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Encyclopedia > Harrow School
Harrow School
Mottoes Stet Fortuna Domus
(Latin:"Let the Fortune of the House Stand")
Donorum Dei Dispensatio Fidelis
(Latin:"The Faithful Dispensation of the Gifts of God")
Established 1572
Type Public, Boarding school
Head Master Barnaby J Lenon
Chairman of the Governors Mr Peter Siddons
Founder John Lyon of Preston
Location Harrow on the Hill
London Borough of Harrow
London
HA1 3 hp
England Flag of England
Staff ~100 (full-time)
Students ~800
Gender Male
Ages 13 to 18
Houses 11
School colours Blue & White           
Publication The Harrovian
Former pupils Old Harrovians
Badges Rampant Lion
Crossed Arrows
Website www.harrowschool.org.uk
Coordinates: 51°34′23″N 0°20′02″W / 51.573103, -0.333792

Harrow School is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys. The school is located in Harrow on the Hill in the London Borough of Harrow, England. It is one of the original nine English public schools as defined by the Public Schools Act 1868.[1] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... January 16 - Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk is tried for treason for his part in the Ridolfi plot to restore Catholicism in England. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... A boarding school is a usually fee-charging school where some or all pupils not only study, but also live during term time, with their fellow students and possibly teachers. ... John Lyon was an educated man who lived at Harrow on the Hill in North West London. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The London Borough of Harrow is a London borough of outer north-west London. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The London Borough of Harrow is a London borough of outer north-west London. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Public Schools Act 1868 was passed by the UK Parliament to regulate nine major English boys schools. ...


The school was founded in 1572 under a Royal Charter granted by Elizabeth I of England; although the school in some form has existed on the hill since 1243.[2] Today Harrow has an enrolment of approximately 800 pupils[3] spread across eleven houses,[4] all of whom board full-time at a cost of £26,445 per year (approximated US$53,000) as of 2007.[5] The majority of boarding houses were constructed in Victorian times, when the number of boys increased dramatically.[6] Students in Rome, Italy. ... For the ship of the same name, see Royal Charter (ship). ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... // Events Innocent IV was elected pope. ...


Harrow has many notable alumni, including seven former British Prime Ministers (most notably Winston Churchill), and the first Indian Prime Minister, Jawaharlal Nehru. In addition, 19 Old Harrovians have been awarded the Victoria Cross.[7] In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... Churchill redirects here. ... Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru (Hindi: , IPA: (November 14, 1889 – May 27, 1964) was a major political leader of the Congress Party, a pivotal figure in the Indian independence movement and the first Prime Minister of independent India. ... For other uses, see Victoria Cross (disambiguation). ...


Harrow is the traditional rival of Eton College and the two schools have a tradition of annual sporting fixtures, some of which have occurred for centuries. Most notable of these is the annual cricket game (dating back to 1805), which is held at Lord's Cricket Ground in London. The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys, founded in 1440 by King Henry VI. It is located in Eton, near Windsor in England, north of Windsor Castle, and... The Pavilion The Grand Stand Match in progress The Media Centre at Lords Cricket Ground This memorial stone to Lord Harris is in the Harris Garden at Lords Lords Cricket Ground is a cricket ground in St Johns Wood in London, at grid reference TQ268827. ...


The School Governors recently introduced Harrow to the international community by opening two new schools, one in Beijing, China, and Harrow International School in Bangkok, Thailand.[8] A twelfth school house is in the early stages of development. Peking redirects here. ... Location within Thailand Coordinates: , Country Settled Ayutthaya Period Founded as capital 21 April 1782 Government  - Type Special administrative area  - Governor Apirak Kosayothin Area  - City 1,568. ...

Contents

History

Harrow School was founded in February 1572 under the Royal Charter granted by Queen Elizabeth I to John Lyon, a local farmer.[9] His new School House was completed in 1615 and the School settled into its gradual growth towards fame.[7] Lyon died in 1592, leaving his assets to two causes, the lesser being the school, and by far the greater benefactor being the maintenance of a road to London, 10 miles away. It was only after the death of his wife in 1608 that the building of the first school building began. It was completed in 1615 and remains to this day, however it is now much larger Elizabeth I redirects here. ... John Lyon was an educated man who lived at Harrow on the Hill in North West London. ... Year 1592 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Events March 18 - Sissinios formally crowned Emperor of Ethiopia May 14 - Protestant Union founded in Auhausen. ...

The original Old Schools, as they were in 1615
The original Old Schools, as they were in 1615

At its foundation, the primary subject taught was Latin, and the only sport was archery. Although most boys were taught for free, their tuition paid for by Lyon's endowment, there were a number of fee-paying "foreigners" (boys from outside the parish). It was their presence that amplified the need for boarding facilities. By 1700 for every local there were two foreign pupils; this was used as a way to generate funds for the school. By 1876, the situation was so pronounced that John Lyon Lower School was brought under the authority of the governors of the Upper School so that the school remained within its charge of providing education for the boys of the parish. It is now known as The John Lyon School and is a prominent independent school in England, and maintains close links with Harrow.[9] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1041x1456, 636 KB) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1041x1456, 636 KB) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Archery is the practice of using a bow to shoot arrows. ... Events January 1 - Russia accepts Julian calendar. ... Year 1876 (MDCCCLXXVI) // January 31 - United States orders all Indigenous peoples in the United States to move onto reservations February 2 - The National League of Professional Baseball Clubs of Major League Baseball is formed. ... John Lyon School (previously The Lower School of John Lyon in Harrow) is a public day school in Harrow-on-the-Hill, England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


The 20th century saw the innovation of a central dining hall, the demolition of small houses and further modernisation of the curriculum. Presently there are approximately 800 boys boarding at Harrow.[3] Harrow has recently expanded into the global community, with educational institutions being introduced in Beijing and Bangkok, respectively.[8][10] Peking redirects here. ... Location within Thailand Coordinates: , Country Settled Ayutthaya Period Founded as capital 21 April 1782 Government  - Type Special administrative area  - Governor Apirak Kosayothin Area  - City 1,568. ...


James Stafford-Allen a noted Old Harrovian, is now the current DMG at Newcastle University


School traditions

A modern view from the library to the Old Schools, one of the sets of the Harry Potter films
A modern view from the library to the Old Schools, one of the sets of the Harry Potter films

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 939 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 939 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ...

Uniform

Weekday dress at Harrow consists of a white shirt, black tie, grey trousers, blue jumper and a bluer (the dark blue uniform jacket), and notably a boater style straw hat with a dark blue band.[11] Sunday dress consists of a black tailcoat, pinstriped trousers, a black waistcoat, black tie and a white shirt. Variations include a grey waistcoat for those in the top sports teams, a hat with black speckles for boys in the top cricket team, and various society ties worn to meetings of the respective societies. Bandleader Vincent Lopez in white tie, early 1920s Evening dress (also known as full evening dress) or white tie is the most formal dress code that exists for civilians today. ...


Songs

Songs have been an important part of Harrow life ever since John Farmer, a former head of music, wrote the first song in 1864. The school considers them to be a unifying force as they are sung by the boys in their houses every term. Songs are sung by the whole school to audiences of parents, former pupils of the school, and guests of honour that have, in the past, included members of the royal family and representatives from previous governments. The song Forty years on has become known as the school song, although in reality it is one of many.[12]


Harrow football

Harrow has its own unique style of soccer called Harrow Football.The purpose of the game is to score a 'base', which is achieved by kicking the ball between two vertical posts, a pair of which is at each end of the ground, similar to rugby posts but without a cross-bar. This may be done either from open play or from 'yards' and the kick may be of any height. An important feature is the offside rule whereby a player must be behind the ball before he can play it. Handling is allowed from a kick on the volley: the ball may be caught and a call of "yards" allows the catcher a space of three running yards unmolested and a free kick out of the hands.[13] Soccer redirects here. ... Harrow Football is a football style game played exclusively at Harrow School. ...


The Harrovian

The Harrovian is the school newspaper that is published weekly during term time. Its articles are written anonymously and the school stresses that the opinions expressed in the newspaper do not reflect school policy. The newspaper is published as both an organ of record and forum for comment, debate and the expression of individual opinions in the school. The Harrovian is also published online by the Harrow Association.[14]


Harrow terminology

Harrow is famous for its unusually large amount of jargon specific to the school that pupils use. The following words and phrases are used during everyday life at Harrow. The origins of many of the terms have been lost through the passage of time.[11]

Slang Term[11] Meaning[11]
Beak Teacher
Bill or Call-over A roll call held in each House that boys from the House must attend.
Bluer Dark blue uniform jacket
Copy Awarded for 12 pieces of good work or to the top boy in each subject every term
Dossers Heavy light grey flannel trousers worn by a select few - a Sixth Form Privilege. Originally three notes from three different beaks (teachers) had to be obtained stating that the boy was indeed 'a dosser'.
Double Lines on special paper set as a punishment
Ducker The swimming pool
Eccer Any form of games
Flannels School colours for sport
Georgic 500 double
Greyers The grey school trousers
Lock-up The deadline by which any work or punishments must be handed-in. It is also the time after which pupils may not leave their House without putting their name in the 'signing out' book.
Monitor (School) School prefect
Monitor (House) House prefect (called a Sixth Former or 'priv' in some houses)
Philathletic club The school's top athletes
Queue Time of day to see the house master for matters of business or concern
Remove Second year group at Harrow
Send up A very good piece of work
Shepherd A boy in the year above whose task it is to look after and mentor new boys in their first two weeks at the school
Skew Punishment given by a teacher for a poor or incomplete piece of work
Sunday dress Tailcoat and striped trousers worn on Sundays and other special occasions
Tolley up Permission to work after lights out
Torpids House sports team (under 16s)
Tosh A bath or shower
Trials Internal school examinations
Yarder Outdoor recreation area
Yearlings First year teams or groups

Georgics Book III, Shepherd with Flocks, Vatican The Georgics, published in 29 BC, is the second major work by the Latin poet Virgil. ...

Harrow curriculum

During their first year boys take English, French, Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, History, Geography, Latin or Classical Civilisation, Religious Studies, Art, Music, Design Technology and Information Technology. Greek, German or Spanish is offered to boys with good linguistic ability.[15] The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... For the song by Girls Aloud see Biology (song) Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: Βιολογία - βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, speech lit. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... HIStory – Past, Present and Future, Book I is a double album by American singer Michael Jackson released in June 1995 and remains Jacksons most conflicting and controversial release. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... Religious studies is the designation commonly used in the English-speaking world for a multi-disciplinary, secular study of religion that dates to the late 19th century in Europe (and the influential early work of such scholars as Friedrich Max Müller, in England, and Cornelius P. Tiele, in the... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... Design Technology is an IB course focusing on design, materials, and manufacturing processes. ... Information and communication technology spending in 2005 Information Technology (IT), as defined by the Information Technology Association of America (ITAA), is the study, design, development, implementation, support or management of computer-based information systems, particularly software applications and computer hardware. ...


During their second and third years, boys work towards their GCSE examinations. By the end of the third year all boys will have taken English Language, English Literature, French, Mathematics, Religious Studies and a Science. In addition to these core subjects pupils choose, in a wide variety of combinations, four other subjects from History, Geography, Latin, Classical Civilisation, Greek, German, Spanish, Italian, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Music, Art and Design Technology.[15] GCSE is an acronym that can refer to: General Certificate of Secondary Education global common subexpression elimination - an optimisation technique used by some compilers This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


In the Sixth Forms all pupils are expected to take AS-level in four main subjects, going on to A-level in at least three. There are many to choose from including English Literature, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Latin, Greek, History, Geography, Economics, Business Studies, Ancient History, Classical Civilisation, Political Studies, Religious Studies, Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Design Technology, Physical Education, Music, Music Technology, Art, History of Art, Theatre Studies, Statistics and Photography.[15] An A-level, short for Advanced Level, is a General Certificate of Education usually taken during Further Education and after GCSEs. ... An A-level, short for Advanced Level, is a General Certificate of Education usually taken during Further Education and after GCSEs. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Ancient redirects here. ... Political science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behavior. ... Photography [fәtɑgrәfi:],[foʊtɑgrәfi:] is the process of recording pictures by means of capturing light on a light-sensitive medium, such as a film or electronic sensor. ...


Harrow Campus

Old Schools
Old Schools

Harrow is not built on a campus, it is fully integrated into the surrounding area—there are private houses, and shops on the hill, and the main road through the hill is a normal public highway. The school is made up of some 300 acres of playing fields, golf course, woodland, gardens and its own working farm.


School houses

Harrow School divides its boarders into eleven houses, each of about seventy boys, with one further house, Gayton, used as an overflow. Each house has its own facilities and customs, and each competes in sporting events against the others. A boarding school is a usually fee-charging school where some or all pupils not only study, but also live during term time, with their fellow students and possibly teachers. ... The House System is a traditional feature of British schools, similar to the collegiate system of a university. ...

House name[4]
Bradbys
Druries
Elmfield
Gayton
The Grove
The Headmaster's
The Knoll
Moretons
Newlands
The Park
Rendalls
West Acre

Up until the 1950s there existed what were known as 'small houses' where only 5-10 boys stayed at one time while they waited for a space in a 'large house' to become available (hence the use of the term large house in this article). A twelfth house is in the planning stages and is not aimed to increase the population of the school. Instead each of the present eleven houses will reduce its population in each year thus reducing their individual numbers and filling the twelfth house. The opening date is set for September 2011. It has not yet received a name.[4]


House Masters and their families live in the boarding houses and are assisted by House Tutors appointed from the teaching staff. Every House has a residential House Tutor. The House Master oversees the welfare of every boy in his care; for parents he is the main point of contact with the School.[4]


Each House has a resident Matron and sick room. The Matrons are supported by the School's Medical Centre where trained nursing staff offer round the clock care. The Medical Centre is under the direct supervision of the School Doctor who is available on the Hill every day for consultation.[4]


There are no dormitories: a boy shares his room with a boy of the same age for the first three to six terms and thereafter has a room to himself. It is very much his own place, his home for the term, where he keeps his belongings, puts up his pictures, does his work and leads much of his social life. Each House has a Common Room with newspapers, television and video. All have their own gardens and sports facilities.[4]


See also

  • Harrow History Prize
  • List of Old Harrovians
  • List of Victoria Crosses by School

The following is a list of notable Old Harrovians, graduates of Harrow School in the United Kingdom. ... The schools of Britain, the British Empire, and later the Commonwealth, have contributed greatly to their armed forces, with some schools having lost hundreds of former pupils, especially in the First and Second World Wars. ...

References

  1. ^ Public Schools Act. Public Schools Guide. Retrieved on 2008-11-01.
  2. ^ Tyerman, Christopher (2000). A History of Harrow School. Oxford University Press, pp.8-17. ISBN 0-19-822796-5. 
  3. ^ a b Inspection Report on Harrow School. Reports. Inependent Schools Inspectorate (October 2006). Retrieved on 2008-01-11.
  4. ^ a b c d e f Houses. Harrow School. Retrieved on 2007-12-19.
  5. ^ Fees and Charges. Admissions. Harrow School. Retrieved on 2007-12-19.
  6. ^ Tyerman, Christopher (2000). A history of Harrow School. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-822796-5. 
  7. ^ a b History of the School. Harrow School. Retrieved on 2007-12-19.
  8. ^ a b Harrow International School, (Beijing). Harrow Beijing. Retrieved on 2007-12-19.
  9. ^ a b Harrow school. British History Online. Retrieved on 2007-12-19.
  10. ^ Harrow International school (Beijing). Retrieved on [[19 December 2007]].
  11. ^ a b c d Harrow Terminology. Tradition. Harrow School. Retrieved on 2007-12-19.
  12. ^ The school Song. Tradition. Harrow School. Retrieved on 2007-12-19.
  13. ^ Harrow Football: The Game. Tradition. Harrow School. Retrieved on 2007-12-19.
  14. ^ The Harrovian online. Harrow School. Retrieved on 2007-12-19.
  15. ^ a b c Academic Life. Academic. Harrow School.

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Literature

  • Rimmer, Rambles round Eton and Harrow, (London, 1882)
  • Thornton, Harrow School and its Surroundings, (London, 1885)
  • Harrow School Register, 1801-93, (London, 1894)
  • Minchin, Old Harrow Days, (London, 1898)
  • Williams, Harrow, (London, 1901)
  • Archibald Fox, Harrow, (London, 1911)
  • G. T. Warner, Harrow in Prose and Verse (London, 1913)
  • Christopher Tyerman, 'A History of Harrow School 1324-1991 (Oxford, 2000)

External links

  • Harrow School website
  • Harrow Association website
  • Harrow Development Trust website
  • Harrow School Enterprises
  • Hills and Saunders Photo archive- This site, run by the Harrow School Archive, contains an index and scans of photos of Harrow boys. The negatives date from as early as the 1800s and were taken on glass plates
  • Harrow International School, Bangkok website
  • Harrow International School, Beijing website

  Results from FactBites:
 
Harrow School (861 words)
Strong applicants come to Harrow to sit a test or be interviewed by a teacher in each of the AS/A-level subjects they intend to study.
Pupils come to Harrow, either with their parents or a teacher from their boarding prep school.
Unsuccessful candidates will be encouraged to register for an alternative school but they will also be told that they may apply to be reassessed in a year's time if their prep school feels that a great deal of academic progress has been made in that year.
Harrow School: Information from Answers.com (4289 words)
Harrow is also acknowledged by most historians as the inventor of the indoor racket sport squash, in the mid-nineteenth century in Headmasters House Yarder.
Harrow is for boys aged 13–18 and prepares pupils for the national GCSE and A-Level examinations.
Harrow is not built on a campus in that it is fully integrated into the surrounding area – there are private houses and businesses on the hill, the road is used by local residents, etc. However, it does have a number of important buildings.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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