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Encyclopedia > Harry F. Byrd
Harry F. Byrd, Sr.

Harry Flood Byrd, Sr. as a Senator in the 1930s.
Governor of Virginia
In office
1926 – 1930
Preceded by John Garland Pollard
Succeeded by Elbert Lee Trinkle
Born June 10, 1887
Martinsburg, West Virginia
Died October 20, 1966
New York City
Residence 7683 Clarke Street, 24th Avenue, New York City
Political party Democratic Party
Religion Democratic
Spouse Susan Ray-Byrd
Children Harry Flood Byrd Junior and Amanda Winston Byrd

Harry Flood Byrd, Sr. (June 10, 1887October 20, 1966) of Berryville in Clarke County, Virginia was an American politician. He was a dominant figure in Virginia Democratic Party politics for much of the first half of the 20th century. He represented Virginia as a United States Senator from 1933 until 1965. Image File history File links Harry_F._Byrd. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Tim Kaine, the current Governor The Governor of Virginia serves as the chief executive of the Commonwealth of Virginia for a four-year term. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link is to a full 1930 calendar). ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Elbert Lee Trinkle or E. Lee Trinkle (1876-1939) an American politician who served as Governor of Virginia from 1922 to 1926. ... June 10 is the 161st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (162nd in leap years), with 204 days remaining. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... Martinsburg is a city located in Berkeley County, West Virginia. ... October 20 is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 72 days remaining. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Nickname: Big Apple, City that never Sleeps, Gotham Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1613 Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Nickname: Big Apple, City that never Sleeps, Gotham Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1613 Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... Democracy is a form of government under which the power to alter the laws and structures of government lies, ultimately, with the citizenry. ... Harry Flood Byrd, Jr. ... June 10 is the 161st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (162nd in leap years), with 204 days remaining. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... October 20 is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 72 days remaining. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Berryville is a small main street community located in Clarke County, Virginia. ... Location in the state of Virginia Formed 1836 Seat Berryville Area  - Total  - Water 462 km² (178 mi²) 4 km² (2 mi²) 0. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... It has been suggested that Rest of Virginia be merged into this article or section. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... It has been suggested that Rest of Virginia be merged into this article or section. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ...

Contents

Early life

Harry Flood Byrd was born in Martinsburg, West Virginia and moved with his parents to Winchester, Virginia the same year, Byrd belonged to one of Virginia's oldest families. A wealthy apple grower in the Shenandoah Valley, he took over his father's newspaper, the Winchester Star, in 1903. The paper had slipped into debt under his father's ownership. The paper owed its newsprint supplier $2,500 and the company refused to ship more newsprint on credit. Byrd cut a deal to make daily cash payments in return for paper. This experience gave him a lifelong aversion to borrowing money and to debt of any kind. "I stand for strict economy in governmental affairs," he proclaimed. "The State of Virginia is similar to a great business corporation . . . and should be conducted with the same efficiency and economy as any private business." In a fifty-year political career, no statement of Byrd's ever more succinctly spelled out his view of government. (Heinemann) Martinsburg is a city located in Berkeley County, West Virginia. ... Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Independent City Founded 1802 Mayor Elizabeth Minor Area    - City 24. ... Binomial name Malus domestica Borkh. ... Canoeing on the Shenandoah River near Winchester, VA. The Shenandoah Valley region of western Virginia, from Winchester to Staunton, is bounded by the Blue Ridge mountains to the East and the Allegheny mountains to the West. ... 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ...


Career

He was a progressive with an early interest in road improvements. In 1908, he became president of The Valley Turnpike Company, a 93-mile toll road between Winchester and Staunton. He served there until 1915, when he was elected to the state senate. He first came to prominence in 1922, when he led a fight against using bonds to pay for new roads. He feared the state would sacrifice future flexibility by committing too many resources to paying off construction debt. The publicity from this drive allowed him to be elected governor in 1925. 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... A drawing etitled the escape of Stonewall Jacksons Army down the valley pike at Strausburg [sic], Va. ... A toll road, tollway, turnpike, pike or tollpike is a road on which a toll authority collects a toll (i. ... West Beverley Street in downtown Staunton Staunton is an independent city within the confines of Augusta County in the commonwealth of Virginia. ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Tim Kaine, the current Governor The Governor of Virginia serves as the chief executive of the Commonwealth of Virginia for a four-year term. ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ...


As governor, Byrd pushed through constitutional amendments that streamlined the state government and allowed for more efficient use of tax dollars. He also made property taxes solely a county responsibility. When it was obvious that increased spending on road construction wasn't enough to "get Virginia out of the mud," he pushed through a secondary roads bill that gave the state responsibility for maintaining county roads. These measures made Byrd seem like a New South progressive at first. However, many of his measures were more to the benefit of rural areas more interested in low taxes than better services. He instituted a "pay as you go" approach to spending, in which no state money was spent until enough taxes and fees came in to pay for it. Highways and tourism were his primary pursuits, says his biographer. "He advocated building roads to state shrines such as Jamestown and Monticello and called for historical markers along roadways, the first of which appeared in Fredericksburg in November. He held regional meetings to bring about closer cooperation between state and county road officials, prophesying that the road system could be completed within ten years through such cooperation . . . . A tour of the highway system convinced him of the progress being made in extending the arterial network. Indeed, over 2,000 miles would be added to the system during Byrd's governorship, 1,787 of these miles in 1928. Road building was one way to keep the voters happy and prove the efficacy of pay-as-you-go." (Heineman) New South is a term that has been used intermittently since the American Civil War to describe the American South, in whole or in part. ...


Education was not on his agenda and spending for schools remained very low until the 1960s. His secondary roads bill didn't apply to cities.


In 1928 he supported Al Smith, who lost the state. He was a favorite son for the 1932 presidential nomination but switched to Franklin D. Roosevelt at the right moment and became a campaign official. In 1933 Byrd was appointed to fill a vacancy in the United States Senate; he won reelection as a Democrat in 1933, 1934, 1940, 1946, 1952, 1958, and 1964. He broke with Roosevelt and became an opponent of the New Deal, but he was an internationalist and strongly supported Roosevelt's foreign policy. As war loomed in 1941 Congress approved his proposal for a joint House-Senate committee to look into ways of eliminating nonessential expenditures. By late September, the Joint Committee on Reduction of Non-essential Federal Expenditures was in operation with Senator Byrd as Chairman; it built his national reputation as an economizer. Alfred Emanuel Al Smith (December 30, 1873 – October 4, 1944) was Governor of New York, and Democratic U.S. presidential candidate in 1928. ... FDR redirects here. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the other being the House of Representatives. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: New Deal For other uses of New Deal and The New Deal, see New Deal (disambiguation). ...


While he was governor, Byrd built up contacts with the "courthouse cliques" in most of Virginia's counties. He curried support from the five constitutional officers in those counties (sheriff, Commonwealth's attorney, clerk of the court, county treasurer, and commissioner of revenue). This formed the basis of the Byrd Organization, which dominated Virginia politics well into the 1960s. They carefully vetted candidates for statewide office, and Byrd only made an endorsement, or "nod," after consulting with them. Without his "nod," no one could win statewide office in Virginia. While he was governor, he shortened the ballot so that only three officials ran statewide--the governor, lieutenant governor and attorney general. This limited opportunities to challenge the candidates that he wanted to run. The Byrd Organization (usually known as just the Organization) was a political machine that dominated Virginia politics for much of the first half of the 20th Century. ...


By the 1950s Byrd was one of the most influential senators, serving on the Armed Services Committee, and later as chairman of the Finance Committee. He often broke with the Democratic Party line, going so far as to refuse to endorse Roosevelt's successor, Harry S. Truman in 1948. He also refused to endorse Adlai Stevenson in 1952. He voted against public works bills, including the Interstate Highway System, and became one of the most vocal proponents of maintaining policies of racial segregation. His call for "massive resistance" against desegregation of schools led to many Virginia schools closing rather than be forced to integrate. Byrd authored and signed the "Southern Manifesto" condemning the Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education. The 1950s was the decade spanning from the 1st of January, 1950 to the 31st December, 1959. ... The Committee on Armed Services is a committee of the United States Senate empowered with legislative oversight of the nations military, including the Department of Defense, military research and development, nuclear energy (as pertaining to national security), benefits for members of the military, the Selective Service System and other... The U.S. Senate Committee on Finance (or, less formally, Senate Finance Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... Harry S. Truman (May 8, 1884–December 26, 1972) was the thirty-third President of the United States (1945–1953); as Vice President, he succeeded to the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (February 5, 1900 – July 14, 1965) was an American politician, noted for intellectual demeanor and advocacy of liberal causes in the Democratic party. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Look up Public works in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways, commonly called the Interstate Highway System, is a network of freeways in the United States. ... The Rex Theatre for Colored People, Leland, Mississippi, June 1937 Racial segregation is creamy jizz of different races in daily life when both are doing equal tasks, such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a rest room, attending school, going to the movies, or in... Massive Resistance was a policy declared by U.S. Senator Harry F. Byrd, Sr. ... The Southern Manifesto was a document written in 1956 by legislators in the United States Congress opposed to racial integration in public places. ... Holding Racial segregation of students in public schools violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, because separate facilities are inherently unequal. ...


Although Byrd was never a candidate in a presidential election, he nevertheless received 134,157 votes in the 1956 election. In the 1960 election, also as a non-candidate, he received 15 votes from unpledged electors: all 8 from Mississippi, 6 of Alabama's 11 (the rest going to John F. Kennedy), and 1 from Oklahoma (the rest going to Richard Nixon). Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Unpledged Elector is an option used for Presidential elections in the United States of America. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Official language(s) English Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Area  Ranked 30th  - Total 52,419 sq mi (135,765 km²)  - Width 190 miles (306 km)  - Length 330 miles (531 km)  - % water 3. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), also referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK, John Kennedy or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,960 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ...


Byrd retired from the Senate for health reasons in November 1965. His son, Harry F. Byrd, Jr., was appointed his successor. Byrd Sr. died in 1966. 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... Harry Flood Byrd, Jr. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ...


Note

Byrd was the brother of famed aviator Richard Evelyn Byrd; he is not a relation to Robert Byrd, a U.S. Senator from West Virginia. An aviator is a person who flies aircraft for pleasure or as a profession. ... Rear Admiral Richard Evelyn Byrd, USN (October 25, 1888 – March 11, 1957) was a pioneering American polar explorer and famous aviator. ... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917 in North Wilkesboro, North Carolina), a Democrat, is West Virginias senior United States Senator. ...


References

  • Hatch, Alden, The Byrds of Virginia: An American Dynasty, 1670 to the Present 1969
  • Heinemann, Ronald L. Harry Byrd of Virginia (1966)
  • Wilkinson, J. Harvie. Harry Byrd and the Changing Face of Virginia Politics 1945-1966 (1984) ISBN 0-8139-1043-9
Preceded by
Elbert Lee Trinkle
Governor of Virginia
1926–1930
Succeeded by
John Garland Pollard
Preceded by
Claude A. Swanson
United States Senator (Class 1) from Virginia
1933–1965
Served alongside: Carter Glass, Thomas G. Burch, Absalom W. Robertson
Succeeded by
Harry F. Byrd, Jr.
Preceded by
Eugene D. Millikin
Chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Finance
1955–1965
Succeeded by
Russell B. Long

James Harvie Wilkinson III (born in New York, New York, September 29, 1944) is a federal judge serving on the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals. ... Elbert Lee Trinkle or E. Lee Trinkle (1876-1939) an American politician who served as Governor of Virginia from 1922 to 1926. ... Tim Kaine, the current Governor The Governor of Virginia serves as the chief executive of the Commonwealth of Virginia for a four-year term. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Claude Augustus Swanson (March 31, 1862–July 7, 1939) was an American politician. ... Virginia ratified the Constitution on June 25 1788. ... Carter Glass Carter Glass (January 4, 1858–May 28, 1946) was an American politician from Virginia, who served many years in Congress, as well as U.S. Secretary of the Treasury under Woodrow Wilson. ... 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Image File history File links Flag_of_Virginia. ... Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known and remembered primarily for his stirring oratory. ... This article is 150 kilobytes or more in size. ... William Fleming (July 6, 1736 – February 16, 1824) was an American lawyer and jurist from Virginia. ... Thomas Nelson, Jr. ... Benjamin Harrison V Benjamin Harrison (V) (April 5, 1726 – April 24, 1791) was an American planter and revolutionary leader from Charles City County, Virginia. ... Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known and remembered primarily for his stirring oratory. ... Edmund Jennings Randolph (August 10, 1753 – September 12, 1813) was an American attorney, Governor of Virginia, Secretary of State, and the first United States Attorney General. ... Beverley Randolph (September 11, 1753– February 1797) was a American politician from Virginia. ... 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External links

  • Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress, article on Harry F. Byrd Sr.
  • Library of Virginia, Harry F. Byrd webpage
  • Federal Highway Administration Byrd webpage

 
 

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