FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (film)
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
Directed by Mike Newell
Produced by David Heyman
David Barron
Written by Novel:
J. K. Rowling
Screenplay:
Steve Kloves
Starring Daniel Radcliffe
Rupert Grint
Emma Watson
Ralph Fiennes
Michael Gambon
Brendan Gleeson
Robert Pattinson
Miranda Richardson
Music by Patrick Doyle
Themes by:
John Williams
Cinematography Roger Pratt
Editing by Mick Audsley
Distributed by Warner Bros.
Release date(s) November 18, 2005 (UK, US)
December 1, 2005 (AUS)
Running time 150 minutes
Country Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom
Language English
Budget GB£76 million (US$150 million)
Gross revenue GB£454.3 million (US$896,016,159)
Preceded by Prisoner of Azkaban
Followed by Order of the Phoenix
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is a 2005 fantasy adventure film, based on J. K. Rowling's novel of the same name, and is the fourth film in the popular Harry Potter film series. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (750x1110, 243 KB) Licensing This image is of a movie poster or title card, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the movie or the studio which produced the movie in question. ... Michael Cormac Newell (born 28 March 1942) is an English director and producer of motion pictures for the screen and for television. ... David Heyman is a British film producer born in London, England in 1961. ... David Barron is a producer. ... Joanne Jo Murray, née Rowling OBE[1] (born 31 July 1965),[2] who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling,[3] is a British writer and author of the Harry Potter fantasy series. ... Steven Kloves (born March 18, 1960) is an American screenwriter mainly renowned for his adaptations of novels, especially for the Harry Potter film series and for Wonder Boys, whose screenplay was nominated for a Golden Globe and an Academy Award. ... Daniel Jacob Radcliffe[1][2] (born 23 July 1989)[3] is an English film, television and stage actor. ... Rupert Alexander Lloyd Grint[1] (born August 24, 1988) is an English actor best known for playing Ron Weasley in the Harry Potter films. ... This article is about the actress. ... Ralph Nathaniel Fiennes, (IPA: ), born 22 December 1962) is a Tony Award-winning, Academy Award-nominated and Genie Award-nominated British actor. ... Sir Michael John Gambon, KBE (born October 19, 1940), is an acclaimed Irish-British actor who has worked in television, film and theatre. ... Gleeson as Professor Mad-Eye Moody in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... Robert Thomas Pattinson (born May 13, 1986) is an English actor and model, known for playing Cedric Diggory in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... Miranda Jane Richardson (born 3 March 1958) is an Academy Award nominated English actress. ... Patrick Doyle (born April 6, 1953, Uddingston, South Lanarkshire, Scotland) is an Academy Award nominated Scottish musician and film score composer. ... For other persons named John Williams, see John Williams (disambiguation). ... Roger Pratt is a well-respected British cinematographer. ... “WB” redirects here. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Australia (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... GBP redirects here. ... USD redirects here. ... GBP redirects here. ... USD redirects here. ... Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban is a 2004 fantasy adventure film, based on the novel of the same name by J. K. Rowling. ... Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a 2007 fantasy adventure film, based on the novel of the same name, by J. K. Rowling. ... The year 2005 in film involved some significant events. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... Look up adventure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Joanne Jo Murray, née Rowling OBE[1] (born 31 July 1965),[2] who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling,[3] is a British writer and author of the Harry Potter fantasy series. ... HP4 redirects here. ... The Harry Potter film series are the fantasy films based on the Harry Potter heptalogy of novels by British author and writer J. K. Rowling. ...


Directed by Mike Newell, the film concerns Harry Potter's fourth year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Hogwarts has been selected to hold the recently returning wizard competition known as the Triwizard Tournament. Though Harry does not apply, the Goblet of Fire mysteriously selects him as a second representative of Hogwarts in the tournament. Michael Cormac Newell (born 28 March 1942) is an English director and producer of motion pictures for the screen and for television. ... Harry James Potter is the title character and the main protagonist of J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter fantasy series. ... Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a setting in J. K. Rowlings best-selling Harry Potter series. ... The Champions of the 1994-1995 Triwizard Tournament: shown characters are portrayed by the actors that play them in the movies The Triwizard Tournament is a fictional tournament featured in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ...


Three days after its release, the film had grossed over US$102 million at the North American box office, the highest first-weekend tally for a Harry Potter film, and enjoyed an immensely successful run at the box office, earning over $896 million worldwide, making it the highest grossing film of 2005 and the 8th-highest grossing film of all time. It was the third highest grossing film in the U.S. for 2005 making $290 million. It is currently the 11th highest-grossing film of all time. The DVD went on to become the fastest selling DVD of all time. It is currently the third-highest grossing Harry Potter film, behind Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone and Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. USD redirects here. ... North American redirects here. ... The following is a non-definitive list of the all-time highest-grossing films. ... Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone, released in the United States as Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone, is a 2001 fantasy/adventure film based on the novel of the same name by J.K. Rowling. ... Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a 2007 fantasy adventure film, based on the novel of the same name, by J. K. Rowling. ...


The film was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Art Direction, but lost to Memoirs of a Geisha. Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Awards are the oldest awards ceremony for achievements in motion pictures. ... Memoirs of a Geisha is an Academy Award and Grammy Award-winning movie adaptation of the novel of the same name, produced by Steven Spielbergs Amblin Entertainment and directed by Rob Marshall. ...


This is the first Harry Potter film to receive a "PG-13" rating or its international equivalent (for sequences of fantasy violence and frightening images), the preceding films having been rated PG or one of its international equivalents.

Contents

Plot

See also: Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

Harry Potter, Hermione Granger and Ron Weasley enter their fourth year at Hogwarts school. First, in a graveyard attached to an old country house; the gardener Frank Bryce awakes in his cottage to see a light on in the house. He investigates the light, and finds Lord Voldemort and Peter Pettigrew discussing plans with an unidentified man; Voldemort kills Bryce. Harry awakes at The Burrow before departing with the Weasley family and Hermione for the Quidditch World Cup. After the introduction to the game, there is a temporal jump to that evening, when the camp is attacked by Death Eaters, who disperse when the Dark Mark is shot into the air by an unknown man. HP4 redirects here. ... Harry James Potter is the title character and the main protagonist of J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter fantasy series. ... Hermione Jean Granger (first name pronounced ) is a fictional character in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... Ronald Bilius Ron Weasley is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a setting in J. K. Rowlings best-selling Harry Potter series. ... Frank Bryce (1917–1994) is a fictional character in the Harry Potter universe. ... Lord Voldemort (pronounced )[1][2] is a fictional character and the primary antagonist in the Harry Potter novel series written by British author J. K. Rowling. ... Peter Pettigrew, often referred to by his nickname Wormtail, is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... The Weasley family are a fictional family of wizards who figure prominently in the plot of J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series of novels. ... The Weasley family are a fictional family of wizards who figure prominently in the plot of J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series of novels. ... Quidditch is a fictional sport developed by J. K. Rowling, found in the internationally bestselling Harry Potter novels and films. ... In the fictional Harry Potter series, a Death Eater is a follower of Lord Voldemort. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Magic (Harry Potter). ...


Harry, Ron and Hermione arrive at Hogwarts, where they find that the school will be hosting the Triwizard Tournament, a legendary event in which one wizard each from two rival schools and Hogwarts compete in three dangerous tasks. Dumbledore reveals the Goblet of Fire, a magical cup into which potential champions must drop a piece of parchment with their name on it. The goblet acts as an impartial judge to select candidates and reveals its results by shooting the relevant pieces of parchment into the air: Cedric Diggory from Hogwarts, Viktor Krum from Durmstrang and Fleur Delacour from Beauxbatons. The goblet then unexpectedly announces a fourth champion, Harry, although he did not enter his name and is in any case under the age limit set by the Ministry of Magic. Harry's entry into the Tournament incites jealousy and suspicion from his fellow students, including a breakdown of friendship with Ron, which lasts until after the first task. Dumbledore asks the new Defence against the Dark Arts professor, Alastor Moody, to keep an eye on Harry. The Champions of the 1994-1995 Triwizard Tournament: shown characters are portrayed by the actors that play them in the movies The Triwizard Tournament is a fictional tournament featured in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... Albus Percival Wulfric Brian Dumbledore is a fictional character within the Harry Potter series written by British author J. K. Rowling. ... Cedric Diggory is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Viktor Krum (Bulgarian: ) (born c. ... The Harry Potter book and film series are set in a number of fictional locations. ... Fleur Isabelle Delacour is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... The Harry Potter book and film series are set in a number of fictional locations. ... In the fictional universe of the Harry Potter series as written by J. K. Rowling, the Ministry of Magic is the governing body of the magical community of Britain and succeeded the earlier Wizards Council. ... Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a fictional school of magic that is the main setting of the Harry Potter novels by J. K. Rowling. ... For the record label, see Mad Eye Recordings. ...


In the first Triwizard task, the four champions each battle a dragon to retrieve a golden egg. Harry casts a summoning charm to bring his broom into the arena, but the dragon breaks free of its chains and chases Harry through the Hogwarts grounds. Harry retrieves the egg, which is said to contain a clue about the second task, though only a horrible screeching emerges when he opens his egg. Cedric Diggory, the other Hogwarts champion, advises Harry to open the egg underwater. Harry does so in the prefects' bathroom and hears the clue clearly; it informs him that the merpeople will take something of Harry's and that he must retrieve it from the lake in the Hogwarts grounds. Harry follows a mermaid to where the merpeople have chained Ron, Hermione, Cho Chang, and Gabrielle Delacour to a rock with thousands of merpeople guarding them. When Harry arrives in the village of the merpeople, they do not attack Harry but they do give him a hard time by threatening him with their spears. Cedric retrieves Cho; Victor, the Durmstrang champion, takes Hermione. As Fleur was attacked by Grindylows and had to withdraw from the task, Harry rescues both Ron and her sister. On the way back to the surface, however, Harry is attacked by a herd of Grindylows who viciously attack Harry and attempt to drown him but Harry escapes by using his wand. Although this causes Harry to finish outside the time limit of one hour, his courage is rewarded with high marks. For other uses, see Dragon (disambiguation). ... Spells in Harry Potter occur in the wizarding world of the series of books by author J. K. Rowling. ... Merpeople refers to the mythological creatures known as Mermaids and Mermen. ... Cho Chang (1978-1979 -) is a fictional character in J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... The subject of this article may not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... A grindylow is a mythological creature that originated from folktales in Yorkshire, England. ...


A traditional part of the Triwizard tournament is the Yule Ball; Harry is especially concerned since, as one of the champions, he is expected to open the dance. Cho turns him down, as she's already been asked by Cedric Diggory, and Hermione also declines, though Harry doesn't find out until the Yule ball that it is Krum himself who has invited her. Eventually, Harry asks Parvati Patil, who accepts; her sister Padma partners Ron. Although Hermione greatly enjoys the ball, Harry and Ron do not; Ron, who is particularly jealous of Krum, accuses Hermione of "fraternising with the enemy," leading to a serious row between the two characters. This article is about minor Harry Potter characters who are Gryffindor students in the same year as Harry. ...


For the third task, the Triwizard cup is placed inside a large maze whose magical hedges are capable of attacking the champions as they attempt to reach it: the first champion to touch the cup will be declared the winner. Harry and Cedric reach the cup together and decide to claim a draw, both touching the cup at the same time. The cup turns out to be a portkey which transports the two to a graveyard, where Pettigrew appears carrying Voldemort. Upon Voldemort's command, Pettigrew kills Cedric and traps Harry against an enchanted tombstone. Pettigrew takes blood from Harry's arm and mixes it with other ingredients to restore Voldemort. Voldemort duels with Harry, but Harry escapes when his wand unexpectedly caused Voldemort's to disgorge the spirits of the people Voldemort has killed, who protect Harry as he escapes and takes Cedric's dead body back to Hogwarts. Moody takes Harry to his office and starts interrogating Harry about what took place in the graveyard. Dumbledore, Snape, and McGonagall burst in the room and stun Moody; he begins to change shape as they watch and quickly transforms into Barty Crouch Junior, who has been impersonating Moody all year in order to ensure that Harry was entered into (and would presumably die during) the Triwizard Tournament. The school year ends as the foreign schools depart after Dumbledore exhorts them to stand together against Voldemort. In the fictional Harry Potter universe, many magical objects exist for the use of the characters. ... For other uses, see Blood (disambiguation). ... Severus Snape is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Professor Minerva McGonagall is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ...


Cast

See also: List of Harry Potter films cast members

Jarvis Cocker, Phil Selway, Jonny Greenwood, Steve Mackey, Jason Buckle and Steven Claydon cameoed as the members of the Weird Sisters. Daniel Radcliffe, who portrays Harry Potter, has been the icon of the film series since the release of the first film in 2001. ... Daniel Jacob Radcliffe[1][2] (born 23 July 1989)[3] is an English film, television and stage actor. ... Harry James Potter is the title character and the main protagonist of J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter fantasy series. ... Rupert Alexander Lloyd Grint[1] (born August 24, 1988) is an English actor best known for playing Ron Weasley in the Harry Potter films. ... Ronald Bilius Ron Weasley is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... This article is about the actress. ... Hermione Jean Granger (first name pronounced ) is a fictional character in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... Ralph Nathaniel Fiennes, (IPA: ), born 22 December 1962) is a Tony Award-winning, Academy Award-nominated and Genie Award-nominated British actor. ... Lord Voldemort (pronounced )[1][2] is a fictional character and the primary antagonist in the Harry Potter novel series written by British author J. K. Rowling. ... Sir Michael John Gambon, KBE (born October 19, 1940), is an acclaimed Irish-British actor who has worked in television, film and theatre. ... Albus Percival Wulfric Brian Dumbledore is a fictional character within the Harry Potter series written by British author J. K. Rowling. ... Gleeson as Professor Mad-Eye Moody in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... For the record label, see Mad Eye Recordings. ... Robert Thomas Pattinson (born May 13, 1986) is an English actor and model, known for playing Cedric Diggory in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... Cedric Diggory is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Gary Leonard Oldman[1] (born March 21, 1958) is an Emmy and Screen Actors Guild-nominated, Saturn and BAFTA award-winning English-born American[2] film actor, writer and director. ... Sirius Black is a fictional character in J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... Exposition is a literary technique by which information is conveyed about events that have occurred prior to the beginning of a novel, play, movie or other work of fiction. ... Miranda Jane Richardson (born 3 March 1958) is an Academy Award nominated English actress. ... Rita Skeeter is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Alan Sidney Patrick Rickman (born February 21, 1946) is an Emmy-, Golden Globe-, BAFTA- and Screen Actors Guild Award-winning English film, television and stage actor. ... Severus Snape is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a fictional school of magic that is the main setting of the Harry Potter novels by J. K. Rowling. ... For the jazz saxophonist, see Ravi Coltrane. ... Rubeus Hagrid is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... A gamekeeper is a person who looks after an area of countryside to make sure there are enough (game)birds for shooting. ... Dame Margaret Natalie Smith, DBE (born 28 December 1934), better known as Dame Maggie Smith, is a two-time Academy Award, and Emmy-winning English film, stage, and television actress. ... Professor Minerva McGonagall is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a fictional school of magic that is the main setting of the Harry Potter novels by J. K. Rowling. ... Timothy Leonard Spall OBE (born February 27, 1957) is an English BAFTA award-nominated film, stage and television actor. ... Peter Pettigrew, often referred to by his nickname Wormtail, is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Jason Isaacs (born 6 June 1963) is a British actor. ... Lucius Malfoy is a fictional character and antagonist in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Draco Malfoy is a fictional character in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... In the fictional Harry Potter series, a Death Eater is a follower of Lord Voldemort. ... The Quidditch World Cup is an event held in the Harry Potter universe every four years since 1473. ... David Tennant is the stage name of David John McDonald[1] (born 18 April 1971), a Scottish actor from Bathgate, West Lothian. ... Bartemius Barty Crouch Junior is a fictional character from the Harry Potter series of books. ... Frances de la Tour (born 30 July 1944) is a Tony Award winning English actress. ... Olympe Maxime is a character from the Harry Potter series, created by J. K. Rowling. ... In the UK and elsewhere, a head teacher is the most senior teacher in a school. ... Predrag Bjelac as Igor Karkaroff in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... Professor Igor Karkaroff was a fictional character in the Harry Potter series, portrayed by Predrag Bjelac. ... In the UK and elsewhere, a head teacher is the most senior teacher in a school. ... Thomas Andrew Felton[2] (born September 22, 1987)[1] is an English film and television actor. ... Draco Malfoy is a fictional character in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... This article is about the mammal. ... Robert Hardy as Cornelius Fudge in the film Harry Potter and Prisoner of Azkaban Timothy Sydney Robert Hardy, CBE (born October 29, 1925) is one of Britains best-known and most popular actors, and also an acknowledged expert on the longbow. ... Cornelius Oswald Fudge is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of novels by J. K. Rowling. ... Roger Lloyd Pack (born in London February 8, 1944) is a British actor. ... Bartemius Barty Crouch Senior is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of books. ... In the fictional universe of the Harry Potter series as written by J. K. Rowling, the Ministry of Magic is the governing body of the magical community of Britain and succeeded the earlier Wizards Council. ... Clémence Poésy (pronounced ; born November 30, 1982) is a French actress perhaps best known to English-speaking audiences for playing Fleur Delacour in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire and Chloë in In Bruges. ... Fleur Isabelle Delacour is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Stanislav Ianevski as Viktor Krum in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire Stanislav Ianevski (Bulgarian: ) (born May 16, 1985) is a Bulgarian actor, known for playing Viktor Krum in the 2005 film Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... Viktor Krum (Bulgarian: ) (born c. ... Katie Liu Leung (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ) (born August 8, 1987) is a Scottish actress, best known for playing Cho Chang, Harry Potters love interest in the film versions of the J. K. Rowling novels Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire and Harry Potter and the Order of... Cho Chang (1978-1979 -) is a fictional character in J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... For other persons named Matthew Lewis, see Matthew Lewis (disambiguation). ... Neville Longbottom is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... For other persons named Mark Williams, see Mark Williams (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... James Andrew Eric Phelps and Oliver Martyn John Phelps (born February 25, 1986) are twin English actors. ... Frederick Fred and George Weasley are fictional characters in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Bonnie Kathleen Wright (born February 17, 1991) is an English actress, best known for her role in the Harry Potter films as Ginny Weasley. ... Ginevra Molly Ginny Weasley is a fictional character in J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... Shirley Henderson (born November 24, 1965) is a Scottish actress. ... Moaning Myrtle is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Jeff Rawle (born 1951 in Birmingham, England) is a British actor. ... Amos Diggory is a character in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series of novels and the father of Cedric Diggory. ... Adrian Rawlins (born March 27, 1958) is a British actor. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For the American Revolutionary War general, see James Potter. ... Chowdhury as Parvati Patil in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... Afshan Azad (born 12 February 1988) is a British actress of Bangladeshi descent. ... This article is about minor Harry Potter characters who are Gryffindor students in the same year as Harry. ... The following are minor characters from the Harry Potter series in Ravenclaw House. ... Jarvis Branson Cocker (born 19 September 1963, in Sheffield, England) is an English musician, best known for fronting the band Pulp. ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... Jonathan Jonny Richard Guy Greenwood (born November 5, 1971 in Oxford, England) is a musician and a member of Radiohead. ... Steve Mackey (born 10 November 1966 in Sheffield, England) is a British musician, best known for playing bass guitar in Britpop band Pulp. ... Jason Buckle (sometimes credited as JP Buckle) is a British electronica artist from Doncaster, England. ... Steven Claydon (born 1969, London) is an artist and musician based in London. ... The Weird Sisters are a fictional pop band in the Harry Potter series. ...


Soundtrack

The Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire original motion picture soundtrack was released on November 15, 2005. ...

Differences from the book

With the Goblet of Fire novel almost twice the length of Prisoner of Azkaban, the writers and producers reduced certain scenes and concepts that made the transition from page to screen. Director Mike Newell described the problem as one of "compressing [a] huge book into the compass of a movie."[1] This was achieved by "putting aside" all the components of the novel which did not directly relate to Harry and his journey.[1] Even producer David Heyman admitted missing many of the scenes which were removed.[2] In particular, the game play at the Quidditch world cup was removed for timing reasons, leaving an abrupt temporal jump which some reviewers considered awkward or "rushed". Also, in the novel, Victor Krum catches the snitch, but his team loses to Ireland by ten points. In the film, it is implied that Ireland was defeated soundly in the match.[3] In the film, the caretaker that Voldemort murders in the beginning is not identified. In the novel, he is Frank Bryce, and his past is connected to Voldemort's. (He almost got the blame, in the Muggle world, for Voldemort's murder of his father and grandparents, as they lived in house of which he was caretaker. This is the same house that he is killed in.) Heyman also regretted the removal of S.P.E.W., Hermione's Society for the Promotion of Elfish Welfare – this omission was continued in the following film.[2] Quidditch is a fictional sport developed by J. K. Rowling, found in the internationally bestselling Harry Potter novels and films. ... The Society for the Promotion of Elfish Welfare (often abbreviated S.P.E.W. or SPEW) is a fictional organisation in the Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling. ... Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a 2007 fantasy adventure film, based on the novel of the same name, by J. K. Rowling. ...


As in Prisoner of Azkaban, most of the classes shown in the book were removed, only the single lesson where Alastor Moody demonstrates the Unforgivable Curses making the final cut. However, in the lesson, he states that only Harry has survived the killing curse, but he does not state that this is because the curse is unblockable. (It is unclear whether it is still intended to be. After Harry's duel with Voldemort in the novel, in which Voldemort shot the killing curse at Harry at the same time Harry shot the disarming spell at Voldemort, it is stated that their wands connected because they both are powered by a feather from Dumbledore's phoenix. In the film, this is never stated and it appears that they connected merely because Harry and Voldemort shot a spell at each other at the same time.) Goblet of Fire is also the only film adaptation not to begin in Privet Drive; after the opening sequence, Harry awakens at the Burrow on the morning of the Quidditch World Cup. The arrival of Mr. Weasley in Privet Drive was also cut.[4] This makes Goblet of Fire the first and, to date, only film in the series in which the Dursleys do not appear. Other scenes are shortened and amalgamated to include only the most essential plot details; the three Death Eater trials Harry witnesses in the Pensieve are merged into one short sequence, and all of Sirius Black's lines are condensed into a single fireside conversation.[4] While in the book, Barty Crouch Jr. is portrayed in the trial scene as perhaps being innocent, or dead, in the film he is portrayed as being unremorseful and remarkably more vicious. The attack on the World Cup campground is depicted as a general terror attack against the wizards and witches in the film, whereas in the book the attack is confined to a small group of Muggles (although the book does describe damage of wizard property), and the graveyard scene is much shorter and confined than the scene in the novel. The scene involving Fred and George attempting to cheat their way into the tournament with an aging potion is changed so that Hermione's concerned warnings become smart-aleck scoffs, and Fred and George begin fighting with each other, rather than laughing along with everyone else, when they grow beards as a result. Many other sequences such as the Yule Ball and the romantic hate-love tension between Hermione and Ron were stretched out longer than they had been in the novel. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Magic (Harry Potter). ... The Weasley family are a fictional family of wizards who figure prominently in the plot of J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series of novels. ... In the fictional Harry Potter series, a Death Eater is a follower of Lord Voldemort. ... Sirius Black is a fictional character in J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ...


In addition to large slices of the school year, many characters, such as Barty Crouch Senior, Rita Skeeter and Amos Diggory, were severely reduced in scope, or removed altogether, such as Ludo Bagman and Winky and Dobby, the house-elves.[4] In particular, the Skeeter subplot from the novel is all but eliminated, particularly Hermione's discovery of Skeeter's ability to change form and her later revenge on Skeeter (which sets up a subplot in the book, but not film, version of Order of the Phoenix). In the movie, both Beauxbatons and Durmstrang appear to be single-sex schools. All of the Beauxbatons visitors to Hogwarts are girls, while all the Durmstrang students are boys. In the book, both schools are co-educational and send both boys and girls to visit Hogwarts. Viktor Krum's lines, infatuation with Hermione and scenes with Hermione are extremely limited, as well as mentions of Fleur's veela-lineage and their parts are considerably smaller. (Consequently, Ron's abruptly asking Fleur to the ball is not a result of her accidentally using her veela enchantment on him while attempting to enchant someone else, but rather him childishly losing his head at the sight of her "walking".) The Yule Ball argument between Ron and Hermione was shorter and less intense, and ended with Hermione in tears, which was not how it ended in the book. The arrival of the Durmstrang and Beauxbatons students at Hogwarts is also treated with much more pomp and circumstance in the film than in the book, with both visiting groups performing drill team-like exercises, and their arrival is also shown to be overall more friendly than in the book (with references to Fleur being disgruntled during Dumbledore's greeting address, for example, being omitted). Bartemius Barty Crouch, the elder, (d. ... Rita Skeeter is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Amos Diggory is a character in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series of novels and the father of Cedric Diggory. ... Ludovic Ludo Bagman is a fictional character who appears in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... Dobby House-elves are fictional magical creatures in the Harry Potter series of books written by J. K. Rowling. ... Dobby House-elves are fictional magical creatures in the Harry Potter series of books written by J. K. Rowling. ... A single-sex school is a school that only accepts boys or girls exclusively. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... A drill team is a marching unit that performs military style maneuvers in parades, at air shows, football half-time shows, and other public venues. ...


While the three tasks of the Triwizard tournament generally remained true to the original novel, certain adaptations were included, and the details stating that the tournament is not deadly (at least prior to Voldemort's trap) are removed for dramatic effect. The first task, whilst contained entirely within the stadium in the original book, is extended into an extensive chase scene through the Hogwarts buildings and grounds. The second task was almost entirely faithful to the novel, although the Grindylow attack was moved to the end of the sequence as the effects of the Gillyweed wears off. Also, the fact that the prisoners in the second task were never in any danger is removed. Because Dobby is not present in the film, Neville instead gives Harry the Gillyweed, as was Barty Crouch Junior's original plan in the novel. The merpeople are depicted as being less friendly than they are in the book. For the third task, the scene giving the champions advance warning of the maze was removed, as were all of Harry's preparations for it. In the film, the maze itself is devoid of the magical creatures and enchantments that were present in the book; instead, Dumbledore warns the contestants "people change in the maze. Find the cup if you will, but be careful not to lose yourself". Apparently, in the film version, the only thing alive in the maze, besides the four contestants, are the bushes that the maze is made of, which attempt to grab the contestants several times. Krum, visibly under the Imperius Curse, still attempts to attack Cedric (although with the Killing Curse rather than the Cruciatus Curse and Cedric retaliates with a disarming charm that fails to disarm Krum but knocks him unconscious). Also the sphinx scene was removed. Another change was that in the book, the maze was built on the Quidditch Pitch. In the film however, it was built in the valley next to Hogwarts. It was also at least three times bigger than described in the book. In the book, Harry encounters several creatures such as a Boggart and giant spider; although these are not in the film, a game included on the DVD release of the film simulates the third task maze and includes these creatures. Bartemius Barty Crouch (the younger) is a fictional character from the Harry Potter series of books. ...


The ending of the film is markedly different from the book, which has Cornelius Fudge refusing to believe Harry or Dumbledore regarding the Dark Lord's return and Dumbledore beginning to gather his forces (setting up the events of Order of the Phoenix). The film omits this (along with Harry's hospitalization) and jumps to Dumbledore's eulogy for Cedric, the farewells for the visiting students, and adds a film-specific exchange between Hermione and Harry about the fact "everything has changed."


Reaction

Critical reception

The film was received very positively by critics, garnering an 89% "Cream of the Crop" rating at Rotten Tomatoes.[5] This was the same rating that Prisoner of Azkaban received, they both are currently the most favorably reviewed Harry Potter films on the site. The New York Daily News praised the film for both its humour and its dark tone.[6] The young actors were praised for demonstrating a "greater range of subtle emotions",[7] particularly Daniel Radcliffe whom Variety described as delivering a "dimensional and nuanced performance".[8] New cast members were also praised: Brendan Gleeson's portrayal of Mad-Eye Moody was described as "colourful";[8] Miranda Richardson's scenes as Rita Skeeter were described as "wonderful";[6] and Ralph Fiennes's portrayal of Lord Voldemort was described as "sublime villainy".[9] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban is a 2004 fantasy adventure film, based on the novel of the same name by J. K. Rowling. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Gleeson as Professor Mad-Eye Moody in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... Miranda Jane Richardson (born 3 March 1958) is an Academy Award nominated English actress. ... Ralph Nathaniel Fiennes, (IPA: ), born 22 December 1962) is a Tony Award-winning, Academy Award-nominated and Genie Award-nominated British actor. ...


The maturity of Harry, Ron, and Hermione, among others, impressed most critics. While the major characters were portrayed as children in the previous films, "they have subtly transitioned into teenagers (in Goblet of Fire)" according to one USA Today reviewer. Harry has also physically matured since Prisoner of Azkaban. In the scene in the prefects' bathroom, Daniel Radcliffe's character is shown with significant axillary hair and muscle growth. USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... Daniel Jacob Radcliffe[1][2] (born 23 July 1989)[3] is an English film, television and stage actor. ... Armpit Hair Underarm hair is the composition of hair in the underarm area. ...


Negative criticism included the film's pace which The Arizona Republic described as being "far too episodic",[10] while CNN.com described the film as "clunky and disjointed".[11] Another criticism was that the many supporting characters did not get enough screen time.[11][8] Some fans criticised the film for changing and leaving out too much of the source material, particularly those parts that developed character,[12] and those parts of the story that set-up events that occur later in the series.[13] The Arizona Republic is a newspaper published in Phoenix, Arizona. ... CNN.com is the news website maintained by CNN. The website debuted on August 30, 1995, and it describes itself as the first major news and information website on the Internet. ...


Box office performance

After an opening day of $40m at the North American box office and staying at #1 for three weeks, Goblet of Fire enjoyed a successful run at the box office, running for 20 weeks in theatres and closing on April 6, 2006. The film set numerous records including the highest non-May opening weekend in the US and the most successful opening ever in the UK, earning £14.9m in its opening weekend. Goblet of Fire then drew $102.7 million from 3,858 locations its opening weekend at the North American box office, setting a new opening high for the franchise and selling about as many tickets as the first movie, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, did in its opening weekend. The debut marked the fourth $100 million weekend in history and to this day stands as the ninth largest opening weekend ever, behind Spider-Man 3's $151 million, Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest's $135 million, Shrek the Third's $121 million, Spider-Man's $114.8 million, Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End's $112 million Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith's $108.4 million, Shrek 2's $108 million, and X-Men: The Last Stand's $102.8 million. In Mainland China the film generated 93 million yuan.[14] The term box office can refer to either: A place where tickets are sold to the public for admission to a venue The amount of business a particular production, such as a movie or theatre show, does. ... Spider-Man 3 is a 2007 superhero film written and directed by Sam Raimi, with a screenplay by Ivan Raimi and Alvin Sargent. ... This article is about the film. ... Spider-Man is a 2002 American superhero film based on the fictional Marvel Comics character Spider-Man. ... Shrek 2, which was released in the United States on May 19, 2004, is the 2004 sequel to the 2001 computer-animated DreamWorks Pictures film Shrek. ... CNY and RMB redirect here. ...

Japanese poster for the film in Tokyo, Japan

Goblet of Fire has earned US $896 million worldwide, making it not only the highest grossing international and worldwide release of 2005, but also one of the few films to have ever passed $600 million in international box office receipts. It has joined ten other titles that have passed the $600 million mark, including Titanic, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest, Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End, Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace, Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith, Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones, and the first, second and fifth Harry Potter films. Its worldwide total includes $290 million from the U.S. and Canada. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... Titanic is a 1997 disaster romance film directed, written, produced and edited by James Cameron about the sinking of the RMS Titanic. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Film poster for Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace is a 1999 film by George Lucas starring Liam Neeson, Ewan McGregor, Natalie Portman, and Jake Lloyd. ... Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith is the third episode of the Star Wars film series (but the sixth film to be produced), to be released on Thursday, May 19, 2005. ... Film poster for Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones (2002) is the fifth Star Wars science fiction movie released and the second part of the prequel trilogy which began with Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace. ...


The film was also released in IMAX theatres and grossed a total of US $20,033,758 worldwide for a cumulative per screen average of $188,998 thus setting a new record and a new milestone for a digitally remastered 2-D IMAX release.[15]


In January 2006, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire surpassed the box office takings of Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, to become the eighth highest-grossing film worldwide, during that time, and the second highest-grossing film in the Harry Potter series, behind Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone. Today, it is the third highest-grossing Harry Potter film behind The Philosopher's Stone and Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. January 2006 : ← - January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad accuses European nations of trying to complete the Holocaust by creating a Jewish camp Israel in the Middle East. ... Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone, released in the United States as Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone, is a 2001 fantasy/adventure film based on the novel of the same name by J.K. Rowling. ... Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a 2007 fantasy adventure film, based on the novel of the same name, by J. K. Rowling. ...


The film ranks third in the North American box office (domestic) behind Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith and The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe for 2005 though both films rank lower than Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire in worldwide terms.[16] The year 2005 in film involved some significant events. ...


Awards

Award Person
Nominated:
Academy Award for Best Art Direction, lost to Memoirs of a Geisha Stuart Craig
Stephanie McMillan

The Academy Awards are the oldest awards ceremony for achievements in motion pictures. ... Memoirs of a Geisha is an Academy Award and Grammy Award-winning movie adaptation of the novel of the same name, produced by Steven Spielbergs Amblin Entertainment and directed by Rob Marshall. ... Norman Stuart Craig OBE (born April 14, 1942) is a production designer. ... Stephanie McMillan is a set decorator. ...

Wyrd Sisters lawsuit

In the run up to the movie, Warner Bros. approached a Canadian folk group called the Wyrd Sisters to obtain permission to use the name THE WEIRD SISTERS for its Harry Potter Band. When a deal could not be made, the Canadian band filed a US$40-million lawsuit against Warner Brothers, the North American distributor of the film, for the misuse of their group's name. The Canadian band also brought an injunction to stop the release of the movie as it contained a performance by the improperly named Harry Potter band. An Ontario judge dismissed this motion. The Wyrd Sisters are a Canadian folk music group. ... Warner Bros. ...


Before the film was released, Warner Brothers claimed that it had never used the name THE WEIRD SISTERS in any way in the film or otherwise and that it would not do so in the future. However, since this turned out not to be true, the Canadian band is continuing its action in the Federal Court of Canada where Warner Bros. and some of its major licensees are being sued for misuse of the Canadian band's name in Harry Potter merchandise along with misuse in the film and soundtrack. In the Ontario Court, Warner Bros. and its counsel on the injunction are the subject of contempt proceedings relating to alleged violations in Warner Bros.' testimony on the interlocutory injunction. The judge that heard the matter, Mr. Justice Colin Campbell of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice, is the subject of a complaint to the Canadian Judicial Council arising from allegations of judicial misconduct relating to the injunction hearing itself and interference with the action in the Ontario Court in the months following the injunction hearing.[17][18]


DVD

The film was released on DVD in North America on March 7, 2006. It was available in one- and two-disc editions, as well as part of an 8-disc box set that includes all four films to date.[19] The bonus disc features three interactive games, as well as seven behind the scenes featurettes. The film was also released in UMD format for PSP. is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A UMD The Universal Media Disc (UMD) is an optical disc medium developed by Sony for use on the PlayStation Portable. ... The PlayStation Portable (officially abbreviated PSP)[5] is a handheld game console manufactured and marketed by Sony Computer Entertainment. ...


Wal-Mart had a special bonus disc available for purchase alongside the single-disc editions that features extra features and a sample of the Harry Potter edition of the Scene It? DVD game. Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ... Scene It? is a DVD TV board game in which players answer trivia questions about films or pop culture. ...


On its first day of release in North America, over 5 million copies were sold, recording a franchise high for first-day sales. Within its first week it sold over a total of 9 million units of combined sales of both the widescreen and full-screen versions of the DVD.[20]


The UK edition was released on DVD on March 20, 2006 and became the fastest selling UK DVD ever, selling six copies per second on its first day of release. According to the Official Charts Company, the DVD sold 1.4 million copies in its first week alone. It is also available in a two-disc edition with special features similar to the North American two-disc edition.[21][22] is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The DVD currently holds the Guinness World Record for being the fastest selling DVD of all time. The achievement is added to the 2007 edition of The Guinness World Records book which includes a picture of the award being presented at Leavesden Film Studios in April.[23] Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Suresh Joachim, minutes away from breaking the ironing world record at 55 hours and 5 minutes, at Shoppers World, Brampton. ... Leavesden Film Studios is a film and media complex constructed on the site of the former Rolls Royce factory at Leavesden Aerodrome, which was an important centre of aircraft production during World War II. It is situated approximately 20 miles northwest of central London near the town of Watford. ...


Future Shop has an exclusive promotion including a holographic cover for the two-disc edition.


Warner Home Video announced the HD DVD edition of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire was to be released on April 11, 2006; however, due to the delayed release of Toshiba's HD DVD player, the HD DVD edition of Goblet of Fire was pushed back to April 18, 2006.[24] This deadline was also missed. is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the United States, the first five Harry Potter films were released on HD DVD and Blu-ray disc on December 11, 2007. They are available individually or in a gift set containing all five films and a set of collectible cards and bookmarks.[25] The Chinese DVD edition was released 2 weeks before the North American release as an effort to combat DVD piracy in the country of China. The DVD was sold at a low price of $2.73 USD.


The Indian Version of the DVD was a two-disc special edition, which was released by Saregama home video on April 7, 2006. Instead of VHS a VCD was released. The DVD priced Rs.699 INR($14.86 USD) and VCD priced Rs. 299 INR($6.37 USD) Sa Re Ga Ma India Limited (formerly known as The Gramophone Company of India) is an Indian music company. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


References

  1. ^ a b (2005, November 19). Harry Potter: Behind the Magic. Grenada Television.
  2. ^ a b (2005, November 14). Goblet of Fire Red Carpet Interviews, Part 2: Interviews filmed with Tolga Safer, David Heyman, Miranda Richardson, and Dan Radcliffe on the red carpet of the US premiere. (QuickTime). The Leaky Cauldron, MuggleNet. Retrieved on 2007-09-15.
  3. ^ Burr, Ty. "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire movie rewiew", The Boston Globe, 2007-11-17. Retrieved on 2007-09-15. 
  4. ^ a b c Dadds, Kimberly; Miriam Zendle. "Harry Potter: books vs. films", Digital Spy, 2007-07-09. Retrieved on 2007-09-14. 
  5. ^ Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved on 2007-06-10.
  6. ^ a b "A blistering 'Goblet of Fire", New York Daily News. Retrieved on 2007-06-10. 
  7. ^ Stephanie Zacharek. ""Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire"", Salon.com, 2005-11-17. Retrieved on 2007-06-10. 
  8. ^ a b c Todd McCarthy. "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire", Variety, 2005-11-09. Retrieved on 2007-06-10. 
  9. ^ "The Young Wizard Puts Away Childish Things", The New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-06-10.  (Requires membership)
  10. ^ Bill Muller (2005-11-18). Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. The Arizona Republic. Retrieved on 2007-06-10.
  11. ^ a b Paul Clinton. "Review: New 'Potter' tries to do too much", CNN.com, 2005-11-21. Retrieved on 2007-06-10. 
  12. ^ PotterCast #14. PotterCast. Retrieved on 2007-06-10.
  13. ^ Who's seen GoF and what did everybody think?. Fiction Alley. Retrieved on 2007-06-10.
  14. ^ http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-03/07/content_4269696.htm Xinhuanet.com Retrieved on 05-29-07
  15. ^ YahooFinance http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/060418/to193.html?.v=22 YahooFinance Biz.yahoo.com Retrieved on 05-29-07
  16. ^ http://www.boxofficemojo.com/yearly/chart/?yr=2005&p=.htm Boxofficemojo.com Retrieved on 05-29-07
  17. ^ "'Wyrd' lawsuit against new 'Harry Potter' movie", Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. 
  18. ^ "'Wyrd Sisters' cannot stop Harry Potter", Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. 
  19. ^ http://www.mugglenet.com Mugglenet.com Retrieved on 05-29-07
  20. ^ http://www.panandscan.com/news/show/Harry_Potter/433 Panandscan.com Retrieved on 05-29-07
  21. ^ http://www.dvdactive.com DVDactive.com Retrieved on 05-29-07
  22. ^ News.bbc.co.uk Retrieved on 05-29-07
  23. ^ http://www.hpana.com/news.19410.html Hpana.com Retrieved on 05-29-07
  24. ^ http://itvibe.com/news/3993/ Itvibe.com Retrieved on 05-29-07
  25. ^ EyeCraveDVD.com - Harry Potter: Years 1-5' Blu-ray, HD DVD Suitcase Exterior

QuickTime is a multimedia framework developed by Apple Inc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Boston Globe (and Boston Sunday Globe) is the most widely circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and New England. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Digital Spy (or DS as it is often known by its users) is a British media and entertainment website, noted for its extensive Big Brother coverage and forums. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Salon. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Variety is a daily newspaper for the entertainment industry. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Arizona Republic is a newspaper published in Phoenix, Arizona. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... CNN.com is the news website maintained by CNN. The website debuted on August 30, 1995, and it describes itself as the first major news and information website on the Internet. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... PotterCast is the official podcast of Harry Potter fansite The Leaky Cauldron. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Not to be confused with The Straits Times, the Singaporean newspaper. ...

External links

Harry Potter Movies Portal
Preceded by
Chicken Little
Box office number-one films of 2005 (USA)
November 20, 2005December 4, 2005
Succeeded by
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe
Harry James Potter is the title character and the main protagonist of J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter fantasy series. ... Ronald Bilius Ron Weasley is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Hermione Jean Granger (first name pronounced ) is a fictional character in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... Lord Voldemort (pronounced )[1][2] is a fictional character and the primary antagonist in the Harry Potter novel series written by British author J. K. Rowling. ... Albus Percival Wulfric Brian Dumbledore is a fictional character within the Harry Potter series written by British author J. K. Rowling. ... Severus Snape is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Rubeus Hagrid is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Sirius Black is a fictional character in J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... Draco Malfoy is a fictional character in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... Ginevra Molly Ginny Weasley is a fictional character in J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... Neville Longbottom is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Luna Lovegood is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... James and Lily Potter are fictional characters in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... The Weasley family are a fictional family of wizards who figure prominently in the plot of J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series of novels. ... The following are teachers and staff at Hogwarts in the Harry Potter book series by J. K. Rowling. ... In the Harry Potter novels, by J. K. Rowling, the Order of the Phoenix is a fictional organisation founded by Albus Dumbledore to fight Lord Voldemort and his followers, the Death Eaters. ... In the fictional Harry Potter series, a Death Eater is a follower of Lord Voldemort. ... -1... Dobby House-elves are fictional magical creatures in the Harry Potter series of books written by J. K. Rowling. ... Hogwarts, a wizarding school. ... In the fictional Harry Potter series created by J. K. Rowling, magic is depicted as a natural force that can be used to override the usual laws of nature while still being approached entirely scientifically. ... The chronology is a general timeline of events derived from information provided in the series of Harry Potter novels written by J.K. Rowling, along with additional materials posted on her web site and published in various interviews. ... The Harry Potter book and film series are set in a number of fictional locations. ... Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a setting in J. K. Rowlings best-selling Harry Potter series. ... In the fictional universe of the Harry Potter series as written by J. K. Rowling, the Ministry of Magic is the governing body of the magical community of Britain and succeeded the earlier Wizards Council. ... Quidditch is a fictional sport developed by J. K. Rowling, found in the internationally bestselling Harry Potter novels and films. ... Magical creatures comprise a colourful and integral aspect of the wizarding world in the Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling. ... Spells in Harry Potter occur in the wizarding world of the series of books by author J. K. Rowling. ... In the fictional Harry Potter series, many magical objects exist for the use of the characters. ... Tom Riddles diary, the first Horcrux that Harry Potter encountered, as seen in the film Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. ... Because students in the novels board the train to Hogwarts at Platform 9¾ at Kings Cross railway station in London, the real Kings Cross has erected a sign at a wall between tracks 9 and 10 to commemorate this. ... // Writer J. K. Rowling cites several writers as influences in her creation of her bestselling Harry Potter series. ... Different composers have been involved in writing the music for the Harry Potter films. ... The immense popularity and wide recognition of JK Rowlings Harry Potter fantasy series has led to it being extensively parodied, in works spanning nearly every medium. ... There have been many published theories about politics in the Harry Potter books and from academic circles. ... The cover of Harry Potter en de Steen der Wijzen (Harry Potter and the Stone of the Wise Men) – the Dutch language translation of the first book, jointly published by De Harmonie and Standaard. ... Fantastic Beasts & Where to Find Them is a 2001 book written by English author J. K. Rowling to benefit the British charity Comic Relief. ... Quidditch Through the Ages is both a fictional book described in the Harry Potter series of novels by the English author J. K. Rowling, and a real book by that author, although her name is only stated in the book as the copyright holder of the Harry Potter-name. ... The Tales of Beedle the Bard is the title of a book of fairy tales Albus Dumbledore left Hermione Granger in his will. ... Lego Harry Potter is a Lego theme based on the books and films of the Harry Potter series. ... This is the back side of each card in the game. ... Chicken Little (2005) is a computer-generated imagery (CGI) animated film and the forty-fifth animated feature made and produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures and Buena Vista Distribution on November 4, 2005. ... This is a list of films which have placed number one at the weekend box office in the United States during 2005. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (539 words)
Harry fails badly, coming back up last by a long way, but only because he stayed down to make sure all the hostages were rescued, rather than taking Ron back to the surface as soon as he could.
12 Harry Potter And The Goblet Of Fire Walkthrough
11 Harry Potter And The Goblet Of Fire Quiz
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (film) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2510 words)
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is the fourth film in the popular Harry Potter series, begun with the novel by J.K. Rowling.
The film ranks third in the North American box office (domestic) behind Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith and The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe for 2005 though both films rank lower than Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire in worldwide terms.
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire was the top grossing film worldwide of 2005, making $892.2 Million to date [9], making it the eighth top grossing movie of all time worldwide [10].
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m