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Encyclopedia > Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
This article is about the book. You may be looking for the film or the video game.
Harry Potter books
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
Author J. K. Rowling
Illustrators Flag of the United Kingdom Jason Cockcroft
Flag of the United States Mary GrandPré
Genre Fantasy
Publishers Bloomsbury Publishing PLC, Scholastic Press, Raincoast Books
Released June 21, 2003
Book no. Five
Sales ~55 million (Worldwide)
Story timeline Unknown
Chapters 38
Pages Flag of the United Kingdom 766
Flag of the United States 870
Preceded by Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
Followed by Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is the fifth novel in the Harry Potter series written by J. K. Rowling. It is the longest book in the series, and was released on June 21, 2003. The novel features Harry's struggles through his fifth year at Hogwarts, including the surreptitious return of Harry's nemesis Lord Voldemort, O.W.L. exams, awkward teenage love and an obstructive Ministry of Magic. Out of the Park Baseball (latest version entitled Out of the Park Baseball Manager 2006), also known as OOTP, is a text-based baseball simulator for career and fictional play. ... Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a 2007 fantasy adventure film, based on the novel of the same name, by J. K. Rowling. ... Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a computer and video game that is based on the fifth installment of the popular Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling and the film adaptation, for Game Boy Advance, Microsoft Windows, Nintendo DS, PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3, PlayStation Portable, Xbox... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ... Download high resolution version (366x604, 39 KB)Cover image of the Bloomsbury edition of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. ... Joanne Jo Murray, née Rowling OBE[1] (born 31 July 1965),[2] who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling,[3] is a British writer and author of the Harry Potter fantasy series. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Mary GrandPré (born 1954 in South Dakota) is an American illustrator, best known for her illustrations in the US version of the Harry Potter books, published by Scholastic. ... Look up Fantasy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary For other definitions of fantasy, see fantasy (psychology). ... Bloomsbury Publishing plc is an independent, London-based publishing house best known as the publisher of the Harry Potter series of novels, written by J. K. Rowling. ... Scholastic Corporation (NASDAQ: SCHL) is an American book publishing company known for publishing educational materials for schools, teachers, and parents, and selling and distributing them by mail order and via book clubs and book fairs. ... Raincoast Books is a Canadian book publishing company. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is the fourth novel in the Harry Potter series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, released on July 16, 2005, is the sixth of seven novels in J.K. Rowlings popular Harry Potter series. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ... Joanne Jo Murray, née Rowling OBE[1] (born 31 July 1965),[2] who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling,[3] is a British writer and author of the Harry Potter fantasy series. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lord Voldemort (born as Tom Marvolo Riddle)(IPA: [1][2]) is a fictional character and the primary antagonist in the Harry Potter novel series written by British author J. K. Rowling. ... Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a fictional setting in J. K. Rowlings best-selling Harry Potter series. ... In the fictional universe of the Harry Potter series as written by J. K. Rowling, the Ministry of Magic is the governing body of the magical community of Britain and succeeded the earlier Wizards Council. ...

Contents

Plot

Harry Potter produces a Patronus charm when he and his cousin Dudley are attacked by Dementors in a park. Order of the Phoenix members soon arrive to escort Harry to their secret headquarters at Number Twelve, Grimmauld Place in London, where Harry joins the Weasley family, Hermione Granger, and Harry’s godfather Sirius Black. He learns that Voldemort is building an army and is attempting to retrieve a "weapon". Meanwhile, the Ministry of Magic charges Harry with performing underage magic. A few days later, Arthur Weasley escorts Harry to his hearing where he is cleared after testimony from Albus Dumbledore and Harry's Squib neighbour, Arabella Figg. Harry is initially disappointed that unlike Ron and Hermione, he has not been made a prefect. In the Harry Potter novels, by J. K. Rowling, the Order of the Phoenix is a fictional organisation founded by Albus Dumbledore to fight Lord Voldemort and his followers, the Death Eaters. ... Number 12, Grimmauld Place, London is the address of a fictitious house in the Harry Potter books by J. K. Rowling. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... A photograph from the fictional wizard newspaper The Daily Prophet, as seen in the film series, showing the Weasleys on holiday in Egypt. ... Hermione Jean Granger (first name pronounced IPA: ) is a fictional character in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... Sirius Black is a fictional character in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... Lord Voldemort (born c. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Albus Percival Wulfric Brian Dumbledore is a fictional character within the Harry Potter series written by British author J. K. Rowling. ... Blood purity is a central concept in the Harry Potter series of books by J. K. Rowling. ... Arabella Doreen Figg (more often Mrs Figg) is a Harry Potter character who surreptitiously watches over Harry Potter while hes home with the Dursleys. ...


To the trio's surprise, the new Defense Against the Dark Arts teacher at Hogwarts is Dolores Umbridge, a hostile Ministry official who presided at Harry's hearing. Hermione's opinion that the Ministry is interfering with Hogwarts is accurate; Umbridge is there to spy on the school and only teaches Ministry-approved theory rather than practical defence methods. She is soon appointed as High Inquisitor, arbitrarily imposing strict rules and regulations. Umbridge imposes sadistic punishments to those disobeying her rules, making them write with cutting quills (quills that cut the words into the skin when you write with them). She also harbours racial hatred for "half-breeds," such as centaurs, werewolves, and similar creatures. She considers Rubeus Hagrid (a half-giant) and Sybill Trelawney incompetent, firing Trelawney and putting Hagrid on probation. Although Dumbledore is unable to prevent Trelawney's dismissal, he invokes his authority to allow her to remain in the castle and appoints a new Divination teacher — the centaur, Firenze. Dolores Jane Umbridge is a fictional character from the Harry Potter series of novels by J. K. Rowling. ... Dolores Jane Umbridge is a fictional character from the Harry Potter series of novels by J. K. Rowling. ... In the fictional Harry Potter series, many magical objects exist for the use of the characters. ... See also centaur (planetoid), Centaur (rocket stage) Guido Reni, Abduction of Deianira, 1620-21 In Greek mythology, the centaurs (Greek: Κένταυροι) are a race part human and part horse, with a horses body and a human head and torso (illustration, right). ... A werewolf in the Harry Potter series is a human who, at the full moon, transforms into a wolf. ... Rubeus Hagrid is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Jack the Giant-Killer by Arthur Rackham. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Firenze is the name of a character in the Harry Potter series of novels by J. K. Rowling. ...


Harry has disturbing dreams about running down a hallway and attempting to open a door in the Ministry's Department of Mysteries. One night he dreams he is a snake attacking Ron's father. Mr. Weasley is indeed found injured at the Ministry, suffering from severe venomous snake bites, causing Harry to fear that he is being possessed by Voldemort. In response, Dumbledore has Severus Snape teach Harry Occlumency to block his mind from intrusion, but their mutual animosity ends their lessons prematurely. In the fictional universe of the Harry Potter series as written by J. K. Rowling, the Ministry of Magic is the governing body of the magical community of Britain and succeeded the earlier Wizards Council. ... Severus Snape is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... In the fictional realm of J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series, Occlumency is a branch of magic that concerns itself with closing ones mind against external penetration, with the intent of preventing others from reading ones memories or emotions. ...


Rebellion and Dumbledore's Army

To combat the Ministry's smear campaign against Harry and Dumbledore, Hermione blackmails yellow journalist Rita Skeeter into writing a favourable article about Harry witnessing Voldemort's return. Ravenclaw student Luna Lovegood's father publishes the story in his magazine, The Quibbler. Furious, Umbridge bans the Quibbler from the school, but the story spreads rapidly, garnering support for Harry. Nasty little printers devils spew forth from the Hoe press in this Puck cartoon of Nov. ... Rita Skeeter is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Luna Lovegood is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Several media publications are featured in the Harry Potter novels (and film adaptations). ...


Hermione convinces Harry to secretly teach Gryffindor, Ravenclaw, and Hufflepuff students Defense Against the Dark Arts. They name their clandestine group "Dumbledore's Army" (D.A.) to mock the Ministry of Magic, which fears Dumbledore is secretly building a wizard army. Under Harry's tutoring, the group learns defensive magic, but Umbridge's Inquisitorial Squad, comprising mostly Slytherin students, eventually uncovers the group's meetings. To protect Harry and other students from reprisals, Dumbledore claims that he organised the group. Confronted by Minister Fudge, Percy Weasley, Umbridge and Aurors (Dawlish and Shacklebolt), Dumbledore easily overpowers them and is whisked away by his phoenix, Fawkes. Cornelius Oswald Fudge is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of novels by J. K. Rowling. ... Percy Ignatius Weasley is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... In the Harry Potter book series, Aurors are an elite unit of the Department of Magical Law Enforcement of the British Ministry of Magic, who track down and capture criminals, in particular those criminals who pose a danger to the wizarding community. ... It has been suggested that Rufus Scrimgeour be merged into this article or section. ... Kingsley Shacklebolt is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of books written by J. K. Rowling. ... Harry Potter character. ...


Umbridge becomes Headmistress and enacts even stricter rules, firing Hagrid. The disenchanted Weasley twins revolt, unleashing relentless magical chaos throughout the school, while the staff purposely does nothing to help Umbridge regain control. The twins are caught, but summoning their confiscated brooms, they fly away, leaving Hogwarts to open their own joke shop in Diagon Alley. Frederick Fred and George Weasley are fictional characters in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Weasleys Wizard Wheezes is a fictional business in the Harry Potter book series. ... “The Leaky Cauldron” redirects here. ...


Battle at the Department of Mysteries

Harry has a vision of Sirius being tortured at the Department of Mysteries, although Hermione suspects it may be a trap. Harry desperately attempts to contact Sirius at Grimmauld Place via the Floo Network in Umbridge's office fireplace, but he is caught. Umbridge reveals it was she who sent the Dementors to attack Harry during the summer in an attempt to frame or silence him. As she is about to use the illegal Cruciatus Curse on him (as she knows Fudge wouldn't mind), Hermione claims that Dumbledore has hidden a powerful weapon in the Forbidden Forest. She leads Harry and Umbridge into the forest where they encounter the centaurs. Umbridge foolishly insults them and an angry centaur carries her off screaming into the woods. When Hagrid's giant half-brother, Grawp, crashes onto the scene, Hermione and Harry escape amid the chaos. Along with fellow D.A. members Ginny, Neville and Luna, the trio fly to the Ministry of Magic on the school's Thestrals. In the fictional universe of the Harry Potter series as written by J. K. Rowling, the Ministry of Magic is the governing body of the magical community of Britain and succeeded the earlier Wizards Council. ... The Floo Network is a system by which the wizards and witches of the world of Harry Potter travel as an alternative to apparition, portkeys and broomsticks. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Magic (Harry Potter). ... Grawp is the giant half-brother of Hagrid in the Harry Potter books. ... Ginevra Molly Ginny Weasley is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Neville Longbottom is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Luna Lovegood is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... This article contains a trivia section. ...

 at the Ministry of Magic, Death Eaters ambush the students. They heroically defend themselves, but are outmatched. As they are nearly defeated, Order members arrive. During the ensuing battle, the glass prophecy sphere that Voldemort was seeking is shattered and the prophecy lost. Sirius is blasted with a spell by his Death Eater cousin, Bellatrix Lestrange, and falls backwards through a mysterious veiled archway. Lupin restrains Harry from going after him; Sirius is dead. 

The Death Eaters are captured except for Bellatrix Lestrange, whom Harry pursues into the atrium. Voldemort appears and attacks Harry, but he is saved by Dumbledore. Ministry of Magic employees arrive in time to see the Dark Lord before he Disapparates, taking Lestrange with him. Cornelius Fudge finally admits that Voldemort has returned. Rita Skeeter's story is reprinted in the Daily Prophet, exonerating Harry and Dumbledore. In the fictional Harry Potter series, a Death Eater is a follower of Lord Voldemort. ... Bellatrix Lestrange (née Black) is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... In the Harry Potter series created by J.K. Rowling, magic is depicted as a natural force that can be used to override the usual laws of nature while still being approached entirely scientifically. ... Cornelius Oswald Fudge is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of novels by J. K. Rowling. ... Rita Skeeter is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Several media publications are featured in the Harry Potter novels (and film adaptations). ...


Dealing with loss

Dumbledore apologises to Harry for withholding information over the past five years. He reveals the lost prophecy, which was originally given to him by Sybill Trelawney. Either Harry or Voldemort "must die at the hands of the other, for neither can live while the other survives". Dumbledore also reveals that, due to when the boy was predicted to be born, Neville Longbottom could also have been the child in the prophecy. Dumbledore believes Voldemort chose to attack Harry because he is a half-blood like himself; Neville is a pureblood. In so doing, the Dark Lord marked Harry as his equal. Dumbledore also discloses why he continues to send Harry back to the Dursleys' home for the summer. He tells Harry that when his mother died to protect him, this initiated an ancient magic. As long as Harry stays at the house of his blood-relative long enough to call it a home, it would provide for him a shield protection not even Voldemort is able to overcome. Furthermore, Dumbledore explains to Harry why he had not made him a prefect: he thought that Harry had enough to worry about and did not want to burden him with more responsibilities. Neville Longbottom is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ...


Shortly before school ends, Harry seeks out Nearly Headless Nick. He asks if Sirius can come back as a ghost, but Sir Nick says, "he will have...gone on". It is only those fearing death who remain as earthbound spirits. Still grieving, Harry finds Luna Lovegood hanging posters in the hall asking the whereabouts of her missing possessions that students have taken to taunt her. He asks about her being able to see the thestrals, and she replies that she saw her mother die, the result of an experimental magic spell gone wrong. But Luna says that she knows she will see her mother again; she and others who have died are just behind the veiled arch. Surprisingly, Harry feels comforted knowing that he may see Sirius again and heads off to finish packing. The article is about the ghosts who cohabit with the students of the various Hogwarts houses in the Harry Potter novels by J. K. Rowling. ...


At King's Cross station, several Order members are there to greet Harry and the Dursleys. Alastor Moody warns Uncle Vernon that if Harry is mistreated, they will intervene. Harry leaves to head back to 4 Privet Drive with the Dursleys, stopping once to look back towards his two best friends, Ron and Hermione. Kings Cross station (often spelt Kings Cross on platform signs) is a railway station in the district of the same name in northeast central London. ... The Dursleys or the Dursley family are fictional characters in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... For the record label, see Mad Eye Recordings. ... The Dursleys are Harry Potters last living relatives. ... Little Whinging, Surrey, England, is a fictitious town to the south of London created by author J. K. Rowling for the Harry Potter novels. ...


Release history

Potter fans waited three years between the releases of the fourth and fifth books.[1] Before the release of the fifth book, 200 million copies of the first four books had already been sold and translated into 55 languages in 200 countries.[2] As the series was already a global phenomenon, the book forged new pre-order records, with thousands of people queueing outside book stores on June 20th, 2003 to secure their copy at midnight.[2] Despite the security, thousands of copies were stolen from an Earlestown, Merseyside warehouse on June 15, 2003.[3] Earlestown Town Hall The Viaduct seen from the Sankey Valley Country Park Detail of the viaduct from third arch Earlestown forms the western part of the former urban district of Newton-le-Willows, but is now in the Metropolitan Borough of St Helens, Merseyside, England. ... Merseyside is a metropolitan county in North West England, with a population of 1,365,900. ...


In a Newsnight interview with Jeremy Paxman, Rowling reported that she was "reduced to tears" when she killed off a significant character in the book, despite rewriting the death scene several times.[4] She added that although her husband suggested she undo the character's death to stop her sadness, she needed to be "a ruthless killer."[4] However, Rowling revealed in a 2007 interview that she had originally planned to kill off Arthur Weasley in this book, but ultimately couldn't bear to do it.[5] Three days before the book's release, betting firm Ladbrokes stopped taking bets as to the identity of the character to die, saying that people already knew and that it would be a "licence to lose money."[4] Scottish bookmaker Blue Square also took bets on the identity of the killed character, with Hagrid the favourite at 7/2 odds, followed by Sirius Black at 4/1 and Professors Minerva McGonagall and Albus Dumbledore at 5/1.[6] Newsnight is a British daily news analysis, current affairs and politics programme broadcast between 22:30 and 23:20 on weekdays on BBC Two. ... Jeremy Dickson Paxman (born 11 May 1950) is an English BBC journalist, news presenter and author. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Ladbrokes plc (LSE: LAD) is a British based gambling company. ... Rubeus Hagrid (born December 6, year ca. ... Sirius Black is a fictional character in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... Professor Minerva McGonagall is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Albus Percival Wulfric Brian Dumbledore is a fictional character within the Harry Potter series written by British author J. K. Rowling. ...


In another interview when asked if there was anything she would go back and change about the seven novels, Rowling replied that she would have edited Phoenix more, as she feels it is too long.[7]


Translations

The first official foreign translation of the book appeared in Vietnamese on 21 July 2003, when the first of 22 instalments was released. The first official European translation appeared in Serbia and Montenegro in Serbian, by the official publisher Narodna Knjiga, in early September 2003. Other translations appeared later, e.g. in November 2003 in Dutch and German. The English language version has topped the best seller list in France; while in Germany and The Netherlands an unofficial distributed translation process has been started on the net.[8] The cover of Harry Potter en de Steen der Wijzen – the Dutch language translation of the first book, jointly published by De Harmonie and Standaard. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Serbian (; ) is one of the standard versions of the Shtokavian dialect, used primarily in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Croatia, and by Serbs in the Serbian diaspora. ... Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain...

  • In the Czech Republic a college student translated the book in July/September, long before its intended release date, and one 14-year old schoolboy made it available on his private website. This led to confusion, with many newspapers stating that this unofficial translation was done by group of teenagers[9] and the official Czech publisher (Albatros) announcing that they would sue the schoolboy.[10] Later they retracted this announcement.

Editions

The book was published on 21 June 2003 in the United Kingdom and the majority of other countries. It sold almost seven million copies in the United Kingdom and United States combined on that day. It has 38 chapters, is about 255,000 words long,[11] and is the longest book in the series.[12] (Redirected from 2003 book) See also: 2002 in literature, other events of 2003, 2004 in literature, list of years in literature. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In Britain, the blind then-Home Secretary David Blunkett complained about the delay of the cassette version of the book, as well as its projected price. This article is about the visual condition. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department (the Home Secretary) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... David Blunkett (born 6 June 1947) is a British Labour Party politician and has been Member of Parliament for Sheffield Brightside since 1987. ... An audio book is a recording of the contents of a book read aloud. ...


The Canadian version of the book is made from recycled paper and saved the equivalent of 29,650 trees in the initial print run of 1 million books. J.K. Rowling comments on this in a message written specifically for the Canadian edition of the book. The international symbol for recycling. ...

Bloomsbury (United Kingdom, Australia, Canada etc.)
  • ISBN 0-7475-5100-6 Hardback
  • ISBN 0-7475-6107-9 Paperback
  • ISBN 0-7475-6940-1 Hardback (adult edition)
  • ISBN 0-7475-7073-6 Paperback (adult edition)
Scholastic (United States etc.)
  • ISBN 0-439-35806-X Hardback
  • ISBN 0-439-35807-8 Paperback
  • isbn 0-785-64325-7 LARGE PRINT

References

  1. ^ http://www.mugglenet.com/books/index.shtml
  2. ^ a b http://www.cnn.com/2003/SHOWBIZ/books/06/21/sprj.cas03.potter.us/index.html
  3. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/2996718.stm
  4. ^ a b c "Rowling's tears at Potter book death", BBC News, 2003-06-18. Retrieved on 2007-07-24.
  5. ^ http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/19935372/
  6. ^ http://www.the-pensieve.org/archives/2003_06.html
  7. ^ http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20001720/page/4/
  8. ^ Harry auf Deutsch: Projekt-Übersicht der Harry Potter Übersetzung(en). Retrieved on 2005-12-05.
  9. ^ Radio Prague - News. Retrieved on 2005-12-05.
  10. ^ http://www.albatros.cz. Retrieved on 2005-12-05.
  11. ^ Guardian Unlimited Books: Special Reports: June date for Harry Potter 5. Retrieved on 2005-12-05.
  12. ^ OoF longer than HBP and Book 7 with 784 pages[1]

BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

The Harry Potter Wiki has information related to:
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

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Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (684 words)
One copy of Phoenix was sold for every 60 people living in the US and UK in the first 24 hours alone, and Barnes and Noble reported they sold nearly 80 copies a second.
A truck containing more than 7,000 copies of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, the fifth installment in J.K. Rowling's series about the boy wizard, was stolen from outside a warehouse in northern England on June 15.
The fifth installment in the Harry Potter series hits stores on Saturday, June 21, 2003—nearly three years since the release of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.
Compare Prices and Read Reviews on J. K. Rowling - Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix at Epinions.com (1470 words)
Rowling - Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is the book where J.K. Rowling finally succumbs to the great curse of science fiction and fantasy authors; having created a brave new world of myth and legends, she is forced to return to it again and again until the story is drained of vitality and excitement.
Harry is, to a limited extent, in on the concerns of the adult fighters.
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