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Encyclopedia > Harvard College
Harvard Yard

Harvard College is the undergraduate section and oldest school of Harvard University, a private university in the United States, founded in 1636 by the Massachusetts legislature. The College is instructed by the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, which also instructs the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. In accordance with the American norm, the College remains the heart of the University, and people often confuse the two; therefore, see Harvard University for more information relevant to life, academics, etc. at Harvard College. In 2006 The New York Times wrote that "the most prestigious college in the world, of course, is Harvard, and the gap between it and every other university is often underestimated. Colleges that emphasize teaching may well offer a better education than Harvard. But it still exerts a pull on teenagers that is unmatched."[1] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (790x623, 231 KB) Summary self-created Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (790x623, 231 KB) Summary self-created Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Harvard redirects here. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... The Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences (also known as FAS) is the largest of the seven faculties that comprise Harvard University. ... The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS) is the academic unit responsible for many post-baccalaureate degree programs offered through the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University. ... Harvard redirects here. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ...

Contents

History

Lt Gov William Stoughton circa 1700 overlooking one of the buildings of Harvard College, the earliest known view of a Harvard building
Lt Gov William Stoughton circa 1700 overlooking one of the buildings of Harvard College, the earliest known view of a Harvard building

The name Harvard College dates to 1636. In that year the New College, voted into theoretical existence two years earlier by the General Court of the colony, but still without a single building, teacher, or student, was named in honor of the deceased John Harvard, a minister from nearby Charlestown, who in his will had bequeathed to it his library and a sum of money. In the understanding of its members at the time, the name "Harvard College" probably referred to the first (as they foresaw it) of a number of colleges which would someday make up a university along the lines of Oxford or Cambridge. The American usage of the word college had not yet developed: to the founders of Harvard, a college was an association of teachers and scholars for education, room, and board. Only a university could examine for and grant degrees; nonetheless, unhampered by this technicality, Harvard graduated its first students in 1642. Twenty-three years later, in 1665, Caleb Cheeshahteaumauk, "from the Wampanoag...did graduate from Harvard, the first Indian to do so in the colonial period" (Monaghan, E. J., 2005, p.55, 59). "His Latin address to the coroporation (New England Corporation), which begins, 'Honoratissimi benefactores' (Most honored benefactors), has been preserved. (Gookin, as quoted in Monaghan, E. J., 2005, p.60). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1096x1084, 585 KB)Lt Gov William Stoughton (1631–1701) overlooking one of the buildings of Harvard College, quite probably Stoughton Hall for which he was its main benefactor. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1096x1084, 585 KB)Lt Gov William Stoughton (1631–1701) overlooking one of the buildings of Harvard College, quite probably Stoughton Hall for which he was its main benefactor. ... William Stoughton (30 September 1631 – 7 July 1701) was in charge of what has come to be known as the Salem Witch Trials, first as the Chief Magistrate of the Special Court of Oyer and Terminer in 1692, and then as the Chief Justice of the Superior Court of Judicature... Events January 1 - Russia accepts Julian calendar. ... Year 1636 (MDCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... John Harvard Statue in the Harvard University Yard. ... Birdseye view of Boston, Charlestown, and Bunker Hill between 1890 and 1910. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the most prestigious universities in the world. ... For other uses, see College (disambiguation). ... Events January 4 - Charles I attempts to arrest five leading members of the Long Parliament, but they escape. ...


But no further colleges were founded beside it; and as Harvard began to grant higher degrees in the late eighteenth century, people started to call it "Harvard University." "Harvard College" survived, nonetheless; in accordance with the newly-emerging American usage of the words, it was the undergraduate division of the university—which was not a collection of similar colleges, but a collection of unique schools, each teaching a different subject.


Harvard's principal governing board (which happens to be the oldest continuous corporation in The Americas) still goes by its original name of "The President and Fellows of Harvard College" even though it has charge of the entire university and the "fellows" today are simply external trustees such as those who govern most American educational bodies—not residential educators like the fellows of an Oxbridge college. In current Harvard parlance, this governing board is frequently referred to simply as The Harvard Corporation. For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ... World map showing the Americas The Americas are the lands of the Western hemisphere historically considered to consist of the continents of North America and South America with their associated islands and regions. ... The President and Fellows of Harvard College (also known as the Harvard Corporation) is the more fundamental of Harvard Universitys two governing boards. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Oxbridge is a name used to refer to the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, the two oldest in the United Kingdom and the English-speaking world. ...


Academics

Admission

Harvard College is considered to be one of the top undergraduate colleges in the United States, and admission to it is highly desired. For the class of 2010, the College admitted 2,109 students out of 22,753 applicants for an overall admit rate of 9.3%. The 2012 admissions pool was a record-setting 27,278 vying for admission into the pool of roughly 2,100 students.[2]


Many traditions around the College exist, including the superstitious belief that a person who touches the foot of the John Harvard statue during his campus visit is likely to be granted admission. Tour guides estimate that more than a thousand high school students touch the statue each year, the most popular location being the left foot. A few enterprising students kiss the statue, but this is generally not recommended since a popular undergraduate game is to urinate on that foot while drunk.[3] For other uses, see Superstition (disambiguation). ...


In a controversial announcement in March 2008, after the academic year 2008-2009 transfer applications had already been submitted, Harvard denied admission to all transfer applicants because it determined housing would not be available. Some transfer applicants described this decision as “heartbreaking” and “very unfair.”[4] Transfer students will not be accepted for the 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 academic years.[5]


House system

Nearly all students at Harvard College live on campus. First-year students live in dormitories in or near Harvard Yard (see List of Harvard dormitories). Upperclass students live mainly in a system of twelve residential "Houses", which serve as administrative units of the College as well as dormitories. Each house is presided over by a "Master"—a senior faculty member who is responsible for guiding the social life and community of the House—and a "Resident Dean", who acts as dean of the students in the House in its administrative role. A typical American college dorm room Another typical not-so-clean college dorm room Watterson Towers, Illinois State University Potomac Hall, second-largest dormitory at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. ... Harvard Yard in 1905. ... This is a list of dormitories at Harvard College. ... The Allston Burr Resident Dean, or simply the Resident Dean, is the highest-ranking academic officer of an undergraduate House at Harvard College. ... In an educational setting, a dean is a person with significant authority . ...


The House system was instituted by Harvard president Abbott Lawrence Lowell in the 1930s, although the number of Houses, their demographics, and the methods by which students are assigned to particular Houses have all changed drastically since the founding of the system. Funds for the Houses were donated, after much debate and controversy over the reforms, by Edward Harkness, a Yale graduate, who thus became the greatest benefactor to the university in Harvard history. At the same time, Harkness funded the development of Yale's very similar residential college system. (Harkness also donated funds to Phillips Exeter Academy, creating the Harkness plan of teaching around oval wooden tables.) Lowell modeled it on the system of constituent colleges of Oxford and Cambridge, and the Houses borrow terminology from Oxford and Cambridge such as Junior Common Room (the set of undergraduates affiliated with a House) and Senior Common Room (the Master, Resident Dean, and other faculty members, advisors, and graduate students associated with the House). Non-faculty members of the Senior Common Room of a House are given the title "Tutor" and aid the students with day-to-day questions and concerns. The President is the chief administrator of Harvard University. ... Abbott Lawrence Lowell (1856–1943) portrait by John Singer Sargent Abbott Lawrence Lowell (January 1, 1856–January 6, 1943) was a U.S. educator, historian, and President of Harvard University (1909–33). ... Edward Stephen Harkness (1874 - 1940) was an American philanthropist. ... YALE (Yet Another Learning Environment) is an environment for machine learning experiments and data mining. ... A residential college is an organisational pattern for a division of a university that places academic activity in a community setting of students and faculty, usually at a residence and with shared meals, the college having a degree of autonomy and a federated relationship with the overall university. ... For other uses, see College (disambiguation). ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the most prestigious universities in the world. ... The term Junior Combination Room or Junior Common Room (JCR) is used in many British universities (as well as at Harvard College in the United States) to refer to the collective of students (similar to a students union) at a constituent part of a university, typically a college or a... Within an undergraduate college, the Senior Common Room consists of the academic officers who hold a degree above the undergraduate degree. ...


Nine of the Houses are situated south of Harvard Yard, near the busy commercial district of Harvard Square, along or close to the northern banks of the Charles River, and so are known colloquially as the River Houses. These are: Chess players in Harvard Square in August of 2005 Harvard Square is a large triangular area in the center of Cambridge, Massachusetts, at the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue, Brattle Street, and John F. Kennedy Street. ... The Charles River from the Boston side, facing Cambridge and the main campus of Harvard University. ...

The remainder of the residential Houses are located around Harvard's Quadrangle (or "the Quad", formerly the "Radcliffe Quadrangle"), in a more suburban residential neighborhood half a mile (800 m) northwest of Harvard Yard. These housed Radcliffe College students until Radcliffe merged its residential system with Harvard. They are: The Adams House dining hall Adams House is one of the twelve undergraduate houses at Harvard University, located between Harvard Square and the Charles River in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... The tower of Dunster House Dunster House was built in 1930, and is one of the first two Harvard University dormitories constructed under President Abbott Lawrence Lowells House Plan, and one of the seven Houses given to Harvard by Edward Harkness. ... Henry Dunster(c. ... Eliot House is one of twelve upper-class residential houses at Harvard University. ... Prof. ... Kirkland House Yard Kirkland House is one of the 12 undergraduate houses at Harvard University, located near the Charles River in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... John Thornton Kirkland (1770 - 1840) served as President of Harvard University from 1810 to 1828. ... The Leverett House Crest McKinlock Courtyard Leverett House is one of twelve residence houses for upperclass undergraduates at Harvard University. ... John Leverett (1616 - March 16, 1679) was a colonial magistrate, merchant, soldier and governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony John Leverett was born, perhaps, in Boston, England. ... The sky-blue bell tower of Lowell House Lowell House is one of the twelve undergraduate residential houses at Harvard University for sophomores, juniors, and seniors. ... The Lowell family was founded in America by Percival Lowle (1571–1664); his grown sons John (1595–1647) and Richard (1602–82); and his daughter, Joanna Oliver (1609–77), when their families sailed from England to the newly established settlement of Newburyport on the north shore of the Merrimack... Mather House is one of the upperclass residential houses at Harvard College. ... The Reverend Increase Mather (June 21, 1639 – August 23, 1723) was a major figure in the early history of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and Province of Massachusetts Bay (now the Federal state of Massachusetts). ... This is an article about the residential house at Harvard. ... Boston redirects here. ... Josiah Quincy III (February 4, 1772 – July 1, 1864) was a U.S. educator and political figure. ... Winthrop House Crest John Winthrop House is the one of the twelve undergraduate residences at Harvard College and home to slightly under 400 students. ... A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony Capital Charlestown, Boston History  - Established 1629  - New England Confederation 1643  - Dominion of New England 1686  - Province of Massachusetts Bay 1692  - Disestablished 1692 The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on... John Winthrop (12 January 1587/8–26 March 1649) led a group of English Puritans to the New World, joined the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1629 and was elected their first governor on April 8, 1630. ... John Winthrop (December 19, 1714 – May 3, 1779) (not to be confused with his great-great-grandfather John Winthrop, founder of the Massachusetts Bay colony) was the 2nd Hollis Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy in Harvard College. ... The Quadrangle, looking north toward Pforzheimer House. ... “Suburbia” redirects here. ... Radcliffe College was a liberal arts womens college in Cambridge, Massachusetts, closely associated with Harvard University. ...

  • Cabot House, previously called South House, renamed in 1983 for Harvard donors Thomas Dudley Cabot and Virginia Cabot;
  • Currier House, named for Radcliffe alumna Audrey Bruce Currier;
  • Pforzheimer House, often called PfoHo for short, previously called North House, renamed in 1995 for Harvard donors Carl and Carol Pforzheimer

There is a thirteenth House, Dudley House [1], which is nonresidential but fulfills, for some graduate students and off-campus undergraduates (including members of the Dudley Co-op) the same administrative and social functions as the residential Houses do for undergraduates who live on campus. It is named after Thomas Dudley, who signed the charter of Harvard College when he was Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Full name Thomas and Virginia Cabot House Latin Name Domus Capoceus Motto Tres Pisces—Cor Unum Translation Three Fish—One Heart Named after Thomas and Virginia Cabot Previous Names South House, East House Established 1901 Sister College Trumbull College Freshman Dorm Wigglesworth Hall House Master Jay and Cheryl Harris HoCo... Thomas Dudley Cabot (May 1, 1897 - June 8, 1995) was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the son of Godfrey Lowell Cabot and Maria Buckminster (Moors) Cabot. ... Currier House is one of the twelve undergraduate residences of Harvard College, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Pforzheimer House, nicknamed PfoHo (FOE-hoe) (and formerly named North House or NoHo), is one of twelve undergraduate residential Houses at Harvard University. ... Thomas Dudley (October 12, 1576–July 31, 1653) was a colonial magistrate who served several terms as governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ... Bold textThis list of Governors of the Massachusetts Bay Colony is sorted by year (from 1630 to 1680). ...


Tentative plans have been proposed for expanding the House system using land owned by Harvard in Allston, Massachusetts, across the Charles River from the River Houses.[citation needed] Suggestions include moving the Quadrangle Houses to Allston and building up to eight new Houses there. It has not yet been decided whether any of these proposals will be adopted. Allston is a diverse neighborhood in the city of Boston, Massachusetts with a population which includes Boston natives, students from neighboring Boston University, Boston College, MIT and Harvard and various ethnic groups such as Chinese, Vietnamese, Brazilian, and Irish. ...


Harvard's residential houses are paired with Yale's residential colleges in sister relationships; see the Harvard-Yale sister colleges article for more information. Yale redirects here. ... Harvard Colleges residential houses and Yales residential colleges have established sisterly relationships, much like the Oxbridge sister colleges. ...


Core curriculum

Harvard requires all undergraduates to fulfill "the core," which requires students to take courses in 7 of 11 academic areas (such as Moral Reasoning and Social Analysis); each concentration exempts students from four. In 2006, Harvard announced it would change this policy, making the academic areas broader, although it is unclear how and when the system will change.[citation needed]


Concentrations

Majors at Harvard College are known as concentrations. As of 2005, Harvard College offered 41 different concentrations: An academic major, major concentration, concentration, or simply major is a mainly a U.S. and Canadian term for a college or university students main field of specialization during his or her undergraduate studies. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Joint concentrations with a primary and secondary departmental focus are allowed by many departments provided the student can demonstrate how he/she intends to combine the subjects meaningfully. In April 2006, as part of a curricular review plan for College students, a Harvard faculty meeting approved for the first time the institution of secondary concentrations, known as minors at most other schools. A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... This is about the social science. ... Applied mathematics is a branch of mathematics that concerns itself with the mathematical techniques typically used in the application of mathematical knowledge to other domains. ... For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... Spiral Galaxy ESO 269-57 Astrophysics is the branch of astronomy that deals with the physics of the universe, including the physical properties (luminosity, density, temperature, and chemical composition) of celestial objects such as stars, galaxies, and the interstellar medium, as well as their interactions. ... Biochemistry (from Greek: , bios, life and Egyptian kēme, earth[1]) is the study of the chemical processes in living organisms. ... For the song by Girls Aloud see Biology (song) Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, speech lit. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... For other uses, see Classics (disambiguation). ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... Earth science (also known as geoscience, the geosciences or the Earth Sciences), is an all-embracing term for the sciences related to the planet Earth. ... This article is about the geographical region. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... Engineering is the discipline and profession of applying scientific knowledge and utilizing natural laws and physical resources in order to design and implement materials, structures, machines, devices, systems, and processes that realize a desired objective and meet specified criteria. ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... This topic is considered to be an essential subject on Wikipedia. ... Environmental science is the study of the interactions among the physical, chemical and biological components of the environment; with a focus on pollution and degradation of the environment related to human activities; and the impact on biodiversity and sustainability from local and global development. ... Public policy is a course of action or inaction chosen by public authorities to address a problem. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ... The Germanic languages are a group of related languages constituting a branch of the Indo-European (IE) language family. ... This article is about the study of the past in human terms. ... The history of science and technology (HST) is a field of history which examines how humanitys understanding of science and technology has changed over the millennia. ... This article is about the academic discipline of art history. ... For the journal, see Linguistics (journal). ... Comparative literature (sometimes abbreviated Comp. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... Inhabitants of the Near East, late nineteenth century. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... Psychological science redirects here. ... The Major religious groups of the world. ... The Romance languages (sometimes referred to as Romanic languages) are a branch of the Indo-European language family that comprises all the languages that descend from Latin, the language of the Roman Empire. ... Sanskrit ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... The Slavic languages (also called Slavonic languages) comprise the languages of the Slavic peoples. ... Social studies is a term used to describe the broad study of the various fields which involve past and current human behavior and interactions. ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge [1]) is the systematic and scientific study of society, including patterns of social relationships, social action, and culture[2]. Areas studied in sociology can range from the analysis of brief contacts between anonymous... This article is about the field of statistics. ... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The term minor (from Latin smaller, lesser) has several meanings: Minor is a legal term for a young person, see Minor (law). ...


Other special concentrations include the Mind/Brain/Behavior Interfaculty Initiative, a certification program in Neurosciences run jointly by the departments of Anthropology, Biochemical Sciences, Biology, Computer Science, History of Science, Linguistics, Philosophy, and Psychology. In 2005, Harvard College and the New England Conservatory began offering a joint 5-year program for a combined Harvard Bachelor's degree and NEC Master of Arts. Drawing of the cells in the chicken cerebellum by S. Ramón y Cajal Neuroscience is a field that is devoted to the scientific study of the nervous system. ... The Greater Boston Youth Symphony Orchestra performing in Jordan Hall, New England Conservatory of Music. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Student organizations

Harvard has hundreds of student organizations.[citation needed] Every spring there is an "Arts First week", founded by John Lithgow during which arts and culture organizations show off performances, cook meals, or present other work; in 2005 over 40% of students participated in at least one Arts First event. Notable organizations include the student-run business organization Harvard Student Agencies, the daily newspaper The Harvard Crimson, the humor magazine the Harvard Lampoon, the a cappella groups the Din & Tonics and the Krokodiloes, and the public service umbrella organization the Phillips Brooks House Association (PBHA). Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... John Arthur Lithgow (IPA: [ˈʤɔn ˈlɪθɡaʊ]) (born October 19, 1945) is an American actor perhaps best-known for his starring role as Dick Solomon in the NBC sitcom 3rd Rock from the Sun. ... Phillips Brooks House Association (PBHA) is a student-run, staff supported public service/social action organization at Harvard College providing a variety of services to the Greater Boston community. ...


Media and campus publications

The Harvard Lampoon "castle" with its characteristic rooftop ibis and its purple and yellow door
The Harvard Lampoon "castle" with its characteristic rooftop ibis and its purple and yellow door
  • The Harvard Crimson is United States' second oldest daily college newspaper and is doordropped to student rooms.
  • The Harvard Advocate is the oldest continuously published college literary magazine. Famous past members include T. S. Eliot and Theodore Roosevelt. Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer was once Publisher.
  • The Harvard International Review, one of the most widely-distributed undergraduate journals in the world with 35,000 readers in more than 70 countries. The HIR regularly features prominent scholars and policymakers from around the globe.
  • The Harvard Lampoon, an undergraduate humor organization and publication founded in 1876 and rival to the Harvard Crimson. The magazine was originally modelled on the former British satirical periodical Punch, and has outlived it to become the world's oldest humor magazine. Conan O'Brien was president of the Lampoon. The National Lampoon was founded as an offshoot in 1970.
  • Radio station WHRB (95.3FM Cambridge), is run exclusively by Harvard students, and has purchased space on the Harvard campus in the basement of Pennypacker Hall, a freshman dorm. Known throughout the Boston metropolitan area for its classical, jazz, underground rock, blues, and hip-hop programming, and its seasonal "Orgy" format, where the entire catalog of a certain band, composer, or artist is played in sequence.
  • The Harvard Interactive Media Group publishes a quarterly academic review devoted to media studies and video games.
  • The Harvard Political Review, a quarterly undergraduate publication of U.S. and international politics founded in 1969 by Al Gore.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (709x1003, 139 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (709x1003, 139 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Harvard Crimson, of Harvard University, is the United States oldest continuously published daily college newspaper. ... The Harvard Advocate, the premier literary magazine of Harvard College, is the oldest continuously published college literary magazine in the United States. ... For other persons named Thomas Eliot, see Thomas Eliot (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... Steven Anthony Ballmer (born March 24, 1956 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American businessman and has been the chief executive officer of Microsoft Corporation since January 2000. ... The Harvard International Review is a quarterly journal of international relations published by the Harvard International Relations Council, Inc. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Look up punch in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Conan Christopher OBrien (born April 18, 1963)[1] is an Emmy Award-winning American television host and TV writer, best known as host of NBCs Late Night with Conan OBrien. ... January 1973 cover of National Lampoon National Lampoon was an American humor magazine that began in 1970 as an offshoot of the Harvard Lampoon. ... WHRB is a commercial FM radio station in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Harvard Interactive Media Group logo The Harvard Interactive Media Group is a undergraduate student club at Harvard College dedicated to the promotion of interactive media studies, the academic analysis of video games and other new media. ... Media Studies is the study of the constitution and effects of media. ... This article is about computer and video games. ... November 3, 2004 issue of The Harvard Political Review. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... The Harvard Asia Pacific Review is a semi-annual journal about the Asia-Pacific Region published by students at Harvard University. ... Ezra Vogel is an American author who has written several books on Japan and Asia. ... Larry Summers Lawrence Henry Summers (born November 30, 1954) is an American economist, politician, and academic. ... The Right Honourable Christopher Francis Patten, Baron Patten of Barnes, CH, PC (born 12 May 1944) is a prominent British Conservative politician. ... Jiāng Zémín (Traditional Chinese: 江澤民, Simplified Chinese: 江泽民, Hanyu Pinyin: Jiāng Zémín, Wade-Giles: Chiang Tse-min, Cantonese (Jyutping): gong1 zaak6 man4) (born August 17, 1926) was the core of the third generation of Communist Party of China leaders, serving as General Secretary of the Communist... Ieoh Ming Pei (貝聿銘 pinyin Bèi Yùmíng) is a Chinese American architect born in Suzhou, China on April 26, 1917. ... Chan Kong-Sang (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ), also known as Jackie Chan Sing Lung (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) or Jackie Chan SBS, (born on April 7, 1954) is a Chinese martial artist, action star, actor, director, screenwriter, film producer, singer and stunt performer. ... The Harvard Independent is a weekly newspaper produced by undergraduate students at Harvard University. ...

Community service organizations

  • The Phillips Brooks House Association is an umbrella community service organization operating in Phillips Brooks House of Harvard Yard, consists of 78 program committees and over 1,800 student volunteers, and serves close to 10,000 clients in the Cambridge and Boston area.

Harvard Yard in 1905. ...

Political organizations

  • The Harvard Institute of Politics, a non-partisan living memorial to President John F. Kennedy that promotes public service and provides political opportunities to undergraduates.
  • The Harvard College Democrats, the largest partisan political group on campus.
  • The Harvard Republican Club, one of the largest groups on campus and the nation's oldest college political group, founded in 1888.
  • Harvard Model Congress, the nation's oldest and largest congressional simulation conference, provides thousands of high school students from across the U.S. and abroad with the opportunity to experience American government first-hand.
  • The Harvard Project for Asian and International Relations, the campus's major student group focusing on Asian politics and business.

The Kennedy family and its friends founded Harvards Institute of Politics (IOP) to serve as a living memorial to President John F. Kennedy shortly after his death. ... Harvard Model Congress is the oldest and largest congressional simulation conference in the world, providing high school students from across the U.S. and abroad with an opportunity to experience American government first-hand. ...

Musical groups

A cappella groups

  • Harvard Krokodiloes, an all-male a cappella group, Harvard's oldest
  • Harvard LowKeys, mixed vocal, both male and female
  • Harvard Din & Tonics, an all-male a capella group founded in 1979
  • Harvard-Radcliffe Veritones, mixed vocal, both male and female
  • Harvard Callbacks, mixed vocal, both male and female
  • Harvard Opportunes, mixed vocal, both male and female
  • Radcliffe Pitches, all-female a cappella group founded in 1975
  • Fallen Angels, all-female

Logo Founded in 1946, The Harvard Krokodiloes are Harvard Universitys oldest a cappella singing group. ... The Harvard Din & Tonics symbol - white tie, tails and all The Harvard Din & Tonics (or Dins, as they are affectionately known) are a world-renowned 14-voice male jazz a cappella group formed in 1979. ... The Radcliffe Pitches is Harvard Universitys premiere female a cappella (or a capella) singing ensemble, founded in 1975 at the historic Hasty Pudding Club. ...

Choral groups

  • Harvard University Choir, the oldest university choir in the nation, formally established in 1834 but in existence since the eighteenth century, performs the oldest Christmas Carol Services in continuous existence in North America.
  • Harvard Glee Club, the oldest college chorus in America, founded in 1858.
  • Radcliffe Choral Society, founded in 1898, an all-women chorus.
  • The Harvard-Radcliffe Collegium Musicum is a select mixed-voice choir formed in 1971 when Harvard and Radcliffe Colleges merged.
  • The Harvard Radcliffe Chorus is the largest mixed choir at Harvard University and has a diverse membership consisting of faculty members, staff, community members, and both undergraduate and graduate students. HRC was founded in 1979 and continues to perform twice a year as of 2005.
  • The Kuumba Singers of Harvard College, is the largest multicultural organization in the College and focuses on the music and art of the black Diaspora.

Harvard Glee Club logo The Harvard Glee Club is a 60-voice, all-male choral ensemble at Harvard University. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... The Harvard-Radcliffe Collegium Musicum is an undergraduate mixed chorus Harvard University, comprised of roughly 60 voices, drawing from both the undergraduate and graduate student populations. ... The Harvard Radcliffe Chorus (HRC) is the largest co-ed choir at Harvard University and has a diverse membership consisting of faculty members, staff, community members, and both undergraduate and graduate students. ...

Orchestras and bands

The logo of the Pierian Sodality of 1808 The Harvard-Radcliffe Orchestra (HRO) is a collegiate symphony orchestra comprised of Harvard students and based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... The Harvard University Band (HUB) is the official student marching band of Harvard University. ... Robert D. Levin (b. ...

Theater and dance

  • The Harvard-Radcliffe Dramatic Club is an organization that connects smaller campus theater groups and supports all campus productions. The HRDC directly oversees productions within the Loeb Theater, which it shares with the nationally acclaimed American Repertory Theatre. The HRDC also organizes seminars and workshops to connect students with professionals in the field.
  • Hasty Pudding Theatricals, known informally simply as The Pudding, is a theatrical student society at Harvard University, known for its burlesque musicals. They present original student-written and -composed musicals with near-professional production values. Formed in 1795 as a fraternity, the Pudding has performed a production every year since 1891, except during World Wars I and II. Each production is entirely student-written. Although the cast remains all-male (with female parts performed by actors in drag), women participate in the productions as members of the business staff, orchestra, and tech crew.
  • The Harvard-Radcliffe Gilbert and Sullivan Players, founded in 1956 is an independent, nonprofit student theater group, dedicated to performing comic opera.
  • The Immediate Gratification Players (IGP) and On Thin Ice (OTI), Harvard's two undergraduate improv troupes, are among the oldest collegiate Improvisational comedy groups in the nation. Unlike many college troupes, both groups' constitutions require they present all campus shows free of charge.
  • Harvard blackC.A.S.T. (Community and Student Theater) is Harvard's theater group dedicated to black theatrical production and fostering a black theater community on campus. Past productions include Amen Corner, Before it Hits Home, and The Colored Museum.
  • The Harvard-Radcliffe Dance Company
  • The Harvard Ballet Company
  • The Harvard Ballroom Team, one of the largest national collegiate ballroom teams
  • The Harvard Ballet Folklórico de Aztlán
  • The Harvard Intertribal Indian Dance Troupe performs Native American powwow dances.
  • The Harvard Pan-African Dance and Music Ensemble is dedicated to raising awareness of the depth and diversity of African expressive culture through the performance of dance and music from all over the continent.
  • The Harvard Crimson Dance Team

The American Repertory Theatre (or A.R.T.) is housed in the Loeb Drama Center at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... The Hasty Pudding Theatricals, known informally simply as The Pudding, is a theatrical student society at Harvard University, known for its burlesque musicals and for its status as the oldest collegiate theatrical organization in the United States. ... Improvisational comedy (also called improv) is comedy that is performed with a little to no predetermination of subject matter and structure. ...

Academic organizations

  • Harvard College Stem Cell Society A student group dedicated to raising awareness about the ethics, politics, and science of stem cell research.
  • Women in Science at Harvard-Radcliffe

Pre-Professional organizations

  • Harvard Undergraduate Women in Business The largest undergraduate business organization on Harvard's campus.
  • Harvard Investment Association An undergraduate student group founded in 1993. It is dedicated to student education on investing and financial markets and providing opportunities for investing experience.
  • The Harvard College Business Club is Harvard's first mainstream business club, geared towards providing a general business education. In large part, HCBC seeks to accomplish this goal through its emerging online social network, which connects undergraduates with business leaders and potential employers.

Unrecognized student groups

The Fly Clubs clubhouse, pictured in 1935. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... A menu from a dinner at the Porcellian Club 1884 (original in the Buttolph collection of menus, NYPL.) The Porcellian Club is a male-only final club at Harvard University, sometimes called the Porc or the P.C. The year of founding is usually given as 1791, when a group... Alpha Epsilon Pi (ΑΕΠ or AEPi) is currently the only international Jewish college fraternity in North America, with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Phi Iota Alpha (ΦΙΑ), established December 26, 1931, is the oldest Latino fraternity in existence and works to motivate people, develop leaders, and create innovative ways to unite the Latino community. ... Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... Delta Gamma (ΔΓ) is one of the oldest and largest womens fraternities[1] in the United States and Canada, with its Executive Offices based in Columbus, Ohio. ... Kappa Alpha Theta (ΚΑΘ) is an international womens fraternity founded on January 27, 1870 at DePauw University. ... Kappa Kappa Gamma (ΚΚΓ) is a college womens fraternity, founded on October 13, 1870 at Monmouth College, Illinois. ... The Hasty Pudding Club was founded by Nymphus Hatch, a junior at Harvard College, in 1790. ...

Athletics

According the university, Harvard is home to the largest Division I intercollegiate athletics program in the U.S., with 41 varsity teams and over 1,500 student-athletes.[3] Harvard is one of eight members of the Ivy League, along with Brown University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Princeton University, The University of Pennsylvania, and Yale University.[4] Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Cornell redirects here. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... The University of Pennsylvania (commonly referred to as Penn or UPenn, although the former is the preferred and recognized nickname of the University) is a private, nonsectarian, research university located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Yale redirects here. ...


Harvard and Yale enjoy the oldest intercollegiate athletic rivalry in the United States, the Harvard-Yale Regatta, dating back to 1852, when rowing crews from each institution first met on Lake Winnipesaukee, New Hampshire. Harvard won that contest by two boat lengths. Since 1859, the crews have met nearly every year (except during major wars). The race is typically held in early June in New London, Connecticut. Yales Blade The Harvard-Yale Boat Race or Harvard-Yale Regatta is an annual rowing race between Yale and Harvard universities. ... Lake Winnipesaukee at Sunset Lake Winnipesaukee is the largest lake in New Hampshire. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Motto: MARE LIBERUM Coordinates: , NECTA Norwich-New London Region Southeastern Connecticut Settled 1646 (Pequot Plantation) Named 1658 (New London) Incorporated (city) 1784 Government  - Type Council-manager  - City council Margaret Mary Curtin, Mayor Kevin J. Cavanagh, Dep. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ...


Better known is the annual Harvard-Yale football game, known to insiders of both institutions as simply, "The Game." It was first played in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1875. Harvard won the initial contest 4-0. In recent years, The Game is always played on the Saturday before Thanksgiving, making it one of many significant games played on "Rivalry Day." Half-time festivities at The Game, Yale Bowl The Game (always capitalized) is a title given to several U.S. college football rivalry games, but most particularly the annual contest between Harvard and Yale. ... This article is about the city in Connecticut. ...


Sibley's Harvard Graduates

  • Harvard Librarian John Langdon Sibley published 3 volumes of biographies of Harvard Graduates from 1873 to 1885 covering the Classes of 1642 to 1679 and left a posthumous fund to the Massachusetts Historical Society to continue this project: Clifford K. Shipton published 14 volumes covering the Classes of 1690 to 1771 from 1933 to 1975; In 1999 the 18th volume was published covering the Classes of 1772 to 1774.
  • Beginning with Class of 1820 Regular Class Reports were published.[citation needed]

The Massachusetts Historical Society is a a major historical archive specializing in early American, Massachusetts, and New England history. ...

Famous alumni

Architecture

Baseball 1933 Portrait of Philip Johnson by Carl Van Vechten Philip Cortelyou Johnson (July 8, 1906 – January 25, 2005) was an influential American architect. ... Richard Buckminster “Bucky” Fuller (July 12, 1895 – July 1, 1983)[1] was an American visionary, designer, architect, poet, author, and inventor. ...

Business Edward Leslie Grant (b. ...

Literature Ben Shalom Bernanke[1] (born December 13, 1953) (pronounced ber-NAN-kee, bər-nan-kē or ), is an American economist and current Chairman of the Board of Governors of the United States Federal Reserve. ... Sumner Murray Redstone (born Sumner Murray Rothstein on May 27, 1923 in Boston, Massachusetts) is majority owner and Chairman of the Board of the National Amusements theater chain. ... For other persons named Bill Gates, see Bill Gates (disambiguation). ... Steven Anthony Ballmer (born March 24, 1956 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American businessman and has been the chief executive officer of Microsoft Corporation since January 2000. ... For other people named William Randolph Hearst, see William Randolph Hearst (disambiguation) William Randolph Hearst I (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate. ... This article is about the television personality and host of Mad Money. ... For other persons named Paul Allen, see Paul Allen (disambiguation). ...

Performance arts - music, theater and film James Rufus Agee (November 27, 1909 – May 16, 1955) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist, screenwriter, journalist, poet, and film critic. ... Wallace Stevens Wallace Stevens (October 2, 1879 – August 2, 1955) was a major American Modernist poet. ... For other persons named Thomas Eliot, see Thomas Eliot (disambiguation). ... John Roderigo Dos Passos (January 14, 1896 — September 28, 1970) was an American novelist and artist. ... Cummings in 1953 Edward Estlin Cummings (October 14, 1894 – September 3, 1962), popularly known as E. E. Cummings, was an American poet, painter, essayist, and playwright. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: William S. Burroughs William Seward Burroughs II (February 5, 1914) — August 2, 1997; pronounced ), more commonly known as William S. Burroughs, was an American novelist, essayist, social critic, painter and spoken word performer. ... William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (pronounced [1]) (February 23, 1868 – August 27, 1963) was an African American civil rights activist, leader, Pan-Africanist, sociologist, educator, historian, writer, editor, poet, and scholar. ...

Philosophy Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (IPA pronunciation: )[1] (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American conductor, composer, and pianist. ... Rivers Cuomo (born June 13, 1970), is the lead singer, guitarist, and songwriter of the rock band Weezer. ... Matthew Paige Matt Damon (born October 8, 1970) is an American screenwriter and actor. ... John Uhler Lemmon III (February 8, 1925 – June 27, 2001), better known as Jack Lemmon, was a two-time Academy Award and Cannes Award-winning American actor and comedian. ... Hill Harper (born Frank Hill Harper on May 17, 1966) is an American film, television and stage actor. ... For the musician, see Tommy Lee. ... Tom Morello (born May 30, 1964, as Thomas Baptist Morello) is a Grammy Award-winning American guitarist of the band Rage Against the Machine. ... Conan Christopher OBrien (born April 18, 1963)[1] is an Emmy Award-winning American television host and TV writer, best known as host of NBCs Late Night with Conan OBrien. ... Natalie Portman (‎; born June 9, 1981) is a Golden Globe-winning, Academy Award-nominated Israeli-American actress. ... Joshua Redman (born February 1, 1969) is a prominent American Neo-bop jazz saxophonist who records for Nonesuch Records. ... Mira Katherine Sorvino (born September 28, 1967 in Tenafly, New Jersey) is an Oscar and Golden Globe Award-winning American actress. ... Michael Stern (born 1959) is a noted American symphony conductor. ... This is a Chinese name; the family name is Ma Yo-Yo Ma (traditional Chinese: ; simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) (b. ...

Politics Thoreau redirects here. ... Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, poet, and leader of the Transcendentalist movement in the early nineteenth century. ... George Santayana George Santayana (December 16, 1863, Madrid – September 26, 1952, Rome), was a philosopher, essayist, poet, and novelist. ... Charles Sanders Peirce Charles Sanders Peirce (September 10, 1839 – April 19, 1914) was an American logician, philosopher, scientist, and mathematician. ... Norbert Wiener Norbert Wiener (November 26, 1894, Columbia, Missouri – March 18, 1964, Stockholm Sweden) was an American theoretical and applied mathematician. ... W. V. Quine Willard Van Orman Quine (June 25, 1908 - December 25, 2000) was one of the most influential American philosophers and logicians of the 20th century. ... Daniel Clement Dennett (born March 28, 1942 in Boston, Massachusetts) is a prominent American philosopher whose research centers on philosophy of mind, philosophy of science and philosophy of biology, particularly as those fields relate to evolutionary biology and cognitive science. ... There are two Donald Davidsons: Donald Davidson (poet) Donald Davidson (philosopher) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...

Religion John Hancock (January 23 [O.S. January 12] 1737– October 8, 1793) was President of the Second Continental Congress and of the Congress of the Confederation, the first Governor of Massachusetts, and the first person to sign the United States Declaration of Independence. ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was a diplomat, politician, and the sixth President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829). ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), often referred to as FDR, was the 32nd (1933–1945) President of the United States. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Edward Kennedy Edward Moore Ted Kennedy, (born February 22, 1932, in Brookline, Massachusetts) is a Democratic U.S. senator from Massachusetts. ... Henry Alfred Kissinger (born Heinz Alfred Kissinger on May 27, 1923) is a German-born American politician, and 1973 Nobel Peace Prize laureate. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Elbridge Thomas Gerry (pronounced ) (July 17, 1744 – November 23, 1814) was an American statesman and diplomat. ... Meshech Weare (June 16, 1713 – January 14, 1786) was a farmer, lawyer, and revolutionary statesman from Hampton Falls, New Hampshire. ...

For more information, see List of Harvard University people. The Reverend Increase Mather (June 21, 1639 – August 23, 1723) was a major figure in the early history of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and Province of Massachusetts Bay (now the Federal state of Massachusetts). ... This article is about the 17th century Puritan minister. ... Portrait of Joseph Stevens Buckminster by Gilbert Stuart, painted circa 1810. ... Theodore Parker (August 24, 1810 - May 10, 1860) was a reforming American minister of the Unitarian church, and a Transcendentalist. ... The list of Harvard University people includes notable graduates, professors and administrators affiliated with Harvard University. ...


Fictional alumni

Major Charles Emerson Winchester III is a principal character on the television series, M*A*S*H, played by David Ogden Stiers. ... Quentin Compson is a fictional character created by William Faulkner. ... Christian Bale as Patrick Bateman Patrick Bateman is a fictional character, the protagonist and narrator of the novel American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis and its film adaptation. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ The New York Times, The Week in Review: Harvard Ends Early Admissions and Guess Who Wins, 17 September 2006
  2. ^ 27,000 Bid to Join Class of '12The Harvard Crimson
  3. ^ Harvard Crimson, The Truth About John Harvard, 18 September 2006
  4. ^ Transfers Crowded Out.
  5. ^ Transfer Admission Announcement.
  • Gookin, Daniel, Historical Collections, 53: Railton, "Vineyard's First Harvard Men," 91-112.
  • Monaghan, E. J. (2005). Learning to Read and Write in Colonial America University of Massachusetts Press. Boston: MA

The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Harvard Crimson, of Harvard University, is the United States oldest continuously published daily college newspaper. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Harvard College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2344 words)
Harvard College is the undergraduate section and oldest school of Harvard University, having been founded in 1636.
Harvard College is considered to be one of the top undergraduate colleges in the United States, and admission to it is highly desired.
The House system was instituted by Harvard president Abbott Lawrence Lowell in the 1930s, although the number of Houses, their demographics, and the methods by which students are assigned to particular Houses have all changed drastically since the founding of the system.
Harvard University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5323 words)
Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Harvard has a rivalry with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology which dates back to 1900, when a merger of the two schools was frequently mooted and at one point officially agreed upon (ultimately canceled by Massachusetts courts).
Harvard is governed by two boards, the President and Fellows of Harvard College, also known as the Harvard Corporation and founded in 1650, and the Harvard Board of Overseers.
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