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Encyclopedia > Harvard Law School

Harvard Law School

Established 1817
Type Private
Endowment US$840 million
Dean Elena Kagan
Staff 284
Students 1,800
1680 JD
150 LLM
50 S.J.D.
Location Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
Campus Urban
Website www.law.harvard.edu

Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. Located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard Law, considered one of the most prestigious law schools in the United States, is the country's second-oldest law school, and the oldest in continuous operation. It is also home to the largest academic law library in the world.[1] The school's frequent referencing in American culture has led the Wall Street Journal 's law blog to declare that there was "no doubt...Harvard Law School holds a special place in our nation’s collective consciousness".[2] Download high resolution version (1000x1205, 32 KB)Shield of the Harvard Law School Rasterized from Harvard Print Services business card order form (PDF file) by Jacobolus This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In an educational setting, a dean is a person with significant authority . ... Elena Kagan is the dean of Harvard Law School and the Charles Hamilton Houston Professor of Law and has recently been announced as the next President of Harvard University. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... Legum Doctor (English: Doctor of Laws; abbreviated to LL.D.) In the UK and Canada the LL.D. is a doctorate usually awarded on the basis of exceptionally insightful and distinctive publications, containing significant and original contributions to the science or study of law. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... Crowded Shibuya, Tokyo shopping district An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... A colloquialism is an informal expression, that is, an expression not used in formal speech or writing. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - City  7. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... // A law school is an institution where future lawyers obtain legal degrees. ... Julio Pérez Ferrero Library - Cúcuta, Colombia A modern-style library in Chambéry A library is a collection of information, sources, resources and services, organized for use, and maintained by a public body, an institution, or a private individual. ... The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ...


Harvard Law introduced what would become the standard first-year curriculum for American law schools - including classes in contracts, property, torts, criminal law, and civil procedure - in the 1870s, under Dean Christopher Columbus Langdell. At Harvard, Langdell also developed the case method of teaching law, which became the dominant model for U.S. law schools. Curriculum has many different conceptions. ... A contract is any promise or set of promises made by one party to another for the breach of which the law provides a remedy. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... In the common law, a tort is a civil wrong for which the law provides a remedy. ... Criminal law (also known as penal law) is the body of statutory and common law that deals with crime and the legal punishment of criminal offenses. ... Civil procedure is the body of law that sets out the process that courts will follow when hearing cases of a civil nature (a civil action, as opposed to a criminal action). ... Christopher Columbus Langdell (May 22, 1826 _ July 6, 1906), American jurist, was born in New Boston, Hillsborough county, New Hampshire, of English and Scotch-Irish ancestry. ... The casebook method, also known as the case method, is the primary method of teaching law in law schools in the United States. ...


The current dean of Harvard Law School is Elena Kagan, who succeeded Robert C. Clark in 2003. Elena Kagan is the dean of Harvard Law School and the Charles Hamilton Houston Professor of Law and has recently been announced as the next President of Harvard University. ... Robert C. Clark is currently Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor of the Harvard Law School. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The size of each cohort in the J.D. program numbers approximately 550 students and the first-year (1L) class is broken into seven small sections of approximately 80 students, who take all first-year classes (with the exception of one distribution requirement and one elective) together. Harvard Law has 246 faculty members.[3] Doctor of Law, Doctor of Jurisprudence, or Juris Doctor (abbreviated J.D. or JD, from the Latin, Teacher of Law) is a professional degree in law offered by universities in a number of countries. ...


Admission to Harvard Law is extremely selective: In 2007, 12.6% of 6630 applicants were admitted, and 66.9% of those admitted enrolled. Harvard Law's admissions process includes the unusual feature of telephone interviews conducted amongst students likely to be accepted. Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...

Contents

Campus

Austin Hall
Austin Hall
Langdell Hall, home of the Harvard Law School library

Harvard Law School's campus is located just north of Harvard Yard, the historic center of Harvard University, and contains several architecturally significant buildings. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 1,009 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 1,009 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Langdell Hall, Harvard Law School, Dec 2004. ... Langdell Hall, Harvard Law School, Dec 2004. ... Harvard Yard in 1905. ...


Austin Hall, the law school's oldest dedicated structure, was completed in 1884 by architect H. H. Richardson. The law school's student center, Harkness Commons, was designed by Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius, along with several law school dormitories. Austin Hall Entryway detail Austin Hall is a classroom building of the Harvard Law School designed by noted American architect H. H. Richardson. ... Library, North Easton, MA Henry Hobson Richardson (1838 - 1886) was the outstanding American architect of his day, one of a half-dozen most influential American architects. ... The Harvard Graduate Center, also known as Harkness Commons, was commissioned of The Architects Collaborative by Harvard University in 1948. ... Typography by Herbert Bayer above the entrance to the workshop block of the Bauhaus, Dessau, 2005. ... Walter Adolph Georg Gropius (May 18, 1883 – July 5, 1969) was a German architect and founder of Bauhaus. ...


Langdell Hall, the largest building on the law school campus, contains the HLS library, the most extensive academic law library in the world. Langdell Hall, viewed from Holmes Field Langdell Hall is the largest building on the campus of Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ...


As of 2006, a new complex is scheduled to rise on the northwest corner of the law school campus, to be designed by traditionalist architect Robert A. M. Stern. The complex is set to marry the architectural themes present in Austin and Langdell Halls, as well as the Gropius buildings. Robert Arthur Morton Stern, usually credited as Robert A. M. Stern, (born May 23, 1939) is an American architect and Dean of the Yale University School of Architecture. ...


History

Harvard Law School was established in 1817, making it the oldest continuously-operating law school in the nation. (The Marshall-Wythe School of Law at the College of William and Mary opened in 1779, but was forced to close at the outset of the American Civil War, and did not reopen until 1920.[4]) 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Marshall-Wythe School of Law, more commonly known as William & Mary Law School (W&M Law), located in Williamsburg, Virginia, is a top-tier law school in the United States. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ...


The Royall estate

Its origins can be traced to the estate of Isaac Royall, who sold most of his Caribbean slaves and plantations to move to Medford, Massachusetts. His Medford estate, the Isaac Royall House, is now a museum, and includes the only remaining slave quarters in the northeast United States. The estate was passed down to Royall's son, Isaac Royall, Jr., who fled Massachusetts as the American Revolution broke out. Just prior to his death in 1781, Royall, Jr. left land to Harvard, the sale of which was intended for the "endowing of a Professor of Laws at said college, or a Professor of Physics and Anatomy". Harvard took the opportunity to fund its first chair of law. The Royall chair remains today. It traditionally was held by the Dean of the law school, but the current Dean, Elena Kagan, declined the Royall chair, instead giving herself the Charles Hamilton Houston Professorship. “West Indian” redirects here. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1630 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Michael J. McGlynn Area  - City  8. ... The Isaac Royall House is a historic house located at 15 George Street, Medford, Massachusetts. ... Portrait of Isaac Royall, painted in 1769 by John Singleton Copley Isaac Royall, Jr. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen Colonies that... Charles Hamilton Houston (September 3, 1895–April 22, 1950) was a black lawyer, Dean of Howard University Law School and NAACP Litigation Director who helped play a role in dismantling the Jim Crow laws and helped train future Supreme Court justice Thurgood Marshall. ...


In 1806, the Royall estate in Medford was returned to Royall, Jr.'s heirs, who sold it and donated the proceeds for the formal foundation of Harvard Law School. The Royall family coat-of-arms was adopted as the school crest, which shows three stacked wheat sheaves beneath the university motto (Veritas, Latin "truth").


Curricular evolution

While the law school had previously been located on Harvard Yard, Dean Langdell's new curriculum developed in the 1870s demanded lecture halls suited to the case and Socratic method of teaching. H. H. Richardson would later design the law school's first independent home, the Romanesque Austin Hall, to the north of the Yard. This would come to form the nucleus of the current law school campus. Harvard Yard in 1905. ... Library, North Easton, MA Henry Hobson Richardson (1838 - 1886) was the outstanding American architect of his day, one of a half-dozen most influential American architects. ... Austin Hall Entryway detail Austin Hall is a classroom building of the Harvard Law School designed by noted American architect H. H. Richardson. ...


In the second half of the 20th century, the school began to develop a reputation for being a cold and unfeeling place for students. Books and films such as John Jay Osborn, Jr.'s The Paper Chase and Scott Turow's One L, in particular, cast the academic experience in the school in a particularly harsh light. John Jay Osborn Jr. ... The Paper Chase was a 1970 novel, as well as a 1973 movie based on the novel and a television series based on the movie. ... A movie adaptation of Turows bestselling book Presumed Innocent was made in 1990. ...


Elena Kagan sought to reverse this perception when she assumed the deanship of the school, promising substantial reforms. Kagan has managed to significantly boost the school's involvement in international and public interest law and reduce its student:faculty ratio by hiring several new professors. She is also given credit for a host of quality-of-life improvements at the law school, including an ice-skating rink on campus, free coffee in classroom buildings, and free tampons in campus public restrooms. Elena Kagan is the dean of Harvard Law School and the Charles Hamilton Houston Professor of Law and has recently been announced as the next President of Harvard University. ...


In 2006, the faculty voted unanimously to approve a new first-year curriculum, placing greater emphasis on problem-solving, administrative law, and international law. The new curriculum is being implemented in stages over the next several years. In addition, a vast new complex under construction on the northwest part of the law school campus is intended to expand classroom space for additional courses and create more space for an expanding clinical program.


Programs

Harvard Legal Aid Bureau

The Harvard Legal Aid Bureau is the oldest (and perhaps only) student-run legal services office in the country, founded in 1913. The Bureau's mission is to provide an important community service while giving student attorneys the opportunity to develop professional skills as part of the clinical programs of Harvard Law School.


The Harvard Legal Aid Bureau is a student-run law firm. The Bureau serves clients in housing law (landlord-tenant relations, public housing, subsidized housing), family law (divorce, custody, paternity, child support), government benefits (Social Security, unemployment benefits, Veterans' benefits, welfare), and wage and hour cases (including unpaid or underpaid wages, benefits, and overtime). The Bureau employs seven supervising attorneys and elects approximately twenty student members annually. Students at the Bureau practice under the supervision of admitted attorneys; however, students are primarily casehandlers on all matters. As a result, students gain firsthand experience appearing in court, negotiating with opposing attorneys, and working directly with clients. Students receive both classroom and clinical credits for their work at the Bureau.


Unlike most clinical programs at Harvard (or other schools), the Bureau is a two-year commitment. This gives clients a chance to have a much more sustained and in-depth academic experience. In addition to the substantive legal experience, students gain practical experience managing a law firm. The student board of directors makes all decisions regarding case intake, budget management, and office administration.


Famous alumni include Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan, Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick, activist Michelle Obama, and professors Erwin Chemerinsky and Laurence Tribe. William J. Brennan, official portrait, 1976. ... Deval Laurdine Patrick (born July 31, 1956) is an American politician and the current Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... Michelle Robinson Obama (born January 17, 1964) is Vice President for Community and External Affairs for the University of Chicago Hospitals. ... Erwin Chemerinsky (born 1953) is a nationally renowned professor of Constitutional law and federal civil procedure, currently teaching at the Duke University School of Law, a position which he has held since July 1, 2004. ... Laurence Henry Tribe (born October 10, 1941) is a professor of constitutional law at Harvard Law School and the Carl M. Loeb University Professor. ...


Berkman Center for Internet & Society

The Harvard Law School is home to the Berkman Center for Internet & Society, which focuses on the study and construction of cyberspace. The Center sponsors conferences, courses, visiting lecturers, and residential fellows. Members of the Center do research and write books, articles, and weblogs with RSS 2.0 feeds, for which the Center holds the specification. The Center's present location is a small Victorian wood-frame building which sits next to the larger-scale buildings of the Harvard Law School campus. It is in the process of relocating to a larger site on the campus' perimeter. Its newsletter, "The Filter", is on the Web and available by e-mail, and it hosts a blog community of Harvard faculty, students and Berkman Center affiliates. The Berkman Center is funding the Openlaw project. One of the major initiatives of the Berkman Center is the OpenNet Initiative, which is a joint worldwide study of the filtering of the web, along with the Universities of Toronto and Cambridge (UK). The Berkman Center was a co-sponsor of Wikimania 2006. Charles Nesson, Lawrence Lessig, Jonathan Zittrain, John Palfrey, William W. Fisher hold appointments at the Berkman Center. The Berkman Center for Internet and Society is a department of Harvard Law School, which focuses on the legal study of cyberspace. ... It has been suggested that Virtual world be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about a type of web application. ... For RSS feeds from Wikipedia, see Wikipedia:Syndication. ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... Openlaw is a project at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard Law School aimed at releasing case arguments under a copyleft license, in order to encourage public suggestions for improvement. ... Jimmy Wales speaking at Wikimania Wikimania[1] is a conference for users of the wiki projects operated by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Charles Nesson is William F. Weld Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and serves as the Faculty Co-Director of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society, which he co-founded in 1996 with Jonathan Zittrain. ... Not to be confused with Lawrence Lessing. ... Jonathan Zittrain Jonathan Zittrain (born 1969) holds the Chair in Internet Governance and Regulation at Oxford University and is a principal of the Oxford Internet Institute. ... John Palfrey (b. ... William Terry W. Fisher III is the WilmerHale Professor of Intellectual Property Law at Harvard Law School and director of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society. ...


Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice

Established in the fall of 2005 at Harvard Law School, the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice seeks to honor the contributions of Charles Hamilton Houston, who dedicated his life to using law as a tool to reverse the unjust consequences of racial discrimination. The Institute carries forth Houston's legacy by serving as a hub for scholarship, legal education, policy analysis, and public forums on issues central to current civil rights struggles. Charles Hamilton Houston (September 3, 1895–April 22, 1950) was a black lawyer, Dean of Howard University Law School and NAACP Litigation Director who helped play a role in dismantling the Jim Crow laws and helped train future Supreme Court justice Thurgood Marshall. ...


see also Charles Ogletree Charles Ogletree is a law professor at Harvard Law School who has written books on legal topics, including All Deliberate Speed: Reflections on the First Half-Century of Brown v. ...


Labor & Worklife Program

The Labor and Worklife Program (LWP) is Harvard University’s forum for research and teaching on the world of work and its implications for society. Located at the Harvard Law School, the LWP brings together scholars and policy experts from a variety of disciplines to analyze critical labor issues in the law, economy, and society. The LWP also provides unique education for labor leaders throughout the world via the oldest executive training program at Harvard University, the Harvard Trade Union Program, founded in 1942. As a multidisciplinary research and policy network, the LWP organizes projects and programs that seek to understand critical changes in labor markets and labor law, and to analyze the role of unions, business, and government as they affect the world of work. By engaging scholars, students, and members of the labor community, the program coordinates legal, educational, and cultural activities designed to improve the quality of work life.


The faculty, staff, and research associates of the Program include some of the nation’s premier scholars of labor studies and an array of internationally renowned intellectuals. The executive training program (HTUP) works closely with trade unions around the world to bring excellence in labor education to trade union leadership. The LWP regularly holds forums, conferences, and discussion groups on labor issues of concern to business, unions, and the government. Housed at the LWP are the WorklifeWizard.org and ElMundoLaboral.org websites, the latter providing the only Spanish-language wage-checker available for the American workplace.


Hale and Dorr Legal Services Center

The Hale and Dorr Legal Services Center is one of Harvard Law School’s oldest and largest clinical teaching facilities. The Legal Services Center is a general practice law firm that provides legal counsel to over 1,200 clients annually. It offers students an opportunity to gain practical legal experience and earn academic credit by handling real cases for real clients under the supervision of clinical instructors who are experienced practitioners and mentors. The Hale and Dorr Legal Services Center sponsors up to 70 students each semester through several clinical courses offered at Harvard Law School and, during the summer, sponsors a program for volunteer law students from across the country.


Students working at the Center are placed in one of its clinics housed in five substantive practice groups and work with clinical instructors, experienced practitioners and mentors, who supervise student work and provide guidance as students build and manage their own caseload. The Center provides substantive training in each practice area and also offers general instruction on topics such as client interviewing and intake, case management, legal investigation and discovery, creative legal analysis, research and drafting.


The Hale and Dorr Legal Services Center is located in Boston’s culturally diverse Jamaica Plain neighborhood. Jamaica Plain, commonly known as JP, is a historic neighborhood in Boston, Massachusetts. ...


Other Harvard Law School programs

Pound Hall
Pound Hall
  • The Ames Moot Court Competition
  • Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinical Program
  • Child Advocacy Program
  • East Asian Legal Studies Program
  • European Law Research Center
  • Fund for Tax and Fiscal Research
  • Human Rights Program
  • Islamic Legal Studies Program
  • John M. Olin Center for Law, Economics and Business
  • Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology and Bioethics
  • Prison Legal Assistance Project
  • Program on Corporate Governance
  • Program on Empirical Legal Studies
  • Program on International Financial Systems
  • Program on Negotiation
  • Program on the Legal Profession
  • Public Interest Auction
  • Harvard Legal Aid Bureau
  • Harvard Association for Law and Business

There are two additional programs affiliated with Harvard Law School, the Ames Foundation and the Selden Society. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... William P. Alford (Chinese name: 安守廉, An Shoulian) is a US legal scholar. ... The Harvard Law School Public Interest Auction began in 1994 as a student-run fundraising event to support Harvard Law students working in full-time public interest positions during the summer. ...


Publications

Students of the Juris Doctor (JD) program are involved in preparing and publishing the Harvard Law Review, one of the most renowned university law reviews, as well as a number of other law journals and an independent student newspaper. The Harvard Law Review was first published in 1887 and has been staffed and edited by some of the school's most notable alumni. The student newspaper, the Harvard Law Record, has been published continuously since the 1940s, making it one of the oldest law school newspapers in the country, and has included the exploits of fictional law student Fenno for decades. The Harvard Law Review is a journal of legal scholarship published by an independent student group at Harvard Law School. ... A law review is a scholarly journal focusing on legal issues, normally published by an organization of students at a law school or through a bar association. ... The Harvard Law Record is a student-run publication at Harvard Law School. ...

Classroom in Pound Hall
Classroom in Pound Hall

The law journals are: Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 967 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Samuel Klein, in black and red at right, describes the Bambara Wikipedia project at a talk by Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 967 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Samuel Klein, in black and red at right, describes the Bambara Wikipedia project at a talk by Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales. ...

The Harvard Law Review is a journal of legal scholarship published by an independent student group at Harvard Law School. ... Harvard Journal of Law and Technology, also known by the acronym JOLT, is a semi-annual student publication of Harvard Law School. ...

Notable alumni

Fourteen of the school's graduates have served on the Supreme Court of the United States, more than any other law school, and another four justices attended the school without graduating. Six of the current nine members of the court attended HLS: Roberts, Scalia, Kennedy, Souter, Ginsburg and Breyer. Ginsburg transferred to and graduated from Columbia Law School. Past Supreme Court justices from Harvard Law School include Harry Blackmun, Louis Brandeis, Felix Frankfurter, Lewis Powell and Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. This a list of notable graduates of Harvard Law School. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries  Atlas  Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym... John Glover Roberts Jr. ... Antonin Gregory Scalia (born March 11, 1936[1]) is an American jurist and the second most senior Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Anthony McLeod Kennedy (born July 23, 1936) has been an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court since 1988. ... David Hackett Souter (born September 17, 1939) has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1990. ... Ruth Joan Bader Ginsburg (born March 15, 1933, Brooklyn, New York) is an Associate Justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. ... Stephen Gerald Breyer (born August 15, 1938) is an American attorney, political figure, and jurist. ... Columbia Law School, located in the New York City borough of Manhattan, is one of the professional schools of Columbia University, a member of the Ivy League, and one of the leading law schools in the United States. ... Justice Harry Blackmun Harry Andrew Blackmun (November 12, 1908 – March 4, 1999) was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1970 to 1994. ... Louis Dembitz Brandeis (November 13, 1856 – October 5, 1941) was an American litigator, Supreme Court Justice, advocate of privacy, and developer of the Brandeis Brief. ... Felix Frankfurter (November 15, 1882 – February 22, 1965) was an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. ... Notable people with the name Lewis Powell include: Lewis Powell, one of the conspirators hanged for the assassination of United States President Abraham Lincoln. ... Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. ...


Rutherford B. Hayes, the 19th president of the United States, graduated from HLS, as did U.S. attorneys general Alberto Gonzales and Janet Reno, among others, and noted federal judge Richard Posner. Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the nineteenth President of the United States (1877–1881). ... Alberto Gonzales (born August 4, 1955), is the 80th and current Attorney General of the United States. ... Janet Reno (born July 21, 1938) was the first female Attorney General of the United States (1993–2001). ... Richard A. Posner Richard Allen Posner (born January 11, 1939 in New York City) is currently a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. ...


Famous legal academics who graduated from Harvard Law include Erwin Chemerinsky, Ronald Dworkin, Susan Estrich, W. Page Keeton, Arthur R. Miller, William L. Prosser, John Sexton, Kathleen Sullivan, and Laurence Tribe. Erwin Chemerinsky (born 1953) is a nationally renowned professor of Constitutional law and federal civil procedure, currently teaching at the Duke University School of Law, a position which he has held since July 1, 2004. ... Ronald Dworkin (born 1931) is an American legal philosopher, and currently professor of Jurisprudence at University College London and the New York University School of Law. ... Susan Estrich (born 16 December 1952) is a lawyer, professor, author, political operative, feminist advocate and commentator for Fox News. ... Werdner Page Keeton (born in McCoy, Texas, August 22, 1909, died January 10, 1999) graduated first in his class at the University of Texas School of Law in 1931 and joined the University of Texas law faculty the following year at the age of 23. ... Arthur R. Miller is the Bruce Bromley Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, and is considered the leading American authority on Civil Procedure. ... William Lloyd Prosser (born March 15, 1898, New Albany, Indiana; died 1972) was the Dean of the College of Law at UC Berkeley from 1948 to 1961. ... John Sexton at NYU commencement John Edward Sexton (born 1942) is the fifteenth President of New York University, having held this position since 2002. ... Kathleen M. Sullivan (born August 20, 1955), scholar in constitutional law, is a professor at Stanford Law School and currently practices law at Quinn Emanuel Urquart Oliver & Hedges, LLP, a California law firm. ... Laurence Henry Tribe (born October 10, 1941) is a professor of constitutional law at Harvard Law School and the Carl M. Loeb University Professor. ...


Past or current presidential candidates who are HLS graduates include Barack Obama, Mitt Romney, Michael Dukakis and Pat Schroeder. “Barack” redirects here. ... Willard Mitt Romney (born March 12, 1947) was the 70th Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ... Patricia Schroeder (born July 30, 1940), American politician, was a twelve-term Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives from Colorado, serving from 1972 to 1996. ...


The Harvard Lodge A.F. & A.M. was instituted on May 18th 1922, as the first Academic Masonic Lodge in the world. The Lodge was founded primarily through the efforts of both Roscoe Pound, Dean of Harvard Law School; and Kirsopp Lake a Professor of the Divinity School. Roscoe Pound (1870 - 1964) was a distinguished American legal scholar and educator. ... A divinity school is an institute of higher education devoted to the study of divinity, religion and theology. ...


In addition to their achievements in law and politics, Harvard Law alumni have also excelled in other fields. Many have gone on to become influential journalists, writers, media and business leaders and even professional athletes.


Notable professors

Hauser Hall
Hauser Hall

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (600 × 800 pixel, file size: 164 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Hauser Hall, Harvard Law School. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (600 × 800 pixel, file size: 164 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Hauser Hall, Harvard Law School. ... Stephen Gerald Breyer (born August 15, 1938) is an American attorney, political figure, and jurist. ... Zechariah Chafee, 1907 (Brown Archives) Zechariah Chafee, Jr. ... Archibald Cox, Jr. ... Alan Morton Dershowitz (born September 1, 1938) is an American political figure and criminal law professor at Harvard Law School known for his extensive published works, career as an attorney in several high-profile law cases, and commentary on the Arab-Israeli conflict. ... Negotiation and conflict resolution expert Roger Fisher is the co-author (along with Bill Ury) of the classic book on win-win negotiation called Getting to YES. Fisher, a professor at Harvard Law School, says he started by asking the question What advice could I give to both parties in... William Terry W. Fisher III is the WilmerHale Professor of Intellectual Property Law at Harvard Law School and director of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society. ... Felix Frankfurter (November 15, 1882 – February 22, 1965) was an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. ... Charles Fried is a prominent conservative American jurist and lawyer. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... President George W. Bush and Laura Bush stand with 2005 National Humanities Medal recipient Mary Ann Glendon. ... Erwin Griswold Erwin Nathaniel Griswold (July 14, 1904 – November 19, 1994) was a prominent American lawyer. ... Lani Guinier (born 1950) is arguably one of the foremost American civil rights scholars in the United States. ... John Chipman Gray (July 14, 1839 - February 25, 1915) was an American scholar of property law and professor at Harvard Law School. ... Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. ... Morton J. Horwitz (born 1938) is a legal historian and law professor at Harvard Law School. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Duncan Kennedy (*1942 in Washington, D.C.) is the Carter Professor of General Jurisprudence at Harvard Law School. ... Christopher Columbus Langdell (May 22, 1826 _ July 6, 1906), American jurist, was born in New Boston, Hillsborough county, New Hampshire, of English and Scotch-Irish ancestry. ... Daniel Meltzer is the Story Professor of Law, and Vice Dean for Physical Planning at Harvard Law School. ... Soia Mentschikoff (April 5, 1915 - June 18, 1984) was an American lawyer, law professor, and legal scholar, best known for her work in the development and drafting of the Uniform Commercial Code. ... Arthur R. Miller is the Bruce Bromley Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, and is considered the leading American authority on Civil Procedure. ... Martha Minow is the Jeremiah Smith, Jr. ... Charles Nesson is William F. Weld Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and serves as the Faculty Co-Director of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society, which he co-founded in 1996 with Jonathan Zittrain. ... Charles Ogletree is a law professor at Harvard Law School who has written books on legal topics, including All Deliberate Speed: Reflections on the First Half-Century of Brown v. ... John Palfrey (b. ... Roscoe Pound (1870 - 1964) was a distinguished American legal scholar and educator. ... American jurist Joseph Story Joseph Story (September 18, 1779 - September 10, 1845), American jurist, was born at Marblehead, Massachusetts. ... Laurence Henry Tribe (born October 10, 1941) is a professor of constitutional law at Harvard Law School and the Carl M. Loeb University Professor. ... Roberto Unger is a Brazilian contemporary social theorist and law professor at Harvard Law School. ... Elizabeth Warren is the author of The Two-Income Trap: Why Middle-Class Mothers and Fathers Are Going Broke (ISBN 0465090826) An article in Time magazine by Maryanna Murray Buechner was entitled Parent Trap Want to go bust? Have a kid. ... Jonathan Zittrain Jonathan Zittrain (born 1969) holds the Chair in Internet Governance and Regulation at Oxford University and is a principal of the Oxford Internet Institute. ...

In popular culture

Several movies and television shows take place at least in part at the school. Most of them have scenes filmed on location at or around Harvard University. They include: Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ...

Many popular movies and television shows also feature characters introduced as Harvard Law graduates. Some of these include: Legally Blonde is a 2001 comedy film starring Reese Witherspoon, produced by Marc E. Platt for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios and directed by Robert Luketic. ... This article is about the 1993 film. ... Soul Man is a comedy movie made in 1986 about a man who undergoes transracial transformation with pills to qualify for an affirmative action placement at Harvard Law School. ... The Paper Chase was a 1970 novel, as well as a 1973 movie based on the novel and a television series based on the movie. ... Love Story is a 1970 romantic drama film written by Erich Segal based on his 1970 best-selling novel, and directed by Arthur Hiller. ... Love Story in Harvard (Korean language: 러브스토리 인 하버드) is a romantic 16-episode Korean drama television series broadcast in 2004. ...

Scott Turow, a novelist, has also written a book about his experience as a first-year law student in his memoir One L. The Paper Chase was also originally a novel, written by John Jay Osborn, Jr. NCIS is a CBS network show about a team of special agents from the Naval Criminal Investigative Service of the United States Navy and United States Marine Corps. ... Two Weeks Notice is a 2002 romantic comedy film starring Sandra Bullock and Hugh Grant from Warner Bros. ... The People vs. ... Sex and the City is a popular American cable television program. ... Ally McBeal is an American television series which ran on the FOX network from 1997 to 2002 and was one of the best-known dramedy television series of the 1990s winning several awards. ... Quiz Show is a 1994 film which tells the true story of the Twenty One quiz show scandal of the 1950s. ... This article is about the 1993 film. ... A Few Good Men, a play by Aaron Sorkin, was acclaimed on Broadway and was subsequently made into a successful film in 1992. ... Matlock was an American television legal drama starring Andy Griffith as attorney Ben Matlock. ... The Practice was an American legal drama created by David E. Kelley centering on the partners and associates at a Boston, Massachusetts law firm. ... Law & Order is a long-running American television police procedural and legal drama set in New York City. ... Passions is a multi-Daytime Emmy Award-winning American television soap opera created by veteran writer James E. Reilly. ... A movie adaptation of Turows bestselling book Presumed Innocent was made in 1990. ... John Jay Osborn Jr. ...


References

  1. ^ http://www.law.harvard.edu/about/, http://www.ifla.org/IV/ifla67/visit-e.htm
  2. ^ http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2006/10/09/harvard-law-school-revamps-its-one-l-curriculum
  3. ^ HLS Faculty Directory. Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  4. ^ Quick Facts: W&M Law School. Marshall-Wythe School of Law. Retrieved on 2007-08-24.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 236th day of the year (237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Harvard Law School - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1237 words)
Harvard Law School (HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University.
Harvard Law School is also noted for its size -- in its JD program, each class has approximately 550 students, compared to about 180 in each of Stanford, Yale and Chicago's, and 350 in each of Columbia and NYU's.
The Harvard Law School is home to the Berkman Center for Internet and Society, which focuses on the legal study of cyberspace.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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