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Encyclopedia > Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
Harry Potter books
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
Author J. K. Rowling
Illustrators Flag of the United Kingdom Giles Greenfield
Flag of the United States Mary GrandPré
Genre Fantasy
Publishers Bloomsbury Publishing PLC, Scholastic Press, Raincoast Books
Released 8 July 2000
Book no. Four
Sales ~ 66 million (Worldwide)
Story timeline 1942
1994–1995
Chapters 37
Pages Flag of the United Kingdom 636
Flag of the United States 734
Preceded by Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
Followed by Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is the fourth novel in the Harry Potter series written by J. K. Rowling. Published on 8 July 2000, the release of this book was surrounded by more hype than any other book in recent times[citation needed]—outdone only by its successors, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. The book attracted additional attention because of a pre-publication warning from J. K. Rowling that one of the characters would be murdered in the book. , Berkhamsted is an historic town of some 19,000 people. ... The HP postcode area is a group of twenty-three postal districts in north west Hertfordshire and East Buckinghamshire. ... Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is a 2005 fantasy adventure film, based on J.K. Rowlings novel of the same name, and is the fourth film in the popular Harry Potter film series. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ... Cover image of the Bloomsbury edition of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... Joanne Jo Murray, née Rowling OBE[1] (born 31 July 1965),[2] who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling,[3] is a British writer and author of the Harry Potter fantasy series. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Mary GrandPré (born 1954 in South Dakota) is an American illustrator, best known for her illustrations in the US version of the Harry Potter books, published by Scholastic. ... Look up Fantasy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary For other definitions of fantasy, see fantasy (psychology). ... Bloomsbury Publishing plc is an independent, London-based publishing house best known as the publisher of the Harry Potter series of novels, written by J. K. Rowling. ... Scholastic Corporation (NASDAQ: SCHL) is an American book publishing company known for publishing educational materials for schools, teachers, and parents, and selling and distributing them by mail order and via book clubs and book fairs. ... Raincoast Books is a Canadian book publishing company. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... The chronology is a general timeline of events derived from information provided in the series of Harry Potter novels written by J.K. Rowling, along with additional materials posted on her web site and published in various interviews. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... HP3 redirects here. ... OotP redirects here. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ... Joanne Jo Murray, née Rowling OBE[1] (born 31 July 1965),[2] who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling,[3] is a British writer and author of the Harry Potter fantasy series. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... OotP redirects here. ... Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, released on July 16, 2005, is the sixth of seven novels in J.K. Rowlings popular Harry Potter series. ... HP7 redirects here. ...


The novel won a Hugo Award in 2000. The book was made into a film, which was released worldwide on 18 November 2005. The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

Plot

Quidditch World Cup

The fourth book opens as Frank Bryce, the Riddle manor's elderly caretaker who had been questioned by local police for murder of the Riddles over fifty years ago, sees lights inside an abandoned house. Investigating, he overhears Lord Voldemort and Peter Pettigrew (Wormtail) plotting the death of Harry Potter. Frank is discovered and slain by an unknown person or thing. Having seen the killing in a dream, Harry awakens with his scar in agony. Frank Bryce (1917–1994) is a fictional character in the Harry Potter universe. ... Lord Voldemort (born as Tom Marvolo Riddle)(IPA: [1][2]) is a fictional character and the primary antagonist in the Harry Potter novel series written by British author J. K. Rowling. ... Peter Pettigrew, often referred to by his nickname Wormtail, is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Harry James Potter is the title character and the main protagonist of J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter fantasy series. ...


Soon after, Harry, Hermione Granger, the Weasley family (with the exception of Molly) and several wizarding acquaintances depart for the Quidditch World Cup. After the match, a flight of Death Eaters (Lord Voldemort's servants) storm the camp, creating panic and destruction. Harry, Hermione and Ron flee into the forest whence they see the Dark Mark, the sign of Lord Voldemort, beamed into the night sky. The head of the Department of International Magical Co-operation, Barty Crouch Sr., arrives and accuses the trio of conjuring the Mark. But soon they find Winky, the house elf of Crouch himself, clutching Harry's stolen wand. A furious Crouch sacks Winky on the spot. Hermione Jean Granger (first name pronounced ) is a fictional character in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... A photograph from the fictional wizard newspaper The Daily Prophet, as seen in the 3rd film in the film series, showing the Weasleys on holiday in Egypt. ... Molly Weasley (née Prewett) is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Quidditch is a fictional sport developed by J. K. Rowling, found in the internationally bestselling Harry Potter novels and films. ... In the fictional Harry Potter series, a Death Eater is a follower of Lord Voldemort. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Magic (Harry Potter). ... Bartemius Barty Crouch Senior is a fictional character in the Harry Potter series of books. ... Dobby House-elves are fictional magical creatures in the Harry Potter series of books written by J. K. Rowling. ...


Triwizard Tournament

Professor Dumbledore announces during the Welcoming Feast that Hogwarts will host the Triwizard Tournament. The centuries-old inter-school competition was discontinued because it became too dangerous, but has been recently revived. The tournament includes three difficult tasks, one held during each school term. Albus Percival Wulfric Brian Dumbledore (born ca. ... The Champions of the 1994-1995 Triwizard Tournament: shown characters are portrayed by the actors that play them in the movies The Triwizard Tournament is a fictional tournament featured in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ...


The Goblet of Fire chooses one student from each competing school. Students must be at least 17 years old to enter this contest, as it is dangerous. Cedric Diggory is Hogwarts' champion, Fleur Delacour is Beauxbatons' and Viktor Krum represents Durmstrang. The Goblet unexpectedly selects a fourth champion, Harry Potter, even though Harry never entered and is underage. This leads to a falling out with Ron, who thinks Harry cheated to enter. Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a setting in J. K. Rowlings best-selling Harry Potter series. ... Fleur Isabelle Delacour is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Viktor Krum (Bulgarian: ) (born c. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Ronald Bilius Ron Weasley is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ...


Harry is guided through the tournament by Professor Alastor Moody, the new Defence Against the Dark Arts teacher and a former Auror. In the first task, the champions must retrieve a golden egg from a dragon. With advice from Hagrid, Moody, and Hermione, Harry uses his broom to fly past the dragon and capture the egg, earning high marks. Ron realises Harry would not have cheated when he sees how dangerous the first task is, and they reconcile. Meanwhile, Hermione begins the Society For the Protection of Elfish Welfare (S.P.E.W). For the record label, see Mad Eye Recordings. ... The Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a fictional magic school that is the main setting of the Harry Potter novels by J. K. Rowling. ... In the Harry Potter book series, Aurors are an elite unit of the Department of Magical Law Enforcement of the British Ministry of Magic, who track down and capture criminals, in particular those criminals who pose a danger to the wizarding community. ... For other uses, see Dragon (disambiguation). ... Rubeus Hagrid is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ...


The champions are required to attend the Yule Ball, a tradition associated with the Triwizard Tournament. Harry wants to invite Cho Chang, but when he learns she is attending with Cedric Diggory, he agrees to take Parvati Patil, while her twin sister, Padma, goes with Ron. Hermione attends with Viktor Krum—sparking Ron's jealousy, made worse by Hermione's unexpectedly beautiful appearance at the Ball. The Triwizard Tournament is a fictional tournament featured in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... Cho Chang (1978-1979 -) is a fictional character in J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... This article is about minor Harry Potter characters who are Gryffindor students in the same year as Harry. ... The following are minor characters from the Harry Potter series in Ravenclaw House. ...


The second task requires retrieving something important to each champion that is hidden in Hogwarts' lake; the chief impediment here being that they must stay submerged for the time they are underwater without the aid of Muggle scuba gear. As the event is about to begin, Dobby gives Harry gillyweed so he can breathe underwater, and he successfully finds the four "important objects": Ron, Hermione, Cho and Fleur's little sister, Gabrielle. Harry stays on the spot to ensure that everyone is rescued, but Fleur never comes; he rescues Gabrielle in addition to Ron, which causes him to lose time but gain points for 'moral fiber'. (Diggory and Krum have rescued Cho and Hermione, respectively.) Dobby is also a trade term used to refer to the strip of closely-woven material often seen on towels (and much less commonly on washcloths). ...


Harry and Krum are startled when a dishevelled Mr. Crouch emerges from the forest, mumbling incoherently and demanding to see Dumbledore. Harry runs for help, but when he returns with Dumbledore, they find Krum unconscious and Crouch missing. While waiting in Dumbledore's office the headmaster's return, Harry discovers a Pensieve, a method of storing memories one does not wish to be continually remembering, and enters it. It contains one of Dumbledore's own memories: that of the trial in which Barty Crouch, Jr., a Death Eater, was sentenced to Azkaban by his own father for torturing Frank and Alice Longbottom (Neville's parents) into insanity. Bartemius Barty Crouch Junior is a fictional character from the Harry Potter series of books. ... Azkaban is the fictional wizard prison in the Harry Potter series of books by J. K. Rowling. ...


Graveyard Confrontation

The third task involves navigating a maze filled with magical obstacles. Harry and Cedric successfully navigate the maze, helping each other on the way. They reach the center together, and agree to grasp the prize simultaneously as the only honorable solution to a tie. Unknown to them, the Cup is actually a portkey that transports them to an old cemetery in Little Hangleton. Peter Pettigrew awaits them, carrying a deformed Lord Voldemort, who orders Pettigrew to "kill the spare" (Cedric). Pettigrew kills Diggory with the Avada Kedavra curse, and ties Harry to the Riddle tombstone. He then uses a bone from Voldemort's father's grave, some of Harry's blood, and his own severed hand in a magical ritual that restores Lord Voldemort to his former powers and a new body. In the fictional Harry Potter universe, many magical objects exist for the use of the characters. ... In the magical world of the Harry Potter series of fictional novels, many spells are used by the characters. ...


Voldemort summons his Death Eaters, and reveals that his servant at Hogwarts ensured that Harry would participate in the tournament, win it, and thus be brought to the graveyard. Voldemort challenges Harry to a duel, and punishes Harry with the Cruciatus Curse. Harry tries to disarm Voldemort with the Expelliarmus spell, at the same time as Voldemort uses the Avada Kedavra curse. The two curses meet and interlock, causing a special magical effect called Priori Incantatem takes place.This bond between the wands causes the spirits of Voldemort's murdered victims, including Cedric Diggory, Bertha Jorkins, James and Lily Potter, and even the Muggle Frank Bryce, to spill out from his wand. The spirit victims provide protection to Harry, allowing him to escape with Diggory's body. In the magical world of the Harry Potter series of novels, many spells are used by the characters. ... In the magical world of the Harry Potter series of fictional novels by J. K. Rowling, many (often incredible) things are accomplished through the use of magical spells by the characters. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into List of spells in Harry Potter. ... Cedric Diggory is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... This article is about minor members of the Ministry of Magic in the Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling. ... For the American Revolutionary War general, see James Potter. ... Muggle is the only word used in the Harry Potter series of books by J. K. Rowling to refer to a normal person who lacks any sort of magical ability. ...


Aftermath

After Harry returns to the school grounds through the portkey, Moody takes Harry to his office immediately. He reveals that he has been helping Harry throughout the tournament so that Harry would reach the portkey, thereby going to the cemetery so Voldemort could be restored. Dumbledore, Snape, MacGonagall arrive just at this point; Dumbledore had realized that something was wrong when he saw Moody whisk Harry away from the maze so quickly, and followed them. Dumbledore feeds Moody three drops of Veritaserum, and they discover that "Moody" is actually Barty Crouch, Jr. He has escaped Azkaban and used a Polyjuice Potion to impersonate the real Alastor Moody, who is trapped in a magical trunk. Crouch Jr. murdered his father and entered Harry's name into the Goblet of Fire, covertly ensuring that Harry completed each difficult task. Minister of Magic, Cornelius Fudge, arrives at Hogwarts accompanied by a Dementor. Fudge denies Dumbledore's claim that Voldemort has returned and before Crouch can repeat his confession, his soul is sucked out when the Dementor performs the Dementor's Kiss on him (on Fudge's orders). A dementor is an utterly foul fictional being, the worst creature J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter book series has to offer. ...


Dumbledore swiftly and urgently revives the Order of the Phoenix and, against the Ministry's orders, tells students the truth about Cedric's death and that Voldemort has returned, stating that "it would be an insult to his memory" to claim otherwise. Harry is crowned the Triwizard Tournament champion and is awarded one thousand Galleons, which he gives to Ron's twin brothers, Fred and George, telling them to use it to open their own joke shop, their life-long ambition. In the Harry Potter novels, by J. K. Rowling, the Order of the Phoenix is a fictional organisation founded by Albus Dumbledore to fight Lord Voldemort and his followers, the Death Eaters. ... In the Harry Potter series of novels by J. K. Rowling, a fictional system of currency is used by the wizards of the United Kingdom. ... Frederick Fred and George Weasley are fictional characters in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ...


Subplot: Rita Skeeter

Rita Skeeter, a writer for the Daily Prophet, has been writing lies about Harry (about the time his scar hurt after a strange dream in Divination), Hagrid (about the time he told them about his mother), and Hermione (in love with Viktor Krum). Skeeter has been having secret interviews with the Slytherins about these issues in the articles. First, Harry suspects that she has an Invisibility Cloak, but Hermione knows that Mad Eye Moody would have noticed her by seeing through the cloak. Then Harry thinks that she may have had those areas wired (bugged). However, Hermione tells them that electronic devices do not work in Hogwarts because of the magic in the air. Near the end of the book, it was finally revealed how she was doing this. Hermione figured out that Skeeter is an unregistered Animagus and can turn into a beetle. Harry and Ron realise that there was a beetle on the statue near Hagrid's hut, and later in Hermione's hair after the second task, and on the window of Divination class when Harry's scar hurt, and that the Slytherins knew about it all along. Hermione had Rita trapped in a jar at the end and did not let her out until she got back to London. The Daily Prophet is a fictional newspaper featured in the Harry Potter book series as the most widely-read newspaper in Englands wizard community. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Registered Animagus Minerva McGonagall mid transformation In the Harry Potter books, an Animagus is a wizard or witch capable of turning into a particular animal and back at will. ...


Foreshadowing

  • Ron's jealousy comes to the fore when Harry's name is pulled from the Goblet of Fire. He thinks Harry is lying about putting his name in for the contest, and abandons his friend. Ron later returns when he sees how dangerous the competition is. Also, Ron's feelings towards Hermione, which were more subtle prior to Goblet of Fire, now become obvious, with their relationship blossoming in Half-Blood Prince and finally being consummated with their first kiss in Deathly Hallows. Both of these are faced in the seventh book when Ron, angered by Harry's lack of a concrete plan and the usual comforts of home, leaves Hermione and Harry (though regrets this instantly).
  • Fleur looks interested in Bill Weasley, whom she later dates (Order of the Phoenix), is engaged to (Half-Blood Prince) and marries (Deathly Hallows).
  • At the end of Goblet of Fire, Dumbledore asks Sirius to round up "the old crowd". This includes Arabella Figg, who is mentioned as early in the series as the second chapter of the first book. However, she is introduced as a crazy old Muggle who lives a street or two over from Privet Drive. In Order of the Phoenix, it is revealed that she is a Squib who has been assigned to keep an eye on Harry. The only reason she never let him have fun while at her house was because she (and Dumbledore) feared that if the Dursleys believed Harry enjoyed himself there, they would find a different babysitter.

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, released on July 16, 2005, is the sixth of seven novels in J.K. Rowlings popular Harry Potter series. ... HP7 redirects here. ... Arabella Doreen Figg (more often Mrs Figg) is a Harry Potter character who surreptitiously watches over Harry Potter while hes home with the Dursleys. ... Squib may refer to: Squib, a small explosive Squib, a short article that is intended to ignite thinking and discourse Squib, a small sailboat Squib, a computer message board system Squib, a magically-impaired member of a wizarding family in Harry Potter Squib, an alien race in Star Wars This...

Trivia

  • In a Q&A session at the Edinburgh International Book Festival, J. K. Rowling revealed that the three Triwizard tasks were inspired by the four classical elements of earth, air, fire and water, the dragon combining air and fire, the lake representing water, and the maze symbolising earth. There were apparently originally intended to be four tasks, but Rowling later decided to combine air and fire into one task.
  • Concerning the chronological history in Harry Potter, the story starts in the summer of 1994. However, in a letter from Harry Potter to Sirius Black, Harry claims that Dudley was so upset about his diet that he threw his PlayStation out the window. This is incorrect, because the first PlayStation was released on December 4, 1994 in Japan, which would take place several months after the letter was written.

Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... The Edinburgh International Book Festival is a book festival that takes place in the last three weeks in August (coinciding with the general Edinburgh Festival) in Charlotte Square in the centre of Edinburgh. ... Several ancient Classical Element Greek version of these ideas persisted throughout the Middle Ages and into the Renaissance, deeply influencing European thought and culture. ... Harry James Potter is the title character and the main protagonist of J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter fantasy series. ... Sirius Black is a fictional character in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... The Dursleys are Harry Potters last living relatives. ... For other uses, see PlayStation (disambiguation). ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ...

Release history

Until the official title's announcement on 27 June 2000, the fourth book was called by its working title, Harry Potter and the Doomspell Tournament.[1] J. K. Rowling expressed her indecision about the title in an Entertainment Weekly interview. is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ...

I changed my mind twice on what [the title] was. The working title had got out — 'Harry Potter and the Doomspell Tournament.' Then I changed 'Doomspell' to 'Triwizard Tournament.' Then I was teetering between 'Goblet of Fire' and 'Triwizard Tournament.' In the end, I preferred 'Goblet of Fire' because it's got that kind of 'cup of destiny' feel about it, which is the theme of the book.[2]

Rowling also admitted that the fourth book was the most difficult to write at the time, because she noticed a giant plot hole halfway through writing.[3] In particular, Rowling had trouble with the ninth chapter, which she rewrote 13 times.[4] A plot hole is a gap or inconsistency in a storyline that goes against the flow of logic established by the storys plot. ...


U.S./U.K. Release

Goblet of Fire was the first book in the Harry Potter series to be released simultaneously in the United States and the United Kingdom, on 8 July 2000. The three previous books had been released in the United Kingdom several months before the U.S. edition. is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ...


Editions

Bloomsbury (United Kingdom, Australia, Canada etc.)
  • ISBN 0-7475-4624-X Hardcover
  • ISBN 0-7475-5099-9 Paperback
  • ISBN 0-7475-7450-2 Hardcover (adult edition)
  • ISBN 0-7475-7450-2 Paperback (adult edition)
Scholastic (United States etc.)
  • ISBN 0-439-13959-7 Hardcover
  • ISBN 0-439-13960-0 Paperback

References

  1. ^ Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire: Pre-release
  2. ^ 2000: Accio Quote!, the largest archive of J.K. Rowling interviews on the web
  3. ^ J.K. Rowling explains why ''Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire'' was the hardest to write | Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire | Book News | Books | Entertainment Weekly
  4. ^ 2001: Accio Quote!, the largest archive of J.K. Rowling interviews on the web

External links

Wikibooks
Wikibooks Muggles' Guide to Harry Potter has a page on the topic of
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
  • Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire extended information
  • Book Summary: Goblet of Fire
  • Errors & Mistakes: Goblet of Fire
The Harry Potter Wiki has information related to:
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
Awards
Preceded by
A Deepness in the Sky
by Vernor Vinge
Hugo Award for Best Novel
2001
Succeeded by
American Gods
by Neil Gaiman
Harry James Potter is the title character and the main protagonist of J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter fantasy series. ... Ronald Bilius Ron Weasley is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Hermione Jean Granger (first name pronounced ) is a fictional character in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... Lord Voldemort (born as Tom Marvolo Riddle)(IPA: [1][2]) is a fictional character and the primary antagonist in the Harry Potter novel series written by British author J. K. Rowling. ... Albus Percival Wulfric Brian Dumbledore is a fictional character within the Harry Potter series written by British author J. K. Rowling. ... Severus Snape is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Sirius Black is a fictional character in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... Rubeus Hagrid is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Draco Malfoy is a fictional character in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter series. ... Ginevra Molly Ginny Weasley is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Neville Longbottom is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... Luna Lovegood is a fictional character in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... James and Lily Potter are fictional characters in the Harry Potter book series written by J. K. Rowling. ... A photograph from the fictional wizard newspaper The Daily Prophet, as seen in the 3rd film in the film series, showing the Weasleys on holiday in Egypt. ... The following are teachers and staff at Hogwarts in the Harry Potter book series by J. K. Rowling. ... In the Harry Potter novels, by J. K. Rowling, the Order of the Phoenix is a fictional organisation founded by Albus Dumbledore to fight Lord Voldemort and his followers, the Death Eaters. ... In the fictional Harry Potter series, a Death Eater is a follower of Lord Voldemort. ... Dobby House-elves are fictional magical creatures in the Harry Potter series of books written by J. K. Rowling. ... Hogwarts, a wizarding school. ... In the fictional Harry Potter series created by J. K. Rowling, magic is depicted as a natural force that can be used to override the usual laws of nature while still being approached entirely scientifically. ... The chronology is a general timeline of events derived from information provided in the series of Harry Potter novels written by J.K. Rowling, along with additional materials posted on her web site and published in various interviews. ... The Harry Potter book and film series are set in a number of fictional locations. ... Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a setting in J. K. Rowlings best-selling Harry Potter series. ... In the fictional universe of the Harry Potter series as written by J. K. Rowling, the Ministry of Magic is the governing body of the magical community of Britain and succeeded the earlier Wizards Council. ... Quidditch is a fictional sport developed by J. K. Rowling, found in the internationally bestselling Harry Potter novels and films. ... Magical creatures comprise a colourful and integral aspect of the wizarding world in the Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling. ... Spells in Harry Potter occur in the wizarding world of the series of books by author J. K. Rowling. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Magic (Harry Potter). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Magic (Harry Potter). ... In the fictional Harry Potter series, many magical objects exist for the use of the characters. ... Tom Riddles diary, the first Horcrux that Harry Potter encountered, as seen in the film Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. ... The Sign of the Deathly Hallows represents all three objects symbolically: the Wand, the Stone, and the Cloak. ... This is a list of fictional books mentioned in the Harry Potter series. ... Several media publications are featured in the Harry Potter novels (and film adaptations). ... In the Harry Potter series, Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is divided into four houses, each bearing the last name of its founder: Godric Gryffindor, Salazar Slytherin, Rowena Ravenclaw and Helga Hufflepuff. ... The Hogwarts Express, as seen in the film adaptation of the first book. ... Different composers have been involved in writing the music for the Harry Potter films. ... Mary GrandPré (born 1954 in South Dakota) is an American illustrator, best known for her illustrations in the US version of the Harry Potter books, published by Scholastic. ... Because students in the novels board the train to Hogwarts at Platform 9¾ at Kings Cross railway station in London, the real Kings Cross has erected a sign at a wall between tracks 9 and 10 to commemorate this. ... // Writer J. K. Rowling cites several writers as influences in her creation of her bestselling Harry Potter series. ... The immense popularity and wide recognition of JK Rowlings Harry Potter fantasy series has led to it being extensively parodied, in works spanning nearly every medium. ... There have been many published theories about politics in the Harry Potter books and from academic circles. ... The cover of Harry Potter en de Steen der Wijzen – the Dutch language translation of the first book, jointly published by De Harmonie and Standaard. ... Fantastic Beasts & Where to Find Them is a 2001 book written by English author J. K. Rowling to benefit the British charity Comic Relief. ... Quidditch Through the Ages is both a fictional book described in the Harry Potter series of novels by the English author J. K. Rowling, and a real book by that author, although her name is only stated in the book as the copyright holder of the Harry Potter-name. ... The Tales of Beedle the Bard is the title of a book of fairy tales Albus Dumbledore left Hermione Granger in his will. ... Lego Harry Potter is a Lego theme based on the books and films of the Harry Potter series. ... This is the back side of each card in the game. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3149 words)
The publication of Goblet of Fire caused unprecedented heights of Pottermania to be reached internationally.
Harry, with the aid of his broomstick, outmaneuvers the dragon and manages to steal the golden egg with only one injury in his shoulder.
Harry and Cedric arrive at the cup first, and decide, because of the help they provided to each other during the Tournament, to grab the trophy at the same time, since it will be a Hogwarts victory anyway.
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (film) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2510 words)
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is the fourth film in the popular Harry Potter series, begun with the novel by J.K. Rowling.
In January 2006, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire surpassed the box office takings of Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, to become the eighth-highest grossing film of all time, and the second-highest grossing film in the Harry Potter series so far, behind Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone.
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire was the top grossing film worldwide of 2005, making $892.2 Million to date [9], making it the eighth top grossing movie of all time worldwide [10].
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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