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Encyclopedia > Harry Caray

For the actor with a similar name, see Harry Carey. Harry Carey (January 16, 1878–September 21, 1947) was an American actor and one of silent films earliest superstars. ...


For the Japanese method of suicide known formally as seppuku, see Hara-kiri. “hara-kiri” redirects here. ... Seppuku with ritual attire and second. ...

Harry Caray memorialized in a statue near Wrigley Field in Chicago.
Harry Caray memorialized in a statue near Wrigley Field in Chicago.

Harry Caray (b. Harry Christopher Carabina, March 1, 1914, St. Louis, Missouri; d. February 18, 1998, Rancho Mirage, California) was a radio and TV broadcaster for four Major League Baseball teams, beginning with a long tenure doing the games of the St. Louis Cardinals and ending as the iconic announcer for the Chicago Cubs, both of the National League, in between which he also served time as the announcer for the Oakland Athletics (for one year) and the Chicago White Sox (for eleven years). Image File history File links Statue of the beloved former announcer Harry Caray, outside of Wrigley Field, Chicago. ... Image File history File links Statue of the beloved former announcer Harry Caray, outside of Wrigley Field, Chicago. ... Wrigley Field is a baseball stadium in Chicago that has served as the home ballpark of the Chicago Cubs since 1916. ... Nickname: Motto: “Urbs in Horto” (Latin: “City in a Garden”), “I Will” Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country United States State Illinois Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... February 18 is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Rancho Mirage is a city located in Riverside County, California. ... “TV” redirects here. ... Major League Baseball (MLB) is the highest level of play in North American professional baseball. ... Major league affiliations National League (1892–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 6, 9, 14, 17, 20, 42, 42, 45, 85 Name St. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1889) (a. ... The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs, or simply the National League, is the older of two leagues constituting Major League Baseball in the United States and Canada and the worlds oldest extant professional team sports league. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Other nicknames The As, The White Elephants, The... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Contents

Career

The St. Louis-born Caray caught his break when he landed the job with the Cardinals in 1945 and, according to several histories of the storied franchise, proved as expert at selling the sponsor's beer as he'd been in selling the Cardinals on KMOX. Caray was also seen as influential enough that he could affect team personnel moves; Cardinals historian Peter Golenbock (in The Spirit of St. Louis: A History of the St. Louis Cardinals and Browns) has suggested Caray may have had a partial hand in the maneuvering that led to the exit of general manager Bing Devine, the man who had built what proved the team's 1964 World Series winner, and of field manager Johnny Keane, whose rumoured successor, Leo Durocher (the succession didn't pan out), was believed to have been supported by Caray for the job. The following are the baseball events of the year 1945 throughout the world. ... General Information KMOX is an AM radio station broadcasting in St. ... Vaughan Pallmore Bing Devine (March 1, 1916 - January 27, 2007) was an American front office executive for the St. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... John Joseph Keane (November 3, 1911 - January 6, 1967) was an American baseball player and manager. ... Leo Ernest Durocher (July 27, 1905 — October 7, 1991), nicknamed Leo the Lip, was an American infielder and manager in Major League Baseball. ...


In 1969, however, after the Cardinals had won back-to-back National League pennants and the 1967 World Series against the Boston Red Sox, Caray was unexpectedly fired as the Cardinals' lead broadcaster. Golenbock and other Cardinal historians have suggested the cause was a purported affair Caray had with the daughter-in-law of Cardinals owner August Busch, Jr. (who also owned Anheuser-Busch brewery, the club's owner and broadcast sponsor); Caray first called it a business grudge while never necessarily denying or affirming the rumours. For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... August Busch Jr. ... Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc. ...


He spent one season broadcasting for the Athletics before, he often told interviewers, tiring of owner Charles O. Finley's interference and accepting the job with the Chicago White Sox. As had happened in St. Louis, Caray became popular with Chicago listeners and enjoyed a reputation for joviality and public carousing (sometimes doing home game broadcasts bare-topped from the bleachers). He wasn't always popular with players, however; Caray had an equivalent reputation of being excessively critical of home team blunders and for continuing criticism of certain players after even one on-field mistake. During his tenure with the White Sox, Caray was teamed with many color analysts that didn't work out well, including Bob Waller, Bill Mercer and ex-Major League catcher J.C. Martin, among others. But in 1976, during a game against the Texas Rangers, Caray had former outfielder Jimmy Piersall (who was working for the Rangers at the time) as a guest in the White Sox booth that night. The tandem proved to work so well, that Piersall was hired to be Harry's partner in the White Sox radio and TV booth beginning in 1977. Piersall and Caray were arguably the best broadcasting tandem in baseball history (and still fondly remembered by White Sox fans to this day), as Caray and Piersall made the White Sox broadcasts interesting even if the team was not doing well.[citation needed] Charles Oscar Finley (February 22, 1918 - February 19, 1996), born in Ensley, Alabama, was an American businessman who is best remembered for his tenure as the flamboyant owner of the Oakland Athletics Major League Baseball team. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Bill Mercer is an American sportscaster, originally from Muskogee, Oklahoma, who now lives in Richardson, Texas. ... Joseph Clifton Martin (born December 13, 1936 in Axton, Virginia) is a former Major League Baseball player. ... Major league affiliations American League (1961–present) West Division (1972–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 26, 34, 42 Name Texas Rangers (1972–present) Washington Senators (1961-1971) Other nicknames None in common use Ballpark Rangers Ballpark in Arlington (1994–present) a. ... James Anthony Piersall (born November 14, 1929 in Waterbury, Connecticut) is a former center fielder in Major League Baseball. ...


He was considered a fan's broadcaster above all, along the lines of such announcers as New York/San Francisco Giants legend Russ Hodges or Pittsburgh Pirates legend Bob Prince, and that didn't always earn him respect to equal his popularity. But Caray never pretended to be the kind of objective announcer that such broadcasters as Red Barber and Vin Scully prided themselves on being regardless of their team attachments. Russell Patrick Hodges (June 18, 1910 at Dayton, Tennessee - April 18, 1971 at San Francisco, California) was an American broadcaster who did play-by-play for several baseball teams, most notably the New York and San Francisco Giants. ... Robert F. Prince (July 1, 1916 - June 10, 1985) was an American radio and television sportscaster and commentator best known for his 28-year stint as the voice of the Pittsburgh Pirates Major League Baseball club, with whom he earned the nickname “The Gunner” and became a Pittsburgh icon. ... Walter Lanier Red Barber (February 17, 1908 - October 22, 1992) was an American sportscaster. ... Vincent Edward Vin Scully (born November 29, 1927, in The Bronx, New York) is an American sportscaster, known primarily as the play-by-play voice of the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers baseball teams. ...


Caray went from local favorite to national phenomenon, however, after he joined the Cubs in 1981. At the same time White Sox owner Jerry Reinsdorf was unsuccessfully floating a pay-TV scheme for White Sox games, thereby rendering Caray all but invisible, the Cubs' television outlet, WGN, had become among the first of the cable television superstations, offering their programming to providers across the United States for free, and Caray became as famous nationwide as he'd long been on the South Side and, previously, in St. Louis. Jerry Reinsdorf (born February 25, 1936 in Brooklyn, New York) is the owner of Chicago White Sox and the Chicago Bulls. ... WGN is the callsign of two broadcast stations in Chicago, Illinois, both owned by the Tribune company. ... Coaxial cable is often used to transmit cable television into the house. ... Superstation in United States television can have several meanings. ...


The timing was fortuitous especially when the Cubs ended up winning the National League East division title in 1984, led by pitcher Rick Sutcliffe and future Hall of Fame second baseman Ryne Sandberg, and playing thanks to WGN to a nationwide audience. Millions came to love the microphone-swinging Caray, continuing his White Sox practise of leading the home crowd in singing "Take Me Out To The Ball Game" during the seventh inning stretch, mimicking his mannerisms, his gravelly voice, his habit of mispronouncing or slurring some players' names (which some of the players themselves mimicked in turn), and even his trademark barrel-shaped wide-rimmed glasses. Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ... Richard Lee Sutcliffe (born June 21, 1956 in Independence, Missouri) is a former Major League Baseball starting pitcher and current television sportscaster. ... Walhalla temple, Germany A hall of fame (sometimes HOF) is a type of museum established for any a field of endeavour to honour individuals of noteworthy achievement in that field. ... Ryne Dee Sandberg (born September 18, 1959 in Spokane, Washington), nicknamed Ryno, is a former second baseman in Major League Baseball who spent nearly his entire career with the Chicago Cubs. ... Sex and the City episode, see Take Me Out to the Ballgame (SATC episode). ...


Caray's national popularity never really flagged after that, although time eventually took a toll on him. Nicknamed "The Mayor of Rush Street", a reference to Chicago's famous tavern-dominated neighbourhood and Caray's well-known taste for Budweiser, illness and age began to drain some of Caray's skills, even in spite of a remarkable recovery from a 1987 stroke. There were occasional calls for him to retire, but he was kept aboard past WGN's normal mandatory retirement age, an indication of just how popular he really was. Rush Street is an album by Richard Marx, released in 1991. ... Budweiser is an adjective in German describing something from the city České Budějovice (German: Budweis) in the Czech Republic. ...


Caray maintained a winter home in Palm Springs, California, along with his legal residence in Chicago.[1] As discussed in Steve Stone's 1999 book, Where's Harry? (p.177-184), Caray was at a Palm Springs restaurant on February 14, 1998, celebrating Valentine's Day with Dutchie, when he collapsed and was rushed to a hospital in Rancho Mirage, California. He never regained consciousness, and died of cardiac arrest with resulting brain damage there four days later.[2] Palm Springs is a famed Riverside County, California, desert resort city, approximately 110 miles east of Los Angeles. ... There are several famous people named Steve Stone: Steve Stone (baseball player), an American baseball player Steve Stone (footballer), an English football (soccer) player This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Saint Valentines Day or Valentines Day is on February 14. ... Rancho Mirage is a city located in Riverside County, California. ...


Though best known and honoured for baseball work, Caray had also called Missouri Tigers football and St. Louis Hawks basketball in the 1950s and '60s. Nationally, he broadcast three World Series (all involving the Cardinals) and three Cotton Bowl games. The Missouri Tigers athletics programs include the extramural and intramural sports teams of the University of Missouri–Columbia. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The Atlanta Hawks are an American professional basketball team based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Basketball is a team sport in which two teams of five active players each try to score points against one another by throwing a ball through a 10-foot high hoop (the basket) under organized rules. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... For the Cotton Bowl stadium, see Cotton Bowl (stadium). ...


Personality and style

Caray's style became fodder for pop culture parody as well, including a memorable Saturday Night Live recurring sketch featuring Caray (played by Will Ferrell) as a host of a space and astronomy TV talk show, in which his questions to scientists and professors included whether or not they would eat the moon if it were made of spare ribs. The sketch continued after Caray's death. When asked by Joan Allen (impersonating NASA flight director Linda Ham) about his death, Will Ferrell as Caray replied, "What's your point?" The Bob and Tom Show also had a Harry Caray parody show called "After Hours Sports" which eventually became "Afterlife Sports" after Caray's death. In 2005, the cartoon Codename: Kids Next Door had two announcers reporting a baseball game. One was a parody of Caray, the other, Howard Cosell. The most widely-accepted impersonation of Caray in Chicago was done by Jim Volkman, heard most often on the Loop and AM1000. Also, comedian Artie Lange, in his standup, talks about Caray's passively racist attitude. Popular culture, or pop culture, is the vernacular (peoples) culture that prevails in a modern society. ... Saturday Night Live (SNL) is a weekly late night 91-minute American comedy-variety show based in New York City that has been broadcast live by NBC on Saturday nights since October 11, 1975. ... John William Will Ferrell (born July 16, 1967[1]) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated American comedian, impressionist, writer and actor who first established himself as a cast member of Saturday Night Live, and has since gone on to a successful film career. ... Spare ribs with Chinese barbecue sauce Spare ribs (also called spareribs) are a variety of pork ribs, eaten in various cuisines around the world. ... Joan Allen in a scene from The Contender Joan Allen (b. ... The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an agency of the United States federal government, responsible for the nations public space program. ... Chief of Flight Operations during a NASA space mission. ... Linda Ham addresses the Columbia Accident Investigation Board following the loss of Space Shuttle Columbia on February 1, 2003. ... John William Will Ferrell (born July 16, 1967[1]) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated American comedian, impressionist, writer and actor who first established himself as a cast member of Saturday Night Live, and has since gone on to a successful film career. ... The Bob & Tom Show is a radio program established by Bob Kevoian and Tom Griswold at radio station WFBQ in Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1983. ... The year 2005 in television involved some significant events. ... The Codename: Kids Next Door logo. ... Howard William Cosell, born Howard William Cohen (March 25, 1918 – April 23, 1995) was an American sports journalist on American television. ... WLUP (97. ... WMVP (1000 AM) is the callsign of a commercial radio station in Chicago. ... Arthur Steven Lange, Jr. ...


Caray had a number of broadcasting partners and colleagues through the years, some of whom made known their dislike of the man. Milo Hamilton, especially, never forgave Caray for taking what he thought was his job-to-be as the Cubs anchor once Brickhouse retired. Caray's long-time St. Louis partner, Jack Buck, was guarded in his comments about Caray in his own autobiography, while acknowledging that he sometimes felt held-back by Caray. However, Caray also didn't lack for broadcast companions who played well with and off him. With the White Sox his longest-lasting partner was the eccentric and knowledgeable former outfielder Jimmy Piersall; with the Cubs, his partner was the equally knowledgeable but rather less eccentric former pitcher Steve Stone. Milo Hamilton (born September 2, 1927 in Fairfield, Iowa) has been a Major League Baseball announcer for a number of decades, with a variety of teams. ... John Francis Jack Buck (August 21, 1924 – June 18, 2002), born in Holyoke, Massachusetts, was an American sportscaster, best known for his work announcing Major League Baseball games of the St. ... James Anthony Piersall (born November 14, 1929 in Waterbury, Connecticut) is a former center fielder in Major League Baseball. ... Steven Michael Stone (born July 14, 1947 in Euclid, Ohio) is a former American Major League Baseball player and current sportscaster. ...


Caray was well-known for his frequent exclamation of "Holy Cow!". He trained himself to say that expression, to avoid any chance of using profanity on the air. (This on-air expression was later used by New York Yankees broadcaster Phil Rizzuto.) Caray also avoided any risk of mis-calling a home run, using what became a trademark home run call: It might be . . . it could be . . . it IS! A home run! Holy cow! On p.51-52 of his 1989 autobiography, Holy Cow!, Caray said he first used the "It might be..." part of that expression on the air while covering a college baseball torunament in Kalamazoo, Michigan, in the early 1940s. He also said that was probably the first time he said "Holy cow!" on the air, an expression he used all his life in situations where his street-kid tendency to use X-rated language was unacceptable. Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Philip Francis Rizzuto (born Fiero Francis Rizzuto on September 25, 1917) is a former Major League Baseball player and radio/television sports announcer, known both for his skills as a player and his popular but idiosyncratic style as a broadcaster. ... Nickname: Location of Kalamazoo within Kalamazoo County, Michigan Coordinates: , Counties Kalamazoo County Incorporation 1883 Government  - Type Council-Manager  - Mayor Hannah McKinney Area  - City  25. ...


His catchphrases of "Holy Cow!" and "Cubs win! Cubs win!" after every Cub triumph, which always seemed to represent genuine, unfeigned enthusiasm, carrying on the upbeat tradition of his predecessor Jack Brickhouse. While with the White Sox, of course, he had exclaimed "Sox win! Sox win!" and "Cardinals win! Cardinals win!" when with St. Louis. He said later that his firing from the Cardinals changed his outlook and made him realize that his passion was for the game itself, and the fans, more than anything else. Jack Brickhouse (January 24, 1916 - August 6, 1998) was an American sports broadcast announcer. ...


In 1987 the Cubs had Ryne Sandberg, Jim Sundberg, and Scott Sanderson on the roster. Caray often confused these names and it was not uncommon for him to refer to "Jim Sandberg", "Ryne Sanderson", or "Scott Sundberg." Ryne Dee Sandberg (born September 18, 1959 in Spokane, Washington), nicknamed Ryno, is a former second baseman in Major League Baseball who spent nearly his entire career with the Chicago Cubs. ... James Howard Sundberg (born May 18, 1951 in Galesburg, Illinois) is a former professional baseball catcher for a number of teams, most significantly the Texas Rangers. ... Scott Douglas Sanderson (born July 22, 1956 in Dearborn, Michigan) is a former right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Montreal Expos, Chicago Cubs, Oakland Athletics, New York Yankees, California Angels, San Francisco Giants and Chicago White Sox. ...


Caray originally had a reputation for mastering all aspects of broadcasting - writing his own copy, conducting news interviews, writing and presenting editorials, covering other sports such as University of Missouri football, and hosting a sports talk program. The University of Missouri System is the designated public research and land-grant university system of the state of Missouri. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ...


The seventh-inning stretch

His famous seventh-inning stretch singing of "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" came about almost by accident, during his tenure with the White Sox. Habitually singing the song in the broadcast booth when it played by organist Nancy Faust, Caray was doing it one afternoon when WMAQ radio producer/broadcaster Jay Scott decided to open the booth mikes on him without his realizing it. (Scott had suggested the idea in a memo some years before, but Caray had rejected the idea. He accepted it once it caught on with the home fans.) For the rest of his career, Caray enthusiastically led the song's singing during the seventh-inning stretch, using a hand-held microphone and holding it out outside the booth window. And, he inserted the home team's name for "the home team" in the song's lyric, a practice that has been copied by fans around the majors singing the same song. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Sex and the City episode, see Take Me Out to the Ballgame (SATC episode). ... WMAQ is a callsign shared by three broadcast stations traditionally associated with NBC in Chicago: WMAQ (AM), 670 kHz: a pioneer broadcaster from 1922 to 2000 and a major part of Chicago and NBC radio history. ...


Many of these performances began with Caray speaking directly to the Wrigley faithful, either about the state of the day's game, or the Chicago weather, while the park organ held the opening chord of the song. Then with his trademark opening, "Alright! Lemme hear ya! Ah-One! Ah-Two! Ah-Three!" Harry would launch into his distinctive, down-tempo version of "Take Me Out to the Ballgame". For the lyrics "One, Two, Three, strikes you're out...." Harry would usually hold the microphone out to the crowd to punctuate the climactic end of the song. And if the visitors were ahead in that game, Harry would typically make a plea to the Cubs offense- "Let's Get Some Runs!"


The seventh-inning stretch routine became Caray's best-remembered trademark; after his death, the Cubs began a practice of inviting guest celebrities, local and national, to lead the singing Caray-style. The use of "guest conductors" has continued into the 2007 season.


Legacy

Harry Caray's body is interred in All Saints Cemetery in Des Plaines, Illinois. Incorporated City in 1925. ...


Following his death, during the entire 1998 season the Cubs wore a patch on the sleeves of their uniforms depicting a caricature of Caray. Cubs slugger Sammy Sosa dedicated each of his 66 home runs that season to Caray. For the book of comics by Daniel Clowes see Caricature (Daniel Clowes collection) A caricature of film comedian Charlie Chaplin. ... Samuel Sammy Peralta Sosa (born November 12, 1968 in San Pedro de Macorís, Dominican Republic) is a right fielder/designated hitter for the Texas Rangers of Major League Baseball. ...


His son Skip Caray and his grandson Chip Caray have followed him into the booth as baseball broadcasters. The younger Caray was actually hired by WGN-TV to work with his grandfather, but Harry died before that pairing could take place. Chip Caray replaced Harry as the Cubs' play-by-play announcer from 1998 to 2004. He was later hired to work with his father Skip on Atlanta Braves broadcasts. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Chip Caray Harry Christopher Chip Caray III (born 1965) is a television broadcaster for Turner Broadcasting System (TBS) and is also an occasional radio broadcaster and co-host of the pre-game and post-game shows on the Atlanta Braves Radio Network[1]. Chip is also very well known from... This year in baseball 1995 - 1996 - 1997 - 1998 - 1999 - 2000 - 2001 - 2002 - 2003 - 2004 - 2005 Events January-March January 5 - Don Sutton, a 324-game winner is elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame on his fifth try. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 2004 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 21, 35, 41, 42, 44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston...


Honors and special events

On October 23, 1987 Harry Caray's Restaurant opened in the Chicago Varnish Company Building, a Chicago Landmark building that is also listed on the National Register of Historic Places. There are now three restaurants, a 10-pin bowling alley, and an off-premises catering division which bear the Harry Caray name. The original restaurant has received numerous awards for its food and service, and features many items of memorabilia, even a "Holey Cow" (complete with holes!) wearing the trademark Harry Caray eyeglasses. October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... The Chicago Varnish Company Building, at 33 West Kinzie Street, was built in 1895 as the headquarters of one of the leading varnish manufacturers in the United States, the Chicago Varnish Company. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Landmarks of Chicago. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...


In 1989 the Baseball Hall of Fame presented Caray with the Ford C. Frick Award for "major contributions to baseball." He also has his own star on the St. Louis Walk of Fame. 1989 in baseball - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... The Ford C. Frick Award is an award bestowed annually by the Baseball Hall of Fame in the United States to a broadcaster for major contributions to baseball. ... The St. ...


Harry Caray narrated the intro theme for Home Run Derby, a 1959-60 television program where major league players participated in 9-inning home run-hitting contests for prize money.


Caray was spoofed by Will Ferrell in several popular Saturday Night Live sketches. These sketches include "Caray" revealing that The Sun is his favorite planet, that he would eat the moon if it were made of BBQ Spare Ribs, his fear of mad cow disease, and his question to Colin Quinn: "If you were a hotdog, would you eat yourself?" http://youtube.com/watch?v=hMebclpHbo4, John William Will Ferrell (born July 16, 1967[1]) is an Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated American comedian, impressionist, writer and actor who first established himself as a cast member of Saturday Night Live, and has since gone on to a successful film career. ... Saturday Night Live (SNL) is a weekly late night 91-minute American comedy-variety show based in New York City that has been broadcast live by NBC on Saturday nights since October 11, 1975. ... Look up sun in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Apparent magnitude: up to -12. ... A member of the Airpork Crew barbecue team prepares pork shoulder at the Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest. ... Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or commonly mad cow disease) is a fatal, neurodegenerative disease of cattle, which infects by a mechanism that shocked biologists on its discovery in late 20th century and appears transmissible to humans. ... Colin Quinn Colin Quinn (born June 6, 1959) is a Irish-American comedian, best known for his five years in the cast of Saturday Night Live. ...


Caray can be briefly heard in the 1986 film Ferris Bueller's Day Off, as a Cub game is shown on a TV in a pizza parlor. Ferris Buellers Day Off is a 1986 comedy film written and directed by John Hughes. ...


Of course, as Tim Rowley of Des Moines (see chip caray) states so clearly, the main (and most important reason why) Harry is so famous is because of the quite odd way he spells his last name. Take me out to the ball game is only secondary to his legacy according to Tim Rowley of Des Moines.


External links

Awards
Preceded by
Lindsey Nelson
Ford C. Frick Award
1989
Succeeded by
Byrum Saam
Preceded by
Jack Brickhouse
Chicago Cubs Television Play-By-Play Announcer
1982–1997
Succeeded by
Chip Caray

  Results from FactBites:
 
WGNTV.com | WGN TV | Chicago's CW | A Tribune to Harry Caray (663 words)
Caray reached a major milestone on July 23, 1989, when he was honored as the winner of the Ford Frick Award at the annual induction ceremonies at the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York.
Caray was born Harry Christopher Carabina of French-Rumanian and Italian parentage in one of the poorest sections of St. Louis.
Caray was also the owner of a popular eatery in downtown Chicago, Harry Caray's Restaurant, which was established in October of 1987.
Harry Caray at AllExperts (1086 words)
Harry Caray (Harry Christopher Carabina, March 1, 1914 — February 18, 1998), was a beloved TV and radio broadcaster for four Major League Baseball teams, lastly the Chicago Cubs of the National League.
Caray was well known to his Cardinal radio audience for drinking and advertising a competing brand of beer before the Busch family acquisition of the team.
Harry Caray is interred in All Saints Cemetery in Des Plaines, Illinois.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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