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Encyclopedia > Harper's Magazine
November 2004 issue
November 2004 issue
An issue of Harper's from 1905
An issue of Harper's from 1905

Harper's Magazine (or simply Harper's) is a monthly general-interest magazine covering literature, politics, culture, finance, and the arts from a progressive, left perspective. It is the second oldest continuously-published monthly magazine (the oldest magazine being Scientific American) in the United States, with a current circulation of slightly more than 220,000. Its editor is Roger Hodge, who replaced longtime editor Lewis Lapham on March 31, 2006.[1] Harper's has won numerous National Magazine Awards.[2] Harpers may refer to: Harpers Magazine (1850 to present), American monthly general-interest magazine Harpers Bazaar (1867 to present), American fashion magazine Harpers Weekly (1857–1916), American political magazine published by Harper & Brothers Harpers Encyclopedia of United States History (1901, 1905), published by Harper & Brothers... November 2004 Cover of Harpers Magazine This image is a book cover. ... November 2004 Cover of Harpers Magazine This image is a book cover. ... File links The following pages link to this file: Harpers Magazine Categories: U.S. history images ... File links The following pages link to this file: Harpers Magazine Categories: U.S. history images ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... In the United States the term progressivism refers to two political movements: first, the original political progressive movement towards social and economic reform of the late 1800s and early 1900s; and second, the continuation of this movement/ideology in the form of modern progressivism which sees itself as a reform... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... Scientific American is a popular-science magazine, published (first weekly and later monthly) since August 28, 1845, making it the oldest continuously published magazine in the United States. ... Roger Hodge (born 1967 in Pocatello, Texas, USA) is the editor of Harpers Magazine. ... Lewis H. Lapham (born January 8, 1935) is the editor of the American monthly Harpers Magazine. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Magazine Award is a prestigious American award that honors excellence in the magazine industry. ...

Contents

History

Harper's was launched in June 1850 by the New York City book-publishing firm Harper & Brothers. This company also founded Harper's Bazaar and what became HarperCollins Publishing. The first press run sold out 7,500 copies almost immediately. Circulation was around 50,000 six months later.[3] For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Group portrait of the four Harper brothers by Mathew Brady, ca. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Harpers & Queen. ... HarperCollins is a publishing company owned by News Corporation. ...

John R Chapin's rendering of the Great Chicago Fire, printed in Harper's Weekly
John R Chapin's rendering of the Great Chicago Fire, printed in Harper's Weekly

The earliest issues consisted largely of material that had already been published in England, but the publication soon began to print the work of American artists and writers. It subsequently published commentaries by prominent politicians from both sides of the Atlantic, such as Winston Churchill and Woodrow Wilson. The Great Chicago Fire, an artists rendering, Chicago in Flames -- The Rush for Lives Over Randolph Street Bridge From [1]. Originally from Harpers Weekly. ... The Great Chicago Fire, an artists rendering, Chicago in Flames -- The Rush for Lives Over Randolph Street Bridge From [1]. Originally from Harpers Weekly. ... John R Chapins rendering of the Great Chicago Fire, printed in Harpers Weekly John R Chapin was a 19th-century American artist and illustrator, who worked for Harpers Magazine. ... Artists rendering of the fire, by John R Chapin, originally printed in Harpers Weekly The Great Chicago Fire was a conflagration that burned from Sunday October 8 to early Tuesday October 10, 1871, killing hundreds and destroying about four square miles in Chicago, Illinois. ... Churchill redirects here. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856–February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ...


In 1962, Harper & Brothers merged with Row, Peterson, & Company to become Harper & Row (now HarperCollins). Later, the magazine became a separate corporation and a division of the Minneapolis Star and Tribune Company. On June 17, 1980, the Star Tribune announced that Harper's would cease publication with the August issue. On July 9, however, John R. MacArthur and his father, Roderick, urged the boards of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Atlantic Richfield Company to establish the Harper's Magazine Foundation, which now operates the magazine. [4] HarperCollins is a publishing company owned by News Corporation. ... The Star Tribune is the largest newspaper in Minnesota and is published seven days each week in an edition for the Minneapolis-St. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about American journalist John R. MacArthur. ... The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a major private grant-making foundation based in Chicago that has awarded more than US$3 billion since its inception in 1978. ... An ARCO gas station in Los Angeles ARCO (an acronym for Atlantic Richfield Company) is an American oil company that was formed by the merger of East Coast-based Atlantic Refining and California-based Richfield Petroleum in 1966. ...


The 1970s brought events such as Seymour Hersh's reporting of the My Lai massacre. Seymour Myron Sy Hersh (born April 8, 1937 Chicago) is an American Pulitzer Prize winning investigative journalist and author based in Washington, DC. He is a regular contributor to The New Yorker magazine on military and security matters. ... The My Lai Massacre ( , approximately ) (Vietnamese: thảm sát Mỹ Lai) was the mass murder of 347 to 504 defenseless Vietnamese civilians, mostly women and children, conducted by U.S. Army forces on March 16, 1968, in the hamlet of My Lai, during the Vietnam War. ...


In 1971, after the departure of controversial editor Willie Morris, Lapham joined the magazine as managing editor, serving as editor from 1976 until 1981; in 1983, he resumed his position, which he held until March 2006. William Weaks Willie Morris (November 29, 1934 — August 2, 1999), was an American writer and editor born in Jackson, Mississippi, though his family later moved to Yazoo City, Mississippi, which he immortalized in his works of prose. ...


In 1984, Lapham and MacArthur — now publisher and president of the foundation — redesigned Harper's and introduced the popular Harper's Index (a list of statistics chosen and arranged, often for ironic effect), Readings, and the Annotation to complement its fiction, essays, and reporting.


Under the leadership of Lapham and MacArthur, the magazine continues to publish literary fiction by such authors as John Updike and George Saunders, and has emerged as a particularly vocal critic of America's domestic and foreign policies. Lapham's monthly Notebook columns have lambasted Bill Clinton's administration as well as the administration of George W. Bush, and since 2003, the magazine has paid special attention to the war in Iraq, with long articles on Fallujah and the post-war reconstruction of Iraq. Other feature stories have covered the debate over abortion, cloning, and global warming.[5] John Hoyer Updike (born March 18, 1932 in Shillington, Pennsylvania) is an American writer. ... George Saunders (born December 2, 1958) is an acclaimed American writer of short stories. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... This article is about the city of Fallujah in Iraq. ...


In April 2006, Harper's began publishing the Washington Babylon blog on its site. Written by Harper's Washington Editor Ken Silverstein, the blog examines corruption in United States politics. In 2007, Harper's added the No Comment blog, written by Scott Horton, which covers legal controversies, Central Asian politics, and German Studies. Also, various writers compose the Weekly Review, which collates one-sentence summaries of political, scientific, and bizarre news. Similar in conception to the Index, the Weekly Review's items are often arranged humorously or for ironic effect. Central Asia is a region of Asia. ... German studies is the field of humanities that researches, documents, and disseminates German language and literature in both its historic and present forms. ...


Controversies

  • The Perils of Obedience, a 1974 article written by Stanley Milgram that was abridged from his book Obedience to Authority, first appeared in Harper's. The article contained results from an experiment that showed adults being willing to subject another person to painful electric shocks for the purpose of learning when under direct orders from a figure of authority. While the person receiving shocks was only an actor, the subjects would continuously increase the voltage of the shock to the point of excruciating pain under orders from the experimenter, despite moral hesitation. The study concluded with Milgram stating that perhaps certain cases, such as the Nazi war crimes, were performed under such authority because of a transfer of responsibility to the superior commander. The idea that ultimate responsibility for such actions does not necessarily belong to the immediate perpetrator, and also the idea that man could be so brutal under such conditions, sparked great controversy. It also raised ethical questions about what types of psychological research are appropriate to subject people to.
  • In 1950, a preview feature by Eric Larrabee in Harper's on Immanuel Velikovsky's soon-to-be bestseller Worlds in Collision marked the beginning of a controversy over the latter's theories which continues to this day.
  • In an essay that appeared in the September 2004 issue of Harper's, Lewis Lapham fictionalized an account of the 2004 Republican National Convention, which had not yet taken place. Lapham subsequently apologized in a note to readers.[6]
  • Harper's decided to serialize John Robert Lennon's novel "Happyland" after the original publisher, W. W. Norton, decided not to publish the novel. The content of the book and its protagonist, doll magnate Happy Masters, strongly parallels the real life story of American Girl doll creator Pleasant Rowland. Norton decided not to publish due to concerns about libel; Harper's began serialization of the story in the summer of 2006.[14]

Stanley Milgram Stanley Milgram (August 15, 1933 – December 20, 1984) was a psychologist at Yale University, Harvard University and the City University of New York. ... The experimenter (V) orders the subject (L) to give what the subject believes are painful electric shocks to another subject (S), who is actually an actor. ... Immanuel Velikovsky photographed by Fima Noveck, ca. ... Worlds in Collision book cover. ... 2004 Republican National Convention Logo President George W. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney accepted their partys nomination to run for second terms. ... The AIDS reappraisal movement (or AIDS dissident movement) is a loosely-connected group of activists, journalists, citizens, scientists, researchers, and doctors who deny, challenge, or question, in various ways, the mainstream scientific consensus that the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is the cause of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). ... Celia Farber is a writer and journalist who has been chronicling HIV and AIDS since 1987. ... Species Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Human immunodeficiency virus 2 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, a condition in humans in which the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections). ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ... The AIDS reappraisal movement or AIDS dissident movement, pejoratively referred to as AIDS denialism, is a loosely connected group of activists, journalists, scientists, and HIV-positive persons who dispute the scientific consensus that the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the cause of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Columbia Journalism Review (CJR) is an American magazine for professional journalists published bimonthly by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism since 1961. ... The Treatment Action Campaign is a South African grassroots pressure group which was founded by Zackie Achmat, an HIV-positive activist who refused anti-retroviral treatment (ARVs) until they were universally available. ... John Robert Lennon (born 1970) is an American author of several works of fiction, including a number of short stories and four novels to date. ... Happyland is satirical novel written by J. Robert Lennon about a town in upstate New York that is taken over by a doll. ... W. W. Norton & Company is an American book publishing company that has remained independent since its founding. ... The American Girls Collection is a brand of dolls and other items of girls interest. ... Pleasant Rowland (born Pleasant Williams Thiele circa 1941) is an American educator, writer, and entrepreneur. ...

Notable contributors

Horatio Alger, Jr. ... John R Chapins rendering of the Great Chicago Fire, printed in Harpers Weekly John R Chapin was a 19th-century American artist and illustrator, who worked for Harpers Magazine. ... Churchill redirects here. ... Stephen Arnold Douglas (nicknamed the Little Giant because he was short but was considered by many a giant in politics) was an American politician from the western state of Illinois, and was the Democratic Party nominee for President in 1860. ... Theodore Dreiser, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1933 Theodore Herman Albert Dreiser (August 27, 1871 – December 28, 1945) was an American naturalist author known for dealing with the gritty reality of life. ... IRWIN EDMAN (November 28, 1896 – September 4, 1954) was an American philosopher and professor of philosophy. ... Jonathan Franzen (born August 17, 1959) is an award-winning American novelist and essayist. ... Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. ... Barbara Garson (born July 7, 1941 in Brooklyn, New York City) is an American playwright, author and social activist. ... John Taylor Gatto (born John Gatto) is an American retired school teacher of 30 years and author of several books on education. ... Horace Greeley (February 3, 1811 – November 29, 1872) was an American editor of a leading newspaper, a founder of the Republican party, reformer and politician. ... Mark Greif is the co-editor, co-founder, and contributor to the magazine n+1, as well as a frequent contributor to American Prospect. ... Barbara Grizzuti Harrison (1934-2002) was an Italian-American journalist, essayist and memoirist. ... Edward Hoagland (born December 21, 1932 in New York, New York, USA) is an author best known for his nature and travel writing. ... Winslow Homer Winslow Homer (February 24, 1836 – September 29, 1910) was an North American landscape painter and printmaker, most famous for his marine subjects. ... William Dean Howells (March 1, 1837 – May 11, 1920) was an American realist author. ... Seymour Myron Sy Hersh (born April 8, 1937 Chicago) is an American Pulitzer Prize winning investigative journalist and author based in Washington, DC. He is a regular contributor to The New Yorker magazine on military and security matters. ... For other uses of this name, see Henry James (disambiguation). ... Naomi Klein is a Canadian journalist, author and activist well known for her political analyses of corporate globalization. ... For other persons named Jack London, see Jack London (disambiguation). ... Fitz Hugh Ludlow Fitz Hugh Ludlow, sometimes seen as “Fitzhugh Ludlow,” (September 11, 1836 – September 12, 1870) was an American author, journalist, and explorer; best-known for his autobiographical book The Hasheesh Eater (1857). ... Norman Kingsley Mailer (January 31, 1923 – November 10, 2007) was an American novelist, journalist, playwright, screenwriter and film director. ... Stanley Milgram Stanley Milgram (August 15, 1933 – December 20, 1984) was a psychologist at Yale University, Harvard University and the City University of New York. ... John Stuart Mill (20 May 1806 – 8 May 1873), British philosopher, political economist, civil servant and Member of Parliament, was an influential liberal thinker of the 19th century. ... For other persons named John Muir, see John Muir (disambiguation). ... Thomas Nast (September 27, 1840 – December 7, 1902) was a famous German-American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist in the 19th century and is considered to be the father of American political cartooning. ... Frederic Remington (October 4, 1861 - December 26, 1909) was an American painter, illustrator, sculptor, and writer who specialized in depictions of the American West. ... Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... George Saunders (born December 2, 1958) is an acclaimed American writer of short stories. ... Henry L. Stimson Henry Lewis Stimson (September 21, 1867 – October 20, 1950) was an American statesman, who served as Secretary of War, Governor-General of the Philippines, and Secretary of State at various times. ... Susan Straight (born in Riverside, California) is a writer, currently director of the creative writing department at University of California, Riverside. ... Time magazine, December 21, 1925 Newton Booth Tarkington (July 29, 1869 _ May 19, 1946) was an American novelist and dramatist. ... Hunter Stockton Thompson (July 18, 1937 – February 20, 2005) was an American journalist and author. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ... John Hoyer Updike (born March 18, 1932 in Shillington, Pennsylvania) is an American writer. ... David Foster Wallace (born February 21, 1962) is an American novelist, essayist, and short story writer. ... Elwyn Brooks White (July 11, 1899–October 1, 1985) was an American essayist, author, and noted prose stylist. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856–February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... Richard Hofstadter (August 6, 1916 - October 24, 1970) was an American historian and DeWitt Clinton Professor of American History at Columbia University. ...

References

  1. ^ Carlson, Peter (2006-03-21). Lewis Lapham Lights Up: The Longtime, Two-Time Harper's Editor Is Retiring, but Not Quitting. Washington Post. Retrieved on 2006-03-27.
  2. ^ Awards and Honors (PDF) at Harper's site
  3. ^ History of Harper's (PDF) on Harper's site
  4. ^ Facts on File 1980 Yearbook, p501, 582
  5. ^ An American Album: One Hundred and Fifty Years of Harper's Magazine, a 712-page illustrated anthology with an introduction by Lewis H. Lapham and a foreword by Arthur Schlesinger Jr.
  6. ^ Lapham, Lewis H. (2004-08-26). Back to the Future. Harper's Magazine. Retrieved on 2006-03-13.
  7. ^ Farber, Celia (2006-03-01). Out Of Control, AIDS and the corruption of medical science. Harper's Magazine. Retrieved on 2006-03-13. 
  8. ^ Farber Feedback. POZ Magazine. Retrieved on 2006-03-13. 
  9. ^ Letters from scientists and physicians criticizing Harper's for poor fact-checking of Celia Farber's article on AIDS. Accessed 21 Oct 2006.
  10. ^ Harper's Races Right over the Edge of a Cliff, by Gal Beckerman. Published in the Columbia Journalism Review on March 8, 2006. Accessed June 14, 2007.
  11. ^ Kim, Richard (2006-03-02). Harper's Publishes AIDS Denialist. Retrieved on 2006-03-13. 
  12. ^ (2006-03-04) Errors in Celia Farber's March 2006 article in Harper's Magazine. Treatment Action Campaign. Retrieved on 2006-03-13. 
  13. ^ Miller, Lia (2006-03-13). An Article in Harper's Ignites a Controversy Over H.I.V.. The New York Times. Retrieved on 2006-03-13. 
  14. ^ NYT Book Review

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... An issue of Harpers Magazine from 1905 Another issue, from November 2004 Harpers Magazine (or simply Harpers) is a monthly magazine of politics and culture. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Columbia Journalism Review (CJR) is an American magazine for professional journalists published bimonthly by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism since 1961. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Harpers Magazine - Regular Ed | Best price for Magazine (482 words)
I can see why people might not like this magazine because it appears to be "uppity." In fact, the only thing that annoys me about this magazine is the letters to the editor, where all of the Ivy-league intellectuals write in and try to prove how smart they are.
During the 1980s and 90s Harpers decayed badly from a journal of literature and opinion into a collection of short pieces and meaningless charts- sort of a journal for the literary pretentious with a short attention span.
During the late 90s and the early part of this century, an effort was made to recreate the old Harpers.
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