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Encyclopedia > Harvard Medical School
Harvard Medical School

Established: 1782
Type: Private
Endowment: US$3.96 Billion [1]
Dean: Jeffrey S. Flier
Faculty: 10,458
Students: 1,345
627 MD
141 MD-PhD
577 PhD
Location: Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Campus: Urban
Website: www.hms.harvard.edu

Harvard Medical School (HMS) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. It is a American medical school located in the Longwood Medical Area of the Mission Hill neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. Download high resolution version (1000x1204, 28 KB)Shield of the Harvard Medical School Rasterized from Harvard Print Services business card order form (PDF file) by Jacobolus This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... In an educational setting, a dean is a person with significant authority . ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... Boston redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Harvard redirects here. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in Lubbock, Texas, USA. A medical school or faculty of medicine is a tertiary educational institution — or part of such an institution — that teaches medicine. ... Longwood Medical and Academic Area (also known as Longwood Medical Area, LMA, or just Longwood) is a section of Boston with a high density of hospitals and biomedical research centers. ... Mission Hill is a one square mile[1] neighborhood of approximately 18,000 people in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Boston redirects here. ...


As of Fall 2006, HMS is home to 616 students in the M.D. program, 435 in the Ph.D. program, and 155 in the M.D.-Ph.D program.[1] HMS M.D.-Ph.D program allows a student to receive an M.D. from HMS and a Ph.D from either Harvard or the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (see Medical Scientist Training Program). Doctor of Medicine (M.D. or MD, from the Latin Medicinae Doctor meaning Teacher of Medicine,) is an academic degree for medical doctors. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... “MIT” redirects here. ... Medical Scientist Training Programs are highly selective combined M.D. and Ph. ...


The school has a large and distinguished faculty to support its missions of education, research, and clinical care. These faculty hold appointments in the basic science departments on the HMS Quadrangle, and in the clinical departments located in multiple Harvard-affiliated hospitals and institutions in Boston. There are approximately 2,900 full- and part-time voting faculty members consisting of assistant, associate, and full professors, and over 5,000 full or part-time non-voting instructors. Harvard redirects here. ... For the town in the Republic of Ireland, see Hospital, County Limerick. ... Boston redirects here. ...


Prospective students apply to one of two tracks to the M.D. degree. New Pathway, the larger of the two programs, emphasizes problem-based learning. HST, operated by the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, emphasizes medical research. Problem-based learning (PBL) is a pedagogical strategy of active learning often used in higher education, but it can be adapted for use in K-12 education. ... Founded in 1970, the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST) is one of the oldest and largest biomedical engineering and physician-scientist training programs in the United States and the longest-standing collaboration between Harvard and MIT. From the beginning, HST pioneered a new way of thinking...


The current dean of the medical school is Dr. Jeffrey S. Flier, a diabetes specialist and the former Chief Academic Officer of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Both an international and regional referral center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) in Boston, Massachusetts is a major teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School. ...

Contents

History

Harvard Medical School quadrangle, view from Longwood Avenue.
Harvard Medical School quadrangle, view from Longwood Avenue.

The school is the third oldest medical school in the US and was founded by Dr. John Warren on September 19th, 1782 with Benjamin Waterhouse, and Aaron Dexter. The first lectures were given in the basement of Harvard Hall and then in Holden Chapel. The first class, composed of 2 students, graduated in 1788. Harvard Medical School quad. ... Harvard Medical School quad. ... Dr. John Warren (1753–1815) was a Continental Army surgeon during the American Revolutionary War and the younger brother of Dr. Joseph Warren. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Dr. Benjamin Waterhouse (March 4, 1754 - October 2, 1846) was a Cambridge physician and medical professor, born into a Quaker family in Newport, Rhode Island, in 1754. ... Holden Chapel Holden Chapel Holden Chapel detail Holden Chapel is a small building in Harvard Yard on the campus of Harvard University. ...


It moved from Cambridge to 49 Marlborough Street in Boston in 1810. From 1816 to 1846, the school, known as Massachusetts Medical College of Harvard University, was located on Mason Street. In 1847, the school relocated to North Grove Street, and then to Copley Square in 1883. The medical school moved to its current location on Longwood Avenue in 1906, where the "Great White Quadrangle" with its 5 white marble buildings was established.[2][3] Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-City Council  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - Total 7. ... Boston redirects here. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Major teaching affiliates

These three institutions are often referred to as the "Harvard Trinity" by students and faculty. This is because their affiliations have been in place for the greatest period of time and every department is directly affiliated with the medical school. Both an international and regional referral center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) in Boston, Massachusetts is a major teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School. ... Brigham and Womens Hospital (BWH) is a hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Massachusetts General Hospital (often abbreviated to Mass General or just MGH) is a teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School and biomedical research facility in Boston, Massachusetts. ...


Teaching affiliates

Childrens Hospital Boston is a hospital located in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, adjacent to Brigham and Womens Hospital and Harvard Medical School. ... Dana-Farber Cancer Institute is a major affiliate of Harvard Medical School and a Comprehensive Cancer Center designated by the National Cancer Institute. ... The Joslin Diabetes Center is a prestigious American medical institution located in the Longwood Medical Area section of Boston. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... McLean Hospital (pronounced Mc-Lane) is a psychiatric hospital in Belmont, Massachusetts, USA. It is noted for its clinical staff expertise and ground-breaking neuroscience research. ... Cambridge Hospital is a 151-bed medical/surgical and psychiatric hospital in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital is a rehabilitation hospital located in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Forsyth dental institute is one of the leading center for dental and craniofacial research. ... VA Medical Center Boston (Jamaica Plain campus) The VA Boston Healthcare System is a set of hospitals run by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs in the Greater Boston area. ...

Harvard Medical School's Center for Mental Health and Media

This center, co-founded by Cheryl Olson and Lawrence Kutner, studies the effects of media on behavior. In 2004, the U.S. Department of Justice asked Olson and Kutner to run federally funded studies of how video games affect adolescents. Among other things, Olson and Kutner found positive and paradoxical dimensions of playing video games with violence in them: these games helped kids grapple with life's scariest experiences. Olson and Kutner also found that video games helped less social or popular children to socialize online. Moreover, they did not find a link between violent video game paying and school shootings. Olson and Kutner's findings are featured in Greater Good magazine, Greater Good Science Center. The United States Department of Justice (DOJ) is a Cabinet department in the United States government designed to enforce the law and defend the interests of the United States according to the law and to ensure fair and impartial administration of justice for all Americans. ... Greater Good Science Center, UC Berkeley // The Greater Good Science Center, located at the University of California, Berkeley is an interdisciplinary research center devoted to the scientific understanding of happy and compassionate individuals, strong social bonds, and altruistic behavior. ...


Student life

Second Year Show

Every winter second year students at HMS write, direct and perform a full length musical parody, lampooning Harvard, their professors, and themselves. 2007 was the Centennial performance as the Class of 2009 presented "Joseph Martin and the Amazing Technicolor White Coat"[4] to sellout crowds at Roxbury Community College on February 22, 23 and 24.[5]


Societies

Upon matriculation, medical and dental students at Harvard Medical School are divided into five societies named after famous HMS alumni, with the exception of HST. Each has a society master along with several associate society masters who serve as academic advisors to students. In the New Pathway program, students work in small group tutorials and lab sessions within their societies. Every year, the five societies compete in "Society Olympics" for the famed Pink Flamingo in a series of events (e.g. dance-off, dodgeball) that test the talents of the students in each society. HST currently possesses the Pink Flamingo.[6] Founded in 1970, the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST) is one of the oldest and largest biomedical engineering and physician-scientist training programs in the United States and the longest-standing collaboration between Harvard and MIT. From the beginning, HST pioneered a new way of thinking...

William Bosworth Castle (1897-1990) was an eminent American physician and physiologist who transformed hematology from a descriptive art to a dynamic interdisciplinary science. ... Walter Bradford Cannon (Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, October 19, 1871 – Lincoln, Massachusetts, October 19, 1945) was an American physiologist. ... Oliver Wendell Holmes the elder, (August 29, 1809 - October 8, 1894) was a physician by profession but achieved fame as a writer; he was one of the best regarded American poets of the 19th century. ... Founded in 1970, the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST) is one of the oldest and largest biomedical engineering and physician-scientist training programs in the United States and the longest-standing collaboration between Harvard and MIT. From the beginning, HST pioneered a new way of thinking...

In fiction

In Samuel Shem's book, The House of God, the medical school and its students are referred to as BMS (Best Medical School/Students). The novel is set in the famed Beth Israel Deaconess hospital in Boston where the author spent his internship year. Samuel Shem is the pen-name of the American psychiatrist Stephen Joseph Bergman (1944-). His main works are The House of God and Mount Misery, both fictional but close-to-real first-hand descriptions of the training of doctors in the United States. ... This article is about the book The House of God. ... Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, located in Boston, Massachusetts, is one of the three major teaching hospitals of Harvard Medical School. ... Boston redirects here. ...


In Erich Segal's book, "Doctors (novel)", the main plot is set in Harvard Medical School (HMS) where the main characters attend. Erich Wolf Segal (born June 16, 1937 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American author, screenwriter, and educator. ... One of the highly acclaimed books by Erich Segal, Doctors (1988) deals with the Harvard medical class of 1962 with emphasis on the two main characters, Barney Livingston and Laura Castellano. ...


Notable alumni

John R. Adler, Jr. ... Robert Burns Aird (1903-2000), an American educator and physician, founded the department of neurology at the University of California at San Francisco. ... Tenley Emma Albright, M.D. (born July 18, 1935 in Newton Centre, Massachusetts) became the first American female skater to win a figure skating Olympic gold medal, at the 1956 Winter Olympics in Cortina dAmpezzo, Italy. ... William French Anderson, M.D. (born 1936) is a U.S. geneticist and molecular biologist. ... Christian Boehmer Anfinsen, Jr. ... Jerome Jerry Lewis Avorn, M.D. is a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Chief of the Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. ... Herbert Benson (born 1935) is an American cardiologist and founder of the Mind/Body Medical Institute near Boston, Massachusetts. ... Roscoe O. Brady M.D., is a senior investegator at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke at the National Institute of Health, where he is currently the chief of the Developmental and Metabolic Neurology Branch. Brady graduated from Pennsylvania State University and got his M.D. degree from... Henry Bryant (May 12, 1820 - February 2, 1867) was an American physician and naturalist. ... Rafael Campo (poet) (1964) is an openly gay, Cuban-American poet, doctor, and author. ... Ethan Canin is an author. ... Walter Bradford Cannon (Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, October 19, 1871 – Lincoln, Massachusetts, October 19, 1945) was an American physiologist. ... William Bosworth Castle (1897-1990) was an eminent American physician and physiologist who transformed hematology from a descriptive art to a dynamic interdisciplinary science. ... George Cheyne Shattuck Choate, was born on March 30, 1827 at Ipswich, Massachusetts, the descendant of a family which settled in Massachusetts in 1667. ... Aram Chobanian is the president ad interim of Boston University. ... Stanley Cobb (1887–1968) was a neurologist and could be considered the founder of biological psychiatry in the United States. Cobbs childhood and education were affected by his stammer, which it is suggested led him to study the neurosciences in an attempt to understand its cause. ... Biography Ernest A. Codman, M.D., (1869-1940) was the acknowledged founder of what today is known as outcomes management. ... Michael Crichton, pronounced [1], (born October 23, 1942) is an American author, film producer, film director, and television producer. ... Harvey Cushing (c. ... Yellapragada Subbarow January 12, 1895-August 9, 1948) remains in the views of many the most notable medical scientist to emerge from India. ... Allan S. Detsky addressing HMS regarding the Toronto SARS crisis Allan Steven Detsky is a Canadian physician, health policy expert and international expert in clinical epidemiology. ... Dr. James Madison DeWolf (January 14, 1843 – June 25, 1876) was an acting Assistant Surgeon in the U.S. 7th Cavalry Regiment who was killed in the Battle of the Little Big Horn. ... Peter H. Diamandis (born 20 May 1961 in Bronx, New York) is considered a key American figure in the development of the personal spaceflight industry, having created many space-related businesses or organizations. ... Dr. Daniel John DiLorenzo is a physician-scientist inventor/entrepreneur. ... Anatomist and teacher, born Boston, Massachusetts, 1843; died Nahant, Massachusetts, 1911. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Dr Sydney Farber, after whom the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute is named Sidney Farber was a pediatric pathologist. ... Dr. Paul Farmer Paul Farmer (born October 26, 1959) is an American anthropologist and physician, currently the Presley Professor of Medical Anthropology at Harvard University and an attending physician at Brigham and Womens Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... John Francis Honey Fitz Fitzgerald (February 11, 1863 – October 2, 1950) was a politician and the maternal grandfather of President John F. Kennedy. ... Tom Fitzpatrick may refer to: Thomas J. Fitzpatrick (Cavan politician) (born 1918), Irish Fine Gael politician, Cavan TD and Ceann Comhairle of Dáil Éireann Thomas J. Fitzpatrick (Dublin politician) (born 1926), Irish Fianna Fáil politician and Dublin TD Tom Fitzpatrick (born 1941), American actor[1] Tom Fitzpatrick, Irish... Dr. Judah Folkman (b. ... William Harrison Bill Frist, Sr. ... Atul Gawande is a general and endocrine surgeon at Brigham and Womens Hospital in Boston, an assistant professor at the Harvard School of Public Health and of surgery at Harvard Medical School. ... George Lincoln Goodale (August 3, 1839–April 12, 1923) was an American botanist, born at Saco, Maine. ... Bronze by George Anthonisen. ... Dr. I. Kathleen Hagen is a former medical doctor who gained notoriety for being accused of murder by asphyxia of her parents, Idella Hagen, aged 92, and James Hagen, aged 86, with a plastic bag and a pillow as they slept in their home in Chatham Township, New Jersey, in... Dr Dean Hamer (born 1951) is a geneticist, who, as of 2007 is the director of the Gene Structure and Regulation Unit at the U.S. National Cancer Institute (part of the National Institutes of Health). ... Dr. Alice Hamilton Alice Hamilton (February 27, 1869 – September 22, 1970) was the first woman appointed to the faculty of Harvard Medical School and was a leading expert in the field of occupational health. ... Michael R. Harrison, M.D. (born May 5, 1943 in Portland, OR) has served as division chief in Pediatric Surgery at the Children’s Hospital at the University of California, San Francisco for over 20 years, where he established the first Fetal Treatment Center in the U.S. He is... Dr. Bernadine Patricia Healy (b. ... Ronald A. Heifetz is the King Hussein bin Talal Senior Lecturer in Public Leadership, and cofounder of the Center for Public Leadership at John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. ... Lawrence Joseph Henderson (b. ... Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. ... Yang Huanming Dr. Yang Huanming, also known as Dr. Henry Yang, is one of Chinas leading genetics researchers. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Mildred Fay Jefferson (1927-) is an American doctor and activist, born in Texas. ... Elliot Proctor Joslin, M.D. (June 1869 - 28 January 1962) was an American diabetologist, and founder of the Joslin Clinic. ... Dr. Nathan Cooley Keep (1800–1875) was a great pioneer in the field of dentistry, and the founding Dean of the Harvard School of Dental Medicine. ... Dr. Jim Yong Kim is an American physician. ... Melvin Konner is Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of Anthropology and Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Neurology at Emory University. ... Charles Krauthammer (born March 13, 1950 in New York City[1][2]), is a Pulitzer Prize-winning syndicated columnist and commentator. ... Aristides de Azevedo Pacheco Leão (b. ... Philip Leder (b. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Joseph Lovell Joseph Lovell (December 22, 1788 - October 17, 1836), Surgeon General of the United States Army, April 18, 1818 - October 17, 1836, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of James S. and Deborah (Gorham) Lovell. ... This article is about the psychiatrist. ... Randell L. Mills (born September 3, 1957) is a U.S. scientist and inventor best known as the chief proponent of the controversial hydrino theory. ... Joseph E. Murray (born 1 April 1919), American surgeon, performed the first successful human kidney transplant from an adult to his identical twin. ... Amos Nourse (December 17, 1794–April 7, 1877) was a medical doctor and U.S. Senator for a very short term from the state of Maine. ... David C. Page, MD, is a professor of biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the director of the Whitehead Institute, where he has a laboratory devoted to the study of the Y-chromosome. ... Dr. Hiram C. Polk Dr. Hiram Polk is native of Jackson, Mississippi and alumnus of Millsaps College and the Harvard Medical School. ... Geoffrey Franklin Potts, Ph. ... Morton Henry Prince (December 21, 1854 – August 31, 1929). ... Alexander Rich, MD (American; born 1925) is a biologist and biophysicist. ... Oswald Hope Robertson (2 June 1886 – 23 March 1966) was an English-born medical scientist who pioneered the idea of blood banks. ... Wilfredo Santa Gomez is a puertorican author born in the city of Caguas, Puerto Rico and has written a total of five books in Spanish on self help, short stories and poetry books. ... Alfred (Al) Sommer is an American academic at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. ... Dr. Felicia H. Stewart, MD (1943 - 2006) was a womens health physician and expert in the field of reproductive health. ... Lubert Stryer is the Mrs. ... James Batcheller Sumner (November 19, 1887 – August 12, 1955) was an American chemist. ... Helen B(roke). ... John Marks Templeton, Jr (born 1940) is the elder son of the stock investor, businessman and philanthropist John Templeton and serves as the President of the Templeton Foundation and organizes its day-to-day running. ... The John Templeton Foundation was established in 1987 by international money manager Sir John Templeton; it is usually referred to simply as the Templeton Foundation. ... Dr. Edward Donnall (Don) Thomas (b. ... Lewis Thomas (November 25, 1913 - December 3, 1993) was a physician, poet, etymologist, essayist, administrator, educator, policy advisor, and researcher. ... Abby Howe Turner (1875-1957) was a noted professor of Physiology and Zoology who founded the department of physiology at Mount Holyoke College. ... Richard D. Urman (b. ... George E. Vaillant, M.D. Dr. Vaillant is a Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and Director of Research for the Department of Psychiatry, Brigham and Womens Hospital. ... Mark Vonnegut is an American pediatrician and writer He is the son of noted writer Kurt Vonnegut Jr. ... This article is about the American doctor, soldier and statesman during the American Revolutionary War. ... Dr. Andrew Weil (born December 19, 1941) is a world-famous United States physician. ... Paul Dudley White, M.D. (June 6, 1886 – October 31, 1973) was a pioneering cardiologist, and a founding member of the American Heart Association. ... Charles Frederick Winslow (1811-1877) was a physician, diplomat, and world traveler. ... Leonard Wood (October 9, 1860 – August 7, 1927) was a physician who served as the US Army Chief of Staff and Governor General of the Philippines. ... Louis Tompkins Wright (born 1891 in LaGrange, Georgia; died 1952) was a Spingarn Medal winning surgeon noted for his work in Harlem. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), is one of the oldest and most influential hate organizations in the United States. ... Congressman David Wu David Wu (Traditional Chinese: 吳振偉; pinyin: Wú Zhènwěi; born April 8, 1955) is a Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives for Oregon, representing the states 1st Congressional District (map). ... Jeffries Wyman (1814-74) was an American naturalist and anatomist, born at Chelmsford, Mass. ...

Fictional alumni

Father Damien Carrass in "The Exorcist".Psychologist trained at Harvard. Dr. Abigail Ann Abbey Bartlet, M.D., former First Lady of the United States, was a fictional character played by Stockard Channing on the television serial drama The West Wing. ... “The West Wing” redirects here. ... For the NES (Nintendo Entertainment System) video game, see The Adventures of Gilligans Island. ... Major Charles Emerson Winchester III is a principal character on the television series, M*A*S*H, played by David Ogden Stiers. ... M*A*S*H is an American television series developed by Larry Gelbart, inspired by the 1968 novel MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors by Richard Hooker (penname for H. Richard Hornberger) and its sequels, but primarily by the 1970 film MASH, and influenced by the 1961 novel Catch... Becker is an American situation comedy that originally aired on CBS from 1998 to 2004. ... Paris Eustace Geller is a fictional character on the television series Gilmore Girls, played by Liza Weil. ... Gilmore Girls is a long-running, Emmy Award winning, and Golden Globe nominated American television drama/comedy created by Amy Sherman-Palladino and starring Lauren Graham and Alexis Bledel. ... Lexie Grey is a fictional character from the ABC television series Greys Anatomy. ... This article is about the television series. ... This article needs cleanup. ... John Winslow Irving (born March 2, 1942 as John Wallace Blunt, Jr. ... This article is about the novel. ... Drake & Josh was an American sitcom shown on the Nickelodeon television network, starring Drake Bell and Josh Peck. ... Dr. Frasier Winslow Crane (b. ... This article is about the TV series. ... Frasier is an American sitcom starring Kelsey Grammer as psychiatrist Dr. Frasier Crane. ... Simpsons redirects here. ...


See also

Longwood Medical and Academic Area (also known as Longwood Medical Area, LMA, or just Longwood) is a section of Boston with a high density of hospitals, colleges, and biomedical research centers. ... The list of Harvard University people includes notable graduates, professors and administrators affiliated with Harvard University. ... Harvard School of Dental Medicine Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ...

External links

  • Harvard Medical School
  • Second Year Show

References

  1. ^ a b Harvard Medicine - Basic Facts. Retrieved on February 8, 2008.
  2. ^ Harvard Medical School - History. Retrieved on February 25, 2007.
  3. ^ Countway Medical Library - Records Management - Historical Notes. Retrieved on February 25, 2007.
  4. ^ Class of 2009 Second Year Show. Retrieved on March 11, 2007.
  5. ^ SECOND YEAR SHOW: New Curriculum Debuts in Second Year Show. Retrieved on March 11, 2007.
  6. ^ HST MD Class of 2009 Wins HMS Society Olympics. Retrieved on March 2, 2007.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Harvard Medical School - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (382 words)
Harvard Medical School (HMS) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University.
It is a prestigious American medical school located in the Longwood Medical Area section of Boston, Massachusetts.
The school was founded by Dr. John Warren and established in 1782, and was moved from Cambridge to Boston in 1810.
Harvard Medical School - definition of Harvard Medical School in Encyclopedia (188 words)
Harvard Medical School is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University.
The school was established in 1782, and was moved from Cambridge to Boston in 1810.
The School is home to about 650 students in the MD program, 500 in the PhD program, and 130 in the MD-PhD program, allowing a student to receive his or her MD from HMS and his or her PhD from either Harvard or MIT.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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