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Encyclopedia > Harry Houdini
Ehrich Weiss (Harry Houdini)

Harry Houdini became world-renowned for his stunts and feats of escapology even more than for his magical illusions.
Born March 24, 1874(1874-03-24)
Budapest, Hungary
Died October 31, 1926 (aged 52)
Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
Occupation magician, escapologist, stunt performer, actor, historian, pilot, and paranormal investigator

Harry Houdini (March 24, 1874October 31, 1926) whose birth name in Hungary was Erik Weisz[1] (which was changed to Ehrich Weiss[2] when he immigrated to the United States), was a Hungarian American magician, escapologist (widely regarded as one of the greatest ever) and stunt performer, as well as a skeptic and investigator of spiritualists, film producer and actor. Houdini may refer to: Harry Houdini, (1874–1926) one of the most famous magicians, escapologists, and stunt performers of all time Houdini (software), a high-end 3D animation package developed by Side Effects Software. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 383 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (698 × 1093 pixel, file size: 332 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Harry Houdini, a famous escapologist and magician. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Detroit redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... “Illusionist” redirects here. ... This article is about the study of escapology. ... Stunt man and stunt woman redirect here. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Historian (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Aviator (disambiguation). ... Paranormal is an umbrella term used to describe a wide variety of reported anomalous phenomena. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hungarian-American refers to American citizens with Hungarian ethnicity. ... “Illusionist” redirects here. ... This article is about the study of escapology. ... Stunt man and stunt woman redirect here. ... Spiritualism is a religion in which contact with the spirits of the dead through a medium is central. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Birth and name

Houdini was born in Budapest, Hungary. A copy of his birth certificate was found and published in The Houdini Birth Research Committee's Report (1972). [3] His family name, Weiß, is German, meaning "White" in English. As to his birth date, from 1907 onwards, Houdini claimed in interviews to have been born in Appleton, Wisconsin, on April 6, 1874. For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ... Mary Elizabeth Winblad (1895-1987) birth certificate A birth certificate is a vital record that documents the birth of a child. ... ß as the combination of Å¿s on a Pirna street sign (Waldstraße) This article is about the letter ß in the German alphabet. ... Appleton is a city in the U.S. state of Wisconsin, on the Fox River, 100 miles (161 km) north of Milwaukee. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Houdini's father was Mayer (Mayo) Samuel Weiss (1829-1892), a rabbi; his mother was Cecilia Steiner (1841-1913). Ehrich had six siblings: Herman M. (1885); Nathan J. Weiss (1870-1927); Gottfried William Weiss (1872-1925); Theodore Weiss (Dash) (1876-1945); [4] Leopold D. Weiss (1879-1962); and Gladys Carrie Weiss (1882-?). For the town in Italy, see Rabbi, Italy. ... Theodore Hardeen(born Ferencz Deszo Weisz; March 4, 1876 - June 12, 1945) was a magician and stunt performed, best known as Houdinis brother. ...


He immigrated with his family to the United States on July 3, 1878, at the age of four, on the SS Fresia with his mother (who was pregnant) and his four brothers. Houdini's name was listed as Ehrich Weiss.[5] Friends called him "Ehrie" or "Harry". is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


At first, they lived in Appleton, where his father served as rabbi of the Zion Reform Jewish Congregation. In 1880, the family was living on Appleton Street.[6] On June 6, 1882, Rabbi Weiss became an American citizen. After losing his tenure, he moved to New York City with Ehrich in 1887. They lived in a boarding house on East 79th Street. Rabbi Weiss later was joined by the rest of the family once he found more permanent housing. As a child, Ehrich took several jobs, then became a champion cross country runner. He made his public début as a 10-year-old trapeze artist, calling himself "Ehrich, the prince of the air". Weiss became a professional magician and began calling himself "Harry Houdini" because he was heavily influenced by the French magician Jean Eugène Robert-Houdin, and his friend Jack Hayman told him that in French, adding an "i" to Houdin would mean "like Houdin" the great magician. In later life, Houdini would claim that the first part of his new name, Harry, was an homage to Harry Kellar, whom Houdini admired a great deal. However, it's more likely Harry derived naturally from his nickname "Ehrie". For the town in Italy, see Rabbi, Italy. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Minnesota State Highschool Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... “Illusionist” redirects here. ... Jean Eugène Robert-Houdin (Zhean Yuzhean Ro-bayr oo-da) (December 6, 1805 - June 13, 1871) was a French magician. ... Publicity Poster of Harry Kellar. ...


Magic career

Initially, Houdini's magic career resulted in little success. He performed in dime museums and sideshows, and even doubled as "the Wild Man" at a circus. Houdini initially focused on traditional card tricks. At one point, he billed himself as the "King of Cards". But he soon began experimenting with escape acts. In 1893, while performing with his brother "Dash" at Coney Island as "The Brothers Houdini", Harry met and married fellow performer Wilhelmina Beatrice (Bess) Rahner. Bess replaced Dash in the act, which became known as "The Houdinis". For the rest of Houdini's performing career, Bess would work as his stage assistant. Harry Houdini, a famous escapologist and magician. ... The grave of Bess Houdini in Gate of Heaven Cemetery Wilhelmina Beatrice Rahner, known as Bess, was the stage assistant and wife of Harry Houdini. ...

"My Two Sweethearts". Houdini with his wife and mother, ca. 1907.
"My Two Sweethearts". Houdini with his wife and mother, ca. 1907.

Harry Houdini's "big break" came in 1899 when he met manager Martin Beck. Impressed by Houdini's handcuffs act, Beck advised him to concentrate on escape acts and booked him on the Orpheum vaudeville circuit. Within months, he was performing at the top vaudeville houses in the country. In 1900, Beck arranged for Houdini to tour Europe. Image File history File linksMetadata Weiss_with_mother_and_wife. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Weiss_with_mother_and_wife. ... Martin Beck (1867 – November 16, 1940) was a vaudeville theatre owner. ... A pair of handcuffs Handcuffs are restraint devices designed to secure an individuals wrists close together. ... This article is about the musical variety theatre. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


Houdini was a sensation in Europe, where he became widely known as "The Handcuff King". He toured England, Scotland, the Netherlands, Germany, France, and Russia. In each city, Houdini would challenge local police to restrain him with shackles and lock him in their jails. In many of these challenge escapes, Houdini would first be stripped nude and searched. In Moscow, Houdini escaped from a Siberian prison transport van. Houdini publicly stated that, had he been unable to free himself, he would have had to travel to Siberia, where the only key was kept. In Cologne, he sued a police officer, Werner Graff, who claimed he made his escapes via bribery.[7] Houdini won the case when he opened the judge's safe (he would later say the judge had forgotten to lock it). With his new-found wealth and success, Houdini purchased a dress said to have been made for Queen Victoria. He then arranged a grand reception where he presented his mother in the dress to all their relatives. Houdini said it was the happiest day of his life. In 1904, Houdini returned to the U.S. and purchased a house for $25,000, a brownstone at 278 W. 113th Street in Harlem, New York.[8] The house still stands today. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain... Fetters, shackles or leg irons are a kind of physical restraint used on the feet or ankles. ... A strip search is the stripping (removal of clothing, search of person, or personal effects) of a person to check for weapons or other contraband. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... This article is about Siberia as a whole. ... For other uses, see Cologne (disambiguation). ... Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819–22 January 1901) was a Queen of the United Kingdom, reigning from 20 June 1837 until her death. ... This article is about the building material and the dwelling. ... For other uses, see Harlem (disambiguation). ...

Poster promoting Houdini taking up the challenge of escaping an "extra strong and large traveling basket".
Poster promoting Houdini taking up the challenge of escaping an "extra strong and large traveling basket".

From 1907 and throughout the 1910s, Houdini performed with great success in the United States. He would free himself from jails, handcuffs, chains, ropes, and straitjackets, often while hanging from a rope in plain sight of street audiences. Because of imitators and a dwindling audience, on January 25, 1908, Houdini put his "handcuff act" behind him and began escaping from a locked, water-filled milk can. The possibility of failure and death thrilled his audiences. Houdini also expanded his challenge escape act - in which he invited the public to devise contraptions to hold him - to include nailed packing crates (sometimes lowered into the water), riveted boilers, wet-sheets, mailbags, and even the belly of a whale that washed ashore in Boston. At one point, brewers challenged Houdini to escape from his milk can after they filled it with beer. Many of these challenges were prearranged with local merchants in what is certainly one of the first uses of mass tie-in marketing. Rather than promote the idea that he was assisted by spirits, as did the Davenport Brothers and others, Houdini's advertisements showed him making his escapes via dematerializing[9], although Houdini himself never claimed to have supernatural powers. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 405 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1997 × 2952 pixel, file size: 7. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 405 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1997 × 2952 pixel, file size: 7. ... This is an article about a garment of clothing. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Ira Erastus Davenport (1839 – 1911) and William Henry Davenport (1841 – 1877), better known as the Davenport Brothers, were American magicians in the late 1800s, sons of a Buffalo, New York policeman. ... Teleport redirects here. ...


In 1912, Houdini introduced perhaps his most famous act, the Chinese Water Torture Cell, in which he was suspended upside-down in a locked glass-and-steel cabinet full to overflowing with water. The act required that Houdini hold his breath for more than three minutes. Houdini performed the escape for the rest of his career. Despite two Hollywood movies depicting Houdini dying in the Torture Cell, the escape had nothing to do with his demise. green is good This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ...


Houdini explained some of his tricks in books written for the magic brotherhood throughout his career. In Handcuff Secrets (1909), he revealed how many locks and handcuffs could be opened with properly applied force, others with shoestrings. Other times, he carried concealed lockpicks or keys, being able to regurgitate small keys at will. When tied down in ropes or straitjackets, he gained wiggle room by enlarging his shoulders and chest, moving his arms slightly away from his body, and then dislocating his shoulders. His straitjacket escape was originally performed behind curtains, with him popping out free at the end. However, Houdini's brother, who was also an escape artist billing himself as Theodore Hardeen, after being accused of having someone sneak in and let him out and being challenged to escape without the curtain, discovered that audiences were more impressed and entertained when the curtains were eliminated so they could watch him struggle to get out. They both performed straitjacket escapes dangling upside-down from the roof of a building for publicity on more than one occasion. It is said that Hardeen once handed out bills for his show while Houdini was doing his suspended straitjacket escape; Houdini became upset because people thought it was Hardeen up there escaping, not Houdini. Many people imitate some of Houdini's tricks to this day. Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Lock picking is the art of unlocking a lock without its intended key. ... Regurgitation is the passive flow of stomach contents back into the esophagus and mouth. ... This is an article about a garment of clothing. ... With regard to living things, a body is the integral physical material of an individual. ... Theodore Hardeen(born Ferencz Deszo Weisz; March 4, 1876 - June 12, 1945) was a magician and stunt performed, best known as Houdinis brother. ...


For the majority of his career, Houdini performed his act as a headliner in vaudeville. For many years, he was the highest-paid performer in American vaudeville. One of Houdini's most notable non-escape stage illusions was performed at New York's Hippodrome Theater when he vanished a full-grown elephant (with its trainer) from a stage, beneath which was a swimming pool. In 1923, Houdini became president of Martinka & Co., America's oldest magic company. The business is still in operation today. He also served as President of the Society of American Magicians (aka S.A.M.) from 1917 until his death in 1926. In the final years of his life (1925/26), Houdini launched his own full-evening show, which he billed as "3 Shows in One: Magic, Escapes, and Fraud Mediums Exposed." This article is about the musical variety theatre. ... This article is about the state. ... Martinka & Company is Americas oldest magic shop. ...


Notable escapes

The Mirror Handcuff Challenge

In 1909, the London Daily Mirror newspaper challenged Houdini to escape from a special handcuff that it claimed had taken Nathaniel Hart, a locksmith from Hertfordshire, five years to make. Houdini accepted the challenge for March 20 during a matinee performance at London's Hippodrome theater. It was reported that 4000 people and more than 100 journalists turned out for the much-hyped event. The escape attempt dragged on for over an hour, during which Houdini emerged from his "ghost house" (a small screen used to conceal the method of his escape) several times. On one occasion, he asked if the cuff could be removed so he could take off his coat. The Mirror representative, Basse Parker, refused, saying Houdini could gain an advantage if he saw how the cuff was unlocked. Houdini promptly took out a pen-knife and used it to cut his coat from his body. Some 56 minutes later, Houdini's wife appeared on stage and gave him a kiss. It is believed that in her mouth was the key to unlock the special handcuff. Houdini then went back behind the curtain. After an hour and ten minutes, Houdini emerged free. As he was paraded on the shoulders of the cheering crowd, he broke down and wept. Houdini later said it was the most difficult escape of his career. [10] Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a popular British tabloid daily newspaper. ... For the similarly named county in the West Midlands region, see Herefordshire. ...


After Houdini's death, his friend, Will Goldstone, published in his book, Sensational Tales of Mystery Men, that Houdini was bested that day and appealed to his wife, Bess, for help. Goldstone goes on to claim that Bess begged the key from the Mirror representative, then slipped it to Houdini in a glass of water.


Ándi offered no proof of his account, and many modern biographers have found evidence (notably in the custom design of the handcuff itself) that the entire Mirror challenge was pre-arranged by Houdini and the newspaper, and that his long struggle to escape was pure showmanship.[11]


The Milk Can

In 1908, Houdini introduced his original invention, the Milk Can escape. [12] In this effect, Houdini would be handcuffed and sealed inside an over-sized milk can filled with water and make his escape behind a curtain. As part of the effect, Houdini would invite members of the audience to hold their breath along with him while he was inside the can. Advertised with dramatic posters that proclaimed "Failure Means A Drowning Death", the escape proved to be a sensation. [13] Houdini soon modified the escape to include the Milk Can being locked inside a wooden chest. Houdini only performed the Milk Can escape as a regular part of his act for four years, but it remains one of the effects most associated with the escape artist. Houdini's brother, Theodore Hardeen, continued to perform the Milk Can (and the wooden chest variation[14]) into the 1940s. The Milk Can escape was done by filing down the rivets on the inside, which held the top. After he was covered, he pushed them out from inside, removed the lid, and replaced the lid and rivets.


The Chinese Water Torture Cell

Due to the vast number of imitators of his Milk Can escape, in 1911 Houdini replaced the Milk Can with his most famous escape: the Chinese Water Torture Cell. In this escape, Houdini's feet would be locked in stocks, and he'd be lowered upside down into a tank filled with water. The mahogany and metal cell featured a glass front, through which audiences could clearly see Houdini. The stocks would be locked to the top of the cell, and a curtain would conceal his escape. In the earliest version of the Torture Cell, a metal cage was lowered into the cell, and Houdini was enclosed inside that. While making the escape more difficult (the cage prevented Houdini from turning), the cage bars also offered protection should the glass front break. green is good This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ...


The original cell was built in England, where Houdini first performed the escape for an audience of one person as part of a one-act play he called "Houdini Upside Down". This was so he could copyright the effect and have grounds to sue imitators (which he did). While the escape was advertised as "The Chinese Water Torture Cell" or "The Water Torture Cell", Houdini always referred to it as "the Upside Down" or "USD". The first public performance of the USD was at the Circus Busch in Berlin, on September 21, 1912. Houdini continued to perform the escape until his death in 1926. Despite two Hollywood movies depicting Houdini dying in the Torture Cell, the escape had nothing to do with his demise.[15]


Suspended straitjacket escape

One of Houdini's most popular publicity stunts was to have himself strapped into a regulation straitjacket and suspended by his ankles from a tall building or crane. Houdini would then make his escape in full view of the assembled crowd. In many cases, Houdini would draw thousands of onlookers who would choke the street and bring city traffic to a halt. Houdini would sometimes ensure press coverage by performing the escape from the office building of a local newspaper. In New York City, Houdini performed the suspended straitjacket escape from a crane being used to build the New York subway. After flinging his body in the air, Houdini escaped from the straitjacket. Starting from when he was hoisted up in the air by the crane, to when the straitjacket was completely off, it took Houdini two minutes and thirty-seven seconds. Film footage of Houdini performing the escape in Dayton, Ohio, exists in The Library of Congress. After being battered against a building in high winds during one escape, Houdini performed the escape with a visible safety wire on his ankle so that he could be pulled away from the building if necessary.This is the best thing ever!! : Gem City : Birthplace of Aviation United States Ohio Montgomery 56. ...


Pioneer aviator

In 1909, Houdini became fascinated with aviation. That same year, he purchased a French Voisin biplane for $5000 and hired a full-time mechanic, Antonio Brassac. Houdini painted his name in bold block letters on the Voisin's sidepanels and tail. After crashing once, Houdini made his first successful flight on November 26 in Hamburg, Germany. Block letters may mean any of the following : Block letters can be used to write to disguise ones handwriting. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1910, Houdini toured Australia. He brought with him his Voisin biplane and had the distinction of achieving the first controlled powered flight over Australia, doing so on March 21 at Diggers Rest, Victoria, just north of Melbourne. [1]. Colin Defries preceded him, but he crashed the plane on landing. [2]. Houdini proudly claimed to reporters that, while the world may forget about him as a magician and escape artist, it would never forget Houdini the pioneer aviator. is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Diggers Rest is a town northwest of Melbourne Airport near Melbourne, the capital city of Victoria, Australia, along the Calder Freeway. ... The City of Melbournes coat of arms The central business district of Melbourne, viewed from the north Alternate meanings: Melbourne (disambiguation) Melbourne is the capital and largest city of the state of Victoria, and the second largest city in Australia, with a population of 52,117 in the Central...


After his Australia tour, Houdini put the Voisin into storage in England. Although he announced he would use it to fly from city to city during his next Music Hall tour, Houdini never flew again.[16]


Movie career

"The Houdini Serial", 1919
"The Houdini Serial", 1919

Houdini made his first movie for Pathé in 1901. Titled Merveilleux Exploits du Célébre Houdini à Paris, it featured a loose narrative meant to showcase several of Houdini's famous escapes, including his straitjacket escape. Houdini returned to film in 1916 when he served as special-effects consultant on the Pathé thriller, The Mysteries of Myra. That same year, he got an offer to star as Captain Nemo in a silent version of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, but the project never made it into production.[17] Image File history File links Mastermystery-1919poster. ... Image File history File links Mastermystery-1919poster. ... Captain Nemo is a fictional character featured in Jules Vernes novels Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (1870) and The Mysterious Island (1874). ... Front page of Vingt Mille Lieues Sous les Mers 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (or Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea) is a classic science fiction novel by Jules Verne, published in 1870 under the title Vingt mille lieues sous les mers. ...


In 1918, Houdini signed a contract with film producer B.A. Rolfe to star in a 15-part serial, The Master Mystery (released in January 1919). As was common at the time, the film serial was released simultaneously with a novel. Financial difficulties resulted in B.A. Rolfe Productions going out of business, but The Master Mystery was a box-office success and led to Houdini being signed by Famous Players-Lasky Corporation/Paramount Pictures, for whom he made two pictures, The Grim Game (1919) and Terror Island (1920). While filming an aerial stunt for The Grim Game, two biplanes collided in mid-air with a stuntman doubling Houdini dangling by a rope from one of the planes. Publicity was geared heavily toward promoting this dramatic "caught on film" moment, claiming it was Houdini himself dangling from the plane. While filming these movies in Los Angeles, Houdini rented a home in Laurel Canyon. Benjamin Albert Rolfe (October 24, 1879 - April 23, 1956) was an American musician known as The Boy Trumpet Wonder who went on to be a bandleader, recording artist, radio personality and film producer. ... DVD front cover for The Adventures of Captain Marvel, one of the most celebrated serials for both Republic Pictures and of the sound era in general. ... B.A. Rolfes Houdini Serial, 1919 Rolfe Photoplays Inc. ... The Paramount Pictures logo used from 1987 to 1995. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... The Grim Game is a 1919 silent film starring Harry Houdini. ... Laurel Canyon can refer to several things: Laurel Canyon is a 2002 American drama movie, written and directed by Lisa Cholodenko. ...

Houdini swims above Niagara Falls in a scene from The Man from Beyond (1922)
Houdini swims above Niagara Falls in a scene from The Man from Beyond (1922)

Following his two-picture stint in Hollywood, Houdini returned to New York and started his own film production company called the "Houdini Picture Corporation." He produced and starred in two films, The Man From Beyond (1921) and Haldane of the Secret Service (1923). He also started up his own film laboratory business called The Film Development Corporation (FDC), gambling on a new process for developing motion picture film. Houdini’s brother, Hardeen, left his own career as a magician and escape artist to run the company. Magician Harry Kellar was a major investor.[18] Download high resolution version (929x768, 440 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (929x768, 440 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see Niagara Falls (disambiguation). ... Publicity Poster of Harry Kellar. ...


Neither Houdini's acting career nor FDC found success, and he gave up on the movie business in 1923, complaining that "the profits are too meager.” But his celebrity was such that, years later, he would be given a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame (at 7001 Hollywood Blvd). Buskers perform on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. ...


As of 2007, only The Man From Beyond had been commercially released on DVD. Incomplete versions of The Master Mystery and Terror Island were released by private collectors on VHS. Complete 35 mm prints of Haldane of the Secret Service and The Grim Game exist only in private collections. Haldane of the Secret Service was screened in Los Angeles in 2007.[19]


Kino International will release a DVD box set of Houdini's surviving silent movies in April 2008. The set will include The Master Mystery, Terror Island, The Man From Beyond, Haldane of the Secret Service, and five minutes of The Grim Game. The set will also include newsreel footage of Houdini's escapes from 1907 to 1923. [20]


Debunking spiritualists

In the 1920s, after the death of his beloved mother, Cecilia, he turned his energies toward debunking self-proclaimed psychics and mediums, a pursuit that would inspire and be followed by later-day conjurers Milbourne Christopher, James Randi, Martin Gardner, P.C. Sorcar, Criss Angel, and Penn and Teller. Houdini's magical training allowed him to expose frauds who had successfully fooled many scientists and academics. He was a member of a Scientific American committee which offered a cash prize to any medium who could successfully demonstrate supernatural abilities. Thanks to the contributions and skepticism of Houdini and three others (there were five in the committee), the prize was never collected. As his fame as a "ghostbuster" grew, Houdini took to attending séances in disguise, accompanied by a reporter and police officer. Possibly the most famous medium whom he debunked was the Boston medium Mina Crandon, also known as "Margery". Houdini chronicled his debunking exploits in his book, A Magician Among the Spirits. Early parapsychological research employed the use of Zener cards in experiments designed to test for possible telepathic communication. ... In spirituality, a medium or spirit medium (plural mediums) is an individual who possesses the ability to receive messages from spirits (discorporate entities), or claims that he or she can channel such entities — that is, write or speak in the voice of these entities rather than in the mediums... Milbourne Christopher (1914 - 1984) was one of Americas foremost illusionists, performing in sixty-eight countries. ... James Randi (born August 7, 1928), stage name The Amazing Randi, is a stage magician and scientific skeptic best known as a challenger of paranormal claims and pseudoscience. ... Martin Gardner (b. ... P.C. Sorcar P.C. Sorcar (February 23, 1913 - January 6, 1971) was the stage name of Protul Chandra Sorcar, Indias most famous magician. ... Christopher Nicholas Sarantakos (born December 19, 1967), better known by his stage name Criss Angel is an American magician, musician, mentalist, hypnotist, escapologist, stunt performer, and actor. ... Penn (left) & Teller Penn and Teller are a two-man magic and comedy team, comprised of Penn Jillette and Teller. ... Scientific American is a popular-science magazine, published (first weekly and later monthly) since August 28, 1845, making it the oldest continuously published magazine in the United States. ... For other uses, see Supernatural (disambiguation). ... Look up séance in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Boston redirects here. ... // Mina Margery Crandon (1888-1941) was the wife of a wealthy Boston surgeon and socialite, Dr. Le Roi Goddard Crandon. ...

Houdini demonstrates how a photographer could produce fraudulent "spirit photographs" that documented the apparition and social interaction of deceased individuals.
Houdini demonstrates how a photographer could produce fraudulent "spirit photographs" that documented the apparition and social interaction of deceased individuals.[21]

These activities cost Houdini the friendship of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes. Conan Doyle, a firm believer in Spiritualism during his later years, refused to believe any of Houdini's exposés. Conan Doyle actually came to believe that Houdini was a powerful spiritualist medium, had performed many of his stunts by means of paranormal abilities and was using these abilities to block those of other mediums that he was 'debunking' (see Conan Doyle's The Edge of The Unknown, published in 1931, after Houdini's death). This disagreement led to the two men becoming public antagonists. Gabriel Brownstein has written a fictionalized account of the meetings of Houdini, Conan Doyle, and "Margery" in The Man from Beyond: A Novel (2005). Image File history File links Size of this preview: 698 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (894 × 768 pixel, file size: 86 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Houdini and the ghost of Abraham Lincoln, c. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 698 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (894 × 768 pixel, file size: 86 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Houdini and the ghost of Abraham Lincoln, c. ... Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a British author most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction, and for the adventures of Professor Challenger. ... A portrait of Sherlock Holmes by Sidney Paget from the Strand Magazine, 1891 Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. ...


The book The Secret Life of Houdini has an account of Conan Doyle's involvement with the camp of "Margery" and presents personal letters showing that Conan Doyle and Mina's husband strongly believed that revenging spirits (not persons) would soon kill Houdini for hiding the "truth". The book further proposes Conan Doyle's campaign to hijack Houdini's legacy when a Spiritualist minister friend of Conan Doyle, Rev. Arthur Ford[22], conspired with him to bring messages from Houdini and his mother back from the grave in séances, including one on the roof of the Knickerbocker Hotel, which would further the Spiritualists' agenda. According to the book, Houdini's wife felt so depressed that she actually tried to commit suicide on the eve of the séance. There is no mention of the fact that, twelve days after the séance, Bess Houdini wrote a moving letter to Walter Winchell, the columnist, which was published in the Graphic, denying the words she received from her deceased husband were given to Ford by herself, denying the charge Bess and Ford had conspired together to perform a publicity stunt to further their careers in the entertainment industry. She trusted Ford's reading.[23][24] Neither is there any mention of the fact that the Houdini code was already widely known by the public months before the séance. (See Arthur Ford.) Arthur Ford (January 8, 1896 – January 4, 1971) was an American psychic spiritual medium, clairaudient and in 1955 founded the Spiritual Frontiers Fellowship. ... The Knickerbocker Hotel, now senior home Hollywood Knickerbocker Apartments, (1714 Ivar Ave, Los Angeles, CA) is one of the old historic Los Angeles Hotels that has had its share of notoriety and was the scene for some of Hollywood’s most famous dramatic moments, including suicides, séances and death. ... Walter Winchell (April 7, 1897 – February 20, 1972), an American newspaper and radio commentator, invented the gossip column at the New York Evening Graphic. ... Arthur Ford (January 8, 1896 – January 4, 1971) was an American psychic spiritual medium, clairaudient and in 1955 founded the Spiritual Frontiers Fellowship. ...


Death

Houdini and his wife Bess
Houdini and his wife Bess

Harry Houdini died of peritonitis secondary to a ruptured appendix. It has been speculated that Houdini's ruptured appendix was caused by multiple blows to his abdomen from a McGill University student, J. Gordon Whitehead, in Montreal on October 31. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (648x1000, 58 KB)Harry Houdini and his wife Digital ID: varshoud 3c12428 Source: b&w film copy neg. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (648x1000, 58 KB)Harry Houdini and his wife Digital ID: varshoud 3c12428 Source: b&w film copy neg. ... Appendicitis (or epityphlitis) is a condition characterized by inflammation of the appendix. ... For the human abdomen, see human abdomen. ... McGill University is a public co-educational research university located in Montréal, Québec, Canada. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


How it happened

The eyewitnesses were students named Jacques Price and Sam Smilovitz (sometimes called Jack Price and Sam Smiley). Their accounts generally agreed. The following is according to Price's description of events. Houdini was reclining on his couch after his performance, having an art student sketch him. When Whitehead came in and asked if it was true that Houdini could take any blow to the stomach, Houdini replied in the affirmative. In this instance, he was hit three times, before Houdini protested. Whitehead reportedly continued hitting Houdini several times afterwards, and Houdini acted as though he were in some pain. Price recounted that Houdini stated that if he had had time to prepare himself properly, he would have been in a better position to take the blows. After taking statements from Price and Smilovitz, Houdini's insurance company concluded that the death was due to the dressing-room incident and paid double indemnity.[25]. Double Indemnity is a 1944 film noir. ...


Houdini’s last performance

When Houdini arrived at the Garrick Theatre in Detroit, Michigan, on October 24, 1926, for what would be his last performance, he had a fever of 104 degrees F (40°C). Despite a diagnosis of acute appendicitis, Houdini took the stage. Afterwards, he was hospitalized at Detroit's Grace Hospital.[26] Houdini died of peritonitis from a ruptured appendix at 1:26 p.m. in Room 401 on October 31 (Halloween), 1926, at the age of 52. Detroit redirects here. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Appendicitis (or epityphlitis) is a condition characterized by inflammation of the appendix. ... In human anatomy, the vermiform appendix (or appendix, pl. ... Room 401 is a television series on MTV, executive produced by Ashton Kutcher and Jason Goldberg. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the holiday. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Houdini refused medical attention

Although in serious pain, Houdini nonetheless continued to travel without seeking medical attention. Harry had apparently been suffering from appendicitis for several days and refusing medical treatment. His appendix would likely have burst on its own without the trauma. He died at 1:26 pm.[27]


Funeral

Houdini's funeral was held on November 4, 1926, in New York, with more than 2,000 mourners in attendance. He was interred in the Machpelah Cemetery in Queens, New York, with the crest of the Society of American Magicians inscribed on his gravesite. To this day, the Society holds its "Broken Wand" ceremony at the gravesite on the anniversary of his death. Houdini's wife, Bess, died in February 1943 and was not permitted to be interred with him at Machpelah Cemetery because she was a gentile. Bess Houdini is interred at Gate of Heaven Cemetery in Hawthorne, New York. is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Queens is geographically the largest of the five boroughs of New York City in the United States, and the most ethnically diverse county in the U.S. It is coterminous with Queens County in the State of New York and is located on western Long Island. ... The Society of American Magicians is the oldest fraternal magic organization in the world. ... The word gentile is an anglicised version of the Latin word gentilis, meaning of or belonging to a clan or tribe. ... The upper entrance to Gate of Heaven Cemetery The new indoor building of Our Lady Queen of Peace Mausoleum Saint Francis of Assisi Chapel and Garden Mausoleum The Gothic Bridge at Gate of Heaven Cemetery The Gate of Heaven Cemetery, approximately 25 miles north of New York City, was established...


Will

In Houdini's will, his vast library was offered to the American Society for Psychical Research on the condition that research officer and editor of the ASPR Journal, J. Malcolm Bird, resign. Bird refused and the collection went instead to the Library of Congress. The Society for Psychical Research (SPR) is a non-profit organization in the United Kingdom whose purpose is to research and investigate supernatural, magical, paranormal, and occult phenomena in a scientific and unbiased manner. ... ASPR journal is a journal published quarterly by the American Society for Psychical Research. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ...


Code words

Fearing that spiritualists would exploit his legacy by pretending to contact him after his death, Houdini left his wife a secret code—ten words chosen at random from a letter written by Conan Doyle—that he would use to contact her from the afterlife.[28] According to "The Secret Life of Houdini", this fear of the Spiritualists was well-founded: Arthur Conan Doyle's campaign to hijack Houdini's legacy came to a head when a Spiritualist minister friend of Conan Doyle, Rev. Arthur Ford[29], conspired with him to bring alleged messages from Houdini and his mother back from the grave in séances. "The Secret Life of Houdini" alleges that Bess Houdini was seduced by Ford in order to further the Spiritualist agenda and that Bess may have conspired to assist Ford in creating the impression he had contacted Houdini's spirit. The book also states that Houdini's wife felt so depressed that she actually tried to commit suicide on the eve of the séance. Arthur Ford (January 8, 1896 – January 4, 1971) was an American psychic spiritual medium, clairaudient and in 1955 founded the Spiritual Frontiers Fellowship. ...


Conflicting statements

At the séance, Ford claimed to have contacted both Houdini and his deceased mother via Ford's spirit guide "Fletcher", and stated that the message received was in the pre-arranged code worked out by Houdini and Bess before Houdini's death. A brief letter supposedly signed by Bess Houdini appeared, which read in full: "Regardless of any statements made to the contrary, I wish to declare that the message, in its entirety, and in the agreed upon sequence, given to me by Arthur Ford, is the correct message pre-arranged between Mr. Houdini and myself." On January 10, 1929, New York Graphic reporter Rea Jaure filed a story entitled "Houdini Message a Big Hoax!" stating that Ford had confessed in an interview to having paid Bess Houdini for her cooperation, but Ford later claimed the interviewee was an imposter. Further muddying the waters were Bess Houdini's conflicting statements about the success of Ford's experiments; she is alleged to have written an impassioned letter to the famed columnist Walter Winchell initially defending Ford, and a New York Times article from January 15, 1929 has her responding to rumors that the code had been "leaked" in advance by stating that, "No one but her husband and herself could possibly have known the details of the code. Neither overtly nor covertly could it have been gleaned... To this argument she clung." But by March 18,1930, both the New York Times and Bess Houdini had modifed their stance. "Numerous attempts to convince Mrs. Houdini that her husband is communicating through a medium were made," the Times said, "but she steadfastly denied that any of the mediums presented the clue by which she was to recognize a legitimate message." Walter Winchell (April 7, 1897 – February 20, 1972), an American newspaper and radio commentator, invented the gossip column at the New York Evening Graphic. ...


Yearly séances

Bess Houdini held yearly séances on Halloween for ten years after Houdini's death, but Houdini never appeared. In 1936, after a last unsuccessful séance on the roof of the Knickerbocker Hotel, she put out the candle that she had kept burning beside a photograph of Houdini since his death, later (1943) saying, "ten years is long enough to wait for any man." The tradition of holding a séance for Houdini continues by magicians throughout the world to this day; the Official Houdini Seance is currently organized by Sidney H. Radner.[30] This article is about the holiday. ... Knickerbocker Hotel For the old Knickerbocker Hotel (New York), see: Six Times Square The Knickerbocker Hotel (also Knickerbocker on the Lake) is a low-rise building located in the Yankee Hill neighborhood of downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ... Look up séance in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Sidney Hollis Radner (born in 1919) is a retired rug salesman from Holyoke, Massachusetts, who owned one of the worlds largest and most valuable collections of Harry Houdini artifacts. ...


Appearance and voice

Unlike the image of the classic magician, Houdini was short and stocky and typically appeared on stage in a long frock coat and tie. Most biographers peg his height as 5'5", but descriptions vary. Houdini was also said to be slightly bow-legged, which aided in his ability to gain slack during his rope escapes. In the 1996 biography Houdini!!!: The Career of Ehrich Weiss, author Kenneth Silverman summarizes how reporters described Houdini's appearance during his early career: The Life and Times of Cotton Mather, by Kenneth Silverman. ...

They stressed his smallness – "somewhat undersized" – and angular, vivid features: "He is smooth-shaven with a keen, sharp-chinned, sharp-cheekboned face, bright blue eyes and thick, curly, black hair." Some sensed how much his complexly expressive smile was the outlet of his charismatic stage presence. It communicated to audiences at once warm amiability, pleasure in performing, and, more subtly, imperious self-assurance. Several reporters tried to capture the charming effect, describing him as "happy-looking", "pleasant-faced", "good natured at all times", "the young Hungarian magician with the pleasant smile and easy confidence."[31]

The only known recording of Houdini's voice reveals it to be heavily accented. Houdini made these recordings on Edison wax cylinders on October 24, 1914, in Flatbush, New York. On them, Houdini practices several different introductory speeches for his famous Chinese Water Torture Cell. He also invites his sister, Gladys, to recite a poem. Houdini then recites the same poem in German. The six wax cylinders were discovered in the collection of magician John Mulholland after his death in 1970.[32] They are currently part of the David Copperfield collection. is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Flatbush is a community of the Borough of Brooklyn, a part of New York City, consisting of several neighborhoods. ... green is good This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... David Copperfield (born David Seth Kotkin on September 16, 1956) is an American magician and illusionist best known for his combination of illusions and storytelling. ...


Artifacts

Houdini's brother, Theodore Hardeen, who returned to performing after Houdini's death, inherited his brother's effects and props. Houdini's will stipulated that all the effects should be "burned and destroyed" upon Hardeen's death. But Hardeen sold much of the collection to magician and Houdini enthusiast Sidney H. Radner during the 1940s, including the Water Torture Cell. [33] Radner allowed choice pieces of the collection to be displayed at The Houdini Magical Hall of Fame in Niagara Falls, Canada. In 1995, a fire destroyed the museum. While the Water Torture Cell was reported to have been destroyed, its metal frame remained, and the cell was restored by illusion builder John Gaughan.[34] Many of the props contained in the museum such as the Mirror Handcuffs, Houdini's original packing crate, a Milk Can, and a straight-jacket, survived the fire and were auctioned off in 1999 and 2008. Theodore Hardeen(born Ferencz Deszo Weisz; March 4, 1876 - June 12, 1945) was a magician and stunt performed, best known as Houdinis brother. ... Sidney Hollis Radner (born in 1919) is a retired rug salesman from Holyoke, Massachusetts, who owned one of the worlds largest and most valuable collections of Harry Houdini artifacts. ... For other uses, see Niagara Falls (disambiguation). ...


Radner archived the bulk of his collection at the Houdini Museum in Appleton Wisconsin, but pulled it in 2003 and auctioned it off in Las Vegas on October 30, 2004. Many of the choice props, including the restored Water Torture Cell, are now owned by David Copperfield.[35] is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... David Copperfield (born David Seth Kotkin on September 16, 1956) is an American magician and illusionist best known for his combination of illusions and storytelling. ...


Proposed exhumation

On March 22, 2007, around 80 years after Houdini died, his grandnephew George Hardeen announced that the courts would be asked to allow exhumation of Houdini's body. The purpose was to look for evidence that Houdini was poisoned by Spiritualists, as suggested in The Secret Life of Houdini.[36] In a statement given to the Houdini Museum in Scranton, Jeff Blood opposed the application and suggested it was a publicity ploy for the book. Blood is Houdini's grandnephew on his wife's side.[37] is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... By other animals Humans are not the only species to bury their dead. ...


Legacy

  • 1936 - On October 31, 1936, Houdini's widow held the "Final Houdini Seance" atop of the roof of The Knickerbocker Hotel in Hollywood, California. While Houdini did not come back, a sudden mysterious rain storm after the memorial candle had been extinguished led some press to speculate this was Houdini's way of signaling from beyond the grave. A recording of the séance was made and issued as a record album.
  • 1953 - Houdini, a mostly fictionalized biopic of Houdini's life, was made. This movie, starring Tony Curtis and Janet Leigh, has contributed, in part, to several misconceptions about Houdini's life. For example, it portrays the cause of Houdini's death to be the magician's failure to escape from the Chinese Water Torture Cell. (Curtis' Houdini agrees to seek medical attention "when the tour is over.")
  • 1968 - The Houdini Magical Hall of Fame was opened on Clifton Hill in Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada. At its opening, this museum contained the majority of Houdini's personal collection of magic paraphernalia. One of Houdini's death wishes was that his entire collection be given to his brother Theodore (also known as the magician Hardeen) and burned upon Theodore's death. Against his wishes, forty years after Houdini's death, the items were taken from storage and sold. Two entrepreneurs purchased the items and renovated a former meat-packing plant on Clifton Hill, Ontario, Canada, to house the museum. The Hall of Fame was moved in 1972 to its final location on the top of Clifton Hill. Séances were held every year at the museum on October 31, the anniversary of Houdini's death.
  • 1968 - Stuart Damon plays Houdini in a lavishly staged London musical, Man of Magic.
  • 1975 - Houdini received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. The star is located on the northwest corner of Hollywood Blvd. and Orange Drive, just across from the Grauman's Chinese Theater and down the street from The Magic Castle.
  • 1976 - Houdini was played by Paul Michael Glaser, of Starsky and Hutch fame, in a 1976 TV movie called The Great Houdinis (aka The Great Houdini), which was also highly fictionalized. The film focused on Houdini's relationship with his wife and mother, who were portrayed as frequently bickering (although, in reality, they had cordial relations) and on his fascination with life after death. The cast also included Sally Struthers, Bill Bixby, and Ruth Gordon.
  • 1977 - Poem "Ha! Ha! Houdini!" published by Patti Smith.
  • 1978 - Houdini was a key historical figure appearing in Ragtime the 1978 novel, the 1981 film, and the 1998 musical.
  • 1982 - The Kate Bush album The Dreaming includes a song inspired by Houdini and his wife.
  • 1985 - The City of Appleton, Wisconsin, constructed the Houdini Plaza on the site of the magician's childhood home.
  • 1985 - Wil Wheaton played Houdini in Young Harry Houdini, a made-for-TV movie that aired on ABC as a "Disney Sunday Movie." The film also featured Jeffrey DeMunn as the adult Houdini. DeMunn first played Houdini in the film version of Ragtime.[38]
  • 1989 - Canadian synth pop act Kon Kan release "Harry Houdini," the third single from the Move to Move album.
  • 1993 - Grunge rock band The Melvins released Houdini, their second album. In the band illustration, each band member is shown with six fingers (Houdini sometimes used a fake sixth finger to hide lock picks).
  • 1994 - Appears in Spawn issue #20 and serves as Spawn's mentor
  • 1996 - Australian Rock Band The Church released their album, Magician Among the Spirits, inspired by Houdini's life; the cover features a negative of a photograph of Houdini.
  • 1997 - Actor Harvey Keitel plays Houdini and Peter O'Toole Conan Doyle in the film FairyTale: A True Story, set during World War I and portraying the alleged photographing of live fairies by two English schoolgirls. The two are seen as collegial even though they disagree as to the validity of spiritualism.
  • 1998 - Ragtime, the Broadway musical version of the movie, premiered on January 18, 1998. It featured Houdini as a character and has a song called "Harry Houdini, Master Escapist." The book was written by Terrence McNally, with music and lyrics by Stephen Flaherty and Lynn Ahrens. The play ran on Broadway until January 16, 2000, and won four Tony Awards. Both the movie and the play are based on E.L. Doctorow's 1975 novel of the same title.
  • 1998 - Johnathon Schaech played Houdini in the TNT original movie Houdini. The film co-starred Stacy Edwards as Bess and Mark Ruffalo as his brother, Dash (aka Theo. Hardeen). The TV movie first aired on December 6, 1998.
  • 1999 - Novelist Norman Mailer played Houdini in the highly experimental film Cremaster 2, which told the story of murderer Gary Gilmore, who, in real life, claimed to be related to Houdini.[38]
  • 2001 - Houdini appears as a character in Glen David Gold's bestselling novel Carter Beats The Devil.
  • 2001 - The Houdini Seance is mounted as a theatrical piece in Chicago by Neil Tobin and becomes an annual Halloween event at Excalibur (nightclub).[39]
  • 2002 - The United States Postal Service issued a postage stamp with a replica of Houdini's favorite publicity poster on July 3, 2002.[40]
  • Penn and Teller make references to Houdini in their show Bullshit!. They are doing some of the same things that Houdini did: magic tricks and debunking claims of the supernatural.
  • There is a Houdini Museum in Scranton, Pennsylvania. It claims to be the only building in the world entirely dedicated to Houdini and is run by magicians Dick Brooks and Dorothy Dietrich. The museum also holds an annual Houdini séance.
  • While touring in the United States, Houdini met Joe Keaton and his family vaudeville act. It's said that after Joe's young son fell down a flight of stairs unscathed, Houdini remarked, "Your kid is quite the buster" (buster being a stage name for a fall) and gave a name to comedy legend Buster Keaton (the kid).
  • 2007 - Houdini - The Musical, a theatrical production based on the life of Houdini, premiered at The Playhouse, Weston-super-Mare before going on tour across the United Kingdom.[41] The show features many of Houdini's famous acts, including the Chinese Water Torture Cell.

is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Houdini is a 1953 biographical film about the life of the magician and escapologist Harry Houdini. ... For other persons named Tony Curtis, see Tony Curtis (disambiguation). ... Janet Leigh (July 6, 1927 – October 3, 2004), born Jeanette Helen Morrison, was an American actress. ... green is good This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Clifton Hill is a suburb of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. ... Skyline of Niagara Falls, Canada, as seen from Niagara Falls State Park across the river. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Stuart Damon (born Stuart Michael Zonis on February 5, 1937) is an American actor. ... Buskers perform on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... The tone of this article is inappropriate for an encyclopedia. ... Paul Michael Glaser (born March 25, 1943) is an American actor and director. ... For the film, see Starsky & Hutch (film). ... Highly fictionalized made-for-TV movie biography of Harry Houdini featuring TV stars Paul Michael Glaser (Startsky and Hutch) and Sally Struthers (All in the Family) and based on a novel by Melville Shavelson (who also directed the film). ... Harry Houdini (March 24, 1874 - October 31, 1926) was the stage name of Ehrich Weiss (born Weisz Erik in the native Hungarian), one of the most famous magicians, escapologists, and stunt performers of all time. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Ruth Gordon (October 30, 1896 – August 28, 1985) was an American actress and screenwriter who was perhaps best known for her role as the oversolicitous neighbor in Roman Polanskis adaptation of Ira Levins novel Rosemarys Baby, for which she won the 1968 Academy Award for Best Supporting... Patricia Lee (Patti) Smith (born December 30, 1946) is an American musician, singer, and poet. ... This article is about the 1975 novel. ... Ragtime is a 1981 motion picture based on the historical novel Ragtime by E. L. Doctorow. ... Ragtime is a musical with a book by Terrence McNally, lyrics by Lynn Ahrens, and music by Stephen Flaherty. ... Kate Bush (born 30 July 1958) is an English singer, songwriter, musician and record producer. ... The Dreaming is an original manga series created by Artist/Author Queenie Chan and published by TOKYOPOP. Jeanie and Amber Malkin - identical twin sisters - are new students at the 100-year-old Greenwich Private College, a boarding school in North Sydney that lies on the edge of vast, virgin bushlands. ... Appleton is a city in the U.S. state of Wisconsin, on the Fox River, 100 miles (161 km) north of Milwaukee. ... Richard William Wil Wheaton III (born July 29, 1972) is an American writer and actor. ... Jeffrey DeMunn (born April 25, 1947 in Buffalo, New York) is an American theatre, film and television actor. ... Main articles: History of Canada, Timeline of Canadian history Canada has been inhabited by aboriginal peoples (known in Canada as First Nations) for at least 40,000 years. ... Synth pop is a style of popular music in which the synthesizer is the dominant musical instrument. ... Kon Kan was a Canadian Synth Pop band which consisted of Barry Harris (vocals, keyboard, guitar) and Kevin Wynne (vocals) formed in the late 1980s in Toronto, Ontario. ... Move to Move is the debut album by Kon Kan, released in 1989. ... Grunge music (sometimes also referred to as the Seattle Sound) is an independent-rooted music genre that became a commercially successful offshoot of hardcore punk, thrash metal, and alternative rock in the late 1980s and early 1990s. ... The Melvins are an American rock band/ metal band that usually perform as a trio. ... Houdini is an album by Melvins, which was released in 1993 through Atlantic Records. ... The Church are an Australian rock band formed in Sydney in 1980. ... Magician Among the Spirits is a 1996 album by The Church. ... Harvey Keitel (born May 13, 1939) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor from New York City. ... Peter Seamus OToole (born August 2, 1932, uncertain but presumed correct date[1]) is an eight-time Academy Award-nominated Irish actor. ... Ragtime is a musical with a book by Terrence McNally, lyrics by Lynn Ahrens, and music by Stephen Flaherty. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Terrence McNally (born November 3, 1939), is an American playwright. ... Stephen Flaherty (born 1960) is an American composer of musical theatre in collaboration with Lynn Ahrens, and best known for the show Once On This Island, which was nominated for eight Tony Awards. ... Lynn Ahrens (born October 1, 1948) is an American musical theatre lyricist who most-frequently works with Stephen Flaherty. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... What is popularly called the Tony Award® but is formally the Antoinette Perry Award is an annual American award celebrating achievements in theater, including musical theater. ... Johnathon Schaech (born September 10, 1969 in Edgewood, Maryland) is an American actor, writer, director and producer. ... Stacy Edwards (born March 04, 1965 in Glasgow, Montana, USA)is an American actress. ... Mark Alan Ruffalo (born November 22, 1967) is an American actor. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Norman Kingsley Mailer (January 31, 1923 – November 10, 2007) was an American novelist, journalist, playwright, screenwriter, and film director. ... Glen David Gold is best known as the author of Carter Beats the Devil (Hyperion, 2001). ... Carter Beats the Devil is a 2001 novel by Glen David Gold that tells the fictionalized biography of early 20th Century stage magician Charles Joseph Carter. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Neil Tobin, Necromancer (publicity photo) Neil Tobin (b. ... The Excalibur nightclub in Chicago was first opened in 1989. ... USPS and Usps redirect here. ... A selection of Hong Kong postage stamps A postage stamp is evidence of pre-paying a fee for postal services. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Penn (left) & Teller Penn and Teller are a two-man magic and comedy team, comprised of Penn Jillette and Teller. ... Bullshit! (also known as Penn & Teller: Bullshit!) is an American, Emmy-nominated documentary television series, running since 2003 on the premium cable channel Showtime. ... Scranton redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Joseph Francis Kieran Keaton (October 4, 1895 – February 1, 1966) was an Academy Award-winning American silent film comic actor and filmmaker. ... The Playhouse is a 658-seat theatre in Weston-super-Mare, England that hosts opera, ballet, comedy, and pantomime performances. ... green is good This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ...

Publications

Houdini published numerous books during his career (some of which were written by his good friend Walter Brown Gibson, the creator of The Shadow [3]): Walter Brown Gibson (September 12, 1897-December 6, 1985) was an American author and a professional magician best known for his work on The Shadow. ... This article is about the fictional character. ...

  • The Right Way to Do Wrong (1906)
  • Handcuff Secrets (1907)
  • The Unmasking of Robert Houdin (1908)
  • Magical Rope Ties and Escapes (1920)
  • Miracle Mongers and their Methods (1920)
  • Houdini's Paper Magic (1921)
  • A Magician Among the Spirits (1924)
  • Under the Pyramids (1924) with H. P. Lovecraft.

Jean Eugène Robert-Houdin (Zhean Yuzhean Ro-bayr oo-da) (December 6, 1805 - June 13, 1871) was a French magician. ... Under the Pyramids, also known as Imprisoned with the Pharaohs, is a short story ghost-written by American horror fiction writer H. P. Lovecraft for escape artist Harry Houdini in February/March 1924. ... This article is about the author. ...

Biographies

  • Houdini: His Life-Story by Harold Kellock, from the recollections and documents of Beatrice Houdini, Harcourt, Brace Co., June, 1928
  • The Great Houdini: Magician Extraordinary by Beryl Williams & Samuel Epstein, Julian Messner, Inc., NY, 1950
  • Houdini: The Man Who Walked Through Walls by William Lindsay Gresham, Henry Holt & Co, NY, 1959
  • Houdini: Master of Escape by Lance Kendall, Macrae Smith & Co., NY, 1960
  • Houdini: The Untold Story by Milbourne Christopher, Thomas Y. Crowell Co, 1969
  • Houdini: A Mind in Chains by Bernard C. Meyer, M.D., E.P. Dutton & Co. NY, 1976
  • Houdini: His Life and Art by James Randi & Bert Randolph Sugar, Grosset & Dunlap, NY, 1977
  • Houdini: His Legend and His Magic by Doug Henning with Charles Reynolds, Times Books, NY, 1978
  • The Life and Many Deaths of Harry Houdini by Ruth Brandon, Seeker & Warburg, Ltd. GB, 1993
  • Houdini!!!: The Career of Ehrich Weiss by Kenneth Silverman, 1996 ISBN 006092862X
  • The Secret Life of Houdini: The Making of America's First Superhero by William Kalush and Larry Sloman, 2006 ISBN 0743272072
  • Escape! The Story of The Great Houdini, by Sid Fleischman, Greenwillow Books, 2006.

William Lindsay Gresham. ... Milbourne Christopher (1914 - 1984) was one of Americas foremost illusionists, performing in sixty-eight countries. ... James Randi (born August 7, 1928), stage name The Amazing Randi, is a stage magician and scientific skeptic best known as a challenger of paranormal claims and pseudoscience. ... Doug James Henning (born May 3, 1947 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, died February 7, 2000 of liver disease) was a Canadian magician, illusionist, and escape artist. ... The Life and Times of Cotton Mather, by Kenneth Silverman. ...

Further reading

  • Houdini's Escapes and Magic by Walter B. Gibson, Prepared from Houdini’s private notebooks Blue Ribbon Books, Inc., 1930. Reveals some of Houdini's magic and escape methods (also released in two separate volumes: Houdini's Magic and Houdini's Escapes).
  • The Secrets of Houdini by J.C. Cannell, Hutchinson & Co., London, 1931. Reveals some of Houdini's escape methods.
  • Houdini and Conan Doyle: The Story of a Strange Friendship by Bernard M. L. Ernst, Albert & Charles Boni, Inc., NY, 1932.
  • Sixty Years of Psychical Research by Joseph F. Rinn, Truth Seeker Co., 1950, Rinn was a long time close friend of Houdini. Contains detailed information about the last Houdini message (there are 3) and its disclosure.
  • Houdini's Fabulous Magic by Walter B. Gibson and Morris N. Young Chilton, NY, 1960. Excellent reference for Houdini’s escapes and some methods (includes the Water Torture Cell).
  • The Houdini Birth Research Committee’s Report, Magico Magazine (reprint of report by The Society of American Magicians), 1972. Concludes Houdini was born March 24, 1874 in Budapest.
  • Mediums, Mystics and the Occult by Milbourne Christopher, Thomas T. Crowell Co., 1975, pp 122-145, Arthur Ford-Messages from the Dead, contains detailed information about the Houdini messages and their disclosure.
  • Arthur Ford: The Man Who Talked with the Dead by Allen Spraggett with William V. Rauscher, 1973, pp 152-165, Chapter 7, The Houdini Affair contains detailed information about the Houdini messages and their disclosure.
  • Houdini: Escape into Legend, The Early Years: 1862-1900 by Manny Weltman, Finders/Seekers Enterprises, Los Angeles, 1993. Examination of Houdini’s childhood and early career.
  • Houdini Comes To America by Ronald J. Hilgert, The Houdini Historical Center, 1996. Documents the Weiss family’s immigration to the United States on July 3, 1878 (when Ehrich was 4).
  • Houdini Unlocked by Patrick Culliton, Two volume box set: The Tao of Houdini and The Secret Confessions of Houdini, Kieran Press, 1997.
  • The Houdini Code Mystery: A Spirit Secret Solved by William V. Rauscher, Magic Words, 2000.
  • The Man Who Killed Houdini by Don Bell, Vehicule Press, 2004. Investigates J. Gordon Whitehead and the events surrounding Houdini's death.

Walter Brown Gibson (September 12, 1897-December 6, 1985) was an American author and a professional magician best known for his work on The Shadow. ... Walter Brown Gibson (September 12, 1897-December 6, 1985) was an American author and a professional magician best known for his work on The Shadow. ... Milbourne Christopher (1914 - 1984) was one of Americas foremost illusionists, performing in sixty-eight countries. ...

See also

Arthur Ford (January 8, 1896 – January 4, 1971) was an American psychic spiritual medium, clairaudient and in 1955 founded the Spiritual Frontiers Fellowship. ... James Randi (born August 7, 1928), stage name The Amazing Randi, is a stage magician and scientific skeptic best known as a challenger of paranormal claims and pseudoscience. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Joseph Dunninger (April 28, 1892- March 9, 1975), known as The Amazing Dunninger was one of the most famous and proficient mentalists of all time. ... Dai Vernon (11 June 1894 – August 21, 1992) was a Canadian magician. ... Cover Art by Bob Aul & W Bosley Wonder of the Worlds by Sesh Heri, published 2005 by Lost Continent Library, is the first in a trilogy of novels featuring secret agent Harry Houdini facing off against a Martian invasion in the late 19th and early 20th Centuries. ... David Copperfield is a quasi-autobiographical novel by Charles Dickens. ...

External links

Point of Inquiry is a podcast produced by the Center for Inquiry (CFI). ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The front entrance to the History Museum at the Castle, located in Appleton, WI The History Museum at the Castle is located in downtown Appleton, WI across College Avenue from Lawrence University. ...

References

  1. ^ The Houdini Birth Research Committee's Report Reproduction of Houdini's birth certificate on page 4. Also see Houdini!!! The Career of Ehrich Weiss by Ken Silverman, page 8.
  2. ^ The Orignal Houdini Scrapbook by Walter B. Gibson, reproduction of a 1901 Will doubled singed as Harry Houdini and Ehrich Weiss, page 178.
  3. ^ Houdini as a Young Man
  4. ^ "Hardeen Dead, 69. Houdini's Brother. Illusionist, Escape Artist, a Founder of Magician's Guild. Gave Last Show May 29.", New York Times, June 13, 1945, Wednesday. Retrieved on 2007-08-21. "Theodore Hardeen, a brother of the late Harry Houdini, illusionist and a prominent magician in his own right, died yesterday in the Doctors Hospital. His age was 69." 
  5. ^ US National Archives Microfilm serial: M237; Microfilm roll: 413; Line: 38; List number: 684
  6. ^ 1880 US Census with Saml M. Weiss, Cecelia (wife), Armin M., Nathan J., Ehrich, Theodore, and Leopold.
  7. ^ Houdini!!!: The Career of Ehrich Weiss by Kenneth Silverman, 1996, page 81
  8. ^ Houdini!!!: The Career of Ehrich Weiss by Kenneth Silverman, 1996, page 109
  9. ^ The Secret Life of Houdini: The Making of America's First Superhero by William Kalush and Larry Sloman, 2006
  10. ^ Houdini's Mirror Handcuff Challenge, Getting Closer to the Truth by Mick Hanzlik, 2007, reproduction in full of Daily Mirror article "Houdini's Great Victory" March 18, 1904.
  11. ^ Houdini!!!: The Career of Ehrich Weiss by Kenneth Silverman, 1996, pages 59-62
  12. ^ Houdini: His Life and Art by James Randi and Bert Sugar, 1976, pages 175 to 178
  13. ^ Houdini: His Life and Art by James Randi and Bert Sugar, 1976, Milk Can poster on page 177
  14. ^ Houdini A Pictorial Life by Milbourne Chritophern, 1976, page 54
  15. ^ Houdini!!!: The Career of Ehrich Weiss by Kenneth Silverman, 1997, pages162-165
  16. ^ Houdini!!!: The Career of Ehrich Weiss by Kenneth Silverman, 1996, pages 137-154
  17. ^ Houdini!!!: The Career of Ehrich Weiss by Kenneth Silverman, 1996, pages 205
  18. ^ Houdini!!!: The Career of Ehrich Weiss by Kenneth Silverman, 1996, pages 226-249
  19. ^ Haldane wows at LA screening. Retrieved on January 12, 2007.
  20. ^ Houdini’s silent movies coming to DVD. Retrieved on January 18, 2008.
  21. ^ Notes to Houdini and the ghost of Abraham Lincoln, Library of Congress; last accessed October 3, 2007.
  22. ^ Arthur Ford: The Man Who Talked with the Dead, by Allen Spraggett with William V. Rauscher, New American Library, 1974
  23. ^ Mediums, Mystics and the Occult by Milbourne Christopher, Thomas T. Crowell Co., 1975, pp. 132 & 133
  24. ^ Houdini: The Untold Story, Thomas Y. Crowell Co., 1969, page 258
  25. ^ The Man Who did Houdini by Don Bell, Vehicule Press, 2004.
  26. ^ Urban Legends Reference Pages: Death of Houdini
  27. ^ Benoit, Tod (May 2003). Where Are They Buried? How Did They Die?. Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers, 469. ISBN 1-57912-287-6. 
  28. ^ Colin Groves in Skeptical - a Handbook of Pseudoscience and the Paranormal, ed Donald Laycock, David Vernon, Colin Groves, Simon Brown, Imagecraft, Canberra, 1989, ISBN 0731657942, p16
  29. ^ Arthur Ford: The Man Who Talked with the Dead, by Allen Spraggett with William V. Rauscher, New American Library, 1974
  30. ^ Houdini Facts from the History Museum at the Castle
  31. ^ Houdini!!!: The Career of Ehrich Weiss by Kenneth Silverman, 1996, pages 31
  32. ^ Houdini Up To Old Tricks Through Magic of Edison, Los Angeles Times, July 4, 1970
  33. ^ "In Sadness, Prime Houdini Artifact Collector Puts Items on Auction Block", New York Times, October 29, 2004. Retrieved on 2007-02-14. "... Mr. Radner, aka Rendar the Magician, owns one of the world's biggest and most valuable collections of Harry Houdini artifacts, including the Chinese Water Torture Cell, one of Houdini's signature props from 1912 until his death in 1926. Most of the items were given to Mr. Radner in the 1940's by Houdini's brother, another escape artist who went by the stage name Hardeen. Hardeen considered Mr. Radner, then a student at Yale with a reputation for jumping from diving boards in handcuffs, as his protégé. Until early this year, the collection was on display at the Outagamie Museum in Appleton, Wis., where Houdini's father was the town rabbi in the 1870's. But after a rancorous falling out between Mr. Radner and museum officials, the 1,000-piece collection was packed up and shipped here, where it will be auctioned on Saturday in the windowless back room at the Liberace Museum and on eBay. ..." 
  34. ^ The Mystery of the Two Torture Cells. Houdini Lives!. Retrieved on 2007-05-14.
  35. ^ houdini auction
  36. ^ Grandnephew seeks to 'set record straight' about Houdini's death. Retrieved on March 23, 2007.
  37. ^ Family Statement re: exhumation. Retrieved on March 26, 2007.
  38. ^ a b The Great Escape: Hollywood's Struggle to Bring Houdini Back to Life by John Cox, MAGIC Magazine, October 2006
  39. ^ HOUDINI'S HALLOWEEN | Morning News | WGNTV.com | WGN TV | Chicago's CW
  40. ^ USPS Press Release (October 31, 2001) Harry Houdini Returns To World Stage, usps.com
  41. ^ Houdini - The Musical. Smile Productions Ltd. Retrieved on 2007-06-06.
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Persondata
NAME Houdini, Harry
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Weiss, Ehrich (birth name); Weisz, Ehrich (birth name, alternate spelling)
SHORT DESCRIPTION magician, escapologist, and stunt performer
DATE OF BIRTH March 24, 1874
PLACE OF BIRTH Budapest, Hungary
DATE OF DEATH October 31, 1926
PLACE OF DEATH Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1880 US Census The United States Census of 1880 was the tenth United States Census. ... The Life and Times of Cotton Mather, by Kenneth Silverman. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Milbourne Christopher (1914 - 1984) was one of Americas foremost illusionists, performing in sixty-eight countries. ... The Where Are They Buried? How Did They Die? is a browsable guide to more than 500 profiles of the lives, deaths, and final resting places of memorable figures from sports, music, film, television, literature, and politics. ... ... Dr Donald Don Laycock, was a graduate of Newcastle University, NSW, Australia and later worked as a researcher at Adelaide University in Anthropology. ... David Vernon is an Australian writer. ... Dr Colin Groves is a Professor of Biological Anthropology at the Australian National University in Canberra, Australia. ... he is quite poor ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... “Illusionist” redirects here. ... This article is about the study of escapology. ... Stunt man and stunt woman redirect here. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Detroit redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American...

  Results from FactBites:
 
SPECTRUM Biographies - Harry Houdini (794 words)
Houdini was constantly improving his act and incorporating new tricks.
Houdini was soon escaping from numerous devices, including leg irons, coffins, straitjackets, and prison cells.
Houdini's act generated the interest of Martin Beck who ran the Orpheum circuit, the largest chain of vaudeville theaters in the country.
Harry Houdini - Biography (2765 words)
Houdini was very close to his mother, and her death in 1913 was the greatest tragedy of his life.
Houdini admitted that it was true and, despite his weakened state due to his injury and lack of sleep, gave the student permission to test him.
Houdini began to rise from the couch where he was seated, but before he had time to tighten his abdomen muscles, the student punched him three times in the stomach.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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