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Encyclopedia > Harrison Gray Otis (lawyer)
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2nd Harrison Gray Otis House, Beacon Hill, Boston, Massachusetts.
2nd Harrison Gray Otis House, Beacon Hill, Boston, Massachusetts.

Harrison Gray Otis (October 8, 1765 - October 28, 1848), Unitarian businessman, lawyer, and politician, was after 1801 one of the most important leaders of the United States' first political party, the Federalists. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1086 KB) 2nd Harrison Gray Otis House, Beacon Hill, Boston, Massachusetts. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1086 KB) 2nd Harrison Gray Otis House, Beacon Hill, Boston, Massachusetts. ... 2nd Harrison Gray Otis House, 85 Mount Vernon Street. ... Jump to: navigation, search October 8 is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years). ... 1765 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Historic Unitarianism believed in the oneness of God as opposed to traditional Christian belief in the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). ... Jump to: navigation, search The Federalist Party was a political party in the early history of the United States. ...


Otis was born in Boston, Massachusetts to Elizabeth (Gray) and Samuel Allyne Otis. His uncle was Revolutionary War leader James Otis, and his father was active in early American politics as a member of Massachusetts state house of representatives, delegate to Massachusetts state constitutional convention, and Continental Congress delegate from Massachusetts. Jump to: navigation, search For other instances of Boston, see Boston (disambiguation) Boston is the capital and largest city in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... Jump to: navigation, search James Otis James Otis (February 5, 1725 – May 23, 1783) was a lawyer in colonial Massachusetts who was an early advocate of the political views that led to the American Revolution. ... Jump to: navigation, search State nickname: Bay State Other U.S. States Capital Boston Largest city Boston Governor Mitt Romney (R) Senators Edward Kennedy (D) John Kerry (D) Official languages English Area 27,360 km² (44th)  - Land 20,317 km²  - Water 7,043 km² (25. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Continental Congress was the legislature of the Thirteen Colonies and later of the United States from 1774 to 1789, a period that included the American Revolutionary War and the Articles of Confederation. ...


Otis himself married Sally Foster on May 3, 1780, graduated from Harvard University in 1783, then studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1786, when he commenced practice in Boston. In 1794 he was elected to the Massachusetts legislature, and in 1796 was appointed by President George Washington to be district attorney for Massachusetts. In 1797, he was elected U.S. Representative from Massachusetts as a Federalist and a strong advocate for centralized government, in which office he served until 1801. He was appointed United States district attorney for Massachusetts by President John Adams (1801-1802), and again served in the state legislature from 1802 to 1817, serving several terms as President of the state senate (1805-1806, 1808-1811). In subsequent years, Otis was elected U.S. Senator from Massachusetts (1817-1822), and then Mayor of Boston (1829-1831). Jump to: navigation, search Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... Jump to: navigation, search George Washington (February 22, 1732–December 14, 1799) was an American planter, political figure, the highest ranking military leader in U.S. history and first President of the United States. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Jump to: navigation, search John Adams (October 30, 1735 – July 4, 1826) was the first (1789–1797) Vice President of the United States, and the second (1797–1801) President of the United States. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ...


In 1814, in the midst of his political career, he was also named a judge of the court of common pleas (1814-1818), and played a leading role as delegate to the controversial Hartford Convention in which New England's secession from the United States was discussed. It led to the demise of the Federalists. Otis subsequently defended the convention in his Letters Developing the Character and Views of the Hartford Convention (1820) and his Letters in Defence of the Hartford Convention (1824). The Hartford Convention was an event in early United States History during which New Englands secession from the United States was discussed. ... Jump to: navigation, search While the states marked in red show the core of New England, the regions cultural influence may cover a greater or lesser area than shown. ...


Around 1831, Otis was involved in a major financial scandal during the site selection for the Massachusetts State House. Boston was determined to remain the state capitol, and appointed Otis to a town committee to purchase land and donate it to the state. He did so, and also quietly arranged his own private purchase of 18.5 adjoining acres from the agent of John Singleton Copley, then living in England. After a decade of legal arguments, the sale was upheld, and Otis and the Mount Vernon Proprietors developed a large part of Beacon Hill. Categories: Buildings and structures stubs | Government of Massachusetts | Freedom Trail | U.S. state capitols ... Jump to: navigation, search Portrait of Copley by Gilbert Stuart. ... Jump to: navigation, search Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK... 2nd Harrison Gray Otis House, 85 Mount Vernon Street. ...


Otis was an overseer of Harvard University from 1810-1823, and a fellow of the university from 1823-1825, as well as one of the original incorporators of the Boston Bank. During the course of his career, he built not one but three grand houses in quick succession (see Harrison Gray Otis House), all designed by noted architect Charles Bulfinch. He died in Boston on October 28, 1848, and is buried in Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Jump to: navigation, search Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... Jump to: navigation, search There are three houses named the Harrison Gray Otis House in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Massachusetts State House, designed by Charles Bulfinch and completed in 1798. ... Mount Auburn Cemetery Mount Auburn Cemetery Hunnewell family obelisk Bigelow Chapel Civil War memorial Founded in 1831 as Americas first garden cemetery, Mount Auburn Cemetery is an Elysium where, traditionally, chaste classical monuments were set in rolling landscaped terrain. ... Jump to: navigation, search City Hall - Cambridge MA Cambridge is a city in the Greater Boston area of Massachusetts, United States. ...


References

  • Samuel Eliot Morison, Harrison Gray Otis, 1765-1848: The Urbane Federalist, 1913. Rev. ed. (2 vols in 1), Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1969.

  Results from FactBites:
 
James Otis: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (2117 words)
Otis resigned his position on the vice-admiralty court and agreed to represent the merchants in challenging the legality of the writs of assistance.
Otis subsequently authored several important patriotic pamphlets, served in the Massachusetts legislature and was a leader at the Stamp Act Congress.
Otis at times counseled against the mob violence of the radicals and argued against Adams’s proposal for a convention of all the colonies resembling that of the British Glorious Revolution of 1688.
Californians and the Military: Major-General Harrison Gray Otis, U.S.V. Publisher of the Los Angeles Times (2288 words)
Harrison Gray Otis, the youngest of sixteen children of his father Stephen Otis, was born on February 10, 1837, on a farm near Marietta, Ohio.
Otis left Louisville for Ohio, knowing that hostilities were inevitable, and feeling that his proper place would be with the defenders of the Union who would go out from his native State.
Otis claimed that he never objected to "lawful or legitimate organizations formed and maintained by laborers in any branch of industry," only to "gross and mischievous abuse in the management of the organizations by the leaders of them." In fact, he'd even been a member of the typesetters union -- briefly.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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