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Encyclopedia > Harry Reid
Harry Reid


Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 4, 2007
Deputy Richard Durbin (whip)
Preceded by Bill Frist

Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 6, 1987
Serving with John Ensign
Preceded by Paul Laxalt
Succeeded by Incumbent (2011)

In office
January 3, 2001 – January 20, 2001
June 6, 2001 - January 3, 2003
Preceded by Don Nickles (2001)
Succeeded by Don Nickles (2001)
Mitch McConnell (2003)

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Nevada's 1st district
In office
January 3, 1983 – January 3, 1987
Preceded by James David Santini
Succeeded by James Bilbray

Lieutenant Governor of Nevada
In office
1971 – 1975
Preceded by Edward Fike
Succeeded by Robert Rose

Born December 2, 1939 (1939-12-02) (age 68)
Searchlight, Nevada
Political party Democratic
Spouse Landra Gould
Profession Lawyer
Religion The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (753x945, 60 KB) http://reid. ... The Senate Majority Leader is a member of the United States Senate who is elected by the party conference which holds the majority in the Senate to serve as the chief Senate spokesman for his or her party and to manage and schedule the legislative and executive business of the... Open seat redirects here. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Richard Joseph Dick Durbin, (born November 21, 1944) is currently the senior United States Senator from Illinois and Democratic Whip, the second highest position in the party leadership in the Senate. ... William Harrison Bill Frist, Sr. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... Open seat redirects here. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... John Eric Ensign (born March 25, 1958) is the junior United States Senator from Nevada. ... Paul Dominque Laxalt (born August 2, 1922) was a Governor and U.S. Senator from the U.S. state of Nevada. ... The U.S. Senate Majority Whip is the second ranking member of the United States Senate. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image:Don Nickles. ... Image:Don Nickles. ... Addison Mitchell Mitch McConnell, Jr. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... The 1st Congressional District of Nevada is a congressional district occupying most of the City of Las Vegas, as well as parts of North Las Vegas and parts of unincorporated Clark County. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... James Hubert Bilbray (born May 19, 1938) is a U.S. Democratic politician, who was a member of the United States House of Representatives from 1987 to 1995. ... The Nevada Lieutenant Governor is an elected office in the U.S. state of Nevada. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Edward Fike was the Lieutenant Governor of Nevada. ... Robert Rose (born December 27, 1964, in Rochester, New York) is an American / Australian professional basketball player in the Australian National Basketball League. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... View of Searchlight, from the southwest Searchlight is a census-designated place located in Clark County, Nevada. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Senior Senator and Junior Senator are terms commonly used in the media to describe U.S. Senators. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...


Reid is the U.S. Senate Majority Leader in the 110th Congress. He assumed majority leadership after the Democratic Party won seated majority of the Senate in the 2006 congressional elections. Reid is the first member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, commonly known as Mormons, to serve as Senate Majority Leader. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Senate Majority and Minority Leaders (also called Senate Floor Leaders) are two... The 110th United States Congress will be in session from noon on January 3, 2007 until noon on January 3, 2009. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The 2006 United States midterm elections were held on Tuesday, November 7, 2006. ... This article is about the history and use of the word Mormon. For information about the religious beliefs and culture of Mormons, see Mormonism. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... The term Mormon is a colloquial name, most-often used to refer to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Senate Majority and Minority Leaders (also called Senate Floor Leaders) are two...

Contents

Background and family life

Reid was born in the small mining town of Searchlight, Nevada to Inez and Harry V. Reid.[1] Reid attended Basic High School in Henderson, Nevada. Mike O'Callaghan, future Governor of Nevada and Reid's history teacher, coached Reid in boxing at the Henderson Boys' Club.[2] [3] View of Searchlight, from the southwest Searchlight is a census-designated place located in Clark County, Nevada. ... Basic High School is a nine-month public high school that is part of the Clark County School District and is located in Henderson, Nevada. ... A view of Black Mountain above Henderson, Nevada. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ...


Reid received his A.S. from Southern Utah State College in 1959 and in 1961 earned his B.S. from Utah State University. He moved to Washington, D.C. and worked as an officer for the U.S. Capitol Police while attending George Washington University for his law degree. Reid graduated in 1964 and returned to Nevada to work as a lawyer before entering politics. Reid and his wife have five children, one of whom, Rory Reid, is an elected Commissioner for Clark County, Nevada, and another who recently ran for municipal office in Cottonwood Heights, Utah.[4] An associate degree is an academic degree awarded by community colleges, junior colleges, business colleges and some bachelors degree-granting colleges and universities upon completion of a course of study usually lasting two years. ... Southern Utah University, or SUU, is located in Cedar City, Utah. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... Utah State University (USU) is a land-grant university whose main campus is located in Logan, Utah. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... The United States Capitol Police is a police force charged with protecting the legislative branch of the U.S. government. ... The George Washington University Law School, commonly referred to as GW Law, was founded in 1865 and is the oldest law school in the District of Columbia. ... A Law degree is the degree conferred on someone who successfully completes studies in law. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... Rory Reid is an American attorney and political figure. ... Clark County is a county located in the U.S. state of Nevada. ... Cottonwood Heights is a city located in Salt Lake County, Utah along the east bench of the Salt Lake Valley. ...


Reid is a converted member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints[5]. He stated in an interview with Brigham Young University's Daily Universe that "I think it is much easier to be a good member of the Church and a Democrat than a good member of the Church and a Republican." He went on to say that the Democrats' emphasis on helping others, as opposed to what he considers Republican dogma to the contrary, is the reason he's a Democrat.[6] He delivered a speech at BYU to about 4,000 students on October 9, 2007 in which he affirmed that Democratic values mirror Mormon values. He later asserted that some "right-wing" Church leaders, including former president Ezra Taft Benson, helped lead some LDS Church members down the "wrong path." [7] For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... , Brigham Young University (BYU), located in Provo, Utah, is a private coeducational school completely owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon Church) and run under the auspices of its Church Educational System. ... The Daily Universe is the student newspaper for Brigham Young University (BYU) and was started shortly after the school was founded. ...


Nevada political career

Reid was elected to the Nevada State Assembly in 1967. He left after being elected lieutenant governor in 1970, the same year his mentor O'Callaghan was elected governor. He served in that office until 1974, when he ran for the U.S. Senate seat being vacated by Alan Bible. He lost by fewer than 600 votes to former Governor Paul Laxalt. Wikisource has original text related to this article: Constitution of Nevada The Nevada Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Nevada. ... A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... Alan Harvey Bible (November 20, 1909 - September 12, 1988) was a United States politician who served as a Democratic Senator from Nevada. ... Paul Dominque Laxalt (born August 2, 1922) was a Governor and U.S. Senator from the U.S. state of Nevada. ...


Reid then served as chairman of the Nevada Gaming Commission from 1977 to 1981, a post that subjected him to death threats. Reid's wife once found a bomb attached to one of their cars.[8] A character in the film Casino played by Dick Smothers is based, in part, on Reid.[9] Jack Gordon once tried to bribe Reid. Reid allowed the FBI to tape Gordon's attempt to bribe him with $12,000, at which point Reid attempted (unsuccessfully) to strangle Gordon, saying "You son of a bitch, you tried to bribe me!"[10] A chair or seat is also a seat of office, authority, or dignity, such as the chairperson of a committee, or a professorship at a college or university, or the individual that presides over business proceedings. ... Nevada Gaming Commission is the Nevada agency responsible for overseeing casinos in the state of Nevada. ... Casino is a 1995 movie directed by Martin Scorsese, based on the book of the same name by Nicholas Pileggi and Larry Shandling. ... Dick Smothers (born November 20, 1938) is an American comedian, composer and musician from New York, New York. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ...


U.S. Congress

House of Representatives

Until the 1980 census, Nevada had only one member in the United States House of Representatives, but population growth in the 1970s resulted in a second district. Reid won the Democratic nomination for the 1st Congressional District, based in Las Vegas, in 1982, and easily won the general election. He served two terms in the House, from 1983 to 1987. Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... The 1st Congressional District of Nevada is a congressional district occupying most of the City of Las Vegas, as well as parts of North Las Vegas and parts of unincorporated Clark County. ...


Committee memberships

  • 108th Congress[11]
    • Committee on Appropriations
    • Committee on Environment and Public Works
    • Special Committee on Aging
    • Select Committee on Ethics
    • Committee on Indian Affairs
  • 109th Congress[12]
    • Committee on Appropriations

Opinions and beliefs

Abortion and the Supreme Court

Abortion issues

Harry Reid openly identifies himself as "pro-life." He stated in a 1998 National Political Awareness Test that he believed "Abortions should be legal only when the pregnancy resulted from incest, rape, or when the life of the woman is endangered."[13] In 1999, he voted against an amendment explicitly expressing support for Roe v. Wade.[14] This article is about the social movement. ... The National Political Awareness Test is an American initiative intended to make U.S. politics more transparent. ... Abortion in the United States is a highly-charged issue involving significant political and ethical debate. ... Holding Texas law making it a crime to assist a woman to get an abortion violated her due process rights. ...


Reid has voted several times to ban what physicians call the "intact dilation and evacuation" procedure and what abortion opponents call the "partial-birth abortion" procedure.[15] In 2003, he supported alternate language than the act that eventually passed that would have banned all late-term abortions, while allowing exceptions for the life and health of the mother. Several polls have stated that a majority of Americans support banning "partial birth abortion" when the pollsters describe it as such.[16][17] Reid also voted in favor of the Unborn Victims of Violence Act, in favor of parental notification in the case of minors undergoing out-of-state abortions, and in favor of maintaining the ban on abortions and supplying birth control for US military personnel.[18] Intact dilation and extraction (IDX or intact D&X), also known as intact dilation and evacuation (intact D&E), dilation and extraction (D&X), intrauterine cranial decompression and controversially in the United States as partial birth abortion, is a surgical abortion wherein an intact fetus is removed from the womb... This article is about the social movement. ... Partial-birth abortion (PBA) is a non-medical term used to refer to some late-term abortion procedures. ... Late-term abortions are abortions which are performed during the late stages of pregnancy. ... Abortion in the United States is a highly-charged issue involving significant political and ethical debate. ... Signing ceremony at the White House, April 1, 2004. ... Parental notification is the legal requirement that one or more parents be notified (and, typically, give consent) before their minor daughter may have an abortion. ... For other uses, see Birth control (disambiguation). ... The United States Armed Forces are the military services of the United States. ...


Pregnancy prevention and clinic safety

In 1994, Reid voted for the Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act prohibiting the use of intimidation or physical force to prevent or discourage people from gaining access to a reproductive health care facility. He was the co-sponsor of an amendment to the bill which allows anyone to exercise freedom to worship at a health care facility. It allows reproductive health care professionals to gain access to a clinic without being physically threatened and, at the same time, allows religious organizations to pray outside of abortion clinics.[19] The Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act (FACE or the Access Act), 18 USC §248, prohibits the use of intimidation or physical force to prevent or discourage either access to a reproductive health care facility (which most notably includes abortion clinics) or from exercising their freedom to worship at... Within the framework of WHOs definition of health[1] as a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity, reproductive health addresses the reproductive processes, functions and system at all stages of life. ...


Reid introduced legislation in 2006 co-sponsored by Hillary Clinton that would fund abortion prevention efforts such as giving women broader access to contraception. In a press release about their "Prevention First Amendment," Clinton and Reid stated that for every dollar spent on pregnancy prevention, three are saved by pregnancy and birth-related expenses borne by Medicaid.[20] The bill received Republican opposition and failed.[21] Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... REDIRECT Hillary Rodham Clinton   This is a redirect from a title with another method of capitalisation. ...


Reid voted in favor of an amendment that would over turn the Mexico City Policy. The policy bans U.S. aid to overseas health organizations that give men and women birth control, provide information about abortion procedures, or that perform abortion procedures as part of a "family planning policy". Opponents of the policy argue that the ban keeps funds from going to non-governmental organizations distributing condoms and USAID-donated birth control and has resulted in an increase in unwanted pregnancies, and thus an increase in the rate of abortion. Opponents also argue that the ban promotes restrictions on free speech as well as restrictions on accurate medical information.[22][23][24][25] Supporters of the policy have argued, using the example of the Philippines, that the ban prevents overseas health organizations from using US government funds to disobey the abortion and birth control laws of their own countries.[26] Supporters also argue that the policy prevents the health agencies from promoting abortion at the expense of other birth control methods.[27] The amendment overturning the Mexico City Policy passed the Senate by a 53-41 vote. President Bush has vowed to veto any legislation eliminating the policy.[28] The Mexico City Policy, named for the place of the population conference where it was announced, was instituted by United States President Ronald Reagan in 1984 to make the issue of abortion a condition for providing funds from the US foreign aid agency USAID. Called the global gag rule by... For other uses, see Birth control (disambiguation). ... Oral contraceptives. ... NGO is an abbreviation or code for: Non-governmental organization Nagoya Airport (IATA code) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The United States Agency for International Development (or USAID) is the US government organization responsible for most non-military foreign aid. ... Freedom of speech is the right to freely say what one pleases, as well as the related right to hear what others have stated. ... International status of abortion law  Legal on demand  Legal for rape, maternal life, health, mental health, socioecomic factors, and/or fetal defects  Legal for or illegal with exception for rape, maternal life, health, fetal defects, and/or mental health  Illegal with exception for rape, maternal life, health, and/or mental... For other uses, see Birth control (disambiguation). ...


Reid received a 100% rating from NARAL in 2001 and voted with the interests of the National Family Planning and Reproductive Health Association 68% of the time from 1995 to 2004. In 2003 and 2004, he received 29% and 20% ratings, respectively, from NARAL Pro-Choice America.[29][30] From 2005 to 2006, "Reid supported the interests of the National Right to Life Committee 50 percent." Planned Parenthood gave him a 57% rating in 2006.[31] NARAL Pro-Choice America (pronounced Nay-ral) is a United States group that favors the right to legal abortions and engages in political action to oppose restrictions on what it portrays as womens right to abort. ... NARAL Pro-Choice America (pronounced NAY-ral) is a pro-choice organization in the United States that engages in political action to oppose restrictions on abortion and expand access to abortion. ... The National Right to Life Committee is a right to life/pro-life organization, that was founded in in Detroit as a non-sectarian, non-partisan group, opposed to abortion, euthanasia and infanticide. ... This article is about Planned Parenthood Federation of America. ...


Supreme Court Nominations

In 2005, Reid voted against Supreme Court nominee John Roberts, in part because of pressure from his constituents.[32] About 64% of Reid's constituents in Nevada identify themselves as "pro-choice."[33] Reid voted against nominee Samuel Alito.[34] Reid argued against the pursuit of a filibuster of Alito because the Republican majority leader at the time, Bill Frist, had threatened to institute what he and other Republicans called the "Constitutional option" and what Democrats called the "nuclear option". If implemented, the option would have eliminated the filibuster and made a simple majority-- rather than a three-fifths majority-- enough to pass any Senate legislation and federal judicial confirmations.[35][36] The supreme court functions as a court of last resort whose rulings cannot be challenged, in some countries, provinces and states. ... This article is about the Chief Justice of the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... Issues of discussion Pro-choice describes the political and ethical view that a woman should have complete control over her fertility and pregnancy. ... Samuel Anthony Alito, Jr. ... As a form of obstructionism in a legislature or other decision making body, a filibuster is an attempt to extend debate upon a proposal in order to delay or completely prevent a vote on its passage. ... William Harrison Bill Frist, Sr. ... The nuclear option, also called the Constitutional option, is a parliamentary ruling by the presiding officer of the United States Senate to end debate and hold an immediate vote on a matter under consideration. ... The nuclear option, also called the Constitutional option, is a parliamentary ruling by the presiding officer of the United States Senate to end debate and hold an immediate vote on a matter under consideration. ... As a form of obstructionism in a legislature or other decision making body, a filibuster is an attempt to extend debate upon a proposal in order to delay or completely prevent a vote on its passage. ...


The Bush Administration and Supreme Court

Reid made headlines in May 2005 when he said of George W. Bush, "The man's father is a wonderful human being. I think this guy is a loser." Reid later apologized for these comments.[37] Reid also called Supreme Court Associate Justice Clarence Thomas an "embarrassment"[38] and referred to Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan as a "political hack."[39] George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States are the members of the Supreme Court of the United States other than the Chief Justice of the United States. ... Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American jurist and has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1991. ... The Chairman of the Board of Governors of the United States Federal Reserve is the head of the central bank of the United States and one of the more important decision-makers in American economic policies. ... Squalltoonix (born March 6, 1926 in New York City) is an American economist and was Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve of the United States from 1987 to 2006. ...


Civil Rights

Reid has said "I believe marriage should be between a man and a woman" and voted for the Defense of Marriage Act. Reid voted against the Federal Marriage Amendment and against "prohibiting same-sex basic training." He has also voted for "prohibiting job discrimination based on sexual orientation" and for "adding sexual orientation to definition of hate crimes".[40] The Defense of Marriage Act, or DOMA, is the commonly-used name of a federal law of the United States that is officially known as Pub. ... The United States Federal Marriage Amendment (FMA) is a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution which would define marriage in the United States as a union of one man and one woman. ...


Reid supported the original Patriot act passed shortly after the World Trade Center attacks. He opposed the later versions of the act, stating on the Senate floor in December 2005 that "The final bill was written by Republican conferees working behind closed doors with Justice Department lawyers." He argued that "It leaves largely in place a definition of domestic terrorism so broad it could be read to cover acts of civil disobedience."[41] Reid later boasted to Democratic activists that "We killed the Patriot Act." Reid clarified his statement later that day, saying that he only intended to to add more safeguards to the act.[42] Political columnists Rich Lowry[43], Deroy Murdock[44], and Ann Coulter[45]later criticised his statement. Nonpartisan media analysis website FactCheck.org later stated that "obviously, he chose his words poorly" and "Reid's words are grossly misleading".[46] Reid said on Fox News Sunday that he considered the act's defeat worth celebrating. He remarked that "I'm opposed to evil terrorists as most Americans are. But we still believe in this little thing called the Constitution."[47] This article needs cleanup. ... The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ... This article needs cleanup. ... December 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → 31 December 2005 (Saturday) 25-year-old Scottish human rights worker Kate Burton and her parents are freed unharmed in the Gaza Strip by the Palestinian gunmen who kidnapped them two days earlier. ... The United States Department of Justice (DOJ) is a Cabinet department in the United States government designed to enforce the law and defend the interests of the United States according to the law and to ensure fair and impartial administration of justice for all Americans. ... Few words are as politically or emotionally chared States Army|US Army]][1] counted 109 definitions of terrorism that covered a total of 22 different definitional elements. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Civil disobedience (disambiguation). ... A Columnist is a journalist who produces a specific form of writing for publication called a column. ... Rich Lowry on C-SPAN Rich Lowry (born 1968 in Arlington, Virginia) is editor of the conservative monthly magazine, National Review. ... Deroy Murdock is a conservative syndicated columnist, a contributing editor with National Review Online, and a political commentator for the Washington Times. ... Ann Hart Coulter (born December 8, 1961)[1] is an American best-selling author, columnist and political commentator. ... In U.S. politics, nonpartisan denotes an election in which the candidates do not declare or do not formally have a political party affiliation. ... Media Studies is the academic study of the constitution and effects of media. ... FactCheck. ... FOX News Sunday is public affairs magazine on Fox, airing on Sunday mornings. ...


In spring 2006, Reid joined a 89 to 10 bipartisan vote reauthorizing the act, saying "Our support for the Patriot Act does not mean a blank check for the president... What we tried to do on a bipartisan basis is have a better bill. It has been improved." Nine Democratic Senators such as Russell Feingold, Robert Byrd, Daniel Akaka, and Patrick Leahy along with libertarian Independent Jim Jeffords voted against the bill.[48] The Wall Street Journal's editorial page called his vote, in context with his earlier statement, "Reid's "mission accomplished" moment".[49] In a two-party system (such as in the United States), bipartisan refers to any bill, act, resolution, or any other action of a political body in which both of the major political parties are in agreement. ... This article needs cleanup. ... A blank check (carte blanche) is a check that has no numerical value written in, but is still signed; check owners are normally advised to specify the amount before signing. ... In a two-party system (such as in the United States), bipartisan refers to any bill, act, resolution, or any other action of a political body in which both of the major political parties are in agreement. ... Russell Dana Feingold (born March 2, 1953) is an American politician and has been a U.S. senator from Wisconsin since 1993. ... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Daniel Kahikina Dan Akaka (Chinese: 阿卡卡 李碩, Hanyu pinyin: akaka lishuo) (born September 11, 1924) is a U.S. Senator from Hawaiʻi and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Patrick Joseph Leahy (born March 31, 1940) is the senior United States Senator from Vermont. ... See also Libertarianism and Libertarian Party Libertarian,is a term for person who has made a conscious and principled commitment, evidenced by a statement or Pledge, to forswear violating others rights and usually living in voluntary communities: thus in law no longer subject to government supervision. ... For other persons named Jim Jeffords, see Jim Jeffords (disambiguation). ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... Look up editorial, op-ed in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... President George W. Bush addresses sailors during the Mission Accomplished speech, May 1, 2003. ...


Reid supports a constitutional amendment to prevent flag desecration.[50][51] Reid has also criticised Senate Republicans for bringing up anti-desecration legislation, calling it one of "the “pet” issues of the right wing".[52] Amend redirects here. ... Burning the Flag of the United States Flag desecration is a blanket term applied to various acts that intentionally deface a flag, most often a national flag (though other flags can be defaced as well). ...


Death penalty

Reid strongly supports use of the death penalty, having voted in favor of limiting death penalty appeals and executing criminals who were minors when they committed their crime.[53] Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... In law, an appeal is a process for making a formal challenge to an official decision. ...


Energy policy

Reid supports legislation that would cut $15 billion in tax breaks for large oil companies and put the money toward renewable energy sources.[54] In an op-ed to the Reno Gazette Journal, Harry Reid wrote, "I am working on a bipartisan energy bill that will create thousands of Nevada jobs, save consumers money, address global warming, and make our country safer. We can do that by reducing our reliance on oil and investing in the renewable energy sources that are abundant in our state." The environmental organization "Campaign for America's Future" gave him a 100% rating from 2005 to 2006.[55] Renewable energy effectively utilizes natural resources such as sunlight, wind, tides and geothermal heat, which are naturally replenished. ... Reno Gazette-Journal is the main daily newspaper for Reno, Nevada. ... This article is about political advocates. ...


Ethics reform

In January 2007, Harry Reid brought a Senate ethics reform bill to a vote. These rules passed overwhelmingly on a bipartisan basis-- 96 to 2. The bill was a reaction to Republican scandals in the U.S. House of Representatives. The ethics bill bars members from accepting gifts, meals, and trips from lobbyists and organization employing them. It also bars Senators from borrowing corporate jets for travel and compels Senators to disclose the names of sponsors, or authors, of bills and specific projects.[56] January 2007 is the first month of that year. ... In a two-party system (such as in the United States), bipartisan refers to any bill, act, resolution, or any other action of a political body in which both of the major political parties are in agreement. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... This article is about the political effort. ... Business jet (slang, Bizjet) is a term for a jet aircraft, usually of modest size, designed for transporting small groups of business people for commercial reasons at a time convenient to their business needs. ...


Gun politics

Reid voted for the "Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act"-- designed "to prohibit civil liability actions from being brought or continued against manufacturers, distributors, dealers, or importers of firearms or ammunition for damages... resulting from the misuse of their products" and against the ban on semi-automatic firearms. He also voted in favor of the Brady Bill and background checks at gun shows.[57] The Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act was passed by the U.S. Senate on July 29, 2005 by a vote of 65-31. ... Walther P99, a semi-automatic pistol from the late 1990s A semi-automatic firearm is a gun that requires only a trigger pull for each round that is fired, unlike a single-action revolver, a pump-action firearm, a bolt-action firearm, or a lever-action firearm, which require the... The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, also known as the Brady Bill, was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Bill Clinton on November 30, 1993. ...


Immigration

Reid calls "immigration reform" one of his top priorities for the 110th Congress.[58]. He supports the Comprehensive Immigration Reform Act of 2007 (S. 1348), but pulled it from the Senate floor because he believed too many amendments to the legislation were being introduced. The Comprehensive Immigration Reform Act of 2007, or, in its full name, the Secure Borders, Economic Opportunity and Immigration Reform Act of 2007 (S. 1348) was a bill discussed in the 110th United States Congress that would have provided legal status and a path to legal citizenship for the approximately...


Reid supports the DREAM Act which would make it easier for young people who are not citizens of the United States, but are permanent residents, to attend college or university in the United States. [59] The DREAM Act was introduced to the Senate by Senators Orrin Hatch (R-UT) and Richard Durbin (D-IL) [60] Orrin Grant Hatch (born March 22, 1934) is a Republican United States Senator from Utah, serving since 1977. ... Richard Joseph Dick Durbin, (born November 21, 1944) is currently the senior United States Senator from Illinois and Democratic Whip, the second highest position in the party leadership in the Senate. ...


Reid opposed a Constitutional amendment to make English the national language of the United States, calling the proposal "racist."[61]


Iraq War

Reid voted to authorize military force in Iraq in 1991[citation needed] and 2003.[62] In March 2007, he voted in favor of "redeploying US troops out of Iraq by March 2008".[63] Reid said on April 19, 2007 "I believe, myself that the secretary of state, secretary of defense, and — you have to make your own decisions as to what the president knows — this war is lost and the surge is not accomplishing anything as indicated by the extreme violence in Iraq yesterday." Reid said he told President Bush he thought the war could not be won through military force, although he said the U.S. could still pursue political, economic and diplomatic means to bring peace to Iraq.[64] He also said, "As long as we follow the President’s path in Iraq, the war is lost. But there is still a chance to change course and we must change course. No one wants us to succeed in the Middle East more than I do. But there must be a change of course. Our brave men and women overseas have passed every test with flying colors. They have earned our pride and our praise. More important, they deserve a strategy worthy of their sacrifice."[65] There have been three conflicts in the late 20th century and early 21st century called Gulf War, all of which refer to conflicts in the Persian Gulf region: Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988) (aka First Gulf War). ...


In an April 22, 2007 appearance on FOX News Sunday, Reid's Senatorial colleague Charles Schumer stated, "The war is not lost. And Harry Reid believes this — we Democrats believe it — if we change our mission and focus it more narrowly on counter-terrorism, going after an Al Qaida camp that might arise in Iraq. That would take many fewer troops out of harm's way. That's what we're pushing the president to do."[66] is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... FOX News Sunday is public affairs magazine on Fox, airing on Sunday mornings. ... Charles Ellis Chuck Schumer (born November 23, 1950) is the senior U.S. Senator from the state of New York, serving since 1999. ... Jamaat al-Tawhid wal Jihad members with Shosei Koda and with the banner in the background Jamaat al-Tawhid wal-Jihad (Arabic: , Monotheism and Holy War Movement) is the Islamist terrorist network of Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, a Jordanian-born Islamist terrorist believed operating against United States-led...


On September 10, 2007, the Commander of the Multi-National Force in Iraq David H. Petraeus presented a "Report to Congress on the Situation in Iraq". He stated that "As a bottom line up front, the military objectives of the surge are, in large measure, being met." The New York Times reported on September 11 that Petraeus had "warned in stark terms against the kind of rapid pullback favored by the Democratic majorities in the House and Senate".[67] Reid stated that the general's "plan is just more of the same" and "is neither a drawdown or a change in mission that we need." He also said that Congressional Democrats plan to "to change the course of the war".[68] Petraeus will "make a further assessment and [offer] recommendations next March".[69] The Multi-National Force - Iraq (MNF-I), is a military command, led by the United States, that is fighting the Iraq War against the multitude of Iraqi insurgents. ... David Petraeus (born November 7, 1952) is a Lieutenant General in the United States Army. ... The decline in attacks after surge operations fully commenced. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ...


Stem cell research

Reid supports stem cell research, referring to the research as "the next generation of medical breakthroughs." He has stated that "Democrats will not give up the fight for stem cell research. It is a fight America must win."[70] Mouse embryonic stem cells. ...


Technology

Reid's voting record on technology is the following according to OnTheIssues.org [71]

  • Voted NO on restoring $550M in funding for Amtrak for 2007. (Mar 2006)
  • Voted YES on disallowing FCC approval of larger media conglomerates. (Sep 2003)
  • Voted YES on Internet sales tax moratorium. (Oct 1998)
  • Voted YES on telecomm deregulation. (Feb 1996)
  • Promoted internet via Congressional Internet Caucus. (Jan 2001)

Yucca Mountain

Harry Reid firmly opposes the proposed Yucca Mountain federal nuclear waste repository. He's quoted as saying the concept of which "is dead. It'll never happen." Reid, who has long been an opponent of the centralized nuclear waste facility in his home state, said he would continue to work to block completion of the project. "It's dying on its own. It's just happening. You don't need just a sudden demise. It's breathing really hard. Just let it lay there a while and it'll be dead," says Reid.[72] Yucca Mountain Yucca Mountain is a ridge line in Nye County, in the south-central part of the U.S. state of Nevada. ...


Controversy

Laughlin, Nevada, bridge project

Reid earmarked a spending bill to provide for building a bridge between Nevada and Arizona that would make land he owned more valuable. Reid called funding for construction of a bridge over the Colorado River, among other projects, 'incredibly good news for Nevada' in a news release after passage of the 2005 transportation bill. He owned 160 acres of land several miles from the proposed bridge site in Arizona. The bridge could add value to his real estate investment.[73]


Rush Limbaugh letter

In response to radio host Rush Limbaugh's controversial comment about "phony soldiers", Harry Reid authored a letter co-signed by 40 other Democratic senators, which called Limbaugh's words "unpatriotic" and called for Limbaugh to apologize. In response, Limbaugh showed the letter during a speech in Philadelphia on October 11 before auctioning it off on eBay. The auction attained a winning bid of $2,100,100.00 from philanthropist Betty Casey. Limbaugh pledged his own matching donation to the Marine Corps-Law Enforcement Foundation, a charity which provides scholarships to the children of fallen law enforcement officers and Marines, and challenged Harry Reid to do the same.[74][75][76][77] On October 19, 2007, moments before the charity auction was to end, Reid announced on the Senate floor that he was proud to be a party to this donation and stated that he had helped make the donation possible[78][79]. Newsbusters criticised the Senator's statements.[80] For other uses, see Talk Radio. ... For other uses, see Limbaugh. ... The Phony soldiers controversy refers to the controversy surrounding a statement by Rush Limbaugh in which he allegedly referred to Iraq war veterans critical of the war as phony soldiers.[1] In response to Limbaughs comments, United States Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid sent a letter to Mark P... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the online auction center. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... For the band, see The Police. ... France Marines is the name of a commune in the département of Val dOise, France. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Image:BBozell. ...


Criticisms

Reid's position on the Iraq War

Liberal critics argue that Reid is not doing enough to end the American military presence in Iraq. The Boston Globe has stated that disappointment among constituents and Democratic Party activists regarding efforts to bring back troops as well as conservative opposition to those efforts, together, have reduced Congress's approval rating. [81] The Washington Post has stated that liberal antiwar critics such as Moveon.org believe that Reid has not pressured Republicans enough "to concede" to the Democrats' position.[82] Modern liberalism in the United States is a form of liberalism that began in the United States in the last years of the 19th century and the early years of the 20th century. ... The Multi-National Force - Iraq (MNF-I), is a military command, led by the United States, that is fighting the Iraq War against the multitude of Iraqi insurgents. ... The Boston Globe (and Boston Sunday Globe) is the most widely circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and New England. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... A group of MoveOn volunteers helped the get-out-the-vote drive in Cincinnati in the run-up to the 2004 U.S. presidential election. ...


Conservative critics such as commentators writing in National Review, The Weekly Standard, and The Washington Times as well as former Republican Senator Fred Thompson argue that Reid-- in his opposition to the war-- ignores the change in military tactics and methodology with the adoption of the surge, the resignation of Donald Rumsfeld, and the appointment of General David Petraeus.[83] A July 2007 CBS poll found that 65% of Americans "disapprove of the way Republicans in Congress are handling the situation with Iraq" and 59% disapprove of the Democrats' handling. Both results have "unsure" groups of about 10%. An August 2007 CBS poll found that 69% also disapprove of the Bush Administration's handling.[84] American conservatism is a constellation of political ideologies within the United States under the blanket heading of conservative. ... National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley, Jr. ... The Weekly Standard is an American neoconservative [1] magazine published 48 times per year. ... The Washington Times[1] is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Washington, D.C., United States. ... This article is about the actor/politician. ... “The New Way Forward” redirects here. ... Donald Henry Rumsfeld (born July 9, 1932) is a businessman, a U.S. Republican politician, the 13th Secretary of Defense under President Gerald Ford from 1975 to 1977, and the 21st Secretary of Defense under President George W. Bush from 2001 to 2006. ... David Howell Petraeus (born November 7, 1952) is a general in the United States Army and commander of Multi-National Force - Iraq (MNF-I), the four-star post that oversees all U.S. forces in the country. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ...


On April 24, Vice President Dick Cheney criticized what he termed Reid's "blind opposition to the new strategy in Iraq," charging that "Sen. Reid himself has said that the war in Iraq will bring his party more seats in the next election."[85] Earlier in April, Reid had been quoted in the Washington Post as saying that "We're going to pick up Senate seats as a result of this war," and that "Senator Schumer has shown me numbers that are compelling and astounding."[86] Reid later responded, "I'm not going to get into a name calling match with the administration's chief attack dog"[87] and that "I'm not going to get into a name-calling match with somebody who has a 9 percent approval rating."[88] Ironically, Reid's own approval rating and that of the Democratic Leadership have been reported within many sources. is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... ...


Republican criticism of donations

See also: Jack Abramoff Indian lobbying scandal

A Las Vegas Review Journal on Feb. 03, 2006 reported, "The National Republican Senatorial Committee this week revived a charge that Reid received more than $50,000 from four tribes with gaming interests between 2001 and 2004 after they hired Abramoff. The Nevadan had received no money from those tribes before then, Republicans said." John Solomon, an Associated Press reporter, examined this charge as well as other Republican charges against Reid in a series of articles.[89] This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... The Las Vegas Review-Journal, also known as The R-J, is published in Las Vegas, Nevada. ... The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) is the Republican Hill committee for the United States Senate, working to elect Republicans to that body. ... Gambling, often referred to as gaming, had 2003 revenues of $72. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ...


While it is true that Reid received money from Native American tribes that also hired Abramoff, it is not true that Jack Abramoff personally gave donations to Reid.[90] Abramoff personally never donated to Democrats.[91] The Native American tribes who hired him contributed to both Republicans and Democrats.[92] The tribes also donated money to Reid.[93] Reid has always opposed off-reservation gambling.[94] John Solomon and Sharon Theimer of the Associated Press reported that Reid collected donations from Native American gambling interests around the time of each vote Reid caste opposing off-reservation gambling. Ethics rules require senators to avoid even the appearance of a conflict of interest in collecting contributions around the times they take official acts benefiting donors.[95] Both Reid and John Ensign, the Junior Senator from Nevada, received gaming interest money from Native American tribes. The Senate Ethics Committee did not accuse Reid nor Ensign of violating Senate ethics rules.[96] For other uses, see Ethics (disambiguation). ... A conflict of interest is a situation in which someone in a position of trust, such as a lawyer, a politician, or an executive or director of a corporation, has competing professional or personal interests. ... John Eric Ensign (born March 25, 1958) is the junior United States Senator from Nevada. ... The U.S. Senate Select Committee on Ethics is a select committee of the United States Senate charged with dealing with matters related to senatorial ethics. ...


John Solomon also reported, among the contacts between Abramoff's Democratic lobbying team and Reid's office, there were several discussions about a bill to raise the minimum wage of the Northern Mariana Islands.[97][98] Solomon did not report that Reid co-sponsored a the bill that would have raised the minimum wage in the NMI, a bill Abramoff's clients opposed. [99] Reid described the Abramoff affair as "a Republican scandal," referring to Abramoff's felony conviction for making illegal contributions to Republican Congressman Bob Ney and Abramoff's close affiliation with the former House Majority Leader, Tom DeLay's Republican K Street Project.[100] A spokesperson said that Reid had never met Abramoff personally, that neither Reid nor his campaign has ever received money directly from Abramoff, and that his legislative work was done on behalf of his Nevadan constituents as well as the large gaming interests in Nevada. Jim Manley, a Reid spokesperson, told the Associated Press "All the actions that Senator Reid took were consistent with his long- held beliefs, such as not letting tribal casinos expand beyond reservations, and were taken to defend the interests of Nevada constituents."[101] Democracy is a form of government under which the power to alter the laws and structures of government lies, ultimately, with the citizenry. ... Robert William Bob Ney (born July 5, 1954) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Ohio. ... Thomas Dale DeLay (born April 8, 1947) is a former member of the United States House of Representatives from Sugar Land, Texas. ... The K Street Project is a project by the Republican Party to pressure Washington lobbying firms to hire Republicans in top positions, and to reward loyal GOP lobbyists with access to influential officials. ...


Las Vegas land deal

On October 11, 2006, John Solomon reported that Harry Reid's member interest in a limited liability company (LLC) was allocated $1.1 million of the gross proceeds attributable to the sale of a parcel of land. In 1998, Reid bought a plot of land for $400,000, fair market value at the time. One of the sellers was a developer who arranged a land swap that Reid supported. In 2001, he transferred title of the land to the LLC. When the LLC sold the land in an arm's length transaction in 2004, Reid made a profit.[102]


The LLC was formed by long-time friend and former casino attorney Jay Brown,[102]. Reid's failure to disclose the change in the form of his asset holdings upon contribution to the LLC violates Senate rules according to former Federal Election Commission overseer Kent Cooper. Reid did disclose the 2004 sale as though he held the property in his individual name. In addition, Brown paid a small portion of Reid's taxes on the ownership stake, which constitutes basis for Brown and is corrected for at the land's sale resulting in higher taxes for Reid.[citation needed] Since Reid continued to own the land inside the LLC with the same basis he held it before contribution, he continued to report to Congress that he owned the land for 3 years after he transferred title to the LLC he partially owned.[102][103] Reid's staff stated that he did not initially disclose the transfer of the land to the LLC because this transfer was not a change of ownership, but was simply Reid owning the land through an LLC instead of as an individual. The Federal Election Commission (or FEC) is an independent regulatory agency that was founded in 1975 by the United States Congress to regulate the campaign finance legislation in the United States. ...


Reid directed his staff to amend the 2001 financial disclosure forms to reflect the transfer of title to the LLC. He also disclosed two other land transactions on the amended reports.[104]


Condo gifts

On October 17, 2006, John Solomon of the Associated Press reported that Reid had used campaign donations to pay for $3,300 in Christmas gifts to the staff at the condominium where he resides.[105] Federal election law prohibits candidates from using political donations for personal use. Reid's staff stated that his attorneys had approved use of the funds in this manner but that he nonetheless would personally reimburse his campaign for the expenses. That action notwithstanding, the conservative group Citizens United announced it had filed a complaint with the Federal Election Commission to investigate the matter. [106] The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... Citizens United is a conservative U.S. non-profit organization co-founded by Floyd Brown in 1988 and currently headed by David Bossie. ...


Polling on Reid and Congress

Polling on Reid's and the Democratic Congress' approval ratings vary. According to a Rasmussen Reports poll, Reid's approval rating in September 2007 is 27% among voters nation-wide; 7% give a "very favorable" rating and 20% give a "very unfavorable" rating. These numbers do not specifically reflect his approval ratings in his home state.[107] Other Rasmussen polls found that "Democrats have opened an eighteen point lead in the Generic Congressional ballot" and "Democrats are still trusted more than Republicans on nine of ten key issues tracked by Rasmussen Reports."[108][109] A June 2007 NBC poll reported that 41% of registered voters believe their "representative deserves to be reelected" while 48% disagree.[110] A July 2007 Pew Research Center poll reported that 54% of Americans "disapprove of the job the Democratic leaders in Congress are doing."[111] This article is about the television network. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Popular culture

Reid had a cameo role in the movie Traffic, in which he played himself.[112] He appeared along with Senators Sam Brownback and Barack Obama in the 2007 documentary film Sand and Sorrow, which details the genocide in Sudan.[113] Traffic is an award-winning 2000 crime/drama film directed by Steven Soderbergh. ... Samuel Dale Brownback (b. ... “Barack” redirects here. ... 2007 has been referred to, by film and media critics, as the year of the threequels, a nickname referring to both the 2004 summer movie season and several film franchises which premiered or had installments released in 2004, which appear again this year: Spider-Man 3, Shrek the Third, Ocean... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... The Darfur conflict is an ongoing conflict in the Darfur region of western Sudan, mainly between the Janjaweed, a government-supported militia recruited from local Arab tribes, and the non-Arab peoples of the region. ...


Electoral history

After Reid's run for Senate in 1974 in which he lost narrowly to Paul Laxalt, Reid served as Nevada state gaming commissioner, as noted above. After the 1980 Census, Reid successfully ran for the new House district Nevada had been granted, and served two terms. In 1986, Reid was elected as Senator to replace the retiring Laxalt and has served in the Senate ever since. The Twentieth United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11. ...

Nevada Senator (Class III), results 1974, 1986-2004
Nevada's 1st congressional district, results 1982-1984[114]
Year Office Democrat Votes Pct Republican Votes Pct 3rd Party Party Votes Pct 3rd Party Party Votes Pct 3rd Party Party Votes Pct 3rd Party Party Votes Pct 3rd Party Party Votes Pct
1974 Senate Harry Reid 78,981 47% Paul Laxalt 79,605 47% Jack C. Doyle Independent American 10,887 6%
1982 House Harry Reid 61,901 53% Peggy Cavnar 55,391 47%
1984 House Harry Reid 73,242 61% Peggy Cavnar 45,675 38% Joe Morris Libertarian 1,885 2%
1986 Senate Harry Reid 130,955 50% Jim Santini 116,606 45% Kent Cromwell Libertarian 4,899 2% Other 9,472 4%
1992 Senate Harry Reid 253,150 51% Demar Dahl 199,413 40% Joe S. Garcia Independent American 11,240 2% Lois Avery Natural Law 7,279 1% Kent Cromwell Libertarian 7,222 1% Harry Tootle Populist 4,429 1% Other 13,154 3%
1998 Senate Harry Reid 208,621 48% John Ensign 208,220 48% Michael Cloud Libertarian 8,129 2% Michael E. Williams Natural Law 2,781 1% None of these * 8,113 2%
2004 Senate Harry Reid 494,805 61% Richard Ziser 284,640 35% Thomas L. Hurst Libertarian 9,559 1% David K. Schumann Independent American 6,001 1% Gary Marinch Natural Law 2,095 <1% None of these * 12,968 2%
* Nevada law since 1975 allows dissatisfied voters to vote for "None of These Candidates."

Nevada was admitted to the Union on October 31, 1864. ... The 1st Congressional District of Nevada is a congressional district occupying most of the City of Las Vegas, as well as parts of North Las Vegas and parts of unincorporated Clark County. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1974 was an election for the United States Senate held in the wake of the Watergate scandal, Richard M. Nixons resignation from the presidency, and... Paul Dominque Laxalt (born August 2, 1922) was a Governor and U.S. Senator from the U.S. state of Nevada. ... The U.S. House election, 1982 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1982 which occurred in the middle of President Ronald Reagans first term. ... The U.S. House election, 1984 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1984 which coincided with the re-election of President Ronald Reagan in a landslide. ... The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded on December 11, 1971. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1986 was an election for the United States Senate in the middle of Ronald Reagans second presidential term. ... James David Santini (born August 13, 1937) was a United States Representative from Nevada. ... The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded on December 11, 1971. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1992 was an election for the United States Senate in which the victory of Bill Clinton in the presidential election was not accompanied by major Democratic... The Natural Law Party was a United States political party affiliated with the international Natural Law Party. ... The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded on December 11, 1971. ... The Populist Party (also known as the Peoples Party) was a short-lived political party in the United States in the late 19th century. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1998 was a roughly even contest between the Republican and Democratic parties. ... John Eric Ensign (born March 25, 1958) is the junior United States Senator from Nevada. ... The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded on December 11, 1971. ... The Natural Law Party was a United States political party affiliated with the international Natural Law Party. ... Results -- light red represents Republican holds, dark red Republican pickups, light blue Democratic holds, dark blue Democratic pickups. ... Richard Ziser lost a Senate bid in 2004 to Senator Harry Reid. ... The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded on December 11, 1971. ... The Natural Law Party was a United States political party affiliated with the international Natural Law Party. ... None of These Candidates is a voting option for Nevada voters for President of the United States and for state constitutional positions. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ Genealogy Web
  2. ^ Leibovich, Mark. "Land of Hard Knocks", The Washington Post, July 17, 2005. 
  3. ^ Leibovich, Mark. "Land of Hard Knocks", The Washington Post, July 17, 2005. 
  4. ^ Biography of Harry Reid, Senate Website
  5. ^ Tumulty, Karen. "The Democrats' Inside Man", Time Magazine, January 12, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-04-24. 
  6. ^ Newnet.byu.edu
  7. ^ [1] Salt Lake Tribune, [2] Salt Lake Tribune
  8. ^ "Harry Reid Is Not Boring" by Chris Suellentrop, Slate, 22 December 2004
  9. ^ "Harry Reid Is Not Boring" by Chris Suellentrop, Slate, 22 December 2004
  10. ^ Walsh, Elsa "How a pro-gun, anti-abortion Nevadan leads the Senate’s Democrats". The New Yorker, August 8, 2005
  11. ^ MAKING MINORITY PARTY ASSIGNMENTS — (Senate — January 15, 2003)
  12. ^ MAKING MINORITY PARTY APPOINTMENTS TO COMMITTEES — (Senate — January 6, 2005)
  13. ^ http://www.vote-smart.org/npat.php?can_id=53320#408
  14. ^ MSNBC
  15. ^ MSNBC
  16. ^ http://people-press.org/commentary/display.php3?AnalysisID=119
  17. ^ http://www.pollingreport.com/abortion.htm
  18. ^ On the Issues
  19. ^ Preston, Mark. "From the economy to abortion, politicians speak on hot button issues", CNN, July 31, 2006. Retrieved on 2006-07-31. 
  20. ^ http://democrats.senate.gov/~dpc/press/05/2005317532.html
  21. ^ Clinton Senate website
  22. ^ Sierra Club
  23. ^ ReproductiveRights.org
  24. ^ National Organization for Women
  25. ^ Planned Parenthood
  26. ^ National Committee for Human Life Amendment Website
  27. ^ "This Mexican Policy Is a Keeper: Pelosi’s House would export abortion as aid" by Kathryn Jean Lopez in National Review
  28. ^ MSNBC
  29. ^ On the Issues
  30. ^ On the Issues
  31. ^ Vote Smart
  32. ^ Southern Nevada NOW
  33. ^ Survey USA
  34. ^ http://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=109&session=2&vote=00002
  35. ^ Harry Reid Press Release
  36. ^ Senate.gov
  37. ^ "Senate Leader Calls Bush 'A Loser'", CBS News, 2005-05-07. Retrieved on 2007-04-25. 
  38. ^ Solomon, John, and Sharon Theimer "Reid Aided Abramoff Clients, Records Show". The Associated Press, February 9, 2006
  39. ^ Hall, Kevin G.. "Greenspan hit with unusually tough criticism", Knight Ridder, March 5, 2005. Retrieved on 2007-01-11. 
  40. ^ http://www.ontheissues.org/senate/Harry_Reid.htm#Civil_Rights On the Issues
  41. ^ http://democrats.senate.gov/newsroom/record.cfm?id=249875&
  42. ^ http://www.boston.com/news/nation/washington/articles/2005/12/17/gop_suffers_blow_as_senate_blocks_patriot_act_extension/
  43. ^ http://www.nationalreview.com/lowry/lowry200512280854.asp
  44. ^ http://www.nationalreview.com/murdock/murdock200601270937.asp
  45. ^ http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2006/08/what_part_of_the_war_on_terror.html
  46. ^ http://www.factcheck.org/article420.html
  47. ^ http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,179088,00.html
  48. ^ http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2006/02/28/politics/main1356811.shtml
  49. ^ http://www.opinionjournal.com/best/?id=110008044
  50. ^ http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2006-06-12-senate-flag-amendment_x.htm
  51. ^ http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/nationworld/2003090346_flag28.html
  52. ^ http://democrats.senate.gov/newsroom/record.cfm?id=254682&
  53. ^ OnTheIssues.org
  54. ^ The Washington Post
  55. ^ Vote Smart.org
  56. ^ The New York Times "Senate Passes Vast Ethics Overhaul"
  57. ^ On the Issues
  58. ^ Advocates hope new Congress will act on immigration reform
  59. ^ Ried's Senate website
  60. ^ National Immigration Law Center
  61. ^ On the Issues
  62. ^ OnTheIssues.org
  63. ^ OnTheIssues.org
  64. ^ Media Matters Quotation
  65. ^ Government Access Website
  66. ^ "Transcript: Sens. Schumer, Specter on 'FOX News Sunday'", FOXNews.com, 2007-04-22. Retrieved on 2007-04-25. 
  67. ^ New York Times
  68. ^ Yahoo News
  69. ^ Yahoo News
  70. ^ Harry Reid's Personal Website
  71. ^ On the Issues
  72. ^ Analysis: Reid's Yucca and nuke waste plan
  73. ^ http://www.latimes.com/news/politics/la-na-earmarks13nov13,0,6626376,full.story?coll=la-home-headlines Will the Pork stop here? Los Angeles Times Newspaper
  74. ^ http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/20/washington/19cnd-letter.html?_r=2&adxnnl=1&oref&oref=slogin
  75. ^ http://cgi.ebay.com/Original-Harry-Reid%2FRush-Limbaugh-Smear-Letter_W0QQitemZ260170172469QQcmdZViewItem
  76. ^ http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2007/10/16/reids-letter-condemning-limbaugh-fetches-46k-on-ebay/
  77. ^ http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,303569,00.html
  78. ^ http://www.cqpolitics.com/2007/10/senators_letter_sells_for_21_m.html
  79. ^ http://blogs.abcnews.com/politicalradar/2007/10/bidding-over-2m.html
  80. ^ http://newsbusters.org/node/16497/print
  81. ^ The Boston Globe "Congress Returns Ready for Confrontation"
  82. ^ Washington Post
  83. ^ http://article.nationalreview.com/?q=YWE4YWFkYjdlODAxOThkMjc1MzRmMWU0MTI4NmRmZWE=
  84. ^ http://www.pollingreport.com/iraq.htm
  85. ^ "Cheney, Reid trade barbs over Iraq war", CNN.com, 2007-04-24. Retrieved on 2007-04-25. 
  86. ^ "Ads on Prosecutor Case Target N.M.'s Rep. Wilson [Politics Column]", Washington Post, 2007-04-13. Retrieved on 2007-04-25. 
  87. ^ "Cheney, Reid trade barbs over Iraq war", CNN.com, 2007-04-24. Retrieved on 2007-04-25. 
  88. ^ Murray, Shailagh. "Senate Leader Becomes Chief Critic of Bush", Washington Post, 2007-04-25. Retrieved on 2007-04-25. 
  89. ^ http://www.reviewjournal.com/lvrj_home/2006/Feb-03-Fri-2006/news/5696811.html
  90. ^ http://mediamatters.org/items/200602100001
  91. ^ OpenSecrets.org
  92. ^ http://www.capitaleye.org/abramoff_recips.asp
  93. ^ http://www.capitaleye.org/abramoff_recips_detail.asp?type=R&Name=Harry+Reid+%28D%2DNev%29
  94. ^ http://mediamatters.org/items/200602100001
  95. ^ Solomon, John and Theimer, Sharon. "Reid Aided Ambramoff Clients, Records Show", 2006-02-09. Retrieved on 2006-07-16. 
  96. ^ Politicians caught in the rush to return donation
  97. ^ "Lobbyist Minimizes Talks With Reid's Staff", Associated Press,February 11, 2006
  98. ^ Solomon, John, and Sharon Theimer "Probe links Reid, lobbyist". The Associated Press, February 12, 2006
  99. ^ http://mediamatters.org/items/200602100001
  100. ^ Lobbyist Confirms Talks With Reid's Office, The Associated Press, February 11, 2006
  101. ^ Breitbard.com
  102. ^ a b c John Solomon. "[[3] "AP Exclusive: Reid Got $1M in Land Sale"]", Associated Press, October 11, 2006. 
  103. ^ "Reid Land Deal Under Scrutiny", Washington Post, October 12, 2006.
  104. ^ John Solomon. "[[4] "Reid Decides to Amend Ethics Reports"]", Associated Press, October 16, 2006. 
  105. ^ USA Today
  106. ^ Hill News
  107. ^ Rasmusen Reports
  108. ^ Rasmussen Reports
  109. ^ Rasmusen Reports
  110. ^ http://www.pollingreport.com/cong2008.htm
  111. ^ http://www.pollingreport.com/cong_dem.htm
  112. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0181865/fullcredits#cast
  113. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1003051/
  114. ^ Election Statistics from the Clerk of the House of Representatives

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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Lewis Solomon (born May 23, 1950) is a public servant and former Canadian politician. ... Associated Press logo This article concerns the news service. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Associated Press logo This article concerns the news service. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ...

External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Harry Reid
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Harry Reid
  • U.S. Senator Harry Reid, Reid's official Senate site
  • Harry Reid at the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress
  • Federal Election Commission — Harry Reid, a site with campaign finance reports and data
  • New York Times — Harry Reid News ongoing collection of news and commentary
  • On the Issues — Harry Reid issue positions and quotes
  • OpenSecrets.org — Harry Reid campaign contributions
  • Project Vote Smart — Senator Harry Reid (NV) profile
  • SourceWatch Congresspedia — Harry Reid profile
  • Washington Post — Congress Votes Database: Harry Reid voting record
    • Give 'Em Hell Harry issues campaign site
Articles
  • "Reid tells BYU crowd that socially responsible Dems mirror Mormon values" Salt Lake Tribune, October 9, 2007
  • "Reid: Right-wingers have taken LDS Church members down 'wrong path'" Salt Lake Tribune, October 9, 2007
  • Biography from "The First 100 Persons Who Shaped Southern Nevada"
  • Interview with Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid Buzzflash, August 1, 2005
  • Profile of US Senator Harry Reid of Nevada About.com
  • "Harry Reid Is Not Boring" by Chris Suellentrop, Slate, 22 December 2004
  • mormoncentury.com — Why Reid supported stem cell research
  • Senate Democratic leader Reid has mild stroke CNN, August 19, 2005
  • Reid got $1 million in land sale AP, October 12, 2006

Political offices
Preceded by
Edward Fike
Lieutenant Governor of Nevada
1971 – 1975
Succeeded by
Robert Rose
Preceded by
Wendell H. Ford
Senate Minority Whip
1999 – 2001
Succeeded by
Don Nickles
Preceded by
Don Nickles
Senate Majority Whip
January 3, 2001January 20, 2001
Preceded by
Bob Smith
Chairman of the Senate Environment
and Public Works Committee

2001
Succeeded by
Bob Smith
Preceded by
Pat Roberts
Chairman of the Senate Ethics Committee
2001 – 2003
Succeeded by
George Voinovich
Preceded by
Don Nickles
Senate Minority Whip
January 20, 2001June 6, 2001
Succeeded by
Don Nickles
Senate Majority Whip
June 6, 2001January 3, 2003
Succeeded by
Mitch McConnell
Senate Minority Whip
2003 – 2005
Succeeded by
Richard Durbin
Preceded by
Tom Daschle
Senate Minority Leader
2005 – 2007
Succeeded by
Mitch McConnell
Preceded by
Bill Frist
Senate Majority Leader
2007 – present
Incumbent
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
James David Santini
Member from Nevada's 1st congressional district
1983 – 1987
Succeeded by
James Bilbray
United States Senate
Preceded by
Paul Laxalt
Senator from Nevada (Class 3)
1987 – present
Served alongside: Chic Hecht, Richard Bryan, John Ensign
Incumbent
Party political offices
Preceded by
Wendell H. Ford
Senate Democratic Whip
1999 – 2005
Succeeded by
Richard Durbin
Preceded by
Tom Daschle
Senate Democratic Leader
2005 – present
Incumbent

  Results from FactBites:
 
US Senator Harry Reid for Nevada (1343 words)
After Nevadans re-elected Reid to a third Senate term in 1998, he was chosen by his colleagues to serve as the Assistant Democratic Leader, also known as the “Whip.” And after he won a fourth term in 2004 by a wide margin, he was unanimously elected Senate Democratic Leader.
Reid is using that position to stand up for values such as opportunity, personal responsibility, and security – the same values he learned as a boy in Searchlight.
Reid is a tireless worker, and it isn’t unusual for him to be the first Senator of either party to arrive at the Capitol in the morning and the last to go home at night.
The New Yorker: Fact (5585 words)
Reid seems, at first, an unlikely choice for party leader in the Senate, especially given the tradition of men like Lyndon Johnson, whose method of leadership was to cajole and threaten his colleagues.
The Reids took me on a tour of the house, which is decorated in a Western mining motif, including a gate from one of the town’s mines that hangs on a wall in the entry hall.
Reid always blamed Gordon for the bomb, and the incident frightened his family—by then there were five children, four sons and a daughter—so that for a year they started the car by remote control.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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