FACTOID # 9: The bookmobile capital of America is Kentucky.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Harry Potter
Title Harry Potter

Cover of the first book in the series, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (UK Children's edition).
Author Flag of United Kingdom J. K. Rowling (Joanne Rowling)
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Genre(s) Fantasy novel
Publisher Bloomsbury Publishing, et al.
Released 26 June 1997
Media type Print (Hardback & Paperback)
Pages 190 pp (first edition, hardback)

Harry Potter is a series of fantasy novels by English author J. K. Rowling about a teenage boy named Harry Potter. Since the release of the first novel, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (retitled Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone in the United States) in 1997, the books have gained immense popularity, critical acclaim and commercial success worldwide, spawning films, video games and assorted merchandise. The six books published to date have collectively sold more than 377 million copies[1] and have been translated into more than 63 languages.[2] The seventh and last book in the series, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is scheduled to be released on 21 July 2007.[3] Publishers announced a record-breaking 12 million copies for the first print run in the US alone.[4] Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone book cover, published by Bloomsbury. ... Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone is the first volume in a series of seven books by British author J. K. Rowling and featuring the fictional character, Harry Potter, a young wizard. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... Joanne Rowling OBE (born 31 July 1965[1]) is an English fiction writer who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling. ... In political geography and international politics a country is a geographical entity, a territory, most commonly associated with the notions of state or nation. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Look up Fantasy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary For other definitions of fantasy, see fantasy (psychology). ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... Bloomsbury Publishing Plc is an independent, London-based publishing house known for literary novels. ... June 26 is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 188 days remaining. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Harry James Potter (born 31 July, 1980) is a fictional character and the main protagonist in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter novel and film series. ... The Harry Potter film series is the collection of fantasy films based on the Harry Potter series of novels by English author J. K. Rowling. ... Harry Potter may refer to: Harry Potter, a series of contemporary fantasy novels Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix Harry... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Joanne Rowling OBE (born 31 July 1965[1]) is an English fiction writer who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling. ... Harry James Potter (born 31 July, 1980) is a fictional character and the main protagonist in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter novel and film series. ... Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone is the first volume in a series of seven books by British author J. K. Rowling and featuring the fictional character, Harry Potter, a young wizard. ... See also: 1996 in literature, other events of 1997, 1998 in literature, list of years in literature. ... The Harry Potter film series is the collection of fantasy films based on the Harry Potter series of novels by English author J. K. Rowling. ... In marketing, a product is anything that can be offered to a market that might satisfy a want or need. ... Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is the seventh and final book in the Harry Potter series of novels by J. K. Rowling. ... July 21 is the 202nd day (203rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 163 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ...


The story is mostly set at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, a school for young wizards, and focuses on Harry Potter's fight against the evil wizard Lord Voldemort, who killed Harry's parents as part of his plan to take over the wizarding world. Due to the success of the novels, Rowling has become the richest writer in literary history.[5] English language versions of the books are published by Bloomsbury in the United Kingdom, Scholastic Press in the United States, Allen & Unwin in Australia and Raincoast Books in Canada. Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is a fictional school of magic that is the main setting of the Harry Potter novels by J. K. Rowling. ... Lord Voldemort (born 31 December 1926 as Tom Marvolo Riddle) is a fictional character of the Harry Potter book series written by J.K. Rowling. ... Bloomsbury Publishing Plc is an independent, London-based publishing house known for literary novels. ... Scholastic Corporation (NASDAQ: SCHL) is an American book publishing company known for publishing educational materials for schools, teachers, and parents, and selling and distributing them by mail order and via book clubs and book fairs. ... Allen & Unwin, formerly a major British publishing house, is now an independent, Australia-based book publisher and distributor. ... Raincoast Books is a Canadian book publishing company. ...


The first four books have been made into highly successful motion pictures by Warner Bros.. The fifth, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, began filming in February 2006, and is scheduled for release on 13 July 2007.[6] Warner Bros. ... Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is the fifth fantasy adventure film in the popular Harry Potter films series, based on the novel by J. K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. ... July 13 is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ...

Contents

Origins and publishing history

In 1990, J. K. Rowling was on a crowded train from Manchester to London when the idea for Harry simply "popped" into her head. Rowling gives an account of the experience on her website saying:[7] This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...

I had been writing almost continuously since the age of six but I had never been so excited about an idea before. [...] I simply sat and thought, for four (delayed train) hours, and all the details bubbled up in my brain, and this scrawny, black-haired, bespectacled boy who didn't know he was a wizard became more and more real to me.

In 1996, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone was completed and the manuscript was sent off to prospective agents. The second agent she tried, Christopher Little, offered to represent her and sent the manuscript to Bloomsbury. After eight other publishers had rejected Philosopher's Stone, Bloomsbury offered Rowling a £3,000 advance for the publication of Philosopher's Stone.[8] A manuscript (Latin manu scriptus, written by hand), strictly speaking, is any written document that is put down by hand, in contrast to being printed or reproduced some other way. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Despite Rowling's statement that she did not have any particular age group in mind when she began to write the Harry Potter books, the publishers initially targeted them at children age nine to eleven.[9] On the eve of publishing, Joanne Rowling was asked by her publishers to adopt a more gender-neutral pen name, in order to appeal to the male members of this age group, fearing that they would not be interested in reading a novel they knew to be written by a woman. She elected to use J. K. Rowling (Joanne Kathleen Rowling), using her grandmother's name as her second name, because she has no middle name.[10] A pen name or nom de plume is a pseudonym adopted by an author. ...


The first Harry Potter book was published in the United Kingdom by Bloomsbury in July 1997 and in the United States by Scholastic in September of 1998, but not before Rowling had received $105,000 for the American rights – an unprecedented amount for a children's book by an unknown author.[11] Fearing that American readers would either not understand the word "philosopher" or not associate it with a magical theme (as a Philosopher's Stone is alchemy-related), Scholastic insisted that the book be given the title, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone for the American market. Scholastic Corporation (NASDAQ: SCHL) is an American book publishing company known for publishing educational materials for schools, teachers, and parents, and selling and distributing them by mail order and via book clubs and book fairs. ... The philosophers stone, in Latin lapis philosophorum, is a legendary substance that supposedly could turn inexpensive metals such as lead into gold (chrysopoeia in the Greek language) and/or create an elixir that would make humans younger, thus delaying death. ...


Over nearly a decade Harry Potter has achieved much success due in part to positive reviews, Rowling's publisher's marketing strategy, but also due to word-of-mouth buzz among average readers, especially young males. The latter is notable because for years, interest in literature among this group had lagged behind other pursuits like video games and the Internet. Rowling's publishers were able to capitalise on this fervour by the rapid, successive releases of the first three books that allowed neither Rowling's audience's excitement nor interest to wane, along with quickly solidifying a loyal readership.[12] The series has also gathered adult fans, leading to two editions of each Harry Potter book being released, identical in text but with one edition's cover artwork aimed at children and the other aimed at adults.[13]


Story

Plot summary

The story opens with the unrestrained celebration of a normally-secretive wizarding world which for many years had been terrorised by Lord Voldemort. The previous night, Voldemort had discovered the refuge of the hidden Potter family, killed Lily and James Potter. However, when he attempted to kill Harry, the Avada Kedavra killing curse rebounded upon him, and Voldemort was destroyed, becoming nothing more than a spirit: neither dead nor alive. Harry, meanwhile, was left with a distinctive lightning bolt-shaped scar on his forehead, the only physical sign of Voldemort's curse. Harry's mysterious defeat of Voldemort results in him being dubbed "The Boy Who Lived" by the wizarding community. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Unforgivable Curses are some of the most powerful Dark Arts spells known in the fictional world of Harry Potter. ...


The following night, a wizard (Hagrid) delivers Harry to what will be his residence for many years afterward. The orphaned Harry is subsequently raised by his cruel, non-magical relatives, the Dursleys who, in attempt to rid him of his magical powers, hide his magical heritage and give him severe punishments after several strange occurrences. The Dursleys or the Dursley family are fictional characters in the Harry Potter stories created by J. K. Rowling. ...


However, as his eleventh birthday approaches, Harry has his first contact with the magical world when he receives letters from Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, which are taken from him by his Aunt and Uncle before he has a chance to read them. On his eleventh birthday he is informed by Hagrid, the gamekeeper of Hogwarts, that he is in fact a wizard and has been invited to attend Hogwarts. Each book chronicles one year in Harry's life, which is mostly spent at Hogwarts, where he learns to use magic and brew potions. Harry also learns to overcome many magical, social, and emotional obstacles as he struggles through his adolescence, Voldemort's rise to power and the Ministry of Magic's consistent denials of Voldemort's threat for a whole year. In the Harry Potter books, magic is depicted as a natural force, one that can be magicaly used to override the usual laws of nature while still being approached entirely scientifically. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... In the fictional universe of the Harry Potter series as written by J.K. Rowling, the Ministry of Magic is the governing body of the magical community of Britain and succeeded the earlier Wizards Council. ...


For a detailed synopsis of the novels, see the relevant article for each book.


Universe

Hogwarts school, as it is shown in the films.

The wizarding world in which Harry finds himself is both utterly separate from and yet intimately connected to our own world. While the fantasy world of Narnia functions as an alternate universe and the Lord of the RingsMiddle-earth as a mythic past, the wizarding world of Harry Potter exists alongside ours with many magical elements that are analogous to things in the non-magical world. Many of its institutions and locations are in towns, such as London, that are recognisable in the primary world. It is a fragmented collection of hidden streets, overlooked and ancient pubs, lonely country manors and secluded castles that remain utterly invisible to the non-magical population (known as "Muggles"). Wizard ability is inborn, rather than learned, although one must attend schools such as Hogwarts in order to master and control it. There are even people for wizard families that are born with no magical abililty and they are known as "squibs." Since one is either born a wizard or not, most wizards are unfamiliar with the Muggle world, which appears odder to them than their world to us. Despite this, the magical world and its many fantastic elements are depicted very matter-of-factly. One of the principal themes in the novels is the juxtaposition of the magical and the mundane; the characters in the stories live normal lives with "normal" problems, for all their magical surroundings. Image File history File links Hogwarts. ... Image File history File links Hogwarts. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Land of Narnia, artwork from the 2005 movie For other uses of Narnia, see Narnia (disambiguation). ... Dust jacket of the 1968 UK edition The Lord of the Rings is an epic fantasy story by J. R. R. Tolkien, a sequel to his earlier work, The Hobbit. ... A map of the Northwestern part of Middle-earth at the end of the Third Age, courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Arda. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

Recurrent elements

Blood purity: Wizards in general tend to view Muggles with a combination of condescension and suspicion; however, for a few, this attitude has evolved into bigotry. These characters tend to class those around them based on the number of magical ancestors they had, with "pure-blood" wizards (those with an entirely-magical bloodline) at the top of the hierarchy, "half-blood" wizards in the middle (those with both wizard and Muggle ancestry), and "Muggle-borns" (those with no magical ancestors) at the very bottom. Supporters of blood purity believe pure-bloods should control the wizarding world, and don't consider Muggle-borns real wizards. Some have even gone so far as to murder them or demand that they shouldn't be taught magic. Most blood-purity-believers are pure-blood themselves, though it should be noted that Voldemort, one of the most radical supporters of blood purity ever known, is himself half-blood. Also, very few, if any, true "pure-blood" families actually exist as many have intermarried into the Muggle-born population to stop from dying out. Many of these families have covered this up, however. One example of this is the removal of certain members on the Black family tree.[HP5] Blood purity is a central notion in the fictional Harry Potter cycle. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A bigot is a prejudiced person who is intolerant of opinions, lifestyles, or identities differing from his or her own. ... The Black family tree shows the members of one of the oldest magical families, and their links with many other magical families in the Harry Potter fantasy books. ... This article is about the book. ...


Owls: Owls are perhaps the most visible aspect of the Wizarding world. They appear at the start of the first novel, presaging what is to come, and play a very visible role in every novel following. They act as the principal form of communication among wizards (somewhat like carrier pigeons) and also as pets. Harry has a snowy owl named Hedwig. Families Strigidae Tytonidae Ogygoptyngidae (fossil) Palaeoglaucidae (fossil) Protostrigidae (fossil) Sophiornithidae (fossil) Synonyms Strigidae sensu Sibley & Ahlquist Owls are a group of birds of prey. ... A carrier pigeon is a breed of pigeon (specifically a domesticated Rock Dove, Columba livia) that has wattles, a nearly vertical stature, and that may once have been used to carry messages. ... Hedwig is the name of Harry Potters owl in the fictional Harry Potter series of books and films. ...


Houses: Like many boarding schools, Hogwarts is divided into four separate houses, named after the four Hogwarts founders, and students are sorted into their respective houses at the start of their first year. They are Gryffindor, named after Godric Gryffindor, which favours courage; Ravenclaw, named after Rowena Rawenclaw, which favours cleverness; Hufflepuff, named after Helga Hufflepuff, which favours fairness and loyalty; and Slytherin, named after Salazar Slytherin, which favours ambition. Upon arrival, Harry, along with his friend Ron, and Hermione, who would later be their friend, are sorted into Gryffindor.[HP1] In the Harry Potter series, Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry is divided into four houses, each bearing the last name of its founder: Godric Gryffindor, Salazar Slytherin, Rowena Ravenclaw and Helga Hufflepuff. ... The House System is a traditional feature of British schools, similar to the collegiate system of a university. ... The four founders of Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, (the magical education school which Harry Potter attends in J.K. Rowling’s fictional Harry Potter series), were named as follows: Godric Gryffindor; Helga Hufflepuff; Rowena Ravenclaw; and Salazar Slytherin. ... In the fictional Harry Potter universe, many magical objects exist for the use of the characters. ... In the Harry Potter series, the Hogwarts school of witchcraft and wizardry is divided into four houses, each bearing the last name of its founder - Godric Gryffindor, Salazar Slytherin, Rowena Ravenclaw and Helga Hufflepuff. ... In the Harry Potter series, the Hogwarts school of witchcraft and wizardry is divided into four houses, each bearing the last name of its founder - Godric Gryffindor, Salazar Slytherin, Rowena Ravenclaw and Helga Hufflepuff. ... In the Harry Potter series, the Hogwarts school of witchcraft and wizardry is divided into four houses, each bearing the last name of its founder - Godric Gryffindor, Salazar Slytherin, Rowena Ravenclaw and Helga Hufflepuff. ... In the Harry Potter series, the Hogwarts school of witchcraft and wizardry is divided into four houses, each bearing the last name of its founder - Godric Gryffindor, Salazar Slytherin, Rowena Ravenclaw and Helga Hufflepuff. ... Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone is the first volume in a series of seven books by British author J. K. Rowling and featuring the fictional character, Harry Potter, a young wizard. ...


Quidditch: A spectator sport in the Wizard world, played up in the air on brooms, Quidditch is similar in style to polo and football. Harry is a great player at Hogwarts and has helped Gryffindor win a number of games. Harry is the Seeker for his team whose role is to try and catch the Golden Snitch.[HP1] J.K. Rowling has stated that there will be no Quidditch matches in book 7, unlike all the previous books.[14] Quidditch is a fictitious wizarding sport played on broomsticks. ... In the fictional universe of the Harry Potter series, created by author J. K. Rowling, magical flying broomsticks are one of the most popular forms of transportation for wizards and witches, as well as used for magical games like Quidditch. ... A game of polo. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... The fictional game of Quidditch in the Harry Potter universe is centred around four balls: the Quaffle, the two Bludgers and the Golden Snitch (often abbreviated to Snitch). ... The fictional game of Quidditch in the Harry Potter universe is centred around four balls: the Quaffle, the two Bludgers and the Golden Snitch (often abbreviated to Snitch). ... Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone is the first volume in a series of seven books by British author J. K. Rowling and featuring the fictional character, Harry Potter, a young wizard. ...


Characters

This is a list of characters in the Harry Potter books. ...

Themes and motifs

According to Rowling, a major theme in the series is the theme of death. She says:[15] This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

My books are largely about death. They open with the death of Harry's parents. There is Voldemort's obsession with conquering death and his quest for immortality at any price, the goal of anyone with magic. I so understand why Voldemort wants to conquer death. We're all frightened of it.

The series pits good against evil, and love against death. Voldemort is continually seeking to avoid death and uses methods such as his attempted theft of the philosopher's stone and splitting his soul using horcruxes to achieve such an aim. This contrasts with Lily Potter's sacrifice of her life to save Harry from Voldemort. In the end it is her love for Harry which saves him from death, something that Voldemort does not appear to understand. The word 'Voldemort' itself has, amongst other meanings, connotations to death - in French and Catalan, Vol means Flight, de means of or from, and mort means death, so we can interpret "Voldemort" as "flight of death" or "flight from death". In Latin, mort also means death. This article is about living for infinite period of time. ... The philosophers stone, in Latin lapis philosophorum, is a legendary substance that supposedly could turn inexpensive metals such as lead into gold (chrysopoeia in the Greek language) and/or create an elixir that would make humans younger, thus delaying death. ... A Horcrux is a class of magical objects introduced in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. ... Geraldine Somerville as Lily Potter, Adrian Rawlins as James Potter, and one of the Saunders triplets as one-year-old Harry Potter in Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone In the Harry Potter series, James and Lily Potter are the late parents of Harry Potter. ... Catalan IPA: (català IPA: or []) is a Romance language, the national language of Andorra, and a co-official language in the Spanish autonomous communities of Balearic Islands, Catalonia and Valencia (in the latter with the name of Valencian), and in the city of LAlguer in the Italian island of... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ...


Prejudice and discrimination also feature prominently throughout the series. As Harry's education in the magical world continues he learns that there are wizards and witches who hate Muggles and view them as inferior because of their lack of magical ability. Furthermore, the magical world uses a system of designations, Muggle-born, half-blood, and pure-blood, to indicate a wizard's heritage. The more prejudiced within the magical community take these designations a step further, viewing them as a system of ranking to illustrate a wizard's worth, pure-bloods being the preferred wizards, and Muggle-borns (alternatively known by the slur "Mudblood") as the most despised. In addition to prejudices held for fellow humans, there is also discrimination against non-humans and even part-humans (commonly known by the offensive epithet, "half-breeds"). For with(out) prejudice in law, see Prejudice (law). ... Manifestations Slavery · Racial profiling · Lynching Hate speech · Hate crime · Hate groups Genocide · The Holocaust · Armenian Genocide · Pogrom Ethnocide · Ethnic cleansing · Race war Religious persecution · Gay bashing Blood libel · Black Legend Pedophobia · Ephebiphobia Movements Discriminatory Aryanism · Neo-Nazism · Ku Klux Klan National Party (South Africa) American Nazi Party Kahanism · Supremacism Anti... This article describes magic in the fictional Harry Potter universe. ... Terms of disparagement are pejorative words and phrases which are either intended to be or are often regarded as insulting, impolite or unkind. ... An epithet (Greek - επιθετον and Latin - epitheton; literally meaning imposed) is a descriptive word or phrase. ...


Another significant recurring theme is that of choice. In Chamber of Secrets, Dumbledore makes perhaps his most famous statement on this issue: "It is our choices, Harry, that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities."[16] He confronts the issue again in Goblet of Fire, when he tells Cornelius Fudge that what one grows up to be is far more important than what one is born.[17]


As it has been for many characters throughout the series, what Dumbledore termed the "choice between what is right and what is easy" has been a staple of Harry Potter's career at Hogwarts and his choices are among his character's most distinguishing traits from Voldemort's. Both he and Voldemort were orphans raised in difficult environments, in addition to sharing characteristics including, as Dumbledore points out, Voldemort's "own very rare gift, Parseltongue — resourcefulness, determination" and "a certain disregard for rules".[16] However, Harry, unlike Voldemort, has consciously elected to embrace friendship, kindness, and love, where Voldemort knowingly chose to reject them. This article describes magic in the fictional Harry Potter universe. ...


While ideas such as love, prejudice, and choice are, as J.K. Rowling states, "deeply entrenched in the whole plot", the writer prefers to let themes "grow organically", rather than sitting down and consciously attempting to impart such ideas to her readers.[18] Friendship and loyalty are perhaps the most "organic" of these, with their main conduit being the relationship between Harry, Ron, and Hermione, which allows these motifs to naturally develop as the three age, their relationship matures, and their accumulated experiences at Hogwarts test their loyalty to each other. These ordeals become progressively difficult, keeping in line with the series' increasingly darker tone, and the general nature of adolescence. Along the same lines is the ever-present theme of adolescence, in whose depiction the author has been purposeful in her refusal to acknowledge her characters' sexualities and leave Harry, as she put it, "stuck in a state of permanent pre-pubescence".[19]


Also recurring throughout Harry Potter are literary motifs, namely Rowling's frequent use of irony, satire, wordplay, and folklore. From the first page onwards her writing has displayed an ingenuity in finding the absolutely right name for people, places, things, spells, etc. and a strong grasp of irony. From the multilayered sobriquet "Voldemort" through the onomatopoeic "Grawp" (Hagrid's bestial giant half-brother) through the very knowing pun hidden in the killing spell Avada Kedavra, Rowling creates names that usually contain several meanings. In the magical world of the Harry Potter series of fictional novels, many spells are used by the characters. ...


Chronology

The books mainly avoid setting the story in a particular real year. However, there are a few references which allow the books and various past events mentioned in them to be assigned corresponding real years. In particular, that Harry is born in 1980, and the first book commences 1991. A timeline was first suggested by HP-Lexicon, and has since been confirmed by publication of an official version on the DVDs of the films by Warner brothers, from comments by Rowling and by her separate donation of a copy of the Black family tree to a charity auction. The Chronology is a general timeline of events derived from information provided in the series of Harry Potter novels written by J.K. Rowling, along with additional materials posted on her web site and published in various interviews. ... Cover of the original novel in the series, Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone Harry Potter is the informal name given to a series of fantasy novels by J. K. Rowling, and the movies based on them. ... The Black family tree shows the members of one of the oldest magical families, and their links with many other magical families in the Harry Potter fantasy books. ...


Criticism and praise

Early in its history, Harry Potter received overwhelmingly positive reviews, which helped the series to quickly grow a large readership. Following the 2003 release of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix however, the books received strong criticisms from a number of distinguished authors and academics. A. S. Byatt authored a New York Times editorial calling Rowling's universe a “secondary world, made up of intelligently patchworked derivative motifs from all sorts of children's literature [...] written for people whose imaginative lives are confined to TV cartoons, and the exaggerated (more exciting, not threatening) mirror-worlds of soaps, reality TV and celebrity gossip". Byatt went on to analyse the series' widespread appeal and concluded that this "derivative manipulation of past motifs" is for adult readers driven by a desire to regress to their "own childish desires and hopes" and for younger readers, "the powerful working of the fantasy of escape and empowerment, combined with the fact that the stories are comfortable, funny, just frightening enough". The end result being the levelling "of cultural studies, which are as interested in hype and popularity as they are in literary merit".[20] Likewise, author Fay Weldon took issue with the series saying that it was "not what the poets hoped for, but this is not poetry, it is readable, saleable, everyday, useful prose".[21] Literary critic Harold Bloom also attacked the literary worth of Potter, saying “Rowling's mind is so governed by clichés and dead metaphors that she has no other style of writing." Moreover, Bloom disagreed with the common notion that Harry Potter has been good for literature by encouraging children to read, contending that "Harry Potter will not lead our children on to Kipling's Just So Stories or his Jungle Book. It will not lead them to Thurber's Thirteen Clocks or Kenneth Grahame's Wind in the Willows or Lewis Carroll's Alice."[22] For A. Byatt, the director of French documentary films, see Andy Byatt. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... A fictional universe is a cohesive imaginary world that serves as the setting or backdrop for one or (more commonly) multiple works of fiction. ... Fay Weldon (born September 22, 1931) is a British novelist, short story writer, playwright and essayist whose work has been associated with the cause of feminism. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Rudyard Kipling, British author Joseph Rudyard Kipling (December 30, 1865 – January 18, 1936) was a British author and poet, born in India. ... See also Just-so story for anthropological sense Wikisource has original text related to this article: Just So Stories The Just So Stories for Little Children were written by British author Rudyard Kipling. ... The Jungle Book (1967 movie) French edition, 1957. ... James Grover Thurber (December 8, 1894–November 2, 1961) was a U.S. humorist and cartoonist. ... The Thirteen Clocks was written by James Thurber in 1950. ... Kenneth Grahame Kenneth Grahame (March 8, 1859 – July 6, 1932) was a Scottish novelist. ... The Wind in the Willows is a classic of childrens literature by Kenneth Grahame. ... Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) - believed to be a self-portrait Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (January 27, 1832 – January 14, 1898), better known by the pen name Lewis Carroll, was an English author, mathematician, logician, Anglican clergyman, and photographer. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Charles Taylor of Salon.com took issue with Byatt's criticisms in particular. While he conceded that she may have "a valid cultural point — a teeny one — about the impulses that drive us to reassuring pop trash and away from the troubling complexities of art", he rejected her claims that the series is lacking in serious literary merit and that it owes its success merely to the childhood reassurances it offers; Taylor stressed the progressively darker tone of the books, shown by the murder of a classmate and close friend and the resulting psychological wounds and social isolation each causes. Taylor also pointed out that Philosopher's Stone, said to be the most lighthearted of the six published books, disrupts the childhood reassurances that Byatt claims spurs the series' success: the book opens with news of a double murder, for example. Taylor specifically cites "the devastating scene where Harry encounters a mirror that reveals the heart's truest desire and, looking into it, sees himself happy and smiling with the parents he never knew, a vision that lasts only as long as he looks into the glass, and a metaphor for how fleeting our moments of real happiness are", then asks rhetorically if "this is Byatt's idea of reassurance?" Taylor concludes that Rowling's success among children and adults is "because J.K. Rowling is a master of narrative".[23] Screenshot of Salon. ...


Stephen King agreed with Taylor calling the series "a feat of which only a superior imagination is capable", along with declaring "Rowling's punning, one-eyebrow-cocked sense of humour" to be "remarkable". However, he does write that despite the story being "a good one", he is "a little tired of discovering Harry at home with his horrible aunt and uncle", the formulaic beginning of each of the six books published to date.[24] King has also joked that "[Rowling]'s never met an adverb she didn't like!" He does however predict that Harry Potter "will indeed stand time's test and wind up on a shelf where only the best are kept; I think Harry will take his place with Alice, Huck, Frodo, and Dorothy and this is one series not just for the decade, but for the ages."[25] Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author of over 200 stories including over 50 bestselling horror novels. ... An adverb is not a part of speech. ... Harry James Potter (born 31 July, 1980) is a fictional character and the main protagonist in J.K. Rowlings Harry Potter novel and film series. ... Alice is a fictional character in the books Alices Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel Through the Looking-Glass, which were written by Charles Dodgson under the pen name Lewis Carroll. ... Mark Twains series of books featuring the fictional character Tom Sawyer include: The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885) Tom Sawyer Abroad (1894) Tom Sawyer, Detective (1896) Tom Sawyer also appears in at least three unfinished Twain works, Huck and Tom Among the Indians, Schoolhouse... Frodo Baggins is one of the most significant characters in J. R. R. Tolkiens legendarium. ... Dorothy Gale is a fictional character based on Dorethy (Neilson)(Cartwright)Hughes of Western Australia against her will(born 1915), the protagonist of most of the Oz novels by American author L. Frank Baum. ...


Yet another vein of criticism comes from some feminist circles, Christine Schoefer prominent among them, who contend that the novels are patriarchal and chauvinistic. According to Schoefer the series presents a world filled with stereotypes and adherence to "the conventional assumption that men do and should run the world." Schoefer cites Harry's courage in dangerous situations in contrast to Hermione's apparent emotional frailty when confronting the same, along with her need for Harry and Ron's approval. Similarly, she contrasts the female Professor McGonagall and her similar frailty under stress compared to the composed and farsighted Dumbledore. In addition to this is the attachment of fraud to females (Professor Trelawney, Professor Umbridge), immaturity (constantly giggling, naïve and catty school girls), and a general lack of daring, bold heroines.[26] Patriarchy For other uses, see Patriarchy (disambiguation). ... Chauvinism is extreme and unreasoning partisanship on behalf of a group to which one belongs, especially when the partisanship includes malice and hatred towards a rival group. ... Minerva McGonagall (born October 4, ca. ... Sibyll Patricia Trelawney is a fictional character who appears in J.K. Rowlings series of Harry Potter novels. ... Dolores Jane Umbridge is a fictional character from the Harry Potter series of novels by J.K. Rowling. ...


The critic Anthony Holden wrote in The Observer on his experience of judging Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban for the 1999 Whitbread Awards. His overall view of the series was very negative - "the Potter saga was essentially patronising, very conservative, highly derivative, dispiritingly nostalgic for a bygone Britain" and adds that "several of the Whitbread judges agreed with me".[27] Anthony Holden (born 22 May 1947) is a British journalist and writer, particularly known as a biographer of the British Royal family. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article is about the book. ... Book of the Year Seamus Heaney, Beowulf Childrens Book Winner: J K Rowling, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban Shortlist: Carol Ann Duffy, Meeting Midnight Michael Morpurgo, Kensuke’s Kingdom Jacqueline Wilson, The Illustrated Mum First Novel Winner: Tim Lott, White City Blue Shortlist: Suzanne Cleminshaw, The...


Awards and honours

J.K. Rowling and the Harry Potter series have been the recipients of a host of awards since the initial publication of Philosopher's Stone including four Whitaker Platinum Book Awards (all of which were awarded in 2001), three Nestlé Smarties Book Prizes (1997-1999), two Scottish Arts Council Book Awards (1999 and 2001), the inaugural Whitbread children's book of the year award, (1999), the WHSmith book of the year (2006), among others. In 2000 Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban was nominated for Best Novel in the Hugo Awards while in 2001 Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire won said award. Honours include a commendation for the Carnegie Medal (1997), a shortlisting for the Guardian Children's Award (1998), and numerous listings on the notable books, editors' Choices, and best books lists of the American Library Association, New York Times, Chicago Public Library, and Publishers Weekly.[28] The Nestlé Smarties Book Prize is an annual award given to childrens books written in the previous year by a UK citizen or resident. ... Scottish Arts Council logo The Scottish Arts Council is a Non-Departmental Public Body sponsored by the Scottish Executive and is the leading national organization for the funding, development and promotion of the arts in Scotland. ... The Costa Book Awards are among the United Kingdoms most prestigious literary awards. ... The British Book Awards are given annually and promoted by the UK publishing industry trade journal Publishing News. ... This article is about the book. ... The Hugo Award is given every year for the best science fiction or fantasy stories of the previous year, and for related areas in fandom, art and dramatic presentation. ... << Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban | Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix >> This article is about the book. ... The Carnegie Medal in Literature was established in the UK in 1936 in honour of Scottish philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. ... ALA Logo The American Library Association (ALA) is a group based in the United States that promotes libraries and library education internationally. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The Chicago Public Library consists of 80 branches (as of March 2006) throughout the city of Chicago, Illinois, USA. History Harold Washington Library in downtown Chicago. ... Publishers Weekly is a weekly trade news magazine targeted at publishers, librarians, booksellers, and literary agents. ...


Commercial success

The popularity of the Harry Potter series has translated into substantial financial success for Rowling, her publishers, and other Harry Potter related license holders. The books have sold over 325 million copies worldwide and have also given rise to the popular film adaptations produced by Warner Bros., all of which have been successful in their own right with the first, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, ranking number four on the list of all-time highest grossing films and the other three Harry Potter films each ranking in the top 20.[29] The films have in turn spawned five video games and have in conjunction with them led to the licensing of over 400 additional Harry Potter products (including an iPod) that have, as of July 2005, made the Harry Potter brand worth an estimated 4 billion dollars and J.K. Rowling a US dollar billionaire, making her, by some reports, richer than Queen Elizabeth II.[30][31] Warner Bros. ... A top-grossing movie is a motion picture that has received the most total revenue compared to all other movies ever made. ... iPod (fifth generation) in Apple Universal Dock, iPod nano (second generation) and iPod shuffle (second generation) iPod is a brand of portable media players designed and marketed by Apple and launched in 2001. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... A billionaire is a person who has a net worth of at least one billion units of currency, such as United States Dollars (USD), Pounds or Euros. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ...


On 2007 April 12, Barnes & Noble declared that Deathly Hallows has broken its preorder record, with over 500,000 copies preordered through its site.[32] 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 12 is the 102nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (103rd in leap years). ... A typical Barnes & Noble bookstore. ...


Translations

The series is popular around the world in its more than 63 translations. The first translation was into American English, as many words and concepts used by the characters in the novels would have been incomprehensible or misleading to a young American audience. Subsequently the books have seen translations in languages as diverse as Ukrainian, Hindi, Welsh and Vietnamese. The first volume has been translated into Latin and even Ancient Greek,[33] making it the longest published work in that language since the novels of Heliodorus of Emesa in the 3rd century AD.[34] The cover of Harry Potter en de Steen der Wijzen – the Dutch language translation of the first book, jointly published by De Harmonie and Standaard. ... For other uses, see American English (disambiguation). ... Hindi (हिन्दी) is a language spoken mainly in North and Central India. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... Heliodorus of Emesa, from Emesa, Syria, was a Greek writer generally dated in the 3rd century of the Common Era, and is known for the ancient Greek romance or novel called the Aethiopica (the Ethiopian Story) or sometimes Theagenes and Chariclea. According to his own statement, his fathers name...


The high profile and huge public demand for a decent local translation means that a great deal of care is often taken in the task; the Russian translation of the series' fifth book, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, was overseen by Viktor Golyshev, previously best known for translating William Faulkner and George Orwell.[35] The Turkish translation of books two through five was undertaken by Sevin Okyay, a popular literary critic and cultural commentator.[36] Of necessity, these translations take longer to reach their audience than the English editions, and oftentimes this leads to the English books being sold in non-English speaking countries. Such was the global clamour to read the fifth book that its English language edition became the first English-language book ever to top the bookseller list in France.[13] William Cuthbert Faulkner (September 25, 1897 – July 6, 1962) was an American novelist and poet whose works feature his native state of Mississippi. ... Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903[1][2] – 21 January 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ... Sevin Okyay (Istanbul, 1942) is a Turkish literary critic, journalist, author, regular columnist and a prolific translator. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Cultural impact

For more details on this topic, see Harry Potter fandom.

Since the publishing of Philosopher's Stone a number of societal trends have been attributed to the series. In 2005, doctors at the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford reported that their research of the weekends of Saturday 21 June 2003 and Saturday 16 July 2005 (the dates of the two most recent book releases of the series) found that only 36 children needed emergency medical assistance for injuries sustained in accidents, as opposed to other weekends' average of 67.[37] Also, anecdotal evidence suggesting an increase in literacy among children due to Harry Potter was seemingly confirmed in 2006 when the Kids and Family Reading Report (in conjunction with Scholastic) released a survey finding that 51% of Harry Potter readers ages 5-17 said that while they did not read books for fun before they started reading Harry Potter, they now did. The study further reported that according to 65% of children and 76% of parents, they or their children's performance in school improved since they started reading the series.[38] Because students in the novels board the train to Hogwarts at Platform 9¾ at Kings Cross railway station in London, the real Kings Cross has erected a sign at a wall between tracks 9 and 10 to commemorate this. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... June 21 is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 193 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 16 is the 197th day (198th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 168 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Anecdotal evidence is an informal account of evidence in the form of an anecdote, or hearsay. ...

Crowds wait outside a Borders store in Delaware for the midnight release of the book
Crowds wait outside a Borders store in Delaware for the midnight release of the book

Notable also is the development of a massive following of fans. So eager were these fans for the latest series release that book stores around the world began holding events to coincide with the midnight release of the books, beginning with the 2000 publication of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. The events, commonly featuring mock sorting, games, face painting, and other live entertainment have achieved popularity with Potter fans and have been incredibly successful at attracting fans and selling books with nearly nine million of the 10.8 million initial print copies of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince sold in the first 24 hours.[39][40] Among this large base of fans are a minority of "super-fans", similar to the trekkies of the Star Trek fandom. Besides meeting online through blogs, podcasts, and fansites, Harry Potter super-fans can also meet at Harry Potter symposiums. These events draw people from around the world to attend lectures, discussions and a host of other Potter themed activities. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2016x1512, 1023 KB) Picture of the lines for Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince Taken by Raul654 outside a Borders store in Delaware, USA - July 16, 2005 File links The following pages link to this file: Harry Potter and the... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2016x1512, 1023 KB) Picture of the lines for Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince Taken by Raul654 outside a Borders store in Delaware, USA - July 16, 2005 File links The following pages link to this file: Harry Potter and the... Borders Group (NYSE: BGP) is an international bookseller based in Ann Arbor, Michigan. ... Official language(s) None Capital Dover Largest city Wilmington Area  Ranked 49th  - Total 2,491 sq mi (6,452 km²)  - Width 30 miles (48 km)  - Length 100 miles (161 km)  - % water 21. ... Fans of Janet Jackson, at Much Music in Toronto The word fan refers to someone who has an intense, occasionally overwhelming liking of a sporting club, person, group of persons, company, product, work of art, idea, or trend. ... Trekkie (or Trekker) is a term that in recent decades has been used to describe a fan of the Star Trek science fiction franchise. ... The current Star Trek franchise logo Star Trek is an American science fiction entertainment series. ... Fandom (from the noun fan and the affix -dom, as in kingdom, dukedom, etc. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... An orange square with waves indicates that an RSS feed is present on a web page. ... A fansite or fan site, is a website created and maintained by the fans or devotees interested in a celebrity or a particular cultural phenomenon. ... Symposium originally referred to a drinking party (the Greek verb sympotein means to drink together) but has since come to refer to any academic conference, whether or not drinking takes place. ...


The Harry Potter books have inspired the "Wizard Rock" movement, where a number of bands were formed whose names, image and song lyrics relate to the Harry Potter world. Examples include Harry and the Potters and The Cruciatus Curse. Harry and the Potters are an indie wizard rock band from Norwood, Massachusetts who formed in 2002. ... The Cruciatus Curse are an indie wizard rock band from Green Bay, Wisconsin who formed in Late 2002 under the name 4~Saken. ...


Harry Potter has also brought changes in the publishing world, one of the most noted being the reformation of the New York Times Best Seller list. The change came immediately preceding the release of Goblet of Fire in 2000 when publishers complained of the number of slots on the list being held by Harry Potter and other children's books. The Times subsequently created a separate children's list for Harry Potter and other children's literature.[41] The New York Times Best Seller List is a weekly chart in The New York Times newspaper that keeps track of the best-selling books of the week. ...


The word muggle has spread beyond its Harry Potter origins, used by many groups to indicate those who are not in the know or are lacking in some skill. In 2003, "muggle", entered the Oxford English Dictionary with that definition.[42] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is generally regarded as the most comprehensive and scholarly dictionary of the English language. ...


Pop culture references

See also: Harry Potter parodies
  • There are several references to Harry Potter in the animated sitcom The Simpsons, most notably a parody in the The Simpsons episode "Treehouse of Horror XII" (part of the Simpsons' Halloween series). In "Trilogy of Error", Ned Flanders reads a book aloud for his children. Ned reads: "And Harry Potter and all of his wizard friends went straight to Hell for practising witchcraft!" to which his children shout, "Yay!" after Ned throws the book into the fire. Flanders' reactions to, and subsequent burning of the book, is a reference to real-life allegations by the Christian Right that the Harry Potter series promotes witchcraft.[43] J.K. Rowling also voices herself in a cameo appearance in season fifteen episode "The Regina Monologues".
  • In the Doctor Who episode The Shakespeare Code there were multiple references to Harry Potter and J.K. Rowling, most notably the use of the spell "Expelliarmus" to banish the witches who were the villains of the episode as well as a comment about the upcoming release of the seventh book.
  • In Buffy the Vampire Slayer, the starter episode of season 7, Willow describes Giles as having "gone all Dumbledore" on her, referring to the attitude Dumbledore had towards Harry.

Barry Trotter and the Shameless Parody, an English language parody of Harry Potter The immense popularity and wide recognition of JK Rowlings Harry Potter fantasy series has led to it being extensively parodied, in works spanning nearly every medium. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Treehouse of Horror XII is the first episode of The Simpsons thirteenth season, as well as the twelfth Halloween episode. ... Trilogy of Error is an episode from season twelve of the animated TV series The Simpsons. ... Medieval illustration of Hell in the Hortus deliciarum manuscript of Herrad of Landsberg (about 1180) Hell, according to many religious beliefs, is an afterlife of suffering where the wicked or unrighteous dead are punished. ... The Harry Potter series of books by J. K. Rowling has faced a number of controversies. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The Regina Monologues is the fourth episode of The Simpsons fifteenth season. ... Doctor Who is a long-running British science fiction television programme produced by the BBC, (and a 1996 television movie). ... The Shakespeare Code is an episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... In the magical world of the Harry Potter series of fictional novels by J. K. Rowling, many (often incredible) things are accomplished through the use of magical spells by the characters. ... Buffy the Vampire Slayer is an American cult television series that initially aired from March 10, 1997 until May 20, 2003. ...

Controversy

The Harry Potter series of books by J. K. Rowling has faced a number of controversies. ... J. K. Rowlings Harry Potter books share a number of similarities with a wide range of literature, both classical and modern. ...

Future

This article or section contains information about scheduled or expected future events.
It may contain tentative information; the content may change as the event approaches and more information becomes available.

There are currently three more Harry Potter films yet to be released. The fifth film, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, is due to be released in cinemas on July 13, 2007,[44] and the sixth film, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, is due to be released in November 2008.[45] Image File history File links Current_event_marker. ... Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is the fifth fantasy adventure film in the popular Harry Potter films series, based on the novel by J. K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. ... July 13 is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince is a planned future movie based on J. K. Rowlings sixth book in the Harry Potter series, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. ...


In December 2005, Rowling stated on her web site that "2006 will be the year when I write the final book in the Harry Potter series." Updates have since followed in her online diary chronicling the progress of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, with the release date of July 21, 2007. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is the seventh and final book in the Harry Potter series of novels by J. K. Rowling. ... July 21 is the 202nd day (203rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 163 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ...


The book itself had been finished on January 11, 2007 in the Balmoral Hotel, Edinburgh, where she scrawled a message on the back of a bust of Hermes. It read: “JK Rowling finished writing Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows in this room (652) on 11th Jan 2007.”[46] January 11 is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... the Iron Duke in bronze by John Steell The hotel from below the North Bridge The Balmoral Hotel is a luxury five star hotel and landmark in Edinburgh, Scotland which has won many awards[citation needed]. Originally opened in 1902 as the North British Hotel, a traditional railway hotel adjacent... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Rowling herself has stated that the last chapter of the seventh book was completed some time ago, before writing the third book. According to her, the last word in the book is "scar",[47] but she has since stated that this could change.[citation needed]


In June 2006, Rowling, on an appearance on the British talk show Richard & Judy, announced that the chapter had been modified as one character "got a reprieve" and two others who previously survived the story had in fact been killed. She also said she could see the logic in killing off Harry in order to stop other writers from writing books about Harry's life after Hogwarts.[48] Richard & Judy is an afternoon magazine/talk-show in the UK presented by married couple Richard Madeley and Judy Finnigan. ...


On 28 March 2007, the cover art for the Bloomsbury Adult and Child versions and the Scholastic version were released.[49] March 28 is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ...


Regarding the existence of Harry Potter novels beyond the seventh, Rowling has said that she might write an eighth book some day, but it will not continue the life of Harry and his friends. If she does, she intends it to be a sort of encyclopedia of the wizarding world, containing concepts and snippets of information that were not relevant enough to the novels' plots to be included in them. Any future Harry Potter books, she said, would also be written for charity, just as Quidditch Through the Ages and Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them were.[50] She also stated that she would like to write adult mystery novels after she is done with the last Harry Potter book.[not in citation given][51] She has also said that she will not write any sort of prequel to the novels, since by the time the series ends all the necessary back story will have been revealed.[52] This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Quidditch Through the Ages is both a fictional book described in the Harry Potter series of childrens novels by the British author Joanne Rowling, and a real book by that author. ... Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them is both a fictional book described in the Harry Potter series of childrens novels by the British author J. K. Rowling, and a real book by that author. ... A prequel is a work that portrays events which include the structure, conventions, and/or characters of a previously completed narrative, but occur at an earlier time. ...


Series

  1. Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (June 26, 1997) (titled Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone in the United States)
  2. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (July 2, 1998)
  3. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (July 8, 1999)
  4. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (July 8, 2000)
  5. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (June 21, 2003)
  6. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (July 16, 2005)
  7. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Scheduled for July 21, 2007)

All seven books in the series have an audiobook format. The UK editions are performed by Stephen Fry, while the American versions are performed by Jim Dale. Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone is the first volume in a series of seven books by British author J. K. Rowling and featuring the fictional character, Harry Potter, a young wizard. ... June 26 is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 188 days remaining. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (film) or Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (video game) Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, by J.K. Rowling, is the sequel to Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone. ... July 2 is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 182 days remaining. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... This article is about the book. ... July 8 is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 176 days remaining. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... << Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban | Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix >> This article is about the book. ... July 8 is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 176 days remaining. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the book. ... June 21 is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 193 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the film, see Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (film). ... July 16 is the 197th day (198th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 168 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is the seventh and final book in the Harry Potter series of novels by J. K. Rowling. ... July 21 is the 202nd day (203rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 163 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... An audio book is a recording of the contents of a book read aloud. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Jim Dale and Glenn Close in 2006 performing Busker Alley. ...


Supplementary books

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them is both a fictional book described in the Harry Potter series of childrens novels by the British author J. K. Rowling, and a real book by that author. ... Quidditch Through the Ages is both a fictional book described in the Harry Potter series of childrens novels by the British author Joanne Rowling, and a real book by that author. ...

Other media

Films

Main article: Harry Potter (films)

The Harry Potter film series is the collection of fantasy films based on the Harry Potter series of novels by English author J. K. Rowling. ... Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone, known in the United States as Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone, is the first fantasy/adventure film in the popular Harry Potter films series, based on the novel by J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone. ... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... For the 1968 science-fiction film and novel, see 2001: A Space Odyssey // August 8 - Actor Tom Cruise and actress Nicole Kidman get divorced. ... Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets is the second, fantasy adventure film in the popular Harry Potter films series, based on the novel by J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. ... November 15 is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 46 days remaining. ... This is a list of film-related events in 2002. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... June 4 is the 155th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (156th in leap years), with 210 days remaining. ... // Please note that these are the top grossing films that were first released in 2004; because they may have made most of their income in a later year, they may not be the top-grossing films for calendar year 2004. ... Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is the fourth, fantasy adventure Academy Award nominated film in the popular Harry Potter films series, based on the novel by J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a list of film-related events in 2005. ... Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is the fifth fantasy adventure film in the popular Harry Potter films series, based on the novel by J. K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. ... July 13 is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // This section does not cite any references or sources. ... Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince is a planned future movie based on J. K. Rowlings sixth book in the Harry Potter series, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. ... November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Films scheduled to be released in 2008 include: // LR: Limited release in select cities WR: Wide-release to theaters IMAX: Release to IMAX theaters 9 24 The A-Team Artemis Fowl Battle Royale Benighted The Brazilian Job Bubba Nosferatu and the Curse of the She-Vampires Caitlin Captain Underpants The... Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is the seventh and final book in the Harry Potter series of novels by J. K. Rowling. ...

Games

These games follow the plotlines of the books:

Harry Potter Portal

Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone (known as Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone in the United States) is the name of five distinct video games. ... The video game Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets was released in 2002. ... Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban is a computer and video game that was released in 2004, concurrently with the movie release of Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, the third in the Harry Potter series. ... Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is a computer and video game that was released on November 11, 2005, a few days before the movie release of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (the fourth in the Harry Potter series). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is the fifth fantasy adventure film in the popular Harry Potter films series, based on the novel by J. K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. ... Quidditch is a fictitious wizarding sport played on broomsticks. ... Image File history File links Portal. ...

References

  1. ^ Dearbáil Jordan (2007). Time comes for Harry to fly to the rescue. Times UK. Retrieved on 2007-04-07.
  2. ^ "Global Potter sales top 300m mark", BBC, 2005-10-04. Retrieved on 2007-03-10. 
  3. ^ "Final 'Potter' launch on July 21", CNN, 2007-02-01. Retrieved on 2007-02-12. 
  4. ^ McLaren, Elsa. "Harry Potter's final adventure to get record print run", The Times, 2007-03-15. Retrieved on 2007-03-27. 
  5. ^ Watson, Julie and Kellner, Tomas. "J.K. Rowling And The Billion-Dollar Empire". Forbes.com, 26 February 2004. Accessed 19 March 2006.
  6. ^ Confirmed: 'Phoenix' flies on July 13, 2007. HPANA (2006-04-05). Retrieved on 2006-10-23.
  7. ^ Rowling, J.K.. Biography. JKRowling.com. Retrieved on 2006-05-21.
  8. ^ Lawless, John. Nigel Newton. BusinessWeek Online. Retrieved on 2006-09-09.
  9. ^ http://www.kidsreads.com/harrypotter/jkrowling.html
  10. ^ Savill, Richard. Harry Potter and the mystery of J K's lost initial. The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved on 2006-09-09.
  11. ^ Rozhon, Tracie. "A Brief Walk Through Time at Scholastic", The New York Times, 2007-04-21, p. C3. Retrieved on 2007-04-21. 
  12. ^ "Books' Hero Wins Young Minds", New York Times, Jul 12, 1999. 
  13. ^ a b "OOTP is best seller in France - in English!", BBC, July 1, 2003. 
  14. ^ Accio Quote: Luna commentated last Quidditch match
  15. ^ 'There would be so much to tell her...'. Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  16. ^ a b Rowling, J.K. (1999). Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (US Hardback), 333. 
  17. ^ Rowling, J.K. (2000). Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (US Hardback), 708. 
  18. ^ "Mzimba, Lizo, moderator. Interview with Steve Kloves and J.K. Rowling", Quick Quotes Quill, February 2003. 
  19. ^ "About the Books: transcript of J.K. Rowling's live interview on Scholastic.com", Scholastic.com, 16 October 2000. 
  20. ^ "Harry Potter and the Childish Adult", New York Times, July 7, 2003. 
  21. ^ "Rowling books 'for people with stunted imaginations'", The Guardian, July 11, 2003. 
  22. ^ Bloom, Harold. Dumbing down American readers. Boston.com. Retrieved on 2006-06-20.
  23. ^ "A. S. Byatt and the goblet of bile", Salon.com, July 8, 2003. 
  24. ^ ""Wild About Harry"", New York Times, July 23, 2000. 
  25. ^ Fox, Killian (2006-31-12). HJK Rowling:The mistress of all she surveys. Guardian Unlimited. Retrieved on 2007-02-10.
  26. ^ Schoeffer, Christine. Harry Potter's girl trouble. Salon.com. Retrieved on 2006-06-20.
  27. ^ "Why Harry Potter doesn't cast a spell over me", The Observer, June 25, 2000. 
  28. ^ Arthur, Levine. Awards. Arthur A. Levine Books. Retrieved on 2006-05-21.
  29. ^ "Potter book sales top 325 million", USA Today, February 4th, 2007. 
  30. ^ "J.K. Rowling Richer than the Queen", BBC, April 27, 2003. 
  31. ^ "Harry Potter Brand Wizard", Business Week, July 21, 2005. 
  32. ^ New Harry Potter breaks pre-order record. RTÉ.ie Entertainment (2007-04-13). Retrieved on 2007-04-23.
  33. ^ HP in Ancient Greek. Accessed 25 November 2006.
  34. ^ Greek Harry Accessed 25 November 2006.
  35. ^ Steven Goldstein (2004). Translating Harry — Part I: The Language of Magic. GlobalByDesign. Retrieved on 2007-05-09.
  36. ^ EMRAH GÜLER (2005). Not lost in translation: Harry Potter in Turkish. Retrieved on 2007-05-09.
  37. ^ "Reading 'cuts childhood injuries'", BBC News, 23 December 2005. 
  38. ^ "New Study Finds That the Harry Potter Series Has a Positive Impact on Kids' Reading and Their School Work", Scholastic, 2006-25-07. Retrieved on 2007-02-10. 
  39. ^ "Harry Potter casts spell at checkouts", Times Online, July 18, 2005. 
  40. ^ "Potter book smashes sales records", BBC, July 18, 2005. 
  41. ^ Why 'Harry Potter' did a Harry Houdini. CNN (July 21, 2000).
  42. ^ Meg McCaffrey (2003). 'Muggle' Redux in the Oxford English Dictionary. Retrieved on 2007-05-01.
  43. ^ [1]
  44. ^ "Order of the Phoenix film due out on November 13, 2007", MuggleNet, March 1, 2006. 
  45. ^ "Confirmed: HBP movie release date", MuggleNet, 2006-08-04. 
  46. ^ "Potter author signs off in style", British Broadcasting Corporation, 2007-02-02. 
  47. ^ ""Talking With JK Rowling"", Book Links, July 1999. 
  48. ^ JKR On Richard & Judy – Transcript
  49. ^ Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Cover Art. Retrieved on 2007-04-02.
  50. ^ Will you write more Harry Potter books after the seventh?
  51. ^ The Leaky Cauldron and MuggleNet interview Joanne Kathleen Rowling: Part One
  52. ^ Edinburgh Book Festival
  53. ^ Confirmed  : 'Phoenix' flies on July 13, 2007. HPANA (2006-04-05). Retrieved on 2006-10-23.
  54. ^ Confirmed: HBP movie release date. MuggleNet (2006-08-04). Retrieved on 2006-12-17.
  55. ^ "Developers showcase future games", BBC, 2007-03-19. Retrieved on 2007-04-11. 

2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion (US$7. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (70th in leap years). ... The Cable News Network, commonly known as CNN, is a major cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1785, and under its current name since 1788. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... March 27 is the 86th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (87th in leap years). ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 19 is the 78th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (79th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... It is proposed that this article be deleted, because of the following concern: SPAM If you can address this concern by improving, copyediting, sourcing, renaming or merging the page, please edit this page and do so. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... May 21 is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 21 is the 111th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (112th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 21 is the 111th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (112th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... June 20 is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 194 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... February 10 is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... June 20 is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 194 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... May 21 is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ... November 25 is the 329th (in leap years the 330th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... November 25 is the 329th (in leap years the 330th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (130th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (130th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... February 10 is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... MuggleNet is a commercial Harry Potter fansite founded by Emerson Spartz of LaPorte, Indiana. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 4 is the 216th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (217th in leap years), with 149 days remaining. ... This article is an overview article about the Crown chartered British Broadcasting Corporation formed in 1927. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 2 is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 273 days remaining. ... It is proposed that this article be deleted, because of the following concern: SPAM If you can address this concern by improving, copyediting, sourcing, renaming or merging the page, please edit this page and do so. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... MuggleNet is a commercial Harry Potter fansite founded by Emerson Spartz of LaPorte, Indiana. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 4 is the 216th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (217th in leap years), with 149 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... April 11 is the 101st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (102nd in leap years). ...

Further reading

Joanne Rowling OBE (born 31 July 1965[1]) is an English fiction writer who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling. ... Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone is the first volume in a series of seven books by British author J. K. Rowling and featuring the fictional character, Harry Potter, a young wizard. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Bloomsbury Publishing Plc is an independent, London-based publishing house known for literary novels. ... Nickname: Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1625 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area  - City  468. ... Scholastic Corporation (NASDAQ: SCHL) is an American book publishing company known for publishing educational materials for schools, teachers, and parents, and selling and distributing them by mail order and via book clubs and book fairs. ... Joanne Rowling OBE (born 31 July 1965[1]) is an English fiction writer who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling. ... Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (film) or Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (video game) Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, by J.K. Rowling, is the sequel to Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Bloomsbury Publishing Plc is an independent, London-based publishing house known for literary novels. ... Nickname: Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1625 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area  - City  468. ... Scholastic Corporation (NASDAQ: SCHL) is an American book publishing company known for publishing educational materials for schools, teachers, and parents, and selling and distributing them by mail order and via book clubs and book fairs. ... Joanne Rowling OBE (born 31 July 1965[1]) is an English fiction writer who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling. ... This article is about the book. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Bloomsbury Publishing Plc is an independent, London-based publishing house known for literary novels. ... Nickname: Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1625 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area  - City  468. ... Scholastic Corporation (NASDAQ: SCHL) is an American book publishing company known for publishing educational materials for schools, teachers, and parents, and selling and distributing them by mail order and via book clubs and book fairs. ... Joanne Rowling OBE (born 31 July 1965[1]) is an English fiction writer who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling. ... << Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban | Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix >> This article is about the book. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Bloomsbury Publishing Plc is an independent, London-based publishing house known for literary novels. ... Nickname: Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1625 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area  - City  468. ... Scholastic Corporation (NASDAQ: SCHL) is an American book publishing company known for publishing educational materials for schools, teachers, and parents, and selling and distributing them by mail order and via book clubs and book fairs. ... Joanne Rowling OBE (born 31 July 1965[1]) is an English fiction writer who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling. ... This article is about the book. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Bloomsbury Publishing Plc is an independent, London-based publishing house known for literary novels. ... Nickname: Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1625 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area  - City  468. ... Scholastic Corporation (NASDAQ: SCHL) is an American book publishing company known for publishing educational materials for schools, teachers, and parents, and selling and distributing them by mail order and via book clubs and book fairs. ... Joanne Rowling OBE (born 31 July 1965[1]) is an English fiction writer who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling. ... For the film, see Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (film). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Bloomsbury Publishing Plc is an independent, London-based publishing house known for literary novels. ... Nickname: Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1625 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area  - City  468. ... Scholastic Corporation (NASDAQ: SCHL) is an American book publishing company known for publishing educational materials for schools, teachers, and parents, and selling and distributing them by mail order and via book clubs and book fairs. ... Joanne Rowling OBE (born 31 July 1965[1]) is an English fiction writer who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling. ... Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is the seventh and final book in the Harry Potter series of novels by J. K. Rowling. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Bloomsbury Publishing Plc is an independent, London-based publishing house known for literary novels. ... Nickname: Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1625 Government  - Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area  - City  468. ... Scholastic Corporation (NASDAQ: SCHL) is an American book publishing company known for publishing educational materials for schools, teachers, and parents, and selling and distributing them by mail order and via book clubs and book fairs. ...

External links

Harry Potter Portal
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Portal. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

Official sites

Other resources


  Results from FactBites:
 
Harry Potter - The Official Site (937 words)
Harry Potter, "the boy who lived," is in for a dangerous fourth year at Hogwarts when the Goblet of Fire selects him to compete as one of four champions in the Triwizard Tournament - despite the fact that he did not submit his name.
Harry spends a good deal of time working up the nerve to invite her to the Yule Ball.
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, in theaters November 2005!
Harry Potter - Harry Potter Wiki - a Wikia wiki (2877 words)
Harry Potter was born on July 31, 1980 to James and Lily Potter.
Harry is bound to a tombstone and forced to witness a ritual (which uses his blood) that restores Lord Voldemort to his former body.
Harry recovers the locket from Dumbledore's body, but a note inside reveals it is a fake; the real Horcrux has been stolen by someone whose initials are R.A.B. After Dumbledore's funeral, Harry tells Ron and Hermione he is leaving Hogwarts to search for Voldemort's four remaining Horcruxes.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m