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Encyclopedia > Harris Manchester College, Oxford
Harris Manchester, Oxford
Harris Manchester College, Oxford.
College name Harris Manchester
Named after Lord Harris of Peckham
Established 1786
Principal The Revd Dr Ralph Waller
JCR President Toby Fell-Holden
Undergraduates 110
Graduates 40
Home page
The Quad lawn, Harris Manchester College, Oxford
The Quad lawn, Harris Manchester College, Oxford

Harris Manchester College is a constituent college of the University of Oxford, England. Formerly known as Manchester College, it is listed in the University Statutes (V.1) as Manchester Academy and Harris College, and at University ceremonies it is called Collegium de Harris et Manchester. Image File history File links HarrisManchesterDusk. ... Philip Charles Harris, Baron Harris of Peckham (born 15 September 1942) is a Conservative member of the House of Lords. ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The term Junior Combination Room or Junior Common Room (JCR) is used in many British universities (as well as at Harvard College in the United States) to refer to the collective of students (similar to a students union) at a constituent part of a university, typically a college or a... Image File history File links HarrisManchesterQuadLawn. ... Image File history File links HarrisManchesterQuadLawn. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ...


Located in Mansfield Road in central Oxford, Harris Manchester is the only mixed-sex Higher Education college in the UK whose undergraduate places are exclusively for mature students (aged 21 or over). It is the smallest of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford, and is one of the least wealthy colleges with an estimated financial endowment of five million pounds (2003). Mansfield College on Mansfield Road. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

History

The college started as the Manchester Academy in Manchester in 1786. Originally run by English Presbyterians, it was one of the few remaining dissenting academies that provided religious nonconformists with education. At the time, nonconformists were denied admission to Oxford and Cambridge. Harris Manchester College, formerly Manchester College, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom; it has the emphasis on mature students. ... Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough, in the metropolitan county of Greater Manchester, North West England. ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... English Dissenters were dissenters from England who opposed State interference in religious matters and founded their own communities over the 16th to 18th century period. ...


The Manchester Academy went back to the well-known Warrington Academy. It taught radical theology as well as modern subjects, such as science, modern languages, language, or history. This did not mean that the classics were neglected. Warrington Academy was an early dissenters college in Warrington. ...


The college changed its location five times before settling in Oxford.

  • It was located in Manchester between 1786 and 1803.
  • It then moved to York where it stayed until 1840. The key person in York was Charles Wellbeloved, a Unitarian minister. Its location was at Blenheim House, 13 Monkgate, just outside Monkbar. The House was later used as the first building of the College of Ripon and York St John (now York St John University), and was demolished in 1939. [citation needed]
Because Wellbeloved would not move to Manchester, the college moved to York to have him as head. At first he taught all subjects. He hired additional tutors after a year. He always worked hard and several times his health broke. In 1840, when age forced him to retire, the college moved back to Manchester. [1]
Wellbeloved did not allow the school to be called Unitarian because he wanted students to have an open mind and to discover the truth for themselves. In 1809 he wrote to George Wood,

"I do not and will not teach Unitarianism or any ism but Christianism. I will endeavour to teach the students how to study the Scripture—nice if they find Unitarianism there—well if animism—well if Trinitarianism—well, only let them find something for themselves." 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... York is a city in North Yorkshire, England, at the confluence of the Rivers Ouse and Foss. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... York St John University (formerly known variously as York St John University College, College of Ripon and York St John, York St John College or Ripon and York St John College of the University of Leeds) is located in York, England. ...

Under Wellbeloved's Principalship 235 students were educated at the college. Divinity students numbered 121 and laymen 114. Of the divinity students 30 did not enter the ministry and 5 entered the Anglican priesthood. Among the lay students were scholars, public servants, notable people in the arts and businessmen. The majority was Unitarian. Among the distinguished Unitarian students were James Martineau (later Principal), William Gaskell, Philip Pearsall Carpenter, John James Tayler (later Principal), Joseph Hunter, Joseph Hutton, William Raynor Wood, Daniel Jones, William Turner, Jr., James Yates, Robert Wallace (later Principal), Mark Philips (prominent Member of Parliament), and Edward Worthington. James Martineau (April 21, 1805 - January 11, 1900) was an English philosopher. ... Joseph (Joe) Hunter (born 3 August 1855 in Scarborough, Yorkshire, England; died 4 January 1891 in Rotherham, Yorkshire, England) was a professional cricketer who played for Yorkshire County Cricket Club between 1878 and 1888. ... Daniel Jones may refer to: Daniel Jones (phonetician) (1881–1967), phonetician, author of The Pronunciation of English Daniel Jones (composer), (1912–1993) Welsh composer Daniel Jones (musician), Australian musician, member of Savage Garden Daniel Jones (documentarian), American film maker, founder of The Blanket Statement Productions Daniel Jones (born 1992 as... Though severe earthquakes in the north of France and southern England are rare,[1] the Dover Straits earthquake of 6 April 1580 appears to have been the largest in the recorded history of England, Flanders or northern France. ... Robert Wallace (1773 - 1855) UK electoral franchise reformer and agitator for postal service reform; elected to Westminster Parliament as the member for Greenock, Scotland in 1832. ... Mark Philips (1800 - 1873) was one of Manchester, Englands first pair of Members of Parliament of the post-reform era. ...

  • The college moved back from York to Manchester in 1840. It stayed there until 1853.
  • Between 1853 and 1889 the college was located in London
  • From London it moved to Oxford, opening its new buildings designed by Unitarian architect Thomas Worthington in 1893. In 1840, the college started an association with the University of London, and gained the right to present degrees from London.

Harris Manchester College was granted Permanent Private Hall status in 1990. It was only in 1996 that the college became a full college of Oxford University. 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Historic Unitarianism believed in the oneness of God as opposed to traditional Christian belief in the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). ... Thomas Worthington (1826 – 1909) was an eminent 19th century English architect, particularly associated with public buildings in his native Manchester. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The University of London is a university based primarily in London. ... A Permanent Private Hall at the University of Oxford is an educational institution affiliated to the University — not as a full College, but able to award Oxford University degrees. ... 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ...


Today the college focuses on mature students (i.e. for those above the age of 21), both for undergraduate and graduate studies. The college tries to continue its liberal and pioneering ethos; considering its mature student focus as a modern means of providing higher education to those that have, in the past, been excluded from it. In its early days, the College supported reforming causes, such as the repeal of the Test and Corporation Acts and the abolition of slavery. In 1901 the College was the first academic institution in Britain to accept a woman candidate for the Nonconformist ministry. In the 1920s and 30s the College provided courses for the Workers' Educational Association (W.E.A.). The Buxton Memorial Fountain, celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, London. ... A nonconformist is an English or Welsh Protestant of any non-Anglican denomination, chiefly advocating religious liberty. ... The Workers’ Educational Association (WEA) seeks to provide access to education and lifelong learning for adults from all backgrounds, and in particular those who have previously missed out on education. ...


Harris Manchester College is also the base for the Farmington Institute for Christian Studies which sponsors the ongoing training of teachers of Religious Education.


Student life

The Library, Harris Manchester College, Oxford
The Library, Harris Manchester College, Oxford
The Chapel Carvings, Harris Manchester College, Oxford
The Chapel Carvings, Harris Manchester College, Oxford

Despite the small student body, the college offers a wide array of courses and has a very international atmosphere. Most undergraduate tutorials are carried out in the college, though for some specialist papers undergraduates may be sent to tutors in other colleges. Image File history File links HarrisManchesterLibrary. ... Image File history File links HarrisManchesterLibrary. ... Image File history File links HarrisManchesterChapel. ... Image File history File links HarrisManchesterChapel. ...


Members are generally expected to dine in the Arlosh Hall, where there is a twice-weekly formal dinner at which grace is always recited and students dress in jackets, ties, and gowns.


Aside from the College punt, The Royle Yacht, and a croquet lawn, the college has no real sports facilities. However, the College is collectively a member of a central Oxford gym and health club to which members of the college have free access. The college also has an affiliation with neighbouring Wadham College for those interested in rowing and other popular sports. Wadham College is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. ...


The college boasts one of the largest college libraries in Oxford; which owns approximately 70,000 items. The collection has been built up and developed over the two hundred years of the College's existence. It includes a range of artefacts, an antiquarian book collection, and a large collection of manuscripts relating to the college and the Dissenting movement in England.


The college is also the home of a chapel with ornate wood carvings, an organ, and notable stained-glass windows by Edward Burne-Jones and William Morris. Love Among the Ruins, by Edward Burne-Jones. ... William Morris, socialist and innovator in the Arts and Crafts movement William Morris, publisher Davids Charge to Solomon (1882), a stained-glass window by Edward Burne-Jones and William Morris in Trinity Church, Boston, Massachusetts. ...


Academics/teachers

Joseph Frederick Priestley is often credited for the discovery of oxygen. ... John Dalton John Dalton (September 6, 1766 – July 27, 1844) was an English chemist and physicist, born at Eaglesfield, near Cockermouth in Cumberland. ... Lawrence Pearsall Jacks (October 9, 1860-–February 17, 1955), abbreviated L. P. Jacks was an English educator, philosopher, and Unitarian minister who rose to prominence in the period from World War I to World War II. Jacks was born on October 9, 1860, in Nottingham, to Anne Steere and Jabez... Francis Newman (?-1660) was an English colonist in America, Governor of New Haven Colony in 1658-59. ... James Martineau (April 21, 1805 - January 11, 1900) was an English philosopher. ...

External links

  • Harris Manchester College (official website)
  • Harris Manchester College JCR
  • Prints of Harris Manchester College

  Results from FactBites:
 
Harris Manchester College, Oxford - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (926 words)
Harris Manchester College is a constituent college of the University of Oxford, England.
Located in the heart of the University and city of Oxford, Harris Manchester is the only Higher Education college in the UK whose undergraduate places are exclusively for mature students (aged 21 or over).
It is the smallest of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford, and is one of the least wealthy colleges with an estimated financial endowment of five million pounds (2003).
Harris Manchester : 2007/8 Oxford University Undergraduate Admissions (481 words)
Harris Manchester is the only Oxford college which is dedicated solely to mature students, and we take students from the age of 21 with no upper age limit.
Harris Manchester is centrally but quietly located in Mansfield Road, just a few minutes' walk away from the Bodleian library, most faculty libraries, the science area and other University facilities.
All the college accommodation is located on the main college site and students are guaranteed accommodation for at least the first and final years of their course.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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