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Encyclopedia > Hartley Coleridge

Hartley Coleridge (September 19, 1796 - January 6, 1849) was an English writer. He was the eldest son of the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge. September 19 is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years). ... 1796 was a leap year starting on Friday. ... January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... Samuel Taylor Coleridge, English poet, 1795 Samuel Taylor Coleridge (October 21, 1772 – July 25, 1834) was an English poet, critic, and philosopher who was, along with his friend William Wordsworth, one of the founders of the Romantic Movement in England and as one of the Lake Poets. ...


He was born near Bristol, and spent his early years in the care of Robert Southey at Greta Hall, Keswick, and he was educated by the Rev. John Dawes at Ambleside. In 1815 he went to Oxford, as a scholar of Merton College. He had inherited much of his father's character, and his lifestyle was such that, although he was successful in gaining an Oriel fellowship, at the close of the probationary year (1820) he was judged to have forfeited it. The authorities would not reverse their decision; but they awarded him a gift of £300. Bristol is an English city and county and one of the two administrative centres of South West England (the other being Plymouth). ... Robert Southey, English poet Robert Southey (August 12, 1774 РMarch 21, 1843) was an English poet of the Romantic school, and one of the so-called Lake Poets. Although his fame tends to be eclipsed by that of his contemporaries such as William Wordsworth, Southeys verse enjoys enduring popularity. ... Keswick is a market town in Cumbria, England, and inside the Lake District National Park, just north of Derwent Water, one of the Lake Districts most picturesque lakes. ... Map sources for Ambleside at grid reference NY376045 The view over Windermere from Ambleside. ... Merton College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ... Oriel College (in full: The House of Blessed Mary the Virgin in Oxford commonly called Oriel College, of the Foundation of Edward the Second of famous memory, sometime King of England), located in Oriel Square, Oxford, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United...


Hartley Coleridge then spent two years in London, where he wrote short poems for the London Magazine. His next step was to become a partner in a school at Ambleside, but this scheme failed. In 1830 a Leeds publisher, F. E. Bingley, made a contract with him to write biographies of Yorkshire and Lancashire worthies. These were afterwards republished under the title of Biographia Borealis (1833) and Worthies of Yorkshire and Lancashire (1836). Bingley also printed a volume of his poems in 1833, and Coleridge lived in his house until the contract came to an end through the bankruptcy of the publisher. Harro5 23:13, Jun 25, 2005 (UTC) Categories: Possible copyright violations ... 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Leeds Coat Of Arms Map sources for Leeds at grid reference SE297338 Leeds is a city and metropolitan borough in Yorkshire in the north of England. ... The White Yorkshire rose. ... Lancashire (archaically, the County of Lancaster) is a county palatine of England, lying on the Irish Sea. ...


From this time, except for two short periods in 1837 and 1838 when he acted as master at Sedbergh grammar school, he lived quietly at Grasmere and (1840-1849) Rydal, spending his time in study and wanderings about the countryside. His figure was as familiar as Wordsworth's, and he made many friends among the locals. In 1839 he brought out his edition of Massinger and Ford, with biographies of both dramatists. The closing decade of Coleridge's life was wasted in what he himself calls "the woeful impotence of weak resolve." Sedbergh is a small town in Yorkshire. ... A grammar school is a type of school found in some English-speaking countries. ... Categories: UK geography stubs | Towns in Cumbria ... Rydal can refer to: Rydal, Georgia Rydal, a hamlet in the Lake District (Cumbria) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... William Wordsworth, English poet William Wordsworth (April 7, 1770 – April 23, 1850) was a major English poet who with Samuel Taylor Coleridge launched the Romantic Age in English literature with the 1798 publication of Lyrical Ballads. ... Philip Massinger (1583 - 1640) was an English dramatist. ... John Ford (baptized April 17, 1586 - c. ...


Hartley Coleridge's literary reputation chiefly rests on his works of criticism, on his Prometheus, an unfinished lyric drama, and on his sonnets (a form which suited his particular skills). Essays and Marginalia, and Poems, with a memoir by his brother Derwent, appeared in 1851. Francesco Petrarca or Petrarch, one of the best-known of the early Italian sonnet writers The term sonnet is derived from the Provençal word sonet and the Italian word sonetto, both meaning little song. ... Derwent Coleridge (1800 - 1883), third child of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, was a distinguished scholar and author. ...



This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclop√¶dia Britannica, which is in the public domain. Supporters contend that the Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) represents the sum of human knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century; indeed, it was advertised as such. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Hartley Coleridge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (408 words)
Hartley Coleridge (September 19, 1796 - January 6, 1849) was an English writer.
He was the eldest son of the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge.
Hartley Coleridge's literary reputation chiefly rests on his works of criticism, on his Prometheus, an unfinished lyric drama, and on his sonnets (a form which suited his particular skills).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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