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Encyclopedia > Harry Belafonte
Harry Belafonte
Belafonte (center) at the 1963 Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C with Sidney Poitier and Charlton Heston.
Background information
Birth name Harold George Belafonete, Jr.[1]
Born March 1 1927 (1927 -03-01) (age 81)
Years active (Music) 19492003
Label(s) RCA Victor
CBS
EMI
Island

Harold George Belafonte, Jr. (born March 1, 1927) is an American musician, actor and social activist. One of the most successful Jamaican musicians in history, he was dubbed the "King of Calypso" for popularizing the Caribbean musical style in the 1950s. Belafonte is perhaps best known for singing the "Banana Boat Song", with its signature lyric "Day-O". Throughout his career, he has been an advocate for civil rights and humanitarian causes. In recent years he has been a vocal critic of the policies of the Bush Administration. Image File history File links Poitier_Belafonte_Heston_Civil_Rights_March_1963. ... March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. ... Not to be confused with Sydney Tamiia Poitier. ... Charlton Heston (born October 4, 1924) is an US-american film actor, known for playing larger-than-life heroic roles such as Moses in The Ten Commandments, Colonel George Taylor in Planet of the Apes, and Judah Ben-Hur in Ben-Hur. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... See also: 1948 in music, other events of 1949, 1950 in music and the list of years in music. // Events Mitch Miller begins his career as one of the 20th centurys most successful record producers at Mercury Eddie Fisher signs with RCA Bob Hope suggests that Anthony Benedetto change... See also: 2003 in music (UK) Musical groups established in 2003 Record labels established in 2003 // January - following an investigation by The International Federation of the Phonographic Industry and London detectives, police raids in England and the Netherlands recover nearly 500 original Beatles studio tapes, recorded during the Let It... In the music industry, a record label can be a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Sony BMG Music Entertainment is the result of a 50/50 joint venture between Sony Music Entertainment (part of Sony) and BMG Entertainment (part of Bertelsmann AG) completed in August 2004. ... Columbia Records is the oldest continually used brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888. ... For other uses, see EMI (disambiguation). ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Social activists are people who act as the conscience and voice of many individuals within a society. ... Calypso is a style of Afro-Caribbean music which originated in Trinidad at about the start of the 20th century. ... West Indies redirects here. ... The Banana Boat Song is a traditional Trinidadian Calypso folk song, whose best-known version was sung by Harry Belafonte and is the most well-known calypso. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Humanitarianism is the view that all people should be treated with the respect and dignity they deserve as human beings, and that advancing the well-being of humanity is a noble goal. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...

Contents

Biography

Youth and early career

Harold George Belafonete, Jr. (as spelled at birth) [2] was born in Harlem, New York, the son of Melvine (née Love), a domestic worker, and Harold George Belafonete, Sr., a chef in the British Navy and native of the island Martinique.[3][4][5][6] From 1935 to 1939, he lived with his grandmother in the village of Aboukir in her native country of Jamaica. When he returned to New York City he attended George Washington High School[7] after which he joined the Navy and served during World War II.[8] At the end of the 1940s, he took classes in acting alongside Marlon Brando, Tony Curtis, Walter Matthau, Bea Arthur, and Sidney Poitier, while performing with the American Negro Theatre. He subsequently received a Tony Award for his participation in the Broadway revue John Murray Anderson's Almanac. For other uses, see Harlem (disambiguation). ... This article is about the state. ... Née redirects here. ... For other uses, see Chef (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... George Washington High School is a secondary school located in the Washington Heights section of Manhattan in New York City, New York. ... USN redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Marlon Brando, Jr. ... For other persons named Tony Curtis, see Tony Curtis (disambiguation). ... Walter Matthau (October 1, 1920 – July 1, 2000) was an Academy Award-winning American comedy actor best known for his role as Oscar Madison in The Odd Couple and his frequent collaborations with fellow Odd Couple star Jack Lemmon. ... Beatrice Arthur as Maude Findlay on Maude. ... Not to be confused with Sydney Tamiia Poitier. ... The American Negro Theater (ANT) was formed in Harlem on June 5, 1940 by writer Abram Hill and actor Frederick ONeal. ... What is popularly called the Tony Award (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater, primarily honoring productions on Broadway in New York. ... John Murray Andersons Almanac opened on December 10, 1953 at New Yorks Imperial Theatre. ...


Music career

Calypso (1956)
Calypso (1956)

Belafonte started his career in music as a club singer in New York, to pay for his acting classes. The first time he appeared in front of an audience he was backed by the Charlie Parker band, which included Charlie Parker himself, Max Roach, and Miles Davis among others. At first he was a pop singer, launching his recording career on the Jubilee label in 1949, but later he developed a keen interest in folk music, learning material through the Library of Congress' American folk songs archives. With guitarist and friend Millard Thomas, Belafonte soon made his debut at the legendary jazz club The Village Vanguard. Image File history File links Belafontecalypso. ... Image File history File links Belafontecalypso. ... Calypso is an album by Harry Belafonte, released by RCA Victor in 1956. ... For other persons of the same name, see Charles Parker. ... Maxwell Lemuel Roach (January 10, 1924 – August 16, 2007) was a bebop/hard bop percussionist, drummer, and composer. ... Miles Dewey Davis III (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) was an American jazz musician, widely considered to be one of the most influential of the 20th century. ... Jubilee Records was a record company specializing in rhythm and blues along with novelty records. ... Folk song redirects here. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... The Village Vanguard (photo Josh Staiger) The Village Vanguard is a jazz club, located at 178 Seventh Avenue South (just below West 11th St. ...


In 1952 he received a contract with RCA Victor. His first full-release single was Matilda, recorded April 27, 1953, which went on to remain his 'signature' song throughout his career. [9] His breakthrough album Calypso (1956) became the first LP to sell over 1 million copies (Bing Crosby's White Christmas and Tennessee Ernie Ford's Sixteen Tons, both singles, had previously surpassed the 1 million mark). The album is number four on Billboard's "Top 100 Album" list for having spent 31 weeks at number 1, 58 weeks in the top ten, and 99 weeks on the U.S. charts. The album introduced American audiences to Calypso music and Belafonte was dubbed the "King of Calypso", a title he wore with some reservations. One of the songs included in the album is the now famous "Banana Boat Song," with its signature lyric "Day-O". While primarily known for his Calypso songs, Belafonte has recorded in many genres, including blues, folk, gospel, show tunes, and American standards. His second-best hit, which came immediately after "The Banana Boat Song", was the novelty tune "Mama Look at Bubu", also known as "Mama Look a Boo-Boo", in which he sings humorously about misbehaving and disrespectful children. Sony BMG Music Entertainment is the result of a 50/50 joint venture between Sony Music Entertainment (part of Sony) and BMG Entertainment (part of Bertelsmann AG) completed in August 2004. ... A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short recording of one or more separate tracks. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Calypso is an album by Harry Belafonte, released by RCA Victor in 1956. ... An LP Long playing (LP), either 10 or 12-inch diameter, 33 rpm (actually 33. ... Harry Lillis Bing Crosby (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American popular singer and Academy Award-winning actor whose career lasted from 1926 until his death in 1977. ... White Christmas is an Irving Berlin song whose lyrics reminisce about White Christmases. ... Tennessee Ernie Ford Ernest Jennings Ford (February 13, 1919 – October 17, 1991), better known by the stage name Tennessee Ernie Ford, was a pioneering U.S. recording artist and television host who enjoyed success in the country & western, pop, and gospel musical genres. ... Sixteen Tons is a song about the misery of coal mining, written in 1947 by U.S. country singer Merle Travis. ... A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short recording of one or more separate tracks. ... Billboard is a weekly American magazine devoted to the music industry. ... Calypso is a style of Afro-Caribbean music which originated in Trinidad at about the start of the 20th century. ... The Banana Boat Song is a traditional Trinidadian Calypso folk song, whose best-known version was sung by Harry Belafonte and is the most well-known calypso. ... Blues music redirects here. ... Folk song redirects here. ... Gospel music is a musical genre characterized by dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) referencing lyrics of a religious nature, particularly Christian. ... A show tune is a song designed and written for a musical theater production, such as the songs from: Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammersteins Oklahoma!, Carousel, South Pacific, The King and I, Flower Drum Song, The Sound of Music Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewes Brigadoon, Paint Your... Songwriter Harold Arlen (right) with singer Bing Crosby (left) and Decca Records owner Jack Kapp (center) Great American Songbook is an informal term referring to the interrelated music of Broadway musical theater, the Hollywood musical, and Tin Pan Alley, in a period that begins roughly in the 1920s and tapers...


Belafonte continued to record for RCA through the 1950s to the 1970s. Two live albums, both recorded at Carnegie Hall in 1959 and 1960, enjoyed critical and commercial success. He was one of many entertainers recruited by Frank Sinatra to perform at the Inaugural gala of President John F. Kennedy in 1961. That same year he released his second Calypso album, Jump Up Calypso, which went on to become another million seller. Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east stretch of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street. ... Sinatra redirects here. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Calypso might refer to one of several things: Calypso is the name of a sea nymph in Greek mythology; Calypso music is a style of Caribbean folk music; Calypso is the name of an album sung by Harry Belafonte; Calypso is the name of a moon of Saturn; 53 Kalypso...


During the 1960s he introduced a number of artists to American audiences, most notably South African singer Miriam Makeba and Greek singer Nana Mouskouri. His album Midnight Special (1962) featured the first-ever recorded appearance by a then young harmonica player named Bob Dylan. As The Beatles and other stars from Britain began to dominate the U.S. pop charts, Belafonte's impact as a commercial force diminished; 1964's Belafonte At The Greek Theatre was his last album to appear in Billboard's Top 40. Miriam Makeba performing at the Cape Town Jazz Festival in 2006. ... Nana Mouskouri (in Greek, Nανά Μούσχουρη), born as Ioanna Mouskouri on October 13, 1934, in Chania, Crete, Greece, is a singer of Greek origin. ... Midnight Special is a 1962 album by Jamaican-American singer, Harry Belafonte. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Billboard is a weekly American magazine devoted to the music industry. ...


Belafonte has received a Grammy Award for the albums Swing That Hammer (1960) and An Evening With Belafonte/Makeba (1965). The latter album dealt with the political plight of black South Africans under apartheid. He has been awarded six Gold Records.[10] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Republic of South Africa is a large republic located at the southern tip of the continent. ... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... The description Gold Album is applied to recorded music albums that have sold a minimum number of copies (in the US, currently 500,000 sales). ...


Belafonte's album output in the 1970s slowed after leaving RCA. He released only one album of original material in the 1980s, coinciding with a stronger focus on politics and activism. A soundtrack and video of a televised concert were released in 1997 by Island Records. The Long Road to Freedom, An Anthology of Black Music, a huge multi-artist project recorded during the 1960s and 1970s while he was still with RCA, was finally released by the label in 2001. Island Records is a record label that was founded by British record producers in Jamaica. ...

The "Turn the World Around" number on The Muppet Show.
The "Turn the World Around" number on The Muppet Show.

Belafonte was the first African-American man to win an Emmy, with his first solo TV special Tonight with Belafonte (1959). During the 1960s he appeared in a number of TV specials, alongside such artists as Julie Andrews, Petula Clark, Lena Horne, and Nana Mouskouri. He was also a guest star on a memorable episode of The Muppet Show in 1978, in which he sang his signature song "Day-O" on television for the very first time. However, the episode is best known for Belafonte singing the spiritual song, "Turn the World Around", that is performed with Muppets designed like African tribal masks. It has become one of the most famous performances in the series. It was reported to be Jim Henson's favorite episode, and Belafonte did a reprise of the song at Henson's funeral in 1990. Harry Belafonte on The Muppet Show This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... Harry Belafonte on The Muppet Show This is a screenshot of a copyrighted website, video game graphic, computer program graphic, television broadcast, or film. ... The Muppet Show was a television program featuring a cast of Muppets (diverse hand-operated puppets, typically with oversized eyes and large moving mouths) produced by Jim Henson and his team from 1976 to 1981. ... An Emmy Award. ... Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, DBE (born Julia Elizabeth Wells[1] on 1 October 1935[2]) is an award-winning English actress, singer, author and cultural icon. ... Petula Clark, CBE (born 15 November 1932), is an English singer, actress and composer best known for her upbeat popular international hits of the 1960s. ... Lena Mary Calhoun Horne (born June 30, 1917 in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, New York City, New York) is a popular singer of African-American descent. ... Nana Mouskouri (in Greek, Nανά Μούσχουρη), born as Ioanna Mouskouri on October 13, 1934, in Chania, Crete, Greece, is a singer of Greek origin. ... The Muppet Show was a television program featuring a cast of Muppets (diverse hand-operated puppets, typically with oversized eyes and large moving mouths) produced by Jim Henson and his team from 1976 to 1981. ... Jim Henson, born James Maury Henson (September 24, 1936 – May 16, 1990), was the most widely known American puppeteer in modern American television history. ...


Harry Belafonte received the Kennedy Center Honors in 1989. He was awarded the National Medal of Arts in 1994 and he won a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2000. The National Medal of Arts is an award and title bestowed on selected honorees by the National Endowment for the Arts. ... The Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award is awarded by the Recording Academy to performers who, during their lifetimes, have made creative contributions of outstanding artistic significance to the field of recording [1]. This award is distinct from the Grammy Hall of Fame Award, which honors specific recordings rather than individuals, and...


Belafonte has been a major concert draw since his first world tour in 1956. He has continued to perform before audiences globally through the 1950s to the 2000s. He gave his last concert in 2003, and in a recent interview stated that he has since retired from performing.[11]


Film career

Poster for the film Odds Against Tomorrow.

Harry Belafonte has starred in several films. His first major film role was in Bright Road (1953), in which he appeared alongside Dorothy Dandridge. The two subsequently starred in Otto Preminger's hit musical Carmen Jones (1954). Ironically Belafonte's lyrics in the film were dubbed by an opera singer, as Belafonte's own singing voice was seen as unsuitable for the role. Using his star clout, Belafonte was subsequently able to realize several then controversial film roles. In 1957's Island in the Sun there are hints of an affair between Belafonte's character and Joan Fontaine. In 1959 he starred in and produced Robert Wise's Odds Against Tomorrow, in which he plays a bank robber, uncomfortably teamed with a racist partner (Robert Ryan). He also co-starred with Inger Stevens in The World, the Flesh and the Devil. Image File history File links Oddsagainsttomorrow. ... Image File history File links Oddsagainsttomorrow. ... Harry Belafonte starred in and produced Odds Against Tomorrow (1959), the first film noir with a black protagonist. ... Dorothy Jean Dandridge (November 9, 1922–September 8, 1965) was an American actress. ... Otto Ludwig Preminger (December 5, 1906 – April 23, 1986) was a film director. ... Carmen Jones was a 1943 Broadway musical, later also performed a 1954 musical film; the play also ran for a season in 1991 at Londons Old Vic and most recently in Londons Royal Festival Hall in the South Bank Centre in 2007[1]. It is an updating of... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... This article needs cleanup. ... Joan Fontaine (born October 22, 1917) is an Academy Award-winning British American actress, who became an American citizen in April 1943. ... Robert Wise (September 10, 1914 – September 14, 2005) was a sound effects editor, film editor, and Academy Award-winning American film producer and director. ... Harry Belafonte starred in and produced Odds Against Tomorrow (1959), the first film noir with a black protagonist. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota... Robert Ryan (November 11, 1909 – July 11, 1973) was an Irish-American Oscar and Bafta award-nominated actor born in Chicago, Illinois. ... Inger Stevens (October 18, 1934 – April 30, 1970) was an American movie and TV actress. ...


Belafonte was offered the role of Porgy in Otto Preminger's Porgy and Bess, but refused the role, because he objected to the racial stereotyping of African Americans in the story. Feeling dissatisfied with the film roles available to him, he abandoned film in favour of his music career during the 1960s. Otto Ludwig Preminger (December 5, 1906 – April 23, 1986) was a film director. ... The cast of Porgy and Bess during the Boston try-out prior to the Broadway opening. ... An ethnic stereotype may be either (A) an overly-simplified representation of the typical characteristics of members of an ethnic group, or (B) a falsehood that has been repeated so many times that is accepted by many people as generally true. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ...


In the early 1970s Belafonte briefly resurfaced in a number of films including two films in which he starred alongside Sidney Poitier, Buck and the Preacher (1972) and Uptown Saturday Night (1974). Not to be confused with Sydney Tamiia Poitier. ... Uptown Saturday Night is a 1974 comedy-film written by Richard Wesley, and directed by Sidney Poitier. ...


In 1984, Belafonte produced and scored the musical film Beat Street, dealing with the rise of hip-hop culture. A film score is a set of musical compositions written to accompany a film. ... The musical film is a film genre in which several songs sung by the characters are interwoven into the narrative. ... Beat Street is a 1984 mainstream hip hop dramatic feature film, and the second following Breakin. It is set in New York City during the popularity rise of hip hop culture in the early 1980s. ... For other uses, see Hip hop (disambiguation). ...


Belafonte would not star in a major film again until the mid-1990s, when he appeared alongside John Travolta in the race-reverse drama White Man's Burden (1995) and in Robert Altman's jazz age drama Kansas City (1996). He also starred as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States in the TV drama Swing Vote (1999). John Joseph Travolta (born February 18, 1954) is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor, dancer, and singer, best known for his leading roles in films such as Saturday Night Fever, Grease and Pulp Fiction. ... White Mans Burden is a 1996 dramatic film about racism in an alternate America where African Americans and Caucasian Americans have reversed cultural roles. ... For other persons named Robert Altman, see Robert Altman (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Kansas City is a 1996 film, directed by Robert Altman, and featuring numerous jazz tracks. ... Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States are the members of the Supreme Court of the United States other than the Chief Justice of the United States. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Swing vote is a multi-genre band with Jack, Marc, Ryan and Alex hailing from New Jersey. ...


In late 2006, Belafonte appeared in the role of Nelson, a friend of an employee of the Ambassador Hotel played by Anthony Hopkins, in Bobby, Emilio Estevez's ensemble drama about the assassination of Robert Kennedy. The Ambassadors Cocoanut Grove circa the late 1950s. ... For the composer, see Antony Hopkins. ... Bobby, released in 1973, is a popular film directed by Raj Kapoor. ... Emilio Estévez (born May 12, 1962) is an American actor, director and writer. ... Robert Kennedy Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy, also called RFK (November 20, 1925–June 6, 1968) was the younger brother of President John F. Kennedy, and was appointed by his brother as Attorney General for his administration. ...


Political and humanitarian activism

Belafonte's political beliefs are greatly inspired by the man that he still views to this day as his mentor, singer and activist Paul Robeson.[12] Paul Robeson was in his time a controversial figure for strongly supporting the Soviet Union throughout the Cold War. He strongly opposed racial prejudice in the United States, and western colonialism in Africa. Paul LeRoy Bustill Robeson (April 9, 1898 – January 23, 1976) was a multi-lingual American actor, athlete, bass-baritone concert singer, writer, civil rights activist, fellow traveler, Spingarn Medal winner, and Stalin Peace Prize laureate. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Benign colonialism be merged into this article or section. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ...


Like Robeson and other African-American entertainers, Belafonte's success in the arts did not protect him from racial discrimination, particularly in the South of the United States. As a result, he refused to perform in the South of the U.S. from 1954 until 1961. In 1960, President John F. Kennedy named Belafonte as cultural advisor to the Peace Corps. Belafonte was an early supporter of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950s and one of Martin Luther King's confidants. He provided for King's family, since King made only $8,000 a year as a preacher. Like many civil rights activists, he was blacklisted during the McCarthy era. He bailed King out of the Birmingham City Jail and raised thousands of dollars to release other imprisoned civil rights protesters. He financed the Freedom Rides, supported voter registration drives, and helped to organize the March on Washington in 1963. Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... An African-American drinks out of a water fountain marked for colored in 1939 at a street car terminal in Oklahoma City. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... It has been suggested that Crisis corps be merged into this article or section. ... Historically, the civil rights movement was a concentrated period of time around the world of approximately one generation (1960-1980) wherein there was much worldwide civil unrest and popular rebellion. ... “Martin Luther King” redirects here. ... A blacklist is a list or register of people who, for one reason or another, are being denied a particular privilege, service, or mobility. ... This article is about the U.S. senator from Wisconsin (1947-1957). ... Nickname: Location in Jefferson County in the state of Alabama Coordinates: , Country State Counties Jefferson, Shelby Incorporated December 19, 1871 Government  - Type Mayor - Council  - Mayor Bernard Kincaid (Current) Larry Langford (Mayor-Elect) Area  - City 151. ... The Freedom Rides were a series of nonviolent, direct demonstrations performed in 1961 as part of the U.S. civil rights movement. ... Voter registration is the shit in some democracies for citizens to check in with some central registry before being allowed to vote in elections. ... Demonstrator at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom was a political rally that took place on August 28, 1963. ...

Belafonte speaking at the 1963 Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C
Belafonte speaking at the 1963 Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C

In 1968, Belafonte appeared on a Petula Clark primetime television special on NBC. In the middle of a song, Clark smiled and briefly touched Belafonte's arm, which made the show's sponsor, Plymouth Motors, nervous. Plymouth wanted to cut out the segment, but Clark, who had ownership of the special, told NBC that the performance would be shown intact or she would not allow the special to be aired at all. American newspapers published articles reporting the controversy and, when the special aired, it grabbed high viewing figures. Image File history File links Harry_Belafonte_Civil_Rights_March_1963. ... Image File history File links Harry_Belafonte_Civil_Rights_March_1963. ... March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. ... Petula Clark, CBE (born 15 November 1932), is an English singer, actress and composer best known for her upbeat popular international hits of the 1960s. ... This article is about the television network. ... Plymouth was a brand of automobile based in the United States, marketed by the Chrysler Corporation from 1928 to 2001. ...


Belafonte appeared on The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour and performed a controversial "Mardi Gras" number with footage intercut from the 1968 Democratic National Convention riots. CBS censors deleted the entire segment from the program. The Smothers Brothers are an American musical-comedy team, formed by real-life brothers Tom and Dick Smothers. ... For other uses, see Mardi Gras (disambiguation). ... The 1968 National Convention of the U.S. Democratic Party was held at International Amphitheatre in Chicago, Illinois, from August 26 to August 29, 1968, for the purposes of choosing the Democratic nominee for the 1968 U.S. presidential election. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ...


In 1985, he was one of the organizers behind the Grammy Award winning song "We Are the World," a multi-artist effort to raise funds for Africa, and performed in the Live Aid concert that same year. Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... Not to be confused with We Are Here To Change The World, a song that was featured in Captain EO. For the album with the same title, see We Are the World (album). ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... Ethiopia, as its borders were in 1985. ...


In 1987, he received an appointment to UNICEF as a goodwill ambassador. Following his appointment, Belafonte travelled to Dakar, Senegal, where he served as chairman of the International Symposium of Artists and Intellectuals for African Children. He also helped to raise funds, alongside more than 20 other artists, in the largest concert ever held in sub-Saharan Africa. In 1994 he went on a mission to Rwanda, and launched a media campaign to raise awareness of the needs of Rwandan children. In 2001 he went to South Africa to support the campaign against HIV/AIDS. In 2002, Africare awarded him the Bishop John T. Walker Distinguished Humanitarian Service Award for his efforts to assist Africa. In 2004 Belafonte went to Kenya to stress the importance of educating children in the region. UNICEF Logo The United Nations Childrens Fund or UNICEF (Arabic: ; French: ; Spanish: ) was established by the United Nations General Assembly on December 11, 1946. ... (City of Dakar, divided into 19 communes darrondissement) City proper (commune) Région Dakar Département Dakar Mayor Pape Diop (PDS) (since 2002) Area 82. ... Satellite image of Africa, showing the ecological break that defines the sub-Saharan area African countries considered sub-Saharan Sub-Saharan Africa is a geographical term used to describe the area of the African continent which lies south of the Sahara, or those African countries which are fully or partially... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Africare is a non-profit organization specialized in development aid for Africa. ... The Bishop John T. Walker Distinguished Humanitarian Service Award (BWD or Bishop Walker Dinner) is an award presented annually by Africare to recognize those whose work has made a significant impact on raising the standard of living in Africa. ...


Belafonte has been involved in prostate cancer advocacy since 1996, when he was diagnosed and successfully treated for the disease.[13] HRPC redirects here. ...


On June 27, 2006, Belafonte was the recipient of the BET Humanitarian Award at the 2006 BET Awards. He was named one of nine 2006 Impact Award recipients by AARP The Magazine.[14] is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bet may refer to: Look up bet in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... AARP logo The American Association of Retired Persons, or AARP, is a United States-based non-government organization (a special interest group) dedicated to the interests of persons aged 50 and over. ...


Belafonte has been a longtime critic of U.S. foreign policy. He began making controversial political statements on this subject in the early 1980s. He has, at various times, made statements opposing the U.S. embargo on Cuba, praising Soviet peace initiatives, attacking the U.S. invasion of Grenada, praising the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, honoring Ethel and Julius Rosenberg and praising Fidel Castro.[15] President of the United States, George W. Bush (right) at Camp David in March 2003, hosting the British Prime Minister Tony Blair. ... Soviet redirects here. ... The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ... A banner of the Abraham Lincoln Battalion. ... The Rosenbergs Ethel Greenglass Rosenberg (September 28, 1915 – June 19, 1953) and Julius Rosenberg (May 12, 1918 – June 19, 1953) were American citizens and CPUSA members who were thrust into the world spotlight when they were tried, convicted, and executed for spying for the Soviet Union. ... Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz (born on August 13, 1926) is the current President of Cuba but on indefinite medical hiatus. ...


Harry Belafonte is additionally known for his visit to Cuba which helped ensure hip-hop’s place in Cuban society. According to Geoffrey Baker’s article “Hip hop, Revolucion! Nationalizing Rap n Cuba,” in 1999, Belafonte met with representatives of the rap community immediately before meeting with Fidel Castro. This meeting resulted in Castro’s personal approval of (and hence the government’s involvement in), the incorporation of rap into his country’s culture. [16] In a 2003 interview, Belafonte reflected upon this meeting’s influence: “When I went back to Havana a couple years later, the people in the hip-hop community came to see me and we hung out for a bit. They thanked me profusely and I said, why? and they said, because, your little conversation with Fidel and the Minister of Culture on hip-hop led to there being a special division within the ministry and we've got our own studio.” [17]


Belafonte was involved in the anti-apartheid movement. He was the Master of Ceremonies at a reception honoring African National Congress President Oliver R. Tambo at Roosevelt House, Hunter College in New York City. The reception was held by the American Committee on Africa (ACOA) and The Africa Fund. [18] In December 2007 he endorsed John Edwards for the 2008 Presidential Election. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... December 2007 is the twelfth month of that year and has yet to occur. ... This article is about the American attorney and politician. ... ...


In December 2007, Belafonte gave the keynote address and was awarded the Chief Justice Earl Warren Civil Liberties Award at the ACLU of Northern California's annual Bill of Rights Day Celebration.


Opposition to the Bush Administration

Belafonte achieved widespread attention for his political views in 2002 when he began making a series of comments about President George W. Bush, his administration and the Iraq War. George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ...


During an interview with Ted Leitner for San Diego's 760 KFMB, in October 2002, Belafonte referenced a quote made by Malcolm X.[19] Belafonte said: Ted Leitner is a former KFMB News 8 sportscaster and former longtime radioman of 760 KFMB as sportscaster for the San Diego Chargers. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Americas Finest City Location Location of San Diego within San Diego County Coordinates , Government County San Diego Mayor City Attorney         City Council District One District Two District Three District Four District Five District Six District Seven District Eight Jerry Sanders (R) Michael Aguirre Scott Peters Kevin... October 2002 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December // Events October 31, 2002 The Russian Health Minister Yuri Shevchenko has now stated that the incapacitating agent used in the storming of the Moscow theatre siege was a fentanyl derivative. ... Malcolm X, born Malcolm Little, also known as Detroit Red and Al-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz (Omaha, Nebraska, May 19, 1925 – February 21, 1965 in New York City) was a Muslim Minister and National Spokesman for the Nation of Islam. ...

"There is an old saying, in the days of slavery. There were those slaves who lived on the plantation, and there were those slaves who lived in the house. You got the privilege of living in the house if you served the master, do exactly the way the master intended to have you serve him. That gave you privilege. Colin Powell is committed to come into the house of the master, as long as he would serve the master, according to the master's purpose. And when Colin Powell dares to suggest something other than what the master wants to hear, he will be turned back out to pasture. And you don't hear much from those who live in the pasture."

Belafonte used the quote to characterize both former and current United States Secretary of State Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice, both African-Americans. Powell and Rice both responded, with Powell calling the remarks "unfortunate"[20] and Rice saying "I don't need Harry Belafonte to tell me what it means to be black".[21] The comment was brought back up in an interview with Amy Goodman for Democracy Now! in 2006.[22] Slave redirects here. ... General Colin Luther Powell, United States Army (Ret. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954) is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush to hold the office. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Democracy Now! is an independent, award-winning news and opinion radio program airing on over 300 stations across North America every weekday, as well as both satellite television networks. ...


In January 2006, Belafonte led a delegation of activists including actor Danny Glover and activist/professor Cornel West meeting with President of Venezuela Hugo Chávez. In 2005, Chávez, an outspoken Bush critic, initiated a program to provide cheaper heating fuel for poor people in several areas of the United States. Belafonte supported this initiative.[23] During the meeting with Chávez, Belafonte was quoted as saying, "No matter what the greatest tyrant in the world, the greatest terrorist in the world, George W. Bush says, we're here to tell you: Not hundreds, not thousands, but millions of the American people... support your revolution."[24] Belafonte and Glover met again with Chavez in 2006.[25] January 2006 : ← - January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad accuses European nations of trying to complete the Holocaust by creating a Jewish camp Israel in the Middle East. ... Danny Lebern Glover[1] (born July 22, 1946) is an American actor, film director, and political activist. ... Cornell West redirects here. ... List of Presidents of Venezuela José Antonio Páez (1830-1835) José María Vargas (1835-1837) Carlos Soublette (1837-1839) José Antonio Páez (1839-1843) Carlos Soublette (1843-1847) José Tadeo Monagas (1847-1851) José Gregorio Monagas (1851-1855) José Tadeo Monagas (1855-1858) Julián Castro (1858... Hugo Rafael Chávez Frías (pronounced ) (born July 28, 1954) is the current President of Venezuela. ... Terrorist redirects here. ...


The comment ignited a great deal of controversy. Hillary Clinton refused to acknowledge his presence at an awards ceremony that featured both of them.[26] AARP, which had just named him one of their 10 Impact Award honorees 2006, released a statement following the remarks, saying, "AARP does not condone the manner and tone which he has chosen and finds his comments completely unacceptable".[27] REDIRECT Hillary Rodham Clinton   This is a redirect from a title with another method of capitalisation. ... Current logo for AARP, in use since January 2007 For the AppleTalk protocol developed by Apple Computer, see AppleTalk address resolution protocol (AARP). ...


On a Martin Luther King, Jr. Day speech at Duke University in 2006, Belafonte compared the American government to the 9/11 hijackers, saying, "What is the difference between that terrorist and other terrorists?"[28] Martin Luther King Jr. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, United States. ... The date that commonly refers to the attacks on United States citizens on September 11, 2001 (see the September 11, 2001 Attacks). ...


In response to criticism about his remarks, Belafonte asked, "What do you call Bush when the war he put us in to date has killed almost as many Americans as died on 9/11 and the number of Americans wounded in war is almost triple? [...] By most definitions Bush can be considered a terrorist." When he was asked about his expectation of criticism for his remarks on the war in Iraq, Belafonte responded: "Bring it on. Dissent is central to any democracy".[29][30] Dissent is a sentiment or philosophy of non-agreement or opposition to an idea (eg. ...


In another interview, Belafonte remarked that while his comments may have been "hasty", nevertheless he felt the Bush administration suffered from "arrogance wedded to ignorance," and its policies around the world were "morally bankrupt".[31]


In January 2006, in a speech to the annual meeting of the Arts Presenters Members Conference, Belafonte referred to "the new Gestapo of Homeland Security" saying "You can be arrested and have no right to counsel!"[32] January 2006 : ← - January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad accuses European nations of trying to complete the Holocaust by creating a Jewish camp Israel in the Middle East. ... The   (contraction of Geheime Staatspolizei: “secret state police”) was the official secret police of Nazi Germany. ... For the United States Cabinet department, see United States Department of Homeland Security. ... The Right to a fair trial is an essential right in all countries respecting the rule of law. ...


During the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day speech at the Duke University in January 2006, Belafonte said that if he could choose his epitaph, it would be, "Harry Belafonte, Patriot".[33] Martin Luther King Jr. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, United States. ...


Family

Belafonte and Marguerite Byrd were married from 1948 to 1957. They have two daughters, Adrienne and Shari.


Adrienne Biesemeyer is a child/family Licensed Professional Counselor in West Virginia. Adrienne has a BA in Art from West Virginia State College and a Master of Arts Degree in Community Counseling from the West Virginia Graduate College. In 1997 with her daughter Rachel Blue,[34] Adrienne founded the Anir Foundation[35] and the Anir Experience. Anir focuses on humanitarian work in Southern Africa. Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) is a licensure for mental health professionals. ...


Shari Belafonte is a photographer, model, singer and actress. She is married to Sam Behrens. Mrs Belafonte is an avid cigar smoker On the cover of Playboy, September 2000 Shari Belafonte (born September 22, 1954) is an American actress. ... A photographer at the Calgary Folk Music Festival Paparazzi at the Tribeca Film Festival A photographer is a person who takes a photograph using a camera. ... A model is a person who poses or displays for purposes of art, fashion, or other products and advertising. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Sam Behrens Sam Behrens is most notably recognized from his role as Gregory Richards in Aaron Spellings Sunset Beach. ...


On March 8, 1957 Belafonte married Julie Robinson (former dancer with the Katherine Dunham Company).[36] They have two children, David and Gina Belafonte. is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ...


David is executive director of the family-held company Belafonte Enterprises Inc.[37] He married Malene in 2000 and their daughter Sarafina was born in 2003.[38]


Gina is a TV and film actress.[39] She is married to actor Scott McCray.


Belafonte's grandchildren include Adrienne's son, Brian,[40]and daughter, Rachel,[41] and David's daughter, Sarafina (b. 2003).[42] Gina & her husband have one child.


Discography

Harry Belafonte in John Murray Anderson's Almanac on Broadway, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1954
Harry Belafonte in John Murray Anderson's Almanac on Broadway, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1954

Image File history File links Harry_Belafonte_1954. ... Image File history File links Harry_Belafonte_1954. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Carl Van Vechten (June 17, 1880 – December 21, 1964) was an American writer and photographer who was a patron of the Harlem Renaissance and the literary executor of Gertrude Stein. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Calypso is an album by Harry Belafonte, released by RCA Victor in 1956. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... To Wish You A Merry Christmas is an album by Harry Belafonte Recorded May 27, 31, June 1, 3 and 8 of 1958 in Hollywood. ... Jan. ... Jan. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The cast of Porgy and Bess during the Boston try-out prior to the Broadway opening. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Belafonte at Carnegie Hall is a live album by Harry Belafonte. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump Up Calypso is an album by Harry Belafonte Sweetheart From Venezuela - 3:28 Go Down Emmanuel Road - 3:07 The Baby Boy - 3:22 Gloria - 3:08 Land of the Sea and Sun - 2:55 Goin Down Jordan - 3:34 Jump In The Line - 3:39 Kingston Market - 3... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Midnight Special is a 1962 album by Jamaican-American singer, Harry Belafonte. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Filmography

Belafonte in John Murray Anderson's Almanac on Broadway, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1954
Belafonte in John Murray Anderson's Almanac on Broadway, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1954

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1053x1536, 687 KB) Portrait of Harry Belafonte, Almanac, 1954 Feb. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1053x1536, 687 KB) Portrait of Harry Belafonte, Almanac, 1954 Feb. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Carl Van Vechten (June 17, 1880 – December 21, 1964) was an American writer and photographer who was a patron of the Harlem Renaissance and the literary executor of Gertrude Stein. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Carmen Jones was a 1943 Broadway musical, later also performed a 1954 musical film; the play also ran for a season in 1991 at Londons Old Vic and most recently in Londons Royal Festival Hall in the South Bank Centre in 2007[1]. It is an updating of... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... Island in the sun the 1957 film stars an ensemble cast including Dorothy Dandridge, Joan Collins, Harry Belafonte, and James Mason. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Harry Belafonte starred in and produced Odds Against Tomorrow (1959), the first film noir with a black protagonist. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Uptown Saturday Night is a 1974 comedy-film written by Richard Wesley, and directed by Sidney Poitier. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... For the Jimi Hendrix song, see 1983. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... The Player (1992) is a movie that tells the story of Griffin Mill (Tim Robbins), a Hollywood studio executive who believes he is being blackmailed by a screenwriter whose script he once rejected. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Prêt-à-Porter (English: Ready to Wear) is a 1994 satirical black comedy written, directed and produced by Robert Altman and shot during the Paris, France, Fashion Week with a host of international stars, models and designers. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... White Mans Burden is a 1996 dramatic film about racism in an alternate America where African Americans and Caucasian Americans have reversed cultural roles. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Kansas City is a 1996 film, directed by Robert Altman, and featuring numerous jazz tracks. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Fidel: The Untold Story was a documentary released in 2001 by Estela Bravo. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bobby is a Golden Globe Award-nominated drama film written and directed by Emilio Estevez. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Television work

Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Free to Be… You and Me is a record album and illustrated songbook for children, first released in November 1972, and later in 1974 as a television special, featuring songs and stories from celebrities (credited as Marlo Thomas and Friends). Using poetry, songs, and sketches, the basic concept was to... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... The Muppet Show was a television program featuring a cast of Muppets (diverse hand-operated puppets, typically with oversized eyes and large moving mouths) produced by Jim Henson and his team from 1976 to 1981. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Tanner on Tanner was a 2004 comedy and the sequel series to the 1988 Robert Altman written and Garry Trudeau directed mini-series about a failed presidential candidate. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The logo for When the Levees Broke shows the title on a depiction of a damaged New Orleans street sign When the Levees Broke, subtitled A Requiem in Four Acts is a 2006 documentary film directed by Spike Lee, about the devastation of New Orleans, Louisiana due to the failure... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Stage work

  • John Murray Anderson's Almanac (December 10, 1953 - June 26, 1954)
  • 3 for Tonight (April 6 - June 18, 1955)
  • Moonbirds (October 9 - October 10, 1959) (producer)
  • Belafonte at the Palace (December 15, 1959 - closing date unknown)
  • Asinamali! (April 23 - May 17, 1987) (producer)

Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.vinyltimemachine.com/BA_BZ/belafonte_harry/artist_belafonte_harry.htm
  2. ^ http://www.oracamminiamoeretti.com/oracamminiamoeretti/node/365
  3. ^ Hardy, Phil; Dave Laing (1990). The Faber Companion to Twentieth Century Music. Faber, pp. 54. ISBN 0571168485. 
  4. ^ Harry Belafonte Biography (1927-)
  5. ^ The African American Registry http://www.aaregistry.com/african_american_history/2442/Harry_Belafonte_an_entertainer_of_truth
  6. ^ "Harry Belafonte," "Calypso: A World Music" University of Southern Florida http://www.calypsoworld.org/noflash/artists-04.htm
  7. ^ Arenson, Karen W. "Commencements; Belafonte Lauds Diversity Of Baruch College Class", The New York Times, June 2, 2000. Accessed April 16, 2008. "(He said that he had not gotten past the first year at George Washington High School, and that the only college degrees he had were honorary ones.)"
  8. ^ The African American Registry http://www.aaregistry.com/african_american_history/2442/Harry_Belafonte_an_entertainer_of_truth
  9. ^ Harry Belafonte and Friends
  10. ^ [1]
  11. ^ «Besser als es jetzt ist, kann es nicht werden»
  12. ^ Bellefonte speech about Paul Robeson
  13. ^ Harry Belafonte and prostate cancer
  14. ^ Impact Awards 2006 Honorees
  15. ^ FrontPage Magazine
  16. ^ Baker, Geoffrey. 2005. "Hip hop Revolucion! Nationalizing Rap n Cuba." Ethnomusicology, 49, no. 3: 368-402
  17. ^ [2]
  18. ^ African Activist Archive Project
  19. ^ Jennings Hypes Saudi Opposition to Iraq War - 10/10/2002 - Media Research Center CyberAlert
  20. ^ CNN.com - Belafonte won't back down from Powell slave reference - Oct. 14, 2002
  21. ^ FOXNews.com - Powell, Rice Accused of Toeing the Line - Politics | Republican Party | Democratic Party | Political Spectrum
  22. ^ Democracy Now! | Harry Belafonte on Bush, Iraq, Hurricane Katrina and Having His Conversations with Martin Luther King Wiretapped by the FBI
  23. ^ Taipei Times - archives
  24. ^ Belafonte calls Bush ‘greatest terrorist’ - Americas - MSNBC.com
  25. ^ FOXNews.com - Chavez Repeats 'Devil' Comment at Harlem Event - International News | News of the World | Middle East News | Europe News
  26. ^ [3]
  27. ^ AARP Reacts to Comments by Harry Belafonte
  28. ^ Democracy Now! | Harry Belafonte on Bush, Iraq, Hurricane Katrina and Having His Conversations with Martin Luther King Wiretapped by the FBI
  29. ^ The Daily Beacon
  30. ^ The Daily Beacon
  31. ^ POLITICS-US: Belafonte on Thinking Outside the Ballot Box
  32. ^ FOXNews.com - Belafonte Blasts 'Gestapo' Security - Politics | Republican Party | Democratic Party | Political Spectrum
  33. ^ Harry Belafonte Speaks at Duke
  34. ^ Anir Experience
  35. ^ Anir Experience
  36. ^ Science Blog - UCLA News
  37. ^ Science Blog - UCLA News
  38. ^ David Belafonte - Biography
  39. ^ Science Blog - UCLA News
  40. ^ Harry Belafonte
  41. ^ Anir Experience
  42. ^ David Belafonte - Biography

The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Harry Belafonte at the Internet Movie Database
  • Internet Broadway Database
  • Harry Belafonte - a site of sites
  • Harry Belafonte discography
  • 2004 Global Exchange Human Rights Award - Belafonte's acceptance speech in San Francisco
  • Ubben Lecture at DePauw University
  • Democracy Now! transcript/MP3/video of interview by Amy Goodman, January 30, 2006
  • The Bigotry of Belafonte - by Andrew Sullivan, Salon.com, Oct. 25, 2002
  • "The Man Behind Belafonte's Music - Irving Burgie" - by Ronald David Jackson, video,
  • Discography at SonyBMG Masterworks
  • The HistoryMakers Biography and video clips
  • Harry Belafonte Appreciation Group on Imeem
  • Harry Belafonte: Belafonte At Carnegie Hall
The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Andrew Michael Sullivan (born August 10, 1963) is English, a self-described libertarian conservative author and political commentator, known for his often personal style of political analysis. ... Salon. ... For other uses, see Video (disambiguation). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Harry Belafonte - MSN Encarta (414 words)
Harry Belafonte, born in 1927, American folk singer, actor, producer, and activist for civil rights and humanitarian causes.
Born Harold George Belafonte in the Harlem section of New York City, he moved as a child with his mother to Jamaica, her native country.
Belafonte's interest in the plight of Africans suffering under apartheid inspired his critically acclaimed album Paradise in Ganzankulu (1988).
Harry Belafonte - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1448 words)
Belafonte was an early supporter of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950s and one of Martin Luther King's confidants.
Belafonte has been involved in prostate cancer advocacy since 1996, when he was diagnosed and successfully treated for the disease.
Belafonte used the quote to characterize both former and current United States Secretary of State Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice, both African-Americans, as "house slaves" for serving in Bush's cabinet, which he implied was racist, and for their refusal to stand against the 2003 invasion of Iraq.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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