FACTOID # 28: Austin, Texas has more people than Alaska.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Harry Heilmann
Harry Heilmann
Outfielder/First Baseman
Born: August 3, 1894
Died: July 9, 1951 (aged 56)
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
May 16, 1914
for the Detroit Tigers
Final game
May 31, 1932
for the Cincinnati Reds
Career statistics
Batting average     .342
Home runs     183
Runs batted in     1539
Teams
Career highlights and awards
  • American League Batting Champion (1921, 1923, 1925, 1927)
  • Four 200-hit seasons
  • Career batting average (.342) 12th in Major League history
Member of the National
Baseball Hall of Fame
Elected     1952
Vote     86.8% (fourth ballot)

Harry Edwin Heilmann (August 3, 1894July 9, 1951), nicknamed “Slug,” was a Major League Baseball player who played 17 season with the Detroit Tigers (1914, 1916-1929) and Cincinnati Reds (1930, 1932). Heilmann was a line-driver hitter who won four American League batting crowns in 1921, 1923, 1925, and 1927. He and Ted Williams are the last two American League players to hit .400, Heilmann having accomplished the feat in 1923 with a batting average of .403. Heilmann’s career batting average of .342 is the 12th highest in Major League history. [1]. Heilmann was also an excellent slugger, ranking among the American League leaders in both slugging percentage and RBIs in 12 seasons. He is among the all-time Major League leaders in doubles with 542 (23rd all-time), triples with 151 (49th all-time) and RBIs with 1,539 (39th all-time). Heilmann played in 2,148 Major League games, including 1,518 as a right fielder and 448 as a first baseman. Heilmann was also the first player to hit a home run in every Major League ballpark in use during his career. Heilmann was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1952. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Austin Kearns, an outfielder, catches a fly ball. ... The position of the first baseman First base redirects here. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... May 16 is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 5, 6, 16, 23, 42 Name Detroit Tigers (1901–present) Other nicknames The Bless You Boys Ballpark Comerica Park (2000–present) Tiger Stadium (1912-1999) Briggs Stadium (1938-1960) Navin Field (1912-1938) Bennett... May 31 is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Ballpark Great American Ball Park (2003–present) Riverfront... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... In baseball, a home run is a base hit in which the batter is able to circle all the bases, ending at home plate and scoring a run, with no errors on the play that result in the batter achieving extra bases. ... In baseball statistics, a run batted in (RBI) is given to a batter for each run scored as the result of a batters plate appearance. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 5, 6, 16, 23, 42 Name Detroit Tigers (1901–present) Other nicknames The Bless You Boys Ballpark Comerica Park (2000–present) Tiger Stadium (1912-1999) Briggs Stadium (1938-1960) Navin Field (1912-1938) Bennett... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Ballpark Great American Ball Park (2003–present) Riverfront... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The following are the events of the year 1952 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 5, 6, 16, 23, 42 Name Detroit Tigers (1901–present) Other nicknames The Bless You Boys Ballpark Comerica Park (2000–present) Tiger Stadium (1912-1999) Briggs Stadium (1938-1960) Navin Field (1912-1938) Bennett... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Ballpark Great American Ball Park (2003–present) Riverfront... American League The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), best known as Ted Williams, nicknamed The Kid, the Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame and The Thumper, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball. ... American League The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... American League The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... In baseball statistics, slugging average (SLG) is a measure of the power of a hitter. ... RBI is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, including Reserve Bank of India Run batted in, in baseball Radio Berlin International This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The term doubles as used in sports like tennis and badminton refers to games with two players on each side. ... Change ringing is the art of ringing a set of tuned bells in a series of mathematical patterns called changes, without attempting to ring a conventional tune. ... RBI is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, including Reserve Bank of India Run batted in, in baseball Radio Berlin International This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The position of the right fielder A right fielder, abbreviated RF, is the outfielder in baseball who plays defense in right field (e. ... The position of the first baseman First base redirects here. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related...

Contents

Early Years: 1913-1920

Born in San Francisco, California, Heilmann attended Sacred Heart High School, the same school that Joe Cronin attended. [2] In 1913, the 19-year-old Heilmann was working as a bookkeeper for a biscuit-maker, when a former teammate from Sacred Heart asked him to fill in for the Hanford, California team in the San Joaquin Valley League. After a scout saw him hit an 11th-inning, game-winning double, Heilmann was signed to a professional contract by the Portland Beavers of the Northwest League. [3] [4] Heilmann later recalled he received a spaghetti dinner as a bonus for signing with Portland. [5] After he hit .305 for the Portland Beavers [6], his contract was purchased by the Detroit Tigers for $1,500. Nickname: Location of the City and County of San Francisco, California Coordinates: , Country United States of America State California City-County San Francisco Government  - Mayor Gavin Newsom Area  - City  47 sq mi (122 km²)  - Land  46. ... Sacred Heart Cathedral Preparatory, commonly known as SH, SHC, or SHCP is a Catholic school in San Francisco, California. ... Joe Cronin Joseph Edward Cronin (October 12, 1906 – September 7, 1984) was a Major League Baseball player from 1926 to 1945 and manager from 1933 to 1947. ... Hanford is the county seat of Kings County, California. ... The San Joaquin Valley League was a minor league baseball league that operated from 1910 through 1911. ... League Pacific Coast League Division Pacific Conference, Northern Division Year founded 1903 Major League affiliation San Diego Padres Home ballpark PGE Park Previous home ballparks City Portland, Oregon Current uniform colors black, red, gold Previous uniform colors Logo design Script P on cap; winking beaver wearing Portland cap, alternate Division... The Northwest League is a class A minor league. ... League Pacific Coast League Division Pacific Conference, Northern Division Year founded 1903 Major League affiliation San Diego Padres Home ballpark PGE Park Previous home ballparks City Portland, Oregon Current uniform colors black, red, gold Previous uniform colors Logo design Script P on cap; winking beaver wearing Portland cap, alternate Division... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 5, 6, 16, 23, 42 Name Detroit Tigers (1901–present) Other nicknames The Bless You Boys Ballpark Comerica Park (2000–present) Tiger Stadium (1912-1999) Briggs Stadium (1938-1960) Navin Field (1912-1938) Bennett...

Heilmann debuted with the Tigers on May 16, 1914, and played in 69 games that year, batting .225 and committing 6 errors in 31 games in the outfield (28 in center field) for a subpar .870 fielding percentage. For the 1915 season, the Tigers sent Heilmann to the San Francisco Seals of the Pacific Coast League. In 1915, Heilmann and fellow San Francisco native Ping Bodie (later a star with the Chicago White Sox and New York Yankees) led the Seals to their second Pacific Coast League title, with Heilmann hitting .364. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 403 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 892 pixel, file size: 139 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photograph of Harry Heilmann while playing with the San Francisco Seals, 1915 This image is in the public domain in the United States. ... In baseball statistics, fielding percentage, also known as fielding average, is a measure that reflects the percentage of times a defensive player handles a batted ball properly. ... The term San Francisco Seals can refer to any of three defunct professional sports teams based in San Francisco, California: The San Francisco Seals, a minor league baseball team which played in baseballs Pacific Coast League from 1903-1957. ... The Pacific Coast League (PCL) is a minor league baseball league operating in the West and Midwest of the United States. ... Ping Bodie on a 1912 American Tobacco Company baseball card (Brown Backgrounds (T207-018)   Frank Stephen (Ping) Bodie, born Francesco Stephano Pezzolo (October 8, 1887 - December 17, 1961), was a center fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Chicago White Sox (1911-1914), Philadelphia Athletics (1917) and New... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... The Pacific Coast League (PCL) is a minor league baseball league operating in the West and Midwest of the United States. ...


Heilmann returned to the Tigers in 1916, playing in 136 games, including 30 games at first base and 66 games as a backup right fielder for Sam Crawford. Though his .282 batting average was low by the standards he would set later, Heilman ranked among the American League leaders with 30 doubles (7th best), 73 RBIs (7th best), and 43 Extra Base Hits (8th best). Heilmann also became a favorite in Detroit for his actions off the field. On July 25, 1916, Heilmann spotted a woman drowning in the Detroit River. He dove into the river and was credited with saving the woman’s life. After the incident was reported in the local press, Heilmann was given an ovation at the next day’s game [7] In 1917, Heilmann continued to improve as a batter, once again ranking among the American League leaders with 86 RBIs (4th best), 5 Home Runs (7th best), and 11 triples (8th best). However, Heilmann, who earned the nickname “Slug” due to his notoriously slow running, had difficulties as a fielder. In 1917, the Tigers tried playing him in right field (95 games), center field (28 games), and first base (27 games), but he was not particularly good at any of those positions. The position of the right fielder A right fielder, abbreviated RF, is the outfielder in baseball who plays defense in right field (e. ... Sam Crawfords 1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card. ... American League The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... Landsat satellite photo, showing Lake Saint Clair, as well as St. ... RBI is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, including Reserve Bank of India Run batted in, in baseball Radio Berlin International This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Mark McGwire swinging for the fences. ... The position of the right fielder A right fielder, abbreviated RF, is the outfielder in baseball who plays defense in right field (e. ... The position of the center fielder A center fielder, abbreviated CF, is the outfielder in baseball who plays defense in center field - the baseball fielding position between left field and right field (e. ... The position of the first baseman First base, or 1B, is the first of four stations on a baseball diamond which must be touched in succession by a base runner in order to score a run for that players team. ...


In 1918, with the United States at war against Germany, Heilman joined the U.S. Navy and served on a submarine, causing him to miss half of the 1918 season. [8] Heilmann played in only 79 games in 1918, splitting his time between right field (40 games) and first base (37 games). Alvin in 1978, a year after first exploring hydrothermal vents. ...


Heilmann returned to the lineup in 1919 and had his best season to date, ranking among the American League leaders with a .320 batting average (10th best), .477 slugging percentage (7th best), 93 RBIs (4th best), 53 extra base hits (4th best), 15 triples (2nd best), 256 total bases (5th best), 172 hits (6th best), and 8 home runs (8th best). Heilmann had another strong year at the plate in 1920 with a .309 average, 41 extra base hits, and 89 RBIs. However, the 1919 and 1920 seasons also highlighted Heilmann’s shortcomings as a fielder. Detroit manager Hughie Jennings used Heilmann as the Tigers’ starting first baseman, and he led the league in errors by a first baseman both years, including 31 in 1919 for a .979 fielding percentage. American League The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... In baseball statistics, slugging average (SLG) is a measure of the power of a hitter. ... RBI is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, including Reserve Bank of India Run batted in, in baseball Radio Berlin International This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Mark McGwire swinging for the fences. ... RBI is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, including Reserve Bank of India Run batted in, in baseball Radio Berlin International This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Hughie Jennings on a 1909-1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card (White Borders (T206)). Hugh Ambrose Jennings (April 2, 1869 - February 1, 1928) was an American baseball player and manager in Major League Baseball. ... The position of the first baseman First base redirects here. ... The position of the first baseman First base redirects here. ... In baseball statistics, fielding percentage, also known as fielding average, is a measure that reflects the percentage of times a defensive player handles a batted ball properly. ...


Heilmann’s First Batting Title: 1921

Although Heilmann was a good hitter in his first six years, he did not become a great hitter until 1921. In his first six seasons, Heilmann batted .291. The “lively ball” era that started in 1920 certainly played a part in Heimann’s batting in the 1920s. As the lively ball forced outfielders to spread out and play deeper, the line-drive hitting Heilmann took advantage of the gaps that were created.


In addition to the lively ball, Heilmann’s development into a star in the 1920s was likely also influenced by Ty Cobb. Cobb took over as the Tigers’ manager in 1921 and worked closely with Heilmann to improve his batting technique. Cobb taught Heilmann to crouch more, use his wrists to drive the ball and shift his weight to his front foot. Whether due to the lively ball, Cobb’s teaching, or both, Heilmann’s batting average rose by 85 points in 1921. Heilmann won his first of four American League batting crowns with a .394 average. Ironically, Heilmann narrowly won the batting crown, edging his teammate and batting coach, Cobb, by five points. Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player. ...

Though primarily a line-drive hitter, Heilmann could also hit with power. He was among the American League leaders in home runs 11 times. On July 8, 1921, Heilmann hit a home run in Detroit that the New York Tribune reported measured 610 feet –one of the longest home runs ever hit by a Tiger. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... American League The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... Mark McGwire swinging for the fences. ... The New York Tribune building - today the site of Pace Universitys building complex of One Pace Plaza in New York City The New York Tribune was established by Horace Greeley in 1841 and was long considered one of the leading newspapers in the United States. ...


In addition to winning the batting crown, Heilmann also led the league with 237 hits and was among the league leaders with a .444 on base percentage (3rd best), .606 slugging percentage (2nd best), 365 total bases (2nd best), 43 doubles (3rd best), 139 RBIs (2nd best), and 76 extra base hits (3rd best). In baseball statistics, on base percentage (OBP) (sometimes referred to as on base average (OBA)) is a measure of how often a batter gets to first base for any reason other than a fielding error or a fielders choice. ... In baseball statistics, slugging average (SLG) is a measure of the power of a hitter. ... RBI is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, including Reserve Bank of India Run batted in, in baseball Radio Berlin International This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


The entire Detroit Tigers lineup had a remarkable season at the plate in 1921. In addition to Heilmann and Cobb’s 1-2 finish for the batting title, Detroit’s third outfielder, Bobby Veach, was also among the league’s batting leaders with a .338 average. The 1921 Tigers finished the season with a team batting average of .316 – the highest in American League history. Perhaps proving the baseball adage that good pitching beats good hitting, the 1921 Tigers lacked good pitching and finished in 6th place, 27 games behind the Yankees. Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 5, 6, 16, 23, 42 Name Detroit Tigers (1901–present) Other nicknames The Bless You Boys Ballpark Comerica Park (2000–present) Tiger Stadium (1912-1999) Briggs Stadium (1938-1960) Navin Field (1912-1938) Bennett... Robert Hayes Bobby Veach (June 29, 1888 - August 7, 1945) was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball, primarily with the Detroit Tigers. ...


Heilman Wins Three More Batting Titles: 1922-1927

Heilmann broke his collarbone in 1922, but still managed to hit .356 (4th in the AL) with a .432 on base percentage (5th best) and a .598 slugging percentage (4th best). And despite missing more than a month with the broken collarbone, Heilmann hit a career-high 21 home runs – 4th best in the league, ... ... Mark McGwire swinging for the fences. ...


Heilmann strung together twelve consecutive seasons of hitting at least .300, and was in the top ten in batting average ten times. In 1923, Heilmann won his second batting title, hitting .403 for the season, edging out Babe Ruth who hit .393. It was the second time Detroit’s batters had denied Ruth a triple crown. Ruth led the league in home runs and RBIs in both 1921 and 1923 but was edged out both years by Cobb and/or Heilmann. In 1926, another Tiger hitter, Heinie Manush, won the batting title to deny Ruth the triple crown yet again. Detroit manager, and Ruth rival, Ty Cobb, reportedly delighted in the fact that his batters three times denied Ruth of a triple crown. Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... For the band, see Babe Ruth (band). ... The term Triple Crown is used in several distinct contexts. ... Henry Emmett Manush (July 20, 1901 - May 12, 1971) was a Major League Baseball player. ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player. ...


In addition to winning the 1923 batting crown, Heilmann had one of his best seasons as a slugger. He finished 2nd to Ruth in on base percentage (.481) and slugging percentage (.632). He was also among the Top 5 with 121 runs (4th), 211 hits (3rd), 331 total bases (4th), 44 doubles (4th), 18 home runs (3rd), 115 RBIs (3rd), and 73 extra base hits (4th). Despite breaking the .400 mark, Heilmann finished 3rd in the 1923 American League Most Valuable Player voting behind Babe Ruth and Eddie Collins. For the band, see Babe Ruth (band). ... Edward Trowbridge Collins Sr. ...


Heilmann worked as a life insurance agent during the off-season in the 1920s. On October 16, 1923, after Babe Ruth received his World Series winner's share‚ Heilmann‚ who was friends with Ruth despite having beaten him for the batting title‚ sold Ruth a $50‚000 life insurance policy. Life insurance or life assurance is a contract between the policy owner and the insurer, where the insurer agrees to pay a sum of money upon the occurrence of the policy owners death. ... For the band, see Babe Ruth (band). ...


In 1924, Heilmann “slumped” (by his standards) to a .346 batting average (6th best in the AL), though his .445 on base percentage was 2nd best in the league. He also led the league with 41 doubles and had another 100-pluse RBI season. Heilmann had his best defensive season in 1924, collecting 31 outfield assists, more than any other outfielder that year. Heilmann never had more than 18 outfield assists in any other season.


In 1925, Heilmann won his third batting title, this time in a close race with Tris Speaker. At the beginning of September, Heilmann reportedly trailed Speaker by 50 points, but beat speaker in the closing weeks. With a few games to go, Heilmann refused to come out of the lineup, and won the title .393 to .389. Again, Heilmann was among the leaders in most offensive categories, with 134 RBIs (2nd best), a .457 on base percentage (4th best), .569 slugging percentage (5th best), 225 hits (3rd best), and 326 total bases (4th best). Despite Heilmann’s third batting title, the American League MVP award went to Roger Peckinpaugh, whose batting average was almost 100 points below Heilmann’s, and who had 70 fewer RBIs and 40 fewer extra base hits than Heilmann. Tristram E. Speaker (April 4, 1888 in Hubbard, Texas - December 8, 1958 in Lake Whitney, Texas), nicknamed “Spoke” (a play on his last name) and “Grey Eagle” (for his prematurely graying hair), was an American baseball player known as one of the best offensive and defensive center fielders in history. ... Roger Peckinpaugh Roger Thorpe Peckinpaugh (February 5, 1891 - November 17, 1977) was an American shortstop in Major League Baseball for the Cleveland Indians (1910-1913), New York Yankees (1910-1921), Washington Senators (1922-1926) and Chicago White Sox (1927). ...


In 1926, Detroit’s outfielders took three of the top four spots in the batting race, with center fielder Heinie Manush wining the batting crown at .378, and Heilmann and left fielder Bob Fothergill both hitting .367. Heilmann’s .445 on base percentage was 2nd best in the American League, and he once again hit more than 100 RBIs, finishing 5th in the American League MVP voting. Henry Emmett Manush (July 20, 1901 - May 12, 1971) was a Major League Baseball player. ... Robert Roy Fothergill (b. ...


In 1927, Heilmann won his fourth batting crown, batting .398 and missing the .400 mark by just two hits. The 1927 batting title was decided in another close race, this one pitting Heilmann against Al Simmons. Heilmann trailed Simmons by one point going into the last day of the 1927 season. In a doubleheader at Cleveland, Heilmann had four hits in the first game, and three in the second, finishing at .398 - six points above Simmons. Heilmann also finished the 1927 season near the top in most offensive categories with a .475 on base percentage (2nd best), 120 RBIs (3rd best), 201 hits (3rd best), 50 doubles (3rd best), 73 extra base hits (3rd best), .616 slugging percentage (4th best), 311 total bases (.4th best), and 106 runs (5th best). Despite winning a fourth batting title, Heilmann still finished second in the MVP voting, this time behind Lou Gehrig. Aloysius Harry Simmons (May 22, 1902 - May 26, 1956), born Aloysius Szymański in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was an American player in Major League Baseball over three decades. ... Henry Louis (Lou) Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig, was an American baseball player in the first half of the twentieth century. ...


Through the 1920’s Heilmann led all American League batters with a .364 average. His .558 slugging percentage was topped only by Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, and Al Simmons. For the decade, Heilmann averaged 220 hits, 110 runs, 45 doubles, 12 triples, 16 homers, and 130 RBI per 154 games. For the band, see Babe Ruth (band). ... Henry Louis (Lou) Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig, was an American baseball player in the first half of the twentieth century. ... Aloysius Harry Simmons (May 22, 1902 - May 26, 1956), born Aloysius SzymaÅ„ski in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, was an American player in Major League Baseball over three decades. ...


When a reporter pointed out that he had won batting titles every other year from 1921 to 1927, Heilmann replied: “Mr. Navin gives me contracts on a two-year basis. I always bear down real hard when a new contract is coming up.” [9]


Heilmann’s Final Years in the Major Leagues: 1928-1932

Heilmann’s batting average dropped off somewhat in 1928 (.328) and 1929 (.344), though he was still among the league leaders in batting average both years. Even with arthritis in his wrists bothering him in 1929, Heilmann managed to hit .344 with 63 extra base hits and 120 RBIs. Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... Arthritis (from Greek arthro-, joint + -itis, inflammation; plural: arthritides) is a group of conditions where there is damage caused to the joints of the body. ... RBI is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, including Reserve Bank of India Run batted in, in baseball Radio Berlin International This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


In October, 1929, the Tigers sold Heilmann to the Cincinnati Reds. Despite continuing difficulty with arthritis in his writs, Heilmann hit .333 for the Reds in 1930 with 68 extra base hits, 19 home runs, and 91 RBIs. While playing with the Reds, Heilmann became the first player to hit a home run in every major league park used during his career. Ailing with arthritis, Heilmann did not play in 1931. He attempted a brief comeback in 1932, but appeared in only 15 games for the Reds. Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 5, 8, 10, 13, 18, 20, 24, 42 Name Cincinnati Reds (1958–present) Cincinnati Redlegs (1953-1958) Cincinnati Reds (1882-1953) Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876-1882) Ballpark Great American Ball Park (2003–present) Riverfront... Arthritis (from Greek arthro-, joint + -itis, inflammation; plural: arthritides) is a group of conditions where there is damage caused to the joints of the body. ... Mark McGwire swinging for the fences. ... RBI is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings, including Reserve Bank of India Run batted in, in baseball Radio Berlin International This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Mark McGwire swinging for the fences. ... Arthritis (from Greek arthro-, joint + -itis, inflammation; plural: arthritides) is a group of conditions where there is damage caused to the joints of the body. ...


Heilmann retired for good in 1932 with career totals of 2,660 hits (No. 62 in MLB history), 542 doubles (No. 23 in MLB history), 151 triples (No. 49 in MLB history), 1,539 runs batted in (No. 39 in MLB history), 876 extra base hits (No. 57 in MLB history). His .342 batting average is still second only to Rogers Hornsby among right-handed hitters. In 1994, Ted Williams rated Heilmann as one of the top 5 right handed hitters [10] and the 17th best overall hitter of all time. [11] Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... Rogers Hornsby (April 27, 1896 in Winters, Texas - January 5, 1963 in Chicago, Illinois), nicknamed The Rajah, was a Major League Baseball second baseman and manager. ... Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), best known as Ted Williams, nicknamed The Kid, the Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame and The Thumper, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball. ...


Life After Baseball and the Hall of Fame

From 1934 to 1950, Heilmann worked as a play-by-play announcer during Tigers radio broadcasts. Heilmann was popular as a broadcaster for his humor, knowledge of the game, and story-telling talent. His broadcasts were heard throughout Michigan as the Tigers won pennants in 1934, 1935, 1940, and 1945. Heilmann became ill with lung cancer in March 1950. He managed to return to the broadcast booth at Briggs Stadium to broadcast a few innings of the 1950 season. During the summer of 1950, former teammate, Ty Cobb, launched a campaign to elect Heilmann to the Baseball Hall of Fame before he succumbed to cancer. Despite Cobb’s campaign, Heilmann fell short in the 1951 Hall of Fame voting, after being named on 67.7% of the ballots. Play-by-play, in broadcasting, is a North American term and means the reporting of a sporting event with a voiceover describing the details of the action of the game in progress. ... Lung cancer is the malignant transformation and expansion of lung tissue, and is the most lethal of all cancers worldwide, responsible for 1. ... Tiger Stadium is a stadium located in the Corktown neighborhood of downtown Detroit, Michigan. ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related...


Heilmann died on July 9, 1951 – two days before the All Star Game was played in Detroit. Shortly after Heilmann’s death Time magazine published an article on Cobb’s campaign for his former teammate. “Recently, hearing that Heilmann was seriously ill, Cobb wrote to several of his baseball-writer friends, urging them not to bypass Harry in this year's selections. Last week New York Times Columnist Arthur Daley printed part of Cobb's letter, agreed that Heilmann's election was, long overdue. The appeal came too late. At last week's All-Star game in Detroit, 50,000 fans stood and observed a moment of silence. The day before, Harry Heilmann, 56, had died of cancer in Detroit.” [12] Heilmann was elected to the Hall of Fame six months later in January 1952, after being named on 87% of the ballots.


In 1999, Heilmann ranked Number 54 on The Sporting News list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players, and was nominated as a finalist for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ... The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Career statistics

G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG TB SH HBP
2147 7787 1291 2660 542 151 183 1539 113 64 856 550 .342 .397 .520 4053 277 40

In baseball statistics, games played (denoted by G) indicates the total number of games in which a player has participated (in any capacity). ... In baseball statistics, an at bat (AB) is used to calculate other data such as batting average. ... In baseball, a run is scored when a player advances safely around all three bases and returns safely to home plate. ... In baseball statistics, a hit (denoted by H), sometimes called a base hit, is credited to a batter when he safely reaches first base after batting the ball into fair territory, without the benefit of an error or a fielders choice. ... In baseball, a double is the act of a batter safely reaching second base by striking the ball and getting to second before being made out, without the benefit of a fielders misplay (see error) or another runner being put out on a fielders choice. ... In baseball, a triple is the act of a batter safely reaching third base by striking the ball and getting to third before being made out, without the benefit of a fielders misplay (see error) or another runner being put out on a fielders choice. ... Mark McGwire swinging for the fences. ... In baseball statistics, a run batted in (RBI) is given to a batter for each run scored as the result of a batters plate appearance. ... The all-time stolen base leader, Rickey Henderson, swipes third in 1985 In baseball statistics, stolen bases (denoted by SB) is a count of the number of bases successfully stolen by a player. ... In baseball, a player is charged with a caught stealing when, as a runner, the player attempts to advance from one base to another without the ball being struck by a batter, but is put out by a fielder while making the attempt. ... In baseball statistics, a base on balls (BB), also called a walk, is credited to a batter and against a pitcher when a batter receives four pitches that the umpire calls balls. ... Cincinnati Reds outfielder Adam Dunn strikes out swinging to Atlanta Braves pitcher John Smoltz (not pictured). ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... In baseball statistics, on base percentage (OBP) (sometimes referred to as on base average (OBA)) is a measure of how often a batter gets to first base for any reason other than a fielding error or a fielders choice. ... In baseball statistics, slugging average (SLG) is a measure of the power of a hitter. ... In baseball statistics, total bases refers to the number of bases a player has gained with hits, i. ... In baseball, a sacrifice hit is the act of deliberately striking the ball in a manner that allows a runner on base to advance to another base, while the batter is himself put out. ... In baseball, being hit by a pitch refers to the batter being hit in some part of the body by a pitch from the pitcher. ...

See also

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with List of Major League Baseball all-time leaders in doubles. ... In the sport of baseball, a home run is the act of hitting the ball in such a manner, whether out of the park or in (see inside the park home run), that allows the batter to safely reach home and score in one play. ... Below is the list of Major League Baseball players who have reached the 2,000 hit milestone. ... Below is the list of 158 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 100 triple milestone. ...

External links

Preceded by
George Sisler
American League Batting Champion
1921
Succeeded by
George Sisler
Preceded by
George Sisler
American League Batting Champion
1923
Succeeded by
Babe Ruth
Preceded by
Babe Ruth
American League Batting Champion
1925
Succeeded by
Heinie Manush
Preceded by
Heinie Manush
American League Batting Champion
1927
Succeeded by
Goose Goslin

  Results from FactBites:
 
Harry Heilmann - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (143 words)
Harry Edwin Heilmann (August 3, 1894 - July 9, 1951) was a right fielder in Major League Baseball.
Born in San Francisco, California, Heilmann played 17 seasons in the outfield, mostly with the Detroit Tigers, from 1914 until 1932.
Heilmann died of lung cancer at age 56 in Southfield, Michigan.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m