in 1986 about a man who undergoes transracial transformation with pills to qualify for an affirmative action placement at Harvard Law School. ... Harvard Man is a 2001 feature film written and directed by James Toback. ... Love Story is a 1970 romantic drama film written by Erich Segal based on his 1970 best-selling novel, and directed by Arthur Hiller. ... The Great Debaters is a 2007 film produced by Oprah Winfreys Harpo Productions, based on an article about the Wiley College debate team by Tony Scherman written for American Legacy for its 97 Spring issue. ... Binomial name Ucla xenogrammus Holleman, 1993 The largemouth triplefin, Ucla xenogrammus, is a fish of the family Tripterygiidae and only member of the genus Ucla, found in the Pacific Ocean from Viet Nam, the Philippines, Palau and the Caroline Islands to Papua New Guinea, Australia (including Christmas Island), and the... Wheaton College is a four-year, private liberal arts college with an approximate student body of 1,620. ... Bridgewater State College is a public liberal arts college located in Bridgewater, Massachusetts. ... Legally Blonde is a 2001 comedy film starring Reese Witherspoon, produced by Marc E. Platt for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios and directed by Robert Luketic. ... A Corner of Main Quad The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC, U of I, or simply Illinois), is the oldest, largest, and most prestigious campus in the University of Illinois system. ...


Numerous novels are set at Harvard or feature characters with Harvard connections. Robert Langdon, the main character in Dan Brown's novels The Da Vinci Code and Angels and Demons, is described as a Harvard "professor of symbology", (although "symbology" is not the name of an actual academic discipline). [54] The protagonist of Pamela Thomas-Graham's series of mystery novels (Blue Blood, Orange Crushed, and A Darker Shade Of Crimson) is an African-American Harvard professor. Prominent novels with Harvard students as protagonists include William Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury and Elizabeth Wurtzel's Prozac Nation. Douglas Preston's ex-CIA agent Wyman Ford is a Harvard alumnus. Ford appears in the novels Tyrannosaur Canyon and Blasphemy. Much of the action in Margaret Atwood's post-apocalyptic novel The Handmaid's Tale takes place in Cambridge, with vaguely-recognizable Harvard landmarks occasionally making their way into the narrator's place descriptions. Dan Brown (born June 22, 1964) is an American author of thriller fiction, best known for the 2003 bestselling novel, The Da Vinci Code. ... The Da Vinci Code is a mystery/detective novel by American author Dan Brown, published in 2003 by Doubleday. ... Wikibooks has a book on the topic of Angels and Demons Angels and Demons (Angels & Demons) is a bestselling mystery novel by Dan Brown. ... William Cuthbert Faulkner (born William Falkner), (September 25, 1897–July 6, 1962) was an American author. ... The Sound and the Fury is a Southern Gothic novel written by American author William Faulkner, which makes use of the stream of consciousness narrative technique pioneered by European authors such as James Joyce and Virginia Woolf. ... Elizabeth Lee Wurtzel (born July 31, 1967 in New York City) is an American writer and journalist famous for her work in the confessional memoir genre. ... Prozac Nation (sub-titled Young and Depressed in America : A Memoir) is an autobiography published in 1994 and written by Elizabeth Wurtzel. ... Douglas Preston (born 1956 in Cambridge, Massachusetts) is an author of several techno-thriller and horror novels with Lincoln Child. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... Tyrannosaur Canyon is a 2005 novel by Douglas Preston. ... Blasphemy is a novel by Douglas Preston scheduled to be released on January 8, 2008. ... Margaret Eleanor Atwood, OC (born November 18, 1939) is a Canadian writer. ... Apocalyptic science fiction is a sub-genre of science fiction that is concerned with the end of the world or civilization, through nuclear war, plague, or some other general disaster. ... The Handmaids Tale is a dystopian novel by Canadian author Margaret Atwood, first published by McClelland and Stewart in 1985. ...


Also set at Harvard is the Korean hit TV series Love Story in Harvard,[55] filmed at University of Southern California. American television's fictional Harvard graduates include Gilligan's Island's resident aristocrat Thurston Howell, III, played by Jim Backus, and M*A*S*H's pompous Boston Brahmin, Major Charles Emerson Winchester III, played by David Ogden Stiers. Ivory Tower is a student-produced Harvard-Radcliffe Television show[56] about fictional Harvard students. Love Story in Harvard (Korean language: 러브스토리 인 하버드) is a romantic 16-episode Korean drama television series broadcast in 2004. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... For the NES (Nintendo Entertainment System) video game, see The Adventures of Gilligans Island. ... James Gilmore Backus (February 25, 1913 in Cleveland, Ohio - July 3, 1989 In Los Angeles, California) was a radio, television, film actor, character actor, and voice actor. ... M*A*S*H is an American television series developed by Larry Gelbart, inspired by the 1968 novel MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors by Richard Hooker (penname for H. Richard Hornberger) and its sequels, but primarily by the 1970 film MASH, and influenced by the 1961 novel Catch... Major Charles Emerson Winchester III is a principal character on the television series, M*A*S*H, played by David Ogden Stiers. ... David Ogden Stiers (born October 31, 1942) is an American character actor, voice actor and musician, most noted for his role in the television sitcom M*A*S*H, and the science fiction drama The Dead Zone. ... Ivory Tower is a long-running college soap opera. ...


Professors Dr. Richard Alpert and Dr. Timothy Leary were fired from Harvard in May of 1963. Popular opinion attributes their discharge to their activism involving psychedelics, and the popularization and dispensation of psilocybin to students. Ram Dass at the Hanuman Temple in Taos, New Mexico, September 2004 Dr. Richard Alpert (born 1933), later known as Baba Ram Dass, was a professor of psychology at Harvard University who became well known for his controversial research program which studied the effects of LSD. Alpert worked closely with... For the American baseball player, see Tim Leary (baseball player). ... Psilocybin (also known as psilocybine) is a psychedelic alkaloid of the tryptamine family, found in psilocybin mushrooms. ...


Views of Harvard

In 1893, Baedeker's guidebook called Harvard "the oldest, richest, and most famous of American seats of learning."[57] The first two facts remain true today; the third is also arguably true. As of 2007, Harvard has been ranked first among world universities every time since the publications of the THES - QS World University Rankings[58] and the Academic Ranking of World Universities. The 2007 U.S. News & World Report rankings place Harvard in second place among "National Universities," behind Princeton University.[59] Karl Baedeker (not Baedecker) (3 November 1801 - 4 October 1859) was a publisher whose company set the standard for authoritative guidebooks for tourists. ... The THES - QS World University Rankings is an annual publication of university rankings around the world, published by The Times Higher Education Supplement (THES) and Quacquarelli Symonds (QS). ... // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ...


Harvard is the target of a number of criticisms, some of them leveled by other research-based American universities. It has been accused of grade inflation, as have other colleges and universities.[60] A review of the SAT scores of entering students at Harvard over the past two decades shows that the rise in GPAs has been matched by a linear rise in both verbal and math SAT scores of entering students (even after correcting for the renorming of the test in the mid-1990s), suggesting that the quality of the student body and its motivation have also increased.[61] Regardless, after media criticism, Harvard reduced the number of students who receive Latin honors from 90% in 2004 to 60% in 2005. Moreover, the prestigious honors of "John Harvard Scholar" and "Harvard College Scholar" will now be given only to the top 5 percent and the next 5 percent of each class — essentially, those with a GPA of 3.8 or above.[62][63][64][65] Grade inflation is an issue in U.S. education and in GCSEs in England and Wales. ...


The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, The New York Times, and some students have criticized Harvard for its reliance on teaching fellows for some aspects of undergraduate education; they consider this to adversely affect the quality of education.[66][67] The New York Times article also detailed that the problem was prevalent in some other Ivy League schools. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching is an international centre for research in education based in the United States of America. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... A teaching assistant (TA) is a junior scholar employed on a temporary contract by a college or university for the purpose of assisting a professor by teaching students in recitation or discussion sessions, holding office hours, grading homework or exams, supervising labs (in science and engineering courses), and sometimes teaching...


In 2005, The Boston Globe reported obtaining a 21-page Harvard internal memorandum that expressed concern about undergraduate student satisfaction based on a 2002 Consortium on Financing Higher Education (COFHE) survey of 31 top universities.[68] The Globe presented COFHE survey results and quotes from Harvard students that suggest problems with faculty availability, quality of instruction, quality of advising, social life on campus, and sense of community dating back to at least 1994. The magazine section of the Harvard Crimson echoed similar academic and social criticisms.[69][70] The Harvard Crimson quoted Harvard College Dean Benedict Gross as being aware of and committed to improving the issues raised by the COFHE survey.[71] Former Harvard President Larry Summers stated: "I think the single most important issue is faculty-student engagement, where there is too large a fraction of our teaching that takes place in sections taught by graduate students. Too much of it takes place in large lectures, where faculty members don't know students' names. And too little of it involves the kind of active learning experience, whether it's in a laboratory, a debate in a class, or whether it's a seminar dialogue, or whether it's joint work in an archives."[72] COFHE is an acronym for The Consortium on Financing Higher Education. ...


Similar types of criticism have been directed at some other large research universities. In addition, some observers do not consider large class sizes in Core Curriculum courses to be an impediment to learning. Professor of Government Michael Sandel, who teaches a popular course called "Justice" with nearly 900 students, has stated that "the large class size actually helps foster learning. So many students are reading the same texts and wrestling with the same moral dilemmas, the discussion continues outside the classroom."[73]


Harvard has one of the highest alumni giving rates.[74]


The undergraduate admissions office's preference for children of alumni policies have been the subject of scrutiny and debate.[75] Under new financial aid guidelines, parents in families with incomes of less than $60,000 will no longer be expected to contribute any money to the cost of attending Harvard for their children, including room and board. Families with incomes in the $60,000 to $80,000 range contribute an amount of only a few thousand dollars a year. In December 2007, Harvard announced that families earning between $120,000 and $180,000 will only have to pay up to 10% of their annual household income towards tuition.[citation needed] Legacy preferences or legacy admission is a type of preference given by educational institutions to certain applicants on the basis of their familial relationship to alumni of that institution. ...


Harvard and its students have also been criticized for self-promotion in various forms. In "A Flood of Crimson Ink,"[76] Steinberger asserts that one reason Harvard receives much attention from the press is because "Harvard graduates are disproportionately represented in the upper echelons of American journalism."


Harvard also participates in the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU)'s University and College Accountability Network (U-CAN). Founded in 1976, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) is an organization of private US colleges and universities. ... The University and College Accountability Network (U-CAN) is a network planned to compare private colleges and universities across a wide variety of characteristics. ...


Further reading

  • John T. Bethell, Harvard Observed: An Illustrated History of the University in the Twentieth Century, Harvard University Press, 1998, ISBN 0-674-37733-8
  • John Trumpbour, ed., How Harvard Rules. Reason in the Service of Empire, Boston: South End Press, 1989, ISBN 0-89608-283-0
  • Hoerr, John, We Can't Eat Prestige: The Women Who Organized Harvard; Temple University Press, 1997, ISBN 1-56639-535-6
  • Story, R. The Forging of an Aristocracy: Harvard and the Boston Upper Class,1800-1870, Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1981

See also

The Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD) is a graduate school at Harvard University offering degrees in Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Urban Planning and Design. ... Harvard Medical School (HMS) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Harvard School of Dental Medicine Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Harvard School of Public Health The Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) is Harvard Universitys School of Public Health. ... Harvard Business School, officially named the Harvard Business School: George F. Baker Foundation, and also known as HBS, is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Harvard Divinity School is one of the constituent schools of Harvard University, located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in the United States. ... The Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Science (HSEAS or SEAS), a school within Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS), serves as the connector and integrator of Harvard’s teaching and research efforts in engineering, applied sciences, and technology. ... Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Harvard Extension School (HES), one of the twelve degree-granting schools of Harvard University, was founded by university President A. Lawrence Lowell in 1909[1]. The school was originally an academic program designed to serve the educational interests and needs of the greater Boston community. ... Harvard Graduate School of Education The Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University, and is considered by many as one of the top education schools in the United States. ... The John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University (colloquially known as the Kennedy School, Harvard Kennedy School and HKS[1]) is a public policy and public administration school, and one of Harvards graduate and professional schools. ... The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS) is the academic unit responsible for many post-baccalaureate degree programs offered through the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University. ... Harvard Yard Harvard College is the undergraduate section and oldest school of Harvard University, a private university in the United States, founded in 1636 by the Massachusetts legislature. ... Radcliffe College was a liberal arts womens college in Cambridge, Massachusetts, closely associated with Harvard University. ... As the oldest university in the United States, Harvard University has a long tradition of academic dress. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

References

  1. ^ Appearing as it does on the coat of arms itself, Veritas is not a motto in the usual heraldic sense. Properly speaking, rather, the motto is Christo et Ecclesiae ("for Christ and the church") which appears in impressions of the university's seal; but this legend is otherwise not used today, while 'veritas' has widespread currency as a de facto university motto.
  2. ^ a b An appropriation of £400 toward a "school or college" was voted on October 28, 1636 (OS), at a meeting which initially convened on September 8 and was adjourned to October 28. Some sources consider October 28, 1636 (OS) (November 7, 1636 NS) to be the date of founding. In 1936, Harvard's multi-day tercentenary celebration considered September 18 to be the 300-year anniversary of the founding. (The bicentennial was celebrated on September 8, 1836, apparently ignoring the calendar change; and the tercentenary celebration began by opening a package sealed by Josiah Quincy at the bicentennial). Sources: meeting dates, Quincy, Josiah (1860). History of Harvard University. 117 Washington Street, Boston: Crosby, Nichols, Lee and Co.. , p. 586, "At a Court holden September 8th, 1636 and continued by adjournment to the 28th of the 8th month (October, 1636)... the Court agreed to give £400 towards a School or College, whereof £200 to be paid next year...." Tercentenary dates: "Cambridge Birthday". Time Magazine (1936-09-28). Retrieved on 2006-09-08.: "Harvard claims birth on the day the Massachusetts Great and General Court convened to authorize its founding. This was Sept. 8, 1636 under the Julian calendar. Allowing for the ten-day advance of the Gregorian calendar, Tercentenary officials arrived at Sept. 18 as the date for the third and last big Day of the celebration;" "on Oct. 28, 1636 ... £400 for that 'school or college' [was voted by] the Great and General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony." Bicentennial date: Marvin Hightower (2003-09-02). "Harvard Gazette: This Month in Harvard History". Harvard University. Retrieved on 2006-09-15., "Sept. 8, 1836 - Some 1,100 to 1,300 alumni flock to Harvard's Bicentennial, at which a professional choir premieres "Fair Harvard." ... guest speaker Josiah Quincy Jr., Class of 1821, makes a motion, unanimously adopted, 'that this assembly of the Alumni be adjourned to meet at this place on the 8th of September, 1936.'" Tercentary opening of Quincy's sealed package: The New York Times, September 9, 1936, p. 24, "Package Sealed in 1836 Opened at Harvard. It Held Letters Written at Bicentenary": "September 8th, 1936: As the first formal function in the celebration of Harvard's tercentenary, the Harvard Alumni Association witnessed the opening by President Conant of the 'mysterious' package sealed by President Josiah Quincy at the Harvard bicentennial in 1836."
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ (See: Harvard Corporation)Rudolph, Frederick [1961] (1990). The American College and University. Athens, Georgia: University of Georgia Press, 3. ISBN 0820312843.  With regard to age, several institutions founded in the mid-1700s have a difference of opinion over relative position, but none today explicitly challenges Harvard's "oldest" position. One possible challenger is Georgetown University, whose founding date is debated. In the past the university has taken 1634 as the date of its foundation (two years before that of Harvard),[2] this being the year that Jesuit education began on the site.[3] [4] It was not until 1789, however, the founding date currently recognized by the university, that the name Georgetown was taken for the institution. Another potential claimant, the College of William and Mary, describes itself, and is described by supporters, as "America's second-oldest college" and gives its year of "founding" as 1693[5]. A page of its website states, "The College of William & Mary... was the first college planned for the United States. Its roots go back to the College proposed at Henrico in 1619...." but notes that "The College is second only to Harvard University in actual operation."[6]. See Henricus for the University of Henrico, and Colonial colleges for a summary of relevant institutional dates. Unqualified characterizations of Harvard as "oldest" abound. The 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica article on Harvard University which opens with the line "HARVARD UNIVERSITY, the oldest of American educational institutions" (Volume 13, HAR-HUR, p. 38; also [7]). Baedeker's United States, in 1893 called Harvard "the oldest... of American seats of learning." Harvard's own choice of words is "Harvard University... is the oldest institution of higher learning in the United States."[8], thus recognizing the fact that fifteen universities existed in the Spanish dominions in the Americas, from Mexico to Cordoba in Argentina and Santiago in Chile.
  5. ^ Schwager, Sally (2004). "Taking up the Challenge: The Origins of Radcliffe", in Laurel Thatcher Ulrich (ed.): Yards and Gates: Gender in Harvard and Radcliffe History. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN 1403960984. 
  6. ^ a b See the FAQ on the Harvard-Google partnership.
  7. ^ a b "Speaking Volumes: Professor Sidney Verba Champions the University Library" (1998-02-26). Harvard Gazette. The President and Fellows of Harvard College. Retrieved on 2007-02-19. 
  8. ^ See the ranked list of U.S. libraries from the American Library Association.
  9. ^ Harvard Charter of 1650, Harvard University Archives, harvard.edu
  10. ^ Baltzell, D. E. & Schneiderman, H. G. (1994). Judgment and Sensibility: Religion and Stratification." Transaction Publishers, ISBN 1-56000-048-1. The material cited is a review of a book by Ronald Story (1980), The Forging of an Aristocracy: Harvard and the Boston Upper Class, 1800-1870, Wesleyan University Press, ISBN 0-8195-5044-2.
  11. ^ Story, R. (1980). The Forging of an Aristocracy: Harvard and the Boston Upper Class, 1800-1870. Wesleyan University Press, ISBN 0-8195-5044-2 (p. 50: Harvard's explosive growth from 1800 to 1850 separate it from other colleges)
  12. ^ Story, R. (1980). op. cit. p. 97, (1815-1855 as the era when Harvard began to be perceived as socially advantageous)
  13. ^ Steinberg, S. (2001). The Ethnic Myth. Beacon Press, ISBN 0-8070-4153-X. (Harvard most democratic of the Big Three under Eliot, p. 234)
  14. ^ Wister, Owen (1914). Philosophy 4. The Macmillan Company. , p. 23: "had colonial names;" p. 36, "Bertie's and Billy's parents owned town and country houses in New York. The parents of Oscar had come over in the steerage. Money filled the pockets of Bertie and Billy; therefore were their heads empty of money and full of less cramping thoughts. Oscar had fallen upon the reverse of this fate. Calculation was his second nature." 'Philosophy 4, by Owen Wister, available at Project Gutenberg.
  15. ^ Steinberg, Stephen (1977). The Academic Melting Pot: Catholics and Jews in American Higher Education. Transaction Publishers. ISBN 0-87855-635-4.  pp. 21-23; quotes full text policy announcement, explains the openness by suggesting Lowell perceived his actions to be forthright and courageous and as motivated by a wish to restrict the growth of campus anti-semitism.
  16. ^ Kaufman, Myron (1957). Remember Me to God. Philadelphia: J. P. Lippincott Co.. 
  17. ^ Levenson, Michael (2006), "Brandeis pulls artwork...." The Boston Globe, May 3, 2006:"Brandeis, a nonsectarian institution, was founded in 1948, by American Jews seeking to establish a university free from the quotas that Jews faced at elite colleges."
  18. ^ Wright, W. (2005). Harvard's Secret Court: The Savage 1920 Purge of Campus Homosexuals, St. Martin's Press, New York. ISBN 0-312-32271-2.
  19. ^ Malcolm Gladwell. (2005). Getting In. The New Yorker, October 10, 2005
  20. ^ Malka A. Older. (1996). Preparatory schools and the admissions process. The Harvard Crimson, January 24, 1996
  21. ^ Associated Press. (2004). In first, Harvard admits more women than men as undergraduates. The Boston Globe, April 1, 2004
  22. ^ O'Brien, R. D. (2004). Kerry Tops Crimson Poll. The Harvard Crimson, October 29, 2004.
  23. ^ "Harvard College Denies transfer students after housing shortage".
  24. ^ "Transfers Crowded Out".
  25. ^ "Harvard adopts Princeton's no-transfer policy".
  26. ^ "Harvard’s decision to eliminate transfer admissions was misguided and rash".
  27. ^ "Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences,", February 2007
  28. ^ "Dean's Letter on Growth and Renewal of the faculty,", April 2007
  29. ^ Letter to the Harvard community regarding Hurricane Katrina
  30. ^ Bombardieri, M. (2005). Summers' remarks on women draw fire. The Boston Globe, January 17, 2005.
  31. ^ "Faust Expected To Be Named President This Weekend," The Harvard Crimson, 8 February 2007
  32. ^ "Harvard names Drew Faust as its 28th president," Office of News and Public Affairs, 11 February 2007
  33. ^ Saudi Gives $20 Million to Georgetown & Harvard
  34. ^ Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal donates $20 million to support the Harvard University Islamic Studies Program
  35. ^ Saudi in the Classroom
  36. ^ The Saudi Fifth Column On Our Nation's Campuses
  37. ^ University Colors
  38. ^ Times Higher Education Supplement World Rankings 2006
  39. ^ "Largest Academic Library in the World". President and Fellows of Harvard College (2005). Retrieved on 2006-09-16.. However, there is some debate about what constitutes a "single" library: the University of California states that "With collections totaling more than 34 million volumes, the more than 100 libraries throughout UC are surpassed in size on the American continent only by the Library of Congress collection" ("University of California: Cultural Resources > Libraries". University of California (2004-05-16). Retrieved on 2006-09-16.
  40. ^ See the library portal listing of archives and special collections [9].
  41. ^ "America's Best Colleges 2007". Retrieved on 2007-03-20.
  42. ^ U.S. News & World Report (2006). In 2005, only 8.9% of a record of over 22000 applicants were accepted - making it the most competitive year in history.The Best Graduate Schools 2006.
  43. ^ Harvard Ends Early Admission, The New York Times, By Alan Finder and Karen W. Arenson, September 12, 2006
  44. ^ Harvard University Allston Initiative Home Page
  45. ^ "Harvard Green Campus Initiative". Harvard University. Retrieved on 2008-05-21.
  46. ^ "America's Greenest Colleges". Forbes Magazine. Retrieved on 2008-05-21.
  47. ^ "College Sustainability Report Card 2008". Sustainable Endowments Institute. Retrieved on 2008-05-21.
  48. ^ http://www.pbha.org
  49. ^ "Harvard Student Agencies, Inc."
  50. ^ "Harvard Student Agencies, About Us"
  51. ^ Rogers, M. F. (1991). Novels, Novelists, and Readers: Toward a Phenomenological Sociology of Literature. SUNY Press, ISBN 0-7914-0603-2.
  52. ^ Burr, T. (2005)
  53. ^ Reel Boston. The Boston Globe, February 27, 2005.
  54. ^ Jampel, C. E. (2004). Ruffling Religious Feathers. The Harvard Crimson, February 12, 2004.
  55. ^ Catalano, N. M. (2004). Harvard TV Show Popular in Korea. The Harvard Crimson, December 13, 2004.
  56. ^ The Ivory Tower
  57. ^ Baedeker, Karl [1893] (1971). The United States, with an Excursion into Mexico: A Handbook for Travellers. New York: Da Capo Press. ISBN 0-306-71341-1. , p. 83. (Facsimile reprint of original, published in Leipzig and New York)
  58. ^ [10] — A 2007 ranking from the THES - QS of the world’s research universities.
  59. ^ US News and World Report. (2006). National Universities: Top Schools.
  60. ^ Rosane, O. (2006). College Administrators Take On Inflated Grade Averages. Columbia Spectator, March 20, 2006.
  61. ^ Kohn, A. (2002). The Dangerous Myth of Grade Inflation. The Chronicle of Higher Education, November 8, 2002.
  62. ^ No author given. (2003). Brevia. Harvard Magazine, January-February 2003.
  63. ^ Milzoff, R. M., Paley, A. R., & Reed, B. J. (2001). Grade Inflation is Real. Fifteen Minutes March 1, 2001.
  64. ^ Bombardieri, M. & Schweitzer, S. (2006). "At Harvard, more concern for top grades." The Boston Globe, February 12, 2006. p. B3 (Benedict Gross quotes, 23.7% A/25% A- figures, characterized as an "all-time high.").
  65. ^ Associated Press. (2004). Princeton becomes first to formally combat grade inflation. USA Today, April 26, 2004.
  66. ^ Hicks, D. L. (2002). Should Our Colleges Be Ranked?. Letter to [The New York Times, September 20, 2002.
  67. ^ Merrow, J. (2004). Grade Inflation: It's Not Just an Issue for the Ivy League. Carnegie Perspectives, The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.
  68. ^ Bombardieri, M. (2005). Student life at Harvard lags peer schools, poll finds. The Boston Globe, March 29, 2005.
  69. ^ Adams, W. L., Feinstein, B., Schneider, A. P., Thompson, A. H., & and Wasserstein, S. A. (2003). The Cult of Yale. The Harvard Crimson, November 20, 2003.
  70. ^ Feinstein, B., Schneider, A. P., Thompson, A. H., & Wasserstein, S. A. (2003). The Cult of Yale, Part II. The Harvard Crimson, November 20, 2003.
  71. ^ Ho, M. W. & Rogers, J. P. (2005). Harvard Students Less Satisfied Than Peers With Undergraduate Experience, Survey Finds. The Harvard Crimson, March 31, 2005.
  72. ^ [11][dead links]
  73. ^ Six Top Teachers Honored with Harvard College
  74. ^ University Planning & Analysis
  75. ^ Shapiro, J. (1997). A Second Look.
  76. ^ Steinberger, M. (2005). A Flood of Crimson Ink. Wall Street Journal, April 29, 2005.

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Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Harvard Crimson, the breakfast daily of Harvard University, was founded in 1873. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Harvard Crimson, the breakfast daily of Harvard University, was founded in 1873. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with The Times Higher Education Supplement. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... 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  Results from FactBites:
 
Harvard University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (6791 words)
Harvard has the world's third largest library collection (after the British Library and the Library of Congress)[7], and the largest financial endowment of any academic institution, standing at $25.9 billion as of 2005 (which is also the second largest endowment for a non-profit organization, behind only the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation).
Harvard has a friendly rivalry with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology which dates back to 1900, when a merger of the two schools was frequently mooted and at one point officially agreed upon (ultimately canceled by Massachusetts courts).
Harvard University Choir, the oldest university-affiliated choir in the nation, formally established in 1834 but in existence since the eighteenth century and tied to the Memorial Church, performs the oldest Christmas Carol Services in continuous existence in North America.
Harvard University | Admissions Facts and Statistics (489 words)
Harvard, founded in 1636, is the oldest university in the United States (and the oldest corporation in the Americas).
It is perhaps the U.S. university that is both closest to the British model of university education, yet distinctly American in identity and outlook.
Harvard was founded as a small institution with the mission of educating Protestant clergy.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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