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Encyclopedia > Harry Frazee
Harry Frazee, 1916
Harry Frazee, 1916

Harry Herbert Frazee (June 29, 1881 in Peoria, Illinois - June 4, 1929 in New York City) was an American theatrical agent, producer and director, and former owner of the Major League Baseball Boston Red Sox from 1916 to 1923. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 439 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (469 × 640 pixels, file size: 35 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 439 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (469 × 640 pixels, file size: 35 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... : See how it plays in Peoria United States Illinois Peoria 46. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... A theatrical producer is the person ultimately responsible for overseeing all aspects of mounting a theatrical production. ... A theatre director is a principal in the theatre field who oversees and orchestrates the mounting of a play by unifying various endeavors and aspects of production. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds...


Frazee bought the Red Sox from Joseph Lannin in 1916 for about $500,000. The Sox won a World Series title in 1918. The team finished in sixth in 1919, and it started selling off its players to the New York Yankees, most notoriously Babe Ruth after the 1919 season. After the sale of Ruth, the team crashed into the American League cellar and would not finish above .500 until 1934. The Red Sox would not win another World Series until 2004, the third longest drought in MLB history. Joseph J. Lannin was born on April 23, 1866 in Lac Beauport, Quebec, Canada, the son of Irish immigrants. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... The 1918 World Series featured the Boston Red Sox, who defeated the Chicago Cubs four games to two. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... This article is about the baseball player. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dates October 23, 2004–October 27, 2004 MVP Manny Ramírez (Boston) Television network Fox Announcers Joe Buck and Tim McCarver Umpires Ed Montague (Crew Chief), Dale Scott, Brian Gorman, Chuck Meriwether, Gerry Davis, Charlie Reliford The 2004 World Series represented the 100th time two modern Major League Baseball teams...


Frazee backed a number of New York theatrical productions (before and after Ruth's sale), the best known of which is probably No, No, Nanette. He was the subject of an unflattering portrait in Fred Lieb's account of the Red Sox, which insinuated that he had sold Ruth to finance a Broadway musical. This would become a central element in the Curse of the Bambino. No, No, Nanette is an English musical comedy with lyrics by Irving Caesar and Otto Harbach, music by Vincent Youmans, and a book by Otto Harbach and Frank Mandel. ... Fred Lieb (1888 - 1980) was an American sportswriter and baseball historian. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theater combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... Babe Ruth — The Bambino The Curse of the Bambino (1918-2004) was a superstition cited, often jokingly, as a reason for the failure of the Boston Red Sox baseball team to win the World Series in the 86 year period from 1918 until 2004. ...


The truth is somewhat more nuanced and dates to a long-running dispute between Frazee and American League founder and president Ban Johnson (see below). The dispute finally boiled over in the summer of 1919 when pitcher Carl Mays jumped the team. Johnson ordered him suspended, but Frazee instead sold him to the then-moribund Yankees. Johnson had promised Yankee owners Jacob Ruppert and Cap Huston to get them better players, but never followed through. The Mays flap divided the American League into two factions--the Yankees, Red Sox and White Sox on one side and the other five clubs, known as the "Loyal Five," on the other. Byron Bancroft Johnson (January 5, 1864 - March 28, 1931) was an American executive in Major League Baseball who served as the founder and first president of the American League. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Carl Mays Carl William Mays (November 12, 1891 - April 4, 1971) was one of the better right-handed pitchers in Major League Baseball from 1916-1926, but he is best remembered for throwing the pitch that struck Ray Chapman in the head on August 16, 1920, making Chapman the first... Jacob Ruppert (August 5, 1867-January 13, 1939), sometimes referred to as Jake Ruppert, was a National Guard colonel and brewery owner who went on to own the New York Yankees. ...


Under the circumstances, when Frazee finally lost patience with Ruth (see below), his options were severely limited. Under pressure from Johnson, the Loyal Five rejected Frazee's overtures almost out of hand. In effect, Johnson limited Frazee to dealing with either the White Sox or the Yankees. The White Sox offered Joe Jackson and $60,000, but the Yankees offered an all-cash deal--$100,000. Frazee, Ruppert and Huston quickly cut a deal, and Ruth became the property of the Yankees on December 26, 1919. Joseph Jefferson Shoeless Joe Jackson (July 16, 1888 – December 5, 1951) was a left fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Philadelphia Athletics, Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ...

Contents

Fenway Park

The Ruth sale cemented the Red Sox-Yankees alliance, which was ironic given their historically bitter rivalry. A few months later, the two teams drew even closer together in a dispute over Fenway Park. Fenway redirects here. ...


When Frazee bought the Red Sox, Fenway Park was not part of the deal. Instead, he rented it for $30,000 per year from the Fenway Realty Trust. A majority of the trust's stock was controlled by the Taylor family, publishers of the Boston Globe. The Taylor family had owned the Red Sox from 1904 to 1911 and actually built Fenway in the first place. They still held a small ownership interest. This put Frazee in a very difficult spot. If Johnson ever revoked the franchise, it would be relatively easy for a new owner to get a lease for the park. In August 1919, Frazee began negotiations to buy out the shares in the trust held by Lannin and the Taylors. In this way, if Johnson ever yanked the franchise out from under Frazee, any prospective owner of a Boston American League team risked being left without a place to play. The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


However, Frazee had stopped paying installments because of a dispute over who owed Boston's share of MLB's settlement with the Federal League. In the spring of 1920, Lannin finally made good on a threat to slap a lien on the Red Sox. Since the lien barred Frazee from trading players or buying Fenway without Lannin's permission, Lannin effectively controlled the team. Lannin also threatened to sell his interest in the Fenway Realty Trust, which would have opened the door for a new owner to buy into the park if Frazee lost the franchise. Eventually, Lannin and Frazee reached a settlement. Lannin agreed to pay the Federal League bill and would not oppose Frazee's purchase of Fenway. In return, Frazee resumed payments. On May 3, Frazee and Taylor signed a deal to pay off the existing mortgage and make Frazee sole owner of Fenway Park. The Federal League was the last major attempt to establish an independent major league in baseball in the United States in direct competition with and opposition to the established National and American Leagues in 1914 and 1915. ...


As an additional security measure, Frazee secured a $350,000 loan from the Yankees and used a second mortgage on Fenway as collateral.


Other deals with the Yankees

Popular legend holds that the Ruppert loan forced Frazee to trade nearly every player of value to the Yankees for literally nothing in return, running the team into the ground. In truth, the "Loyal Five" refused to make any deals with Frazee even after Ruth left for the Bronx. With the White Sox' reputation in tatters following the Black Sox Scandal, Frazee was left with little choice but to deal with the Yankees. While the trades were not seen as particularly one-sided at the time, a turn of luck made them look like Yankee heists. While the players sent to New York were often stiffs who turned into stars, the ones sent to Boston suffered a rash of injuries. Not to be confused with the Baltimore Black Sox of the Negro Leagues. ...


However, when the Independent article came out, any chance Frazee had of rehabilitating himself evaporated. Although he was forced to sell to a syndicate of Midwestern businessmen fronted by Johnson crony Bob Quinn, he held out for $1.2 million--nearly double what he paid for the team in 1916. Ironically, the Red Sox had some of their worst seasons ever under Quinn's ownership after one of his principal investors died. Bob Quinn is an Australian Liberal Party politician and leader of the Liberal Party in the Parliament of Queensland. ...


Notwithstanding the above, a record of the trades made from 1918 to 1923. The source for this information is Macmillan's Baseball Encyclopedia, 1988 edition, "Trade Section," pp. 2251-2709.


Joe Bush—December 1921. Pitched in two pennant seasons for the Yankees. Traded for Rip Collins (pitcher), Roger Peckinpaugh, Bill Piercy, Jack Quinn. Joe Bush is a well-traveled organ grinder, one of the last in the dying business that reached its height in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. ... Roger Peckinpaugh Roger Thorpe Peckinpaugh (February 5, 1891 - November 17, 1977) was an American shortstop in Major League Baseball for the Cleveland Indians (1910-1913), New York Yankees (1910-1921), Washington Senators (1922-1926) and Chicago White Sox (1927). ... There are different people named Jack Quinn: Jack Quinn, the Congressman from New York. ...


Joe Dugan—July 1922. Played for five Yankee pennant teams. Traded for Chick Fewster, Elmer Miller, Johnny Mitchell, Lefty O'Doul. Joe Dugan (b. ... Wilson Chick Fewster (born November 10, 1895-died April 16, 1945) is a former Major League Baseball player. ... Francis Joseph Lefty ODoul (March 4, 1897 - December 7, 1969) was an American Major League Baseball player who went on to become an extraordinarily successful manager in the minor leagues, and also a vital figure in the establishment of professional baseball in Japan. ...


Harvey Hendrick—January 1923. Never played for Red Sox; was in 1923 World Series with Yankees. Traded for Al DeVormer, who batted .254 after trade (Hendrick’s lifetime average was .308). Harvey Gink Hendrick[1] (November 9, 1897 - October 29, 1941) was an American major league baseball player who played for several different teams during an eleven-year career. ...


Waite Hoyt—December 1920. Traded (with Harry Harper, Wally Schang, and Mike McNally) for Del Pratt, Muddy Ruel, Hank Thormahlen, and Sammy Vick. Hoyt pitched for the Yankees in ten seasons, and was in seven World Series (including the 1931 Series, with the Philadelphia A’s). Waite Charles Hoyt (September 9, 1899 – August 25, 1984) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball, one of the dominant pitchers of the 1920s. ... Wally Schang with the Philadelphia Athletics, American League (circa 1915) Walter Henry (Wally) Schang (August 22, 1889 - March 6, 1965) was a catcher in Major League Baseball. ... Herold Dominic Muddy Ruel (February 20, 1896 - November 13, 1963) was a major league catcher for 18 seasons with the St. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Other nicknames The As, The White Elephants, The...


Sad Sam Jones—December 1921. Traded with Joe Bush (q. v.). Pitched five seasons with Yankees. Samuel Pond Sad Sam Jones ( July 26, 1892 - July 6, 1966) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played in the American League with the Cleveland Indians (1914-15), Boston Red Sox (1916-21), New York Yankees (1922-26), St. ...


Carl Mays—July 1919. Traded to Yankees for players Bob McGraw and Allan Russell. Became persona non grata after killing Ray Chapman with a beanball in a game in 1920, although absolved of criminal blame. Carl Mays Carl William Mays (November 12, 1891 - April 4, 1971) was one of the better right-handed pitchers in Major League Baseball from 1916-1926, but he is best remembered for throwing the pitch that struck Ray Chapman in the head on August 16, 1920, making Chapman the first... Raymond Johnson Chapman (January 15, 1891 – August 17, 1920) was an American baseball player, spending his entire career as a shortstop for Cleveland. ...


Herb Pennock—January 1923. Traded to Yankees for Camp Skinner, Norm McMillan, and George Murray. Pennock stayed with the Yankees until 1933, pitching in five Series. Herbert Jefferis Pennock (February 10, 1894 - January 30, 1948) was a left-handed Major League Baseball pitcher best known for his time spent with the star-studded New York Yankee teams of the mid-to-late-1920s and early 1930s. ... Norman Alexis McMillan (October 5, 1895 in Latta, South Carolina - September 28, 1969 in Marion, South Carolina), was a professional baseball player who played third base in the Major Leagues from 1922-1929. ...


George Pipgras—January 1923. Traded to the Yankees for Al DeVormer (supra). Pipgras never played for Boston; his eleven-year career included three Yankee pennant seasons. Goudey baseball card - 1933 Series, #012 George William Pipgras (December 20, 1899 - October 19, 1986) was an American right-handed starting pitcher and umpire in Major League Baseball. ...


Babe Ruth—the biggest sale Frazee made. He sold Ruth to the Yankees for $125,000 plus a $300,000 mortgage on Fenway Park. This article is about the baseball player. ... Fenway redirects here. ...


Wally Schang—December 1920. Traded to the Yankees for Pratt, Ruel, Thormahlen, and Vick. Caught for three Yankee pennant teams. Wally Schang with the Philadelphia Athletics, American League (circa 1915) Walter Henry (Wally) Schang (August 22, 1889 - March 6, 1965) was a catcher in Major League Baseball. ...


Everett Scott—traded along with Joe Bush (q.v.). Scott set consecutive-game playing record it took Lou Gehrig to break. Lewis Everett Scott (November 19, 1892 – November 2, 1960), nicknamed Deacon, was an American shortstop in Major League Baseball who played for 12 seasons with the Boston Red Sox (1914-1921), New York Yankees (1922-1925), Washington Senators (1925), Chicago White Sox (1926), and Cincinnati Reds (1926). ... Lou Gehrigs number 4 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1939 Henry Louis (Lou) Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig, was an American baseball player in the first half of the twentieth century. ...


Elmer Smith—July 1922. Traded to Yankees with Joe Dugan (q. v.). Was famous as first player (with Indians in 1920) to hit grand slam homer in World Series. Elmer Smith is a common name that can refer to different people: Elmer Smith (NL outfielder) (1868-1945), a baseball outfielder who played from 1886 through 1901 Elmer Smith (AL outfielder) (1892-1984), a baseball outfielder who played from 1914 through 1925 Category: ...


The above only includes the trades Frazee made to the Yankees from 1918 to 1923, when he was owner of the Red Sox. The Encyclopedia lists about 40 trades in all made by the Red Sox in those years, including to teams other than the Yankees.


Death

Harry Frazee's grave in Kensico Cemetery

In 1929, Harry Frazee died of kidney failure in his Park Avenue home with his wife and son at his side. He is interred at Kensico Cemetery. Lou Gehrig and Ed Barrow are also interred at Kensico. Image File history File linksMetadata 1_Harry_Frazee_800. ... Image File history File linksMetadata 1_Harry_Frazee_800. ... Kensico Cemetery, located in Valhalla, Westchester Co. ... Park Avenue in the Upper East Side (2004) Park Avenue runs north and south between Madison Avenue and Lexington Avenue in Manhattan in New York City. ... Kensico Cemetery, located in Valhalla, Westchester Co. ... Lou Gehrigs number 4 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1939 Henry Louis (Lou) Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig, was an American baseball player in the first half of the twentieth century. ... Edward Grant Barrow (May 10, 1868 - December 15, 1953) was an American manager and executive in Major League Baseball who guided the Boston Red Sox to the 1918 World Series title, then built the New York Yankees into baseballs premier franchise and greatest dynasty as their top executive from...

The Top 5 Reasons You Can't Blame...

In 2005, ESPN Classic aired an episode in The Top 5 Reasons You Can't Blame... series in which it examined the sale, and explained why Frazee cannot be held as the scapegoat: ESPN Classic features reruns of famous sporting events, sports documentaries, and sports themed movies. ... The Top 5 Reasons You Cant Blame. ... The Scapegoat by William Holman Hunt, 1854. ...

  • 5. World War I With rosters depleted because of the war, Ruth saw action as both a pitcher and outfielder; the latter made him the home run hitter he would become. After the players returned, Ruth became bigger than the team because his home runs were the talk of baseball and he no longer wanted to pitch.
  • 3. Babe Ruth's antics: He often spent evenings out in bars, often drunk only hours before games. He also jumped the team several times, the final straw being in the final game of the 1919 season.
  • 2. Ed Barrow: Frazee's right-hand man, Barrow served as general manager and field manager. Like Frazee, Barrow also knew how much of a troublemaker Ruth was. When Frazee wanted to send Ruth to the Yankees, Barrow, for reasons unknown, said the Yankees didn't have any players he wanted. In a bizarre twist of fate, Barrow left the Red Sox after the 1920 season to become general manager of none other than the Yankees and built the team to World Champions by 1923 by acquiring as many as seven players from the Red Sox (four of whom had won the World Series in Boston in 1918).
  • 1. Babe Ruth's holdout: Ruth forced Frazee's hand by holding out after the 1919 season, demanding $20,000 per year—twice as much as he had been making during the season. During the holdout, he planned other ventures, such as becoming a boxer and going into acting. Frazee was upset over the holdout because he had given Ruth bonuses after both the 1918 and 1919 seasons. Finally, with Ruth's demands so high and after several occasions in which Ruth had already jumped the team, Frazee felt he had no choice but to ship Ruth out.

“The Great War ” redirects here. ... Homerun redirects here. ... Byron Bancroft Johnson (January 5, 1864 - March 28, 1931) was an American executive in Major League Baseball who served as the founder and first president of the American League. ... The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1901 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 5, 14, 18, 19, 21, 42, 455 Name Cleveland Indians (1915–present) Cleveland Naps (1905-1914) Cleveland Bronchos (1902-1904) Cleveland Blues (1901) Other nicknames The Tribe, The Wahoos Ballpark Jacobs Field (1994–present... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 5, 6, 16, 23, 42, Cobb Name Detroit Tigers (1901–present) Other nicknames The Motor City Kitties, The Bengals, The Tigs, The Bless You Boys Ballpark Comerica Park (2000–present) Tiger Stadium (1912-1999... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Other nicknames The As, The White Elephants, The... (For the 1901-02 American League team known as the Baltimore Orioles, see New York Yankees. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 6, 14, 29, 34, 42 Name Minnesota Twins (1961–present) Washington Nationals/Senators (1901-1960) Other nicknames The Twinkies Ballpark Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome 1982-present Metropolitan Stadium (1961-1981) Griffith Stadium (1911-1960... The following are the baseball events of the year 1919 throughout the world. ... Edward Grant Barrow (May 10, 1868 - December 15, 1953) was an American manager and executive in Major League Baseball who guided the Boston Red Sox to the 1918 World Series title, then built the New York Yankees into baseballs premier franchise and greatest dynasty as their top executive from... The following are the baseball events of the year 1923 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1918 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1919 throughout the world. ... For other senses of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer (disambiguation). ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1918 throughout the world. ...

See also

Babe Ruth — The Bambino The Curse of the Bambino (1918-2004) was a superstition cited, often jokingly, as a reason for the failure of the Boston Red Sox baseball team to win the World Series in the 86 year period from 1918 until 2004. ... The Longacre Theatre is a Broadway theatre. ... No, No, Nanette is an English musical comedy with lyrics by Irving Caesar and Otto Harbach, music by Vincent Youmans, and a book by Otto Harbach and Frank Mandel. ...

External links

  • A "Curse" born of hate, by Glenn Stout, discussing and criticizing the various attacks against Frazee.
  • Harry Frazee at the Internet Broadway Database
Preceded by
Joseph Lannin
Owner of the Boston Red Sox
19171923
Succeeded by
J.A. Robert Quinn

  Results from FactBites:
 
Harry Frazee - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1701 words)
Frazee had been the first owner in the league's history who hadn't been essentially handpicked by Johnson, and Johnson tried on numerous occasions to cancel the franchise after Frazee bought the team.
Frazee, Ruppert and Huston quickly cut a deal, and Ruth became the property of the Yankees on December 26, 1919.
Frazee was upset over the holdout because he had given Ruth bonuses after both the 1918 and 1919 seasons.
Wild About Harry - MSN Encarta (317 words)
In 1920 Harry Frazee sold Babe Ruth's contract to the Yankees.
Harry Blackmun, a justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, began his tenure as a conservative member of the Court, but by the time he retired in 1994 he had become one of the Court's biggest civil liberties advocates.
Harry Wright*, known as the Father of Baseball, was the innovator of pregame batting practice, hand signals, and the double steal.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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