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Encyclopedia > Harry M. Daugherty

Harry Micajah Daugherty (January 26, 1860October 12, 1941) (daw-GER-tee) was an American politician. He is best known as a Republican Party boss, and member of the Ohio Gang, the name given to the group of advisors surrounding president Warren G. Harding. January 26 is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... October 12 is the 285th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (286th in leap years). ... For the movie, see 1941 (film) 1941 (MCMXLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1941 calendar). ... The Ohio Gang is a misnomer, applied to a group of officials within the administration of Warren G. Harding, 29th President of the United States of America. ... Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865–August 2, 1923) was an American politician and the 29th President of the United States, serving from 1921 to 1923, when he became the sixth president to die in office. ...


Daugherty graduated from the University of Michigan Law School at the age of 20, but had to wait one year before taking the bar exam. Over the next 15 years, he practiced law and began his political career as a city councilman in Washington Court House, Ohio. From there, he became a prosecutor in Fayette County, Ohio, then served in the Ohio House of Representatives from 1890 to 1894. Bids for higher offices, such as U.S. Congress, state attorney general and governor all came up short. This article is about the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. ... A bar examination is an series of tests conducted at regular intervals to determine whether a candidate is qualified to practice law in a given American examination usually consists of the following: complicated essay questions concerning that jurisdictions law; the Multistate Bar Examination, a standardized, nationwide examination containing generalized... Washington Court House is a town located in Fayette County, Ohio, United States. ... Fayette County is a county located in the state of Ohio. ... Ohio has a bicameral legislature, the Ohio General Assembly, consisting a House of Representatives and Senate (the Ohio State Senate), based on its constitution of 1851. ... 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar). ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... HI A governor is also, a monkey who is smart and can fly like a penguin is a device that regulates the speed of a machine. ...


As an Ohio Republican party boss in 1920, engineered Harding's ascendency as the Republican Party Presidential nominee at that year's Chicago Republican National Convention. The decision to propel Harding forward if the nomination wasn't decided on the first ballot, was made in what became known as in American politics as the smoke-filled room in the Blackstone Hotel. Daugherty served as campaign manager for Harding in the U.S. presidential election of 1920. He ran the campaign based on Harding's affable personality and fairly neutral political stance, advocating a return to "normalcy" after World War I. 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... The Republican Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States two-party system, the other one being the Democratic Party. ... Chicago (officially named the City of Chicago) is the third largest city in the United States (after New York City and Los Angeles), with an official population of 2,896,016, as of the 2000 census. ... The Republican National Convention, the presidential nominating convention of the United States Republican Party, is held every four years to determine the partys candidate for the coming Presidential election and the partys platform. ... A smoke-filled room is a term used in the United States to describe a gathering of minds secluded from the general public, often insinuating that the majority of people in the room is comprised of old, white males smoking cigars. ... In United States and other democracies, political campaigns larger than a few individuals generally include a campaign manager whose role is to coordinate the campaigns operations. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Combatants Allies: Serbia, Russia, France, Romania, Belgium, British Empire, United States, Italy, and others Central Powers: Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, Ottoman Empire Casualties Military dead:5 million Civilian dead:3 million Total dead:8 million Military dead:4 million Civilian dead:3 million Total dead:7 million The First World...


Harding won the Republican Party nomination after the vote deadlocked between Leonard Wood and Frank Lowden, an event whose possibility Daugherty had suggested months before in an interview. After Harding won the general election, he appointed Daugherty United States Attorney General. The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Leonard Wood (October 9, 1860 – August 7, 1927) was a physician who served as the US Army Chief of Staff and Governor General of the Philippines. ... Frank Orren Lowden (1861 - 1943) was a U.S. political figure. ... Alberto Gonzales, current Attorney General of the United States The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ...


Daugherty's controversial three years in office saw his name surface in connection with veterans bureau irregularities, alien property conspiracies, as well as his role in the pardoning of Eugene V. Debs and Charles W. Morse. However it was his alleged knowledge of a kickback scam involving bootlegers (operated by his chief aid Jess Smith) that lead to his eventual resignation in March 28, 1924. As the subject of a U.S. Senate investigation begun the year before, spearheaded under the direction of Junior Senator Burton K. Wheeler of Montana, Daugherty, was eventually not found guilty in the investigation. Eugene Victor Debs (November 5, 1855 – October 20, 1926) was an American labor and political leader, one of the founders of the international labor union the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) and five-time Socialist Party of America candidate for President of the United States. ... March 28 is the 87th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (88th in Leap years). ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Time magazine, June 18, 1923 Burton Kendall Wheeler (February 27, 1882–January 6, 1975) was an American politician. ...


He returned to practicing law until his retirement in 1932, and that year published along with ghostwriter Thomas Dixon, The Inside Story of the Harding Tragedy about his time in the Harding administration. In the book, he claimed that Albert B. Fall had become Secretary of the Interior by forging Daugherty's name, and that his close friend, Jesse Smith, had killed himself because of diabetes, not a guilty conscience. 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... Thomas F. Dixon, Jr. ... Albert Bacon Fall (November 26, 1861–November 30, 1944) Senator from New Mexico and the Secretary of the Interior under President Warren G. Harding, notorious for his involvement in the Teapot Dome scandal. ... The United States Secretary of the Interior is the head of the United States Department of the Interior, concerned with such matters as national parks and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... This article is about the disease that features high blood sugar. ...


Spending many of his final years in Florida and Mackinac Island, Michigan, Daugherty planned to write more books to clear his reputation, but in October 1940, he suffered two heart attacks and was stricken with pneumonia. Bedridden and blind in one eye during this last year, he died peacefully in his sleep with his son and daugher at his side. His wife, Lucy, had died in 1924, following many years of ill health, while another son died in 1930. Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 22nd 170,451 km² 260 km 800 km 17. ... Mackinac Island is a city located on Mackinac Island and Round Island in Mackinac County in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... Look up October in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... A myocardial infarction occurs when an atherosclerotic plaque slowly builds up in the inner lining of a coronary artery and then suddenly ruptures, totally occluding the artery and preventing blood flow downstream. ... Pneumonia is an illness of the lungs and respiratory system in which the microscopic, air-filled sacs (alveoli) responsible for absorbing oxygen from the atmosphere become inflamed and flooded with fluid. ...


External link

  • MCGRAIN v. DAUGHERTY, 273 U.S. 135 (1927) - US Supreme Court case
Preceded by:
A. Mitchell Palmer
United States Attorney General
1921–1924
Succeeded by:
Harlan F. Stone
United States Attorneys General Seal of the United States Department of Justice

Randolph, Bradford, Lee, Lincoln, R Smith, Breckinridge, Rodney, Pinkney, Rush, Wirt, Berrien, Taney, Butler, Grundy, Gilpin, Crittenden, Legaré, Nelson, Mason, Clifford, Toucey, Johnson, Crittenden, Cushing, Black, Stanton, Bates, Speed, Stanberry, Evarts, Hoar, Akerman, Williams, Pierrepont, Taft, Devens, MacVeagh, Brewster, Garland, Miller, Olney, Harmon, McKenna, Griggs, Knox, Moody, Bonaparte, Wickersham, McReynolds, Gregory, Palmer, Daugherty, Stone, Sargent, W Mitchell, Cummings, Murphy, Jackson, Biddle, T Clark, McGrath, McGranery, Brownell, Rogers, Kennedy, Katzenbach, R Clark, J Mitchell, Kleindienst, Richardson, Saxbe, Levi, Bell, Civiletti, W Smith, Meese, Thornburgh, Barr, Reno, Ashcroft, Gonzales Alexander Mitchell Palmer (May 4, 1872 - May 11, 1936) was an American lawyer and politician. ... 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