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Encyclopedia > Harvard
Harvard University
Shield of Harvard University
Motto Veritas (Truth)
Established September 8, 1636
School type Private
President Lawrence H. Summers
Location Cambridge, Mass., USA
Campus Urban, 380 acres/154 ha
Enrollment 6,650 undergraduate,
13,000 graduate
Faculty 2,300
Mascot John Harvard
Endowment US$25.9 billion
Website www.harvard.edu

Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. It was founded on September 8, 1636, by a vote of the Great and General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, making it the oldest institution of higher education in the United States and older than the United States itself. Originally referred to simply as the New College, it was named Harvard College on March 13, 1639, after its first principal donor, a young clergyman named John Harvard. A graduate of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, John Harvard bequeathed a few hundred books in his will to form the basis of the college library collection, along with several hundred pounds. The earliest known official reference to Harvard as a "university" rather than a "college" occurred in the new Massachusetts constitution of 1780. Download high resolution version (1000x1182, 23 KB)Shield of Harvard University Rasterized from Harvard Print Services business card order form (PDF file) by Jacobolus This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... Events February 24 - King Christian of Denmark gives an order that all beggars that are able to work must be sent to Brinholmen Island to build ships or as galley rowers March 26 - Utrecht University founded in The Netherlands. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... Larry Summers Lawrence Henry Summers (born November 30, 1954) is an American economist, politician, and academic. ... Cambridge City Hall Cambridge is a city in the Greater Boston area of Massachusetts, United States. ... State nickname: Bay State Official languages English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Governor Mitt Romney (R) Senators Edward Kennedy (D) John Kerry (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 44th 27,360 km² 25. ... Urban area is a term used to define an area where there is an increased density of man-made structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... An acre is an English unit of area. ... A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, commonly used for measuring land area. ... In some educational systems, an undergraduate is a post-secondary student pursuing a Bachelors degree. ... Statue of John Harvard in Harvard Yard. ... Harvard University Mascot Logo http://www. ... The word billion and its equivalents in other languages refer to one of two different numbers, depending on whether the writer is using the long or short scale. ... // History Because of the above definition, the oldest universities in the world were all European, as the awarding of academic degrees was not a custom of older institutions of learning in Asia and Africa. ... Cambridge City Hall Cambridge is a city in the Greater Boston area of Massachusetts, United States. ... State nickname: Bay State Official languages English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Governor Mitt Romney (R) Senators Edward Kennedy (D) John Kerry (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 44th 27,360 km² 25. ... The Ivy League is an athletic conference, founded in 1954, of eight institutions of higher education located in the eastern United States. ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... Events February 24 - King Christian of Denmark gives an order that all beggars that are able to work must be sent to Brinholmen Island to build ships or as galley rowers March 26 - Utrecht University founded in The Netherlands. ... The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on the coast of North America in the 1600s, centered around the present-day city of Boston, which is now in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, one of the 50 United... Nine institutions of higher education, sometimes called colonial colleges, were chartered in the American Colonies before the American Revolution (1775–1783). ... Higher education is education provided by universities and other institutions that award academic degrees, such as university colleges, and liberal arts colleges. ... March 13 is the 72nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (73rd in leap years). ... Events January 14 - Connecticuts first constitution, the Fundamental Orders, is adopted. ... Statue of John Harvard in Harvard Yard. ... Full name Emmanuel College Motto - Named after Immanuel Previous names - Established 1584 Sister College Exeter College Master The Lord Wilson of Dinton Location Regent Street Undergraduates 494 Graduates 98 Homepage Boatclub Emmanuel front court and the Wren chapel Emmanuel College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge, founded... The pound sterling is the official currency of the United Kingdom (UK). ... // History Because of the above definition, the oldest universities in the world were all European, as the awarding of academic degrees was not a custom of older institutions of learning in Asia and Africa. ... The term college (Latin collegium) is most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... The Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the fundamental governing document of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ...


Seventy-five Nobel prize winners are affiliated with the university, and since 1974, nineteen Nobel Prize winners and fifteen Pulitzer Prize winners have served on the Harvard faculty. Currently, Harvard has the world's largest university library collection (third largest library overall after the Library of Congress and the British Library) and the largest financial endowment of any academic institution, standing at $25.9 billion as of 2005. This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Nobel Prizes have always been a source of pride for universities, suggesting their excellence in teaching or in providing research opportunities. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) is a common year starting on Tuesday (click on link for calendar). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Listen to this article (help) Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-04-13, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... Modern-style library In the traditional sense of the word, a library is a collection of books and periodicals. ... Library of Congress, Jefferson building The Library of Congress is the unofficial national library of the United States. ... British Library Ossulston St entrance, with distinctive red logo. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... A financial endowment consists of funds or property donated to an institution or individual, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ...

Contents


Institution

The potentially inaccurately titled "John Harvard" statue in Harvard Yard is a frequent target of pranks, hacks, and humorous decorations, such as the colorful lei shown above.

A faculty of about 2,300 professors serves about 6,650 undergraduate and 13,000 graduate students. The school color is crimson, which is also the name of the Harvard sports teams and the daily newspaper, The Harvard Crimson. The color was unofficially adopted (in preference to magenta) by an 1875 vote of the student body, although the association with some form of red can be traced back to 1858, when Charles William Eliot, a young graduate student who would later become Harvard's president, bought red bandannas for his crew so they could more easily be distinguished by spectators at a regatta. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2377x1835, 861 KB) Statue of John Harvard, founder of Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, in the college yard. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2377x1835, 861 KB) Statue of John Harvard, founder of Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, in the college yard. ... Harvard Yard is a grassy area of about 25 acres (10 hectares), adjacent to Harvard Square in Cambridge, Massachusetts, which constitutes the oldest part and the center of the campus of Harvard University. ... Statue of John Harvard in Harvard Yard. ... Harvard Yard is a grassy area of about 25 acres (10 hectares), adjacent to Harvard Square in Cambridge, Massachusetts, which constitutes the oldest part and the center of the campus of Harvard University. ... Do not confuse with the Romanian currency unit. ... Crimson is a deep red color tinged with blue; however the name is also used for red colors in general. ... The Harvard Crimson, of Harvard University, is the United States oldest continuously-published daily college newspaper. ... Magenta is a color that is not a spectral color: that is to say, the hue cannot be generated by light of a single wavelength. ... 1875 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1858 is a common year starting on Friday. ... Prof. ...


Admissions

Harvard's overall undergraduate acceptance rate for 2005 was 9.1%.[1], consistently one of the lowest in the nation. The 2006 figures from U.S. News indicated that the business school admitted 14.3% of its applicants, the engineering division admitted 12.5%, the law school admitted 11.3%, the education school admitted 11.2%, and the medical school admitted 4.9%.[2]


Organization

Harvard today has nine faculties, listed below in order of foundation:

Gore Hall, the former Library (no longer standing)
Gore Hall, the former Library (no longer standing)

In 1999, the former Radcliffe College was reorganized as the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. public domain photo 1910 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... public domain photo 1910 This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences (also known as FAS) is the largest of the nine schools (or faculties) that comprise Harvard University. ... The Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences (DEAS) is a unit of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University responsible for research, as well as undergraduate and graduate education in applied mathematics, computer science, engineering, and technology. ... Harvard College is the main undergraduate section of Harvard University. ... Events February 24 - King Christian of Denmark gives an order that all beggars that are able to work must be sent to Brinholmen Island to build ships or as galley rowers March 26 - Utrecht University founded in The Netherlands. ... Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (also known as GSAS) is the academic unit responsible for all post-baccalaureate degree programs offered through the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University. ... 1872 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Harvard Division of Continuing Education The Division of Continuing Education and University Extension School is a part of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) at Harvard University responsible for various undergraduate, graduate, and non-degree programs that enroll approximately 20,000 students each year. ... The Harvard Extension School, founded by Harvard University President A. Lawrence Lowell in 1909, is an academic program designed to serve the educational interests and needs of the greater Boston community. ... The Harvard Summer School, founded in 1871, is the oldest academic summer session in the United States. ... Harvard Medical School Harvard Medical School (HMS) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Harvard School of Dental Medicine Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... 1867 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Harvard Divinity School Harvard Divinity School is one of the constituent schools of Harvard University, in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in the United States of America. ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Harvard Law School (HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Harvard Business School Harvard Business School (HBS) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University, and is one of the worlds leading management schools. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Harvard Graduate School of Design The Harvard Graduate School of Design is a graduate school at Harvard University offering degrees in Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Urban Planning and Design. ... 1914 (MCMXIV) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Harvard Graduate School of Education The Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University, and is one of the nations top education schools. ... 1920 (MCMXX) is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... Harvard School of Public Health The Harvard School of Public Health is Harvard Universitys school of public health. ... 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... John F. Kennedy School of Government The John F. Kennedy School of Government is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) is a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Radcliffe College is the historical name of a womens educational institution closely associated with Harvard University, one of the Seven Sisters. ... The Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard is an educational institution in Cambridge, Massachusetts, one of the semiautonomous components of Harvard University. ...

Memorial Church
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Memorial Church

The Harvard University Library System, centered in Widener Library and comprising over 90 individual libraries and over 14.5 million volumes, is the largest university library system in the world and, after the Library of Congress, the second-largest library system in the United States. Harvard operates several art museums, including the Fogg Museum of Art (with galleries featuring history of Western art from the Middle Ages to the present, with particular strengths in Italian early Renaissance, British pre-Raphaelite, and 19th-century French art); the Adolph Busch Museum (formerly Busch-Reisinger Museum, formerly Germanic Museum) (central and northern European art; and a Flentrop pipe organ, familiar from recordings by E. Power Biggs); the Sackler Museum (ancient, Asian, Islamic and later Indian art); the Museum of Natural History, which contains the famous Blaschka Glass Flowers exhibit; the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology; and the Semitic Museum. Download high resolution version (1704x2272, 1216 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Harvard University User:Jacobolus Talk:Harvard University/experiment Categories: Harvard University ... Download high resolution version (1704x2272, 1216 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Harvard University User:Jacobolus Talk:Harvard University/experiment Categories: Harvard University ... The Harry Elkins Widener Memorial Library, commonly known as Widener Library, is the primary building of the library system of Harvard University. ... Library of Congress, Jefferson building The Library of Congress is the unofficial national library of the United States. ... The Fogg Art Museum is the oldest of Harvard Universitys art museums. ... Portrait of Giovanni Arnolfini and Wife by Jan van Eyck (1434). ... The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was a group of English painters, poets and critics, founded in 1848 by John Everett Millais, Dante Gabriel Rossetti and William Holman Hunt. ... Edward George Power Biggs (March 29, 1906 - March 10, 1977), but always known as E. Power Biggs, was one of the most influential classical organists of the twentieth century. ... The Glass Flowers at Harvard, formally The Ware Collection of Blaschka Glass Models of Plants, is a famous collection at the Harvard Museum of Natural History in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ...

The Science Center, located just north of Harvard Yard
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The Science Center, located just north of Harvard Yard

Prominent student organizations at Harvard include the aforementioned Crimson; the Harvard Lampoon, a humor magazine; the Harvard Advocate, one of the nation's oldest literary magazines; and the Hasty Pudding Theatricals, which produces an annual burlesque and celebrates notable actors at its Man of the Year and Woman of the Year ceremonies; and the Harvard Glee Club, the oldest college chorus in America. The Harvard-Radcliffe Orchestra, composed mainly of undergraduates, was founded in 1808 as the Pierian Sodality and has been performing as a symphony orchestra since the 1950s. Download high resolution version (768x1024, 252 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Harvard University Affirmative action bake sale User:Jacobolus Talk:Harvard University/experiment Categories: Harvard University ... Download high resolution version (768x1024, 252 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Harvard University Affirmative action bake sale User:Jacobolus Talk:Harvard University/experiment Categories: Harvard University ... The Harvard Lampoon is an undergraduate humor organization founded in 1876 at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Humour (Commonwealth English) or humor (American English) is the ability or quality of people, objects or situations to evoke feelings of amusement in other people. ... The Harvard Advocate, the premier literary magazine of Harvard College, the undergraduate component of Harvard University, is the oldest continuously published college literary magazine in the United States. ... The Hasty Pudding Theatricals, known informally simply as The Pudding, is a theatrical student society at Harvard University, known for its burlesque musicals. ... The Hasty Pudding Man of the Year award is bestowed annually by the Hasty Pudding Theatricals society at Harvard University. ... The Hasty Pudding Woman of the Year award is bestowed annually by the Hasty Pudding Theatricals society at Harvard University. ... The Harvard Glee Club is a 60-voice, all-male choral ensemble at Harvard University. ... The Harvard-Radcliffe Orchestra, or HRO, is the oldest symphony orchestra in the United States. ... 1808 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


The radio station WHRB (95.3FM Cambridge), is run exclusively by Harvard students, and is given space on the Harvard campus in the basement of Pennypacker Hall, a freshman dormitory. Known throughout the Boston metropolitan area for its classical, jazz, underground rock and blues programming, WHRB uses the radio "Orgy" format, where the entire catalog of a certain band, record, or artist is played in sequence. WHRB is the student-run radio station of Harvard College. ... Nickname: City on a Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Solar System), Athens of America Motto: {{{motto}}} Official website: www. ...


Harvard's athletic rivalry with Yale is intense in every sport in which they meet, coming to a climax in their annual football meeting, which dates to 1875 and is usually called simply The Game. While Harvard's football team is no longer one of the country's best, as it often was a century ago during football's early days, today Harvard does field top teams in several other sports, such as ice hockey, rowing, and squash. As of 2003, there were 43 Division I intercollegiate varsity sports teams for women and men at Harvard, more than at any other college in the country. Yale University is a private university in New Haven, Connecticut. ... 1875 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Game (always capitalized) is a title used to describe several college football rivalry games, but most particularly the annual game in November at the end of the schools football season, between the Harvard University Crimson and the Yale University Bulldogs or Elis, currently alternating between Harvard Stadium and the... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... A coxless pair, sweep-oar rowing to the left of the photo; the bowside rower (or the starboard one, although the British term applied on this occasion) is further towards the bow of the boat. ... Squash racquet and ball Squash is an indoor racquet sport which was, until recently, called Squash Rackets, a reference to the squashable soft ball used in the game (compared with the harder ball used in its parent game Racquets or Rackets--see below). ... The word varsity can refer to several things. ...


Harvard College has traditionally drawn many of its students from private schools, though today the majority of undergraduates come from public schools across the United States and around the globe.

An example of cooperation, "The Coop" is the official bookstore of both institutions
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An example of cooperation, "The Coop" is the official bookstore of both institutions

Harvard has a friendly rivalry with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology which dates back to 1900, when a merger of the two schools was frequently mooted and at one point officially agreed upon (ultimately cancelled by Massachusetts courts). Today, the two schools cooperate as much as they compete, with many joint conferences and programs, including the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, the Harvard-MIT Data Center and the Dibner Institute for the History of Science and Technology. In addition, students at the two schools can cross-register without any additional fees, for credits toward their own school's degrees. Harvard MIT Co-op Logo Image Copyright © 1990 by the Harvard-MIT Co-op. ... Harvard MIT Co-op Logo Image Copyright © 1990 by the Harvard-MIT Co-op. ... The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or MIT, is a university located in the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. MIT is known for its strength in science and technology, as well as in numerous other fields, including management, economics, linguistics, political science, and philosophy. ... Cross-registration in United States higher education is a system allowing students at one university, college, or faculty within a university to take individual courses for credit at another institution or faculty, typically in the same region. ...


Over its history, Harvard has graduated many famous alumni, along with a few infamous ones. Among the best-known are political leaders John Hancock, John Adams, and John F. Kennedy; philosopher Henry David Thoreau and author Ralph Waldo Emerson; poets Wallace Stevens, T. S. Eliot and E. E. Cummings; composer Leonard Bernstein; actor Jack Lemmon; architect Philip Johnson; civil rights leader W. E. B. Du Bois; and terrorist Ted Kaczynski (the Unabomber). Among its most famous faculty members are biologists James D. Watson and E. O. Wilson. For a fuller listing of famous faculty and alumni, see List of Harvard University people. Portrait of Hancock (full portrait) Hancocks signature on the United States Declaration of Independence John Hancock (January 12, 1737 (O.S.) – October 8, 1793 (N.S.)) was President of the Continental Congress, and the first person to sign the United States Declaration of Independence. ... John Adams (October 30, 1735 – July 4, 1826) was the first (1789–1797) Vice President of the United States, and the second (1797–1801) President of the United States. ... For other uses, see JFK (disambiguation) or John Kennedy (disambiguation). ... Henry David Thoreau Henry David Thoreau (July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862; born David Henry Thoreau) was an American author, naturalist, transcendentalist, pacifist, tax resister and philosopher who is famous for Walden (available at wikisource) on simple living amongst nature and Civil Disobedience (available at wikisource) on resistance to civil... Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was a famous American essayist and one of Americas most influential thinkers and writers. ... Wallace Stevens Wallace Stevens (October 2, 1879 – August 2, 1955) was an American Modernist poet. ... T.S. Eliot (by E.O. Hoppe, 1919) Thomas Stearns Eliot, OM (September 26, 1888 – January 4, 1965) was an American-born poet, dramatist, and literary critic, whose works, such as The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock, The Waste Land and Four Quartets, are considered major achievements of twentieth... E. E. Cummings Edward Estlin Cummings (October 14, 1894 – September 3, 1962), typically abbreviated E. E. Cummings, was an American poet, painter, essayist, and playwright. ... Leonard Bernstein in 1971 Leonard Bernstein (August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990) was an American composer and orchestra conductor. ... Jack Lemmon Jack Uhler Lemmon III (February 8, 1925 – June 27, 2001) was a Hollywood movie star. ... Philip Cortelyou Johnson (July 8, 1906 (Cleveland, Ohio) – January 25, 2005 (New Canaan, Connecticut)) was an influential American architect. ... W. E. B. DuBois William Edward Burghardt DuBois (February 23, 1868 – August 27, 1963) was an African American civil rights activist, sociologist, freemason, and scholar. ... Theodore Kaczynski Theodore John Kaczynski, Ph. ... Unabomber is a nickname applied to three people: Theodore Kaczynski, an American terrorist. ... James Dewey Watson (born April 6, 1928) is one of the discoverers of the structure of the DNA molecule. ... E.O. Wilson with Dynastes hercules E. O. Wilson, or Edward Osborne Wilson, (born June 10, 1929) is an entomologist and biologist known for his work on ecology, evolution, and sociobiology. ... This is a table of famous people affiliated with Harvard University, including graduates, former students, and professors. ...


Harvard affiliates' politics are generally liberal (center-left): Richard Nixon famously attacked it as the "Kremlin on the Charles". In 2004, the Harvard Crimson found that Harvard undergraduates favored Kerry over Bush by 73% to 19%, consistent with Kerry's margin in major eastern cities such as Boston and New York City.[3] At the same time, Harvard has been criticized as the "incubator for an American ruling class" (Douthat) and "hostile to progressive intellectuals". (Trumpbour) President George W. Bush, in fact, graduated from the Harvard Business School. Indeed, there are both prominent conservative and prominent liberal voices among the faculty of the various schools. // Usage of the word Liberal In the United States, the common meaning of liberal has changed over time. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the thirty-seventh President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... The Moscow Kremlin The Moscow Kremlin (Russian: Московский Кремль) is the best known kremlin (Russian citadel). ... Charles River in Cambridge The Charles River is a small, relatively short Massachusetts river that separates Boston from Cambridge and Charlestown. ... Presidential election results map. ... The Harvard Crimson, of Harvard University, is the United States oldest continuously published daily college newspaper. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States. ... Harvard Business School Harvard Business School (HBS) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University, and is one of the worlds leading management schools. ...


Though Harvard has been featured in many US films, including Legally Blonde, The Firm, The Paper Chase, Good Will Hunting, With Honors, How High, and Harvard Man, the University has not allowed any movies to be filmed on its campus since Love Story in the 1960s; most films are shot in look-alike cities, such as Toronto, and colleges such as Wheaton and Bridgewater State [4]. Also set in Harvard is Korean hit TV series Love Story in Harvard, filmed at University of Southern California. Many movies have characters identified as Harvard graduates, including A Few Good Men, American Psycho, and Two Weeks Notice. Legally Blonde is a 2001 comedy film starring Reese Witherspoon, produced by Mark Platt for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios and directed by Robert Luketic. ... The Firm may refer to more than one thing: The Firm was a British rock group. ... The Paper Chase was a: 1970 novel, 1973 movie based on the novel television series based on the movie. ... Good Will Hunting is a 1997 film directed by Gus Van Sant set in greater Boston, Massachusetts, which tells the story of Will Hunting, a troubled young prodigy who works as a janitor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology even though his knowledge of and facility with mathematics is superior... With Honors (1994) is a dramatic comedy starring Joe Pesci and Brendan Fraser. ... Promotional poster for How High How High (2001) is a comedy film, directed by Jesse Dylan, which is a feature film debut for him. ... Harvard Man is a 2001 film written and directed by James Toback. ... Love Story is a 1970 romance motion picture drama directed by Arthur Hiller that tells the story of two college students: Oliver, the emotionally vacant son of rich parents; and the girl he falls in love with, Jenny, a brassy music major at Radcliffe. ... The 1960s in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1960 and 1969, but the expression has taken on a wider meaning over the past twenty years. ... Wheaton College is the name of two colleges in the United States: Wheaton College, Illinois Wheaton College, Massachusetts External Links Wheaton College (Illinois) Wheaton College (Massachusetts) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... and White Home page bridgew. ... The University of Southern California (also known as USC, SC, and Southern California), Californias oldest private research university, is located in the urban center of Los Angeles, California. ... A Few Good Men, written by Aaron Sorkin, was a Broadway play and subsequently a 1992 film drama that tells the story of military lawyers at a court-martial who encounter a high-level conspiracy in the course of defending their clients, United States Marines accused of murder. ... American Psycho book cover American Psycho (1991) is a novel by Bret Easton Ellis about a young Manhattanite serial killer. ... Two Weeks Notice is a 2002 romantic comedy film starring Sandra Bullock and Hugh Grant from Warner Brothers. ...


History

Rhinoceros sculpture, Biological Sciences Building.

Harvard's foundation in 1636 came in the form of an act of the colony's Great and General Court. By all accounts the chief impetus was to allow the training of home-grown clergy so the Puritan colony would not need to rely on immigrating graduates of England's Oxford and Cambridge universities for well-educated pastors, "dreading," as a 1643 brochure put it, "to leave an illiterate Ministry to the Churches." In its first year, seven of the original nine students left to fight in the English Civil War. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1077 KB) Rhinoceros sculpture, Biological Sciences Building, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1077 KB) Rhinoceros sculpture, Biological Sciences Building, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... The Massachusetts General Court is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Massachusetts. ... The Puritans were members of a group of English Protestants seeking further reforms or even separation from the established church during the Reformation. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: England Travel guide to England from Wikitravel English language English law English (people) List of monarchs of England – Kings of England family tree List of English people Angeln (region in northern Germany, presumably the origin of the Angles for whom England is named) UK... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with one of the most selective sets of entry requirements in the United Kingdom. ... The term English Civil War (or Wars) refers to the series of armed conflicts and political machinations which took place between Parliamentarians and Royalists from 1642 until 1651. ...


Harvard was also founded as a school to educate American Indians in order to train them as ministers among their tribes. Harvard's Charter of 1650 calls for "the education of the English and Indian youth of this Country in knowledge and godliness". Indeed, Harvard and missionaries to the local tribes were intricately connected. The first Bible to be printed in the entire North American continent was printed at Harvard in an Indian language, Massachusett. Termed the Eliot Bible since it was translated by John Eliot, this book was used to facilitate conversion of Indians, ideally by Harvard-educated Indians themselves. Harvard's first American Indian graduate, Caleb Cheeshahteaumuck from the Wampanoag tribe, was a member of the class of 1665. Caleb and other students-- English and American Indian alike-- lived and studied in a dormitory known as the Indian College, which as founded in 1655 under then-President Charles Chauncy. In 1698 it was torn down owing to neglect. The bricks of the former Indian College were later used to build the first Stoughton Hall. Today a plaque on the SE side of Matthews Hall in Harvard Yard, the approximate site of the Indian College, commemorates the first American Indian students who lived and studied at Harvard University.


The connection to the Puritans can be seen in the fact that, for its first few centuries of existence, the Harvard Board of Overseers included, along with certain commonwealth officials, the ministers of six local congregations (Boston, Cambridge, Charlestown, Dorchester, Roxbury and Watertown), who today, although no longer so empowered, are still by custom allowed seats on the dais at commencement exercises. The Harvard Board of Overseers (more formally The Honorable and Reverend The Board of Overseers) is the second of Harvard Universitys two governing boards. ... See also Academic dress Categories: Education | Academia ...


Despite the Puritan atmosphere, from the beginning the intent was to provide a full liberal education such as that offered at European universities, including the rudiments of mathematics and science ('natural philosophy') as well as classical literature and philosophy. In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... In the traditional sense of the term, a classic book is one written in ancient Greece or ancient Rome (see classics). ...


During the Revolutionary War, General Washington and the Continental Army quartered in Harvard buildings and organized military exercises in Cambridge Common. George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799) was the successful Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and later became the first President of the United States, an office to which he was elected twice (1789-1797). ...


Harvard became the bastion of a distinctly Protestant elite--the so-called Boston Brahmin class--well into the 20th century. Its discriminatory policies against immigrants, Catholics and Jews were partly responsible for the founding of Boston College in the 19th century and Brandeis University in 1948. The social milieu at Harvard is depicted in Owen Wister's Philosophy 4, set in the 1870s, which contrasts the character and demeanor of two undergraduates who "had colonial names (Rogers, I think, and Schuyler)" with that of their tutor, one Oscar Maironi, whose "parents had come over in the steerage." Myron Kaufman's 1957 novel Remember Me to God follows the life of a Jewish undergraduate in 1940s Harvard, navigating the shoals of casual antisemitism as he desperately seeks to become a gentleman, be accepted into The Pudding, and marry the Yankee protestant Wimsy Talbot. The point of a bastion on a reconstructed French fort in Illinois. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Boston Brahmins, or simply Brahmins—sometimes also called the First Families of Boston—are a blue-blooded class of New Englanders who claim hereditary or cultural descent from the Anglo-Saxon Protestants who founded the city of Boston, Massachusetts and originally settled New England. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... To discriminate is to make a distinction. ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... Website www. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Brandeis University is a small, private university in Waltham, Massachusetts. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Owen Wister (July 14, 1860 - July 21, 1938) was an American writer of western novels. ...


Recent developments

Destroyed by fire in the 1950s, Memorial Hall's ornate tower was rebuilt in 1999
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Destroyed by fire in the 1950s, Memorial Hall's ornate tower was rebuilt in 1999

On March 15, 2005, members of Harvard's Faculty of Arts and Sciences, which instructs graduate students in GSAS and undergraduates in Harvard College, passed 218-185 a motion of "lack of confidence" in the leadership of the current president Lawrence Summers, with 18 abstentions. In response, Summers convened two committees to study this issue: the Task Force on Women Faculty and the Task Force on Women in Science and Engineering. Summers has also pledged $50 million to support their recommendations and other proposed reforms. Download high resolution version (1024x768, 301 KB) Memorial Hall at Harvard College This is the civil war monument that now serves as Sanders Theater and the Annenberg freshman dining hall Photo © 2004 Jacob Rus File links The following pages link to this file: Harvard University Image:Harvard college - annenberg hall. ... Download high resolution version (1024x768, 301 KB) Memorial Hall at Harvard College This is the civil war monument that now serves as Sanders Theater and the Annenberg freshman dining hall Photo © 2004 Jacob Rus File links The following pages link to this file: Harvard University Image:Harvard college - annenberg hall. ... Larry Summers Lawrence Henry Summers (born November 30, 1954) is an American economist, politician, and academic. ...


In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Harvard, along with numerous other institutions of higher education across the United States and Canada, offered to take in students who were unable to attend universities and colleges that were closed for the fall semester. Twenty-five students were admitted to the College, and the Law School made similar arrangements. Tuition was not charged and housing was provided. Wikinews has news related to this article: Category:New Orleans Disaster Disaster recovery American Red Cross: Official donation site www. ... Harvard Law School (HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ...


Controversy ensued, however, when the Administrative Board ruled that those students visiting from Tulane would have to return to their home college for spring semester, and would not be able to apply for inter-year transfer. The Undergraduate Council advocated for the students to stay or be allowed inter-year transfer rights, whereas the Crimson posted occasional op-ed pieces about the necessity of the students leaving to maintain integrity of contracts. As a result, the Tulane students left Harvard on December 5, 2005.


Criticism of Harvard and of other Ivy League Universities

Harvard is the target of a number of persistent criticisms, many of them leveled at other research-based American universities. It has been accused of grade inflation, as have other Ivy League institutions and Stanford University.[5]. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, The New York Times, and some students have criticized Harvard for its reliance on teaching fellows in undergraduate education, as many in the faculty are engaged in research (assistant teaching is not taken into account by the major college and university rankings); they consider this to be detrimental to the quality of education.[6][7] The New York Times article also detailed that the problem was prevalent in other Ivy League schools. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... For other meanings of Stanford, see Stanford (disambiguation). ... Carnagie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching was founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1905 and chartered in 1906 by an Act of Congress. ... The New York Times is a newspaper published in New York City by Arthur O. Sulzberger Jr. ... A teaching assistant (TA) is a junior scholar employed on a temporary contract by a college or university for the purpose of assisting a professor by teaching students in recitation or discussion sessions, holding office hours, grading homework or exams, supervising labs (in science and engineering courses), and other duties. ... In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of educational institutions in an order determined by any combination of factors. ...


The undergraduate admissions office's preference for children of alumni and wealthy benefactors [8] has been the subject of much scrutiny and debate. Under new financial aid guidelines, parents in families with incomes of less than $40,000 will no longer be expected to contribute any money at all to the cost of attending Harvard for their children including room and board, and a lower contribution is expected of families with incomes between $40,000 and $60,000. Legacy preferences or legacy admission is a type of preference given to certain applicants for that educational institutions based on their ancestral lineage or familial relationship to alumni of that institution. ...


Harvard and Harvard students have also frequently been criticized for self-promotion in various forms. In "A Flood of Crimson Ink" (Wall Street Journal, April, 2005) [9], the author asserts that one reason Harvard receives much attention from the press is because "Harvard graduates are disproportionately represented in the upper echelons of American journalism." Many articles and books making representations of Harvard's pre-eminent prestige have in fact been written by Harvard graduates, such as "GWB: HBS MBA" [10]. But critics of Harvard self-marketing charge that the school is filled with students "specifically selected for their skills at self-promotion" [11]. The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ...


Overview of Campus

The main campus is centered around Harvard Yard in central Cambridge, and extends into the surrounding Harvard Square neighborhood, approximately two miles (3.2 km) from the MIT campus. The Harvard Business School and many of the university's athletics facilities, including Harvard Stadium, are located in Allston, on the other side of the Charles River from Harvard Square. Harvard Medical School is located in the Longwood district of Boston. Harvard Stadium. ... Harvard Stadium. ... Harvard Stadium is a football stadium in the Allston neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. ... Harvard Yard is a grassy area of about 25 acres (10 hectares), adjacent to Harvard Square in Cambridge, Massachusetts, which constitutes the oldest part and the center of the campus of Harvard University. ... Harvard Square, May 2000 Chess players in Harvard Square in August of 2005 Harvard Square is a large triangular area in the center of Cambridge, Massachusetts, at the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue, Brattle Street, and John F. Kennedy Street. ... The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or MIT, is a university located in the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. MIT is known for its strength in science and technology, as well as in numerous other fields, including management, economics, linguistics, political science, and philosophy. ... Harvard Stadium is a football stadium in the Allston neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. ... Allston is a diverse neighborhood in the city of Boston, Massachusetts with a population which includes Boston natives, students from neighboring Boston University, Boston College, MIT and Harvard and various ethnic groups such as Chinese, Vietnamese, Brazilian, and Irish. ... Charles River in Cambridge The Charles River is a small, relatively short Massachusetts river that separates Boston from Cambridge and Charlestown. ... Nickname: City on a Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Solar System), Athens of America Motto: {{{motto}}} Official website: www. ...


Harvard Yard itself contains the central administrative offices and main libraries of the University, several academic buildings and the majority of the freshman dormitories. Upperclass students live in twelve residential Houses; three Houses are located at the Quadrangle, in a residential neigborhood half a mile northwest of the Yard, and the other nine are in a largely commercial district south of the Yard, situated along or close to the banks of the Charles River. Modern-style library In the traditional sense of the word, a library is a collection of books and periodicals. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... A typical American college dorm room A dormitory or dorm is a place to sleep. ... Harvard College is the main undergraduate section of Harvard University. ... The Quadrangle, looking north toward Pforzheimer House. ... Charles River in Cambridge The Charles River is a small, relatively short Massachusetts river that separates Boston from Cambridge and Charlestown. ...


Residential Houses

Nearly all students at Harvard College live on campus. First-year students live in dormitories in or near Harvard Yard (see List of Harvard dormitories). Upperclass students live mainly in a system of twelve residential "Houses", which serve as administrative units of the College as well as dormitories. Each house is presided over by a "Master"—a senior faculty member who is responsible for guiding the social life and community of the House—and a "Senior Tutor", who acts as dean of the students in the House in its administrative role. A typical American college dorm room A dormitory or dorm is a place to sleep. ... Harvard Yard is a grassy area of about 25 acres (10 hectares), adjacent to Harvard Square in Cambridge, Massachusetts, which constitutes the oldest part and the center of the campus of Harvard University. ... This is a list of dormitories at Harvard College. ... The Allston Burr Senior Tutor, or simply the Senior Tutor, is the highest-ranking academic officer of an undergraduate House at Harvard College. ... In an educational setting, a dean is a person with significant authority . ...


The House system was instituted by Harvard president Abbott Lawrence Lowell in the 1930s, although the number of Houses, their demographics, and the methods by which students are assigned to particular Houses have all changed drastically since the founding of the system. Funds for the Houses were donated by Edward Harkness, a Yale graduate, who had previously failed to persuade Yale of its merits (but which later adopted a very similar "college" system). Lowell modeled it on the system of constituent colleges of Oxford and Cambridge, and the Houses borrow terminology from Oxford and Cambridge such as Junior Common Room (the set of undergraduates affiliated with a House) and Senior Common Room (the Master, Senior Tutor, and other faculty members, advisors, and graduate students associated with the House). Non-faculty members of the Senior Common Room of a House are given the title "Tutor". The President is the chief administrator of Harvard University. ... Cover of Time Magazine (June 21, 1926) Abbott Lawrence Lowell (January 1, 1856–January 6, 1943), a U.S. educator, historian and Boston Brahmin, was the President of Harvard University from 1909 to 1933. ... The term college (Latin collegium) is most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... REDIRECT [1] ... The term Junior Common Room (JCR) is used in many British universities to refer to the collective of students (similar to a students union) at a constituent college of the university, as well as to a physical room set aside for the college students use. ... Within an undergraduate college, the Senior Common Room consists of the academic officers who hold a degree above the undergraduate degree. ...


Nine of the Houses are situated south of Harvard Yard, near the busy commercial district of Harvard Square, along or close to the northern banks of the Charles River, and so are known colloquially as the River Houses. These are: Harvard Square, May 2000 Chess players in Harvard Square in August of 2005 Harvard Square is a large triangular area in the center of Cambridge, Massachusetts, at the intersection of Massachusetts Avenue, Brattle Street, and John F. Kennedy Street. ... Charles River in Cambridge The Charles River is a small, relatively short Massachusetts river that separates Boston from Cambridge and Charlestown. ...

The remainder of the residential Houses are located around Harvard's Quadrangle (or "the Quad", formerly the "Radcliffe Quadrangle"), in a more suburban residential neighborhood half a mile (800 m) northwest of Harvard Yard. These housed Radcliffe College students until Radcliffe merged its residential system with Harvard. They are: Adams House is one of the 12 undergraduate houses at Harvard University, located near the Charles River in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... John Adams (October 30, 1735 – July 4, 1826) was the first (1789–1797) Vice President of the United States, and the second (1797–1801) President of the United States. ... The tower of Dunster House Dunster House was built in 1930, and is one of the first two Harvard University dormitories constructed under President Abbott Lawrence Lowells House Plan, and one of the seven Houses given to Harvard by Edward Harkness. ... Henry Dunster(c. ... Eliot House is one of twelve upper-class residential houses at Harvard University. ... Prof. ... Kirkland House is one of the 12 undergraduate houses at Harvard University, located near the Charles River in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... John Thornton Kirkland (1770 - 1840) served as President of Harvard University from 1810 to 1828. ... Leverett House is one of twelve residence houses for upper-class undergraduates at Harvard University. ... John Leverett (1616 - March 16, 1679) was a colonial magistrate, merchant, soldier and governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony John Leverett was born, perhaps, in Boston, England. ... Lowell House is one of the 12 residential upperclass houses at Harvard University (more specifically, Harvard College). ... The Lowell family is a Boston Brahmin family of the United States. ... Mather House is one of the upperclass residential houses at Harvard College. ... Increase Mather, 1688, by John van der Spriett Increase Mather (June 21, 1639 – August 23, 1723) was a Puritan educator and clergyman, noted for being the father of Cotton Mather. ... Quincy House is one of the twelve upper class residential houses of Harvard College, located on Plympton Street between Harvard Yard and the Charles River. ... Nickname: City on a Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Solar System), Athens of America Motto: {{{motto}}} Official website: www. ... Josiah Quincy III (February 4, 1772 - July 1, 1864) was a U.S. educator and political figure. ... Winthrop House is one of twelve upperclass undergraduate residences at Harvard University. ... The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on the coast of North America in the 1600s, centered around the present-day city of Boston, which is now in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, one of the 50 United... John Winthrop was the name of several prominent figures in colonial New England. ... John Winthrop (December 19, 1714 – May 3, 1779) (not to be confused with his great-great-great-grandfather John Winthrop, founder of the Massachusetts Bay colony) was the 2nd Hollis Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy in Harvard College. ... The Quadrangle, looking north toward Pforzheimer House. ... It has been suggested that Suburbia be merged into this article or section. ... Radcliffe College is the historical name of a womens educational institution closely associated with Harvard University, one of the Seven Sisters. ...

  • Cabot House, previously called South House, renamed in 1983 for Harvard donors Thomas Dudley Cabot and Virginia Cabot;
  • Currier House, named for Radcliffe alumna Audrey Bruce Currier;
  • Pforzheimer House, often called PfoHo for short, previously called North House, renamed in 1995 for Harvard donors Carl and Carol Pforzheimer

There is a thirteenth House, Dudley House [12], which is nonresidential but fulfills, for some graduate students and off-campus undergraduates (including members of the Dudley Co-op) the same administrative and social functions as the residential Houses do for undergraduates who live on campus. It is named after Thomas Dudley, who signed the charter of Harvard College when he was Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Cabot House is one of twelve upperclass undergraduate residences at Harvard University. ... Thomas Dudley Cabot (May 1, 1897 - June 8, 1995) was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the son of Godfrey Lowell Cabot and Maria Buckminster (Moors) Cabot. ... Currier House is one of the twelve undergraduate residences of Harvard College, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Pforzheimer House, affectionately called PfoHo (and formerly named North House or NoHo), is an undergraduate residential House at Harvard University. ... Thomas Dudley (October 12, 1576–July 31, 1653) was a colonial magistrate who served several terms as governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ... This list of Governors of the Massachusetts Bay Colony is sorted by year (from 1630 to 1680). ...


Radcliffe Yard, the center of the campus of the former Radcliffe College (and now Radcliffe Institute), is west of Harvard Yard, adjacent to the Graduate School of Education.


Major campus expansion

Throughout the past several years, Harvard has purchased large tracts of land in Allston, a short walk across the Charles River from Cambridge, with the intent of major expansion southward. The university now owns approximately fifty percent more land in Allston than in Cambridge. Various proposals to connect the traditional Cambridge campus with the new Allston campus include new and enlarged bridges, a shuttle service and/or a tram. Allston is a diverse neighborhood in the city of Boston, Massachusetts with a population which includes Boston natives, students from neighboring Boston University, Boston College, MIT and Harvard and various ethnic groups such as Chinese, Vietnamese, Brazilian, and Irish. ... A modern tram in the Töölö district of Helsinki, Finland Volkswagen Cargo-Tram in Dresden. ...


One of the foremost driving forces for Harvard's pending expansion is its goal of substantially increasing the scope and strength of its science and technology programs. The university plans to construct two 500,000 square foot (50,000 m²) research complexes in Allston, which would be home to several interdisciplinary programs, including the Harvard Stem Cell Institute and an enlarged Engineering department. Engineering applies scientific and technical knowledge to solve human problems. ...


In addition, Harvard intends to relocate the Harvard Graduate School of Education and the Harvard School of Public Health to Allston. The university also plans to construct several new undergraduate and graduate student housing centers in Allston, and it is considering large-scale museums and performing arts complexes as well. Harvard Graduate School of Education The Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University, and is one of the nations top education schools. ... Harvard School of Public Health The Harvard School of Public Health is Harvard Universitys school of public health. ...


Harvard University people

This is a table of famous people affiliated with Harvard University, including graduates, former students, and professors. ... The President is the chief administrator of Harvard University. ...

Further reading

  • John T. Bethell, Harvard Observed: An Illustrated History of the University in the Twentieth Century, Harvard University Press, 1998, ISBN 0674377338
  • <span id="Trumpbour">John Trumpbour, ed.</span>, How Harvard Rules, Boston: South End Press, 1989, ISBN 0896082830
  • Hoerr, John, We Can't Eat Prestige: The Women Who Organized Harvard; Temple University Press, 1997, ISBN 1566395356
  • <span id="Douthat">Ross Gregory Douthat</span>, Privilege: Harvard and the Education of the Ruling Class, Hyperion, 2005, ISBN 1401301126

External links

Commons
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

References

  1. ^  Zachary M. Seward. "Endowment Up 21 Percent". The Harvard Crimson. September 15, 2004. http://www.thecrimson.com/article.aspx?ref=503347
  2. ^  "World University Rankings". The Times Educational Supplement. http://www.thes.co.uk/worldrankings/
  3. ^  Daniel J. T. Schuker. "Admissions Rate Sets New Low". The Harvard Crimson. April 4, 2005. http://www.thecrimson.com/article.aspx?ref=506804
  4. ^  Don Peck. "The Selectivity Illusion". The Atlantic Monthly. November 2003. http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/prem/200311/peck
  5. ^  "The Best Graduate Schools 2006". U.S. News & World Report. http://www.usnews.com/usnews/edu/grad/rankings/rankindex_brief.php
  6. ^  Rebecca D. O'Brien. "Kerry Tops Crimson Poll". The Harvard Crimson. October 29, 2004. http://www.thecrimson.com/article.aspx?ref=504151
  7. ^  Ty Burr. "Reel Boston". The Boston Globe. February 27, 2005. http://www.boston.com/news/globe/magazine/articles/2005/02/27/reel_boston/
  8. ^  Linda Wertheimer. "Harvard Grade Inflation". All Things Considered. National Public Radio. November 21, 2001. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=1133702
  9. ^  Rebecca M. Milzoff, Amit R. Paley, and Brendan J. Reed. "Grade Inflation is Real". Fifteen Minutes. March 1, 2001. http://www.thecrimson.com/fmarchives/fm_03_01_2001/article4A.html
  10. ^  "Princeton becomes first to formally combat grade inflation". Associated Press. April 26, 2004. http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2004-04-26-princeton-grades_x.htm
  11. ^  David L. Hicks. "Should Our Colleges Be Ranked?" Letter to The New York Times. September 20, 2002. http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9803E5D71130F933A1575AC0A9649C8B63
  12. ^  John Merrow. "Grade Inflation: It's Not Just an Issue for the Ivy League". Carnegie Perspectives. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. June 2004. http://www.carnegiefoundation.org/perspectives/perspectives2004.June.htm
  13. ^  Mark Alden Branch. "Who's Teaching Whom?" Yale Alumni Magazine. Summer 1999 http://www.yalealumnimagazine.com/issues/99_07/GESO.html
  14. ^  http://www.dartreview.com/archives/1998/04/29/harvard_research_and_destroy.php
  15. ^  Bok, in Derek Bok, Universities in the Marketplace, Princeton (2003)
  16. ^  Rosovsky, in Henry Rosovsky, The University: An Owner's Manual, Norton (1990)
  17. ^  John Trumpbour, ed., How Harvard Rules, South End (1989)
  18. ^  http://www.digitas.harvard.edu/~perspy/old/issues/1997/nov/second.html
  19. ^  http://www.nytimes.com/2005/03/01/education/01college.html
  20. ^  http://www.cfoeurope.com/displayStory.cfm/1777470
  21. ^  http://www.thecrimson.com/article.aspx?ref=503493


The Harvard Crimson, of Harvard University, is the United States oldest continuously-published daily college newspaper. ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom. ... April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 1862 edition of The Atlantic Monthly, with The Battle Hymn of the Republic on the front page. ... October 29 is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 63 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 27 is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... All Things Considered, sometimes abbreviated ATC, is a news radio program in the United States, broadcast on the National Public Radio network. ... NPR logo NPR redirects here. ... November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (61st in leap years). ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... Associated Press logo This article concerns the news service. ... April 26 is the 116th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (117th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 20 is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years). ... 2002 (MMII) is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Yale can refer to: Yale University, one of the United States oldest and most famous universities. ...


Download high resolution version (1000x1182, 23 KB)Shield of Harvard University Rasterized from Harvard Print Services business card order form (PDF file) by Jacobolus This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... The Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences (also known as FAS) is the largest of the nine schools (or faculties) that comprise Harvard University. ... Harvard College is the main undergraduate section of Harvard University. ... Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (also known as GSAS) is the academic unit responsible for all post-baccalaureate degree programs offered through the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University. ... Harvard Division of Continuing Education The Division of Continuing Education and University Extension School is a part of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) at Harvard University responsible for various undergraduate, graduate, and non-degree programs that enroll approximately 20,000 students each year. ... Harvard Medical School Harvard Medical School (HMS) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Harvard School of Dental Medicine Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Harvard Divinity School Harvard Divinity School is one of the constituent schools of Harvard University, in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in the United States of America. ... Harvard Law School (HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Harvard Business School Harvard Business School (HBS) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University, and is one of the worlds leading management schools. ... Harvard Graduate School of Design The Harvard Graduate School of Design is a graduate school at Harvard University offering degrees in Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Urban Planning and Design. ... Harvard Graduate School of Education The Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University, and is one of the nations top education schools. ... Harvard School of Public Health The Harvard School of Public Health is Harvard Universitys school of public health. ... John F. Kennedy School of Government The John F. Kennedy School of Government is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... The Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard is an educational institution in Cambridge, Massachusetts, one of the semiautonomous components of Harvard University. ... Radcliffe College is the historical name of a womens educational institution closely associated with Harvard University, one of the Seven Sisters. ...

Ivy League
Brown University | Columbia University | Cornell University | Dartmouth College
Harvard University | University of Pennsylvania | Princeton University | Yale University
Ivy League

<!-- main campus in --> <!-- business and medical campuses in --> The Ivy League is an athletic conference, founded in 1954, of eight institutions of higher education located in the eastern United States. ... Brown University is an Ivy League university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Columbia University is a private university in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. ... Cornell University is a research university based in Ithaca, New York. ... Dartmouth College is a small private university in Hanover, New Hampshire, and a member of the Ivy League. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Princeton University, located in Princeton, New Jersey, is the fifth-oldest institution of higher education in the United States. ... Yale University is a private university in New Haven, Connecticut. ... This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Harvard (620 words)
Harvard, Illinois Harvard is a city located in 2000 census, the city had a total population of 7,996.
Harvard, Massachusetts Harvard is a town located in 2000 census, the town had a total population of 5,981.
The Harvard Crimson The Harvard Crimson, of 1875.
Harvard - definition of Harvard in Encyclopedia (1651 words)
Harvard is one of the world's most prestigious universities and has the largest endowment of any academic institution in the world ($22.6 billion as of 2004, nearly double that of Yale University, the institution with the second-largest endowment).
Harvard has a friendly rivalry with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology which dates back to 1900, when a merger of the two schools was frequently mooted and at one point officially agreed upon (ultimately cancelled by Massachusetts courts).
Harvard is known for its liberal left-wing politics and has sometimes been called the "Kremlin on the Charles" (note that the city in which Harvard is located is sometimes called the "People's Republic of Cambridge").
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