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Encyclopedia > Harper's Weekly
Teresa Bagioli Sickles confession, 1859
Teresa Bagioli Sickles confession, 1859

Harper's Weekly (A Journal of Civilization) was an American political magazine based in New York City. Published by Harper & Brothers from 1857 until 1916, it featured foreign and domestic news, fiction, essays on many subjects, and humor. During its most influential period it was the forum of the political cartoonist Thomas Nast. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (560x835, 357 KB) Summary Referenced from http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (560x835, 357 KB) Summary Referenced from http://www. ... Harpers Magazine engraving from a photo by Matthew Brady Teresa Bagioli Sickles, (1836-1867) was the wife of Democratic New York State Assemblyman, U.S. Representative, and later U.S. Army Major General Daniel Edgar Sickles. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Group portrait of the four Harper brothers by Mathew Brady, ca. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Thomas Nast (September 27, 1840 – December 7, 1902) was a famous German-American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist in the 19th century and is considered to be the father of American political cartooning. ...

Contents

History

Inception

A Thomas Nast caricature of President Andrew Johnson.
A Thomas Nast caricature of President Andrew Johnson.

Harper & Brothers publishing was started in 1825 by James, John, Fletcher and Wesley Harper. Following the successful example of the Illustrated London News, Fletcher began publishing Harper’s Monthly in 1850. The publication was more intent on publishing established authors such as Dickens and Thackeray, but was a great enough success to begin publishing the Harper’s Weekly in 1857. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... The Illustrated London News was a magazine founded by Herbert Ingram and his friend Mark Lemon, the editor of Punch magazine. ... An issue of Harpers from 1905 November 2004 issue Harpers Magazine (or simply Harpers) is a monthly general-interest magazine covering literature, politics, culture, finance, and the arts from a progressive, left perspective. ... “Dickens” redirects here. ... William Makepeace Thackeray (July 18, 1811 – December 24, 1863) was a British novelist of the 19th century. ...


By 1860 the Weekly’s circulation had reached 200,000. Illustrations were an important part of the Weekly’s content, and it developed a reputation for employing some of the most renowned illustrators, notably Winslow Homer and Livingston Hopkins. Among its recurring features were the political cartoons of Thomas Nast who was recruited in 1862 and would remain with the Weekly for more than 20 years. Nast was a feared caricaturist, considered by some the father of American political cartooning. He was the originator of the use of animals to represent the political parties—the Democrat’s donkey and the Republican’s elephant—as well as the familiar character of Santa Claus. Winslow Homer Winslow Homer (February 24, 1836 – September 29, 1910) was an North American landscape painter and printmaker, most famous for his marine subjects. ... Livingston Hop Hopkins (7 July 1846 – 21 August 1927) was an American cartoonist who became a major Australian cartoonist during the time of the Federation of Australia. ... This early political cartoon by Ben Franklin was originally written for the French and Indian War, but was later recycled during the Revolutionary War An editorial cartoon, also known as a political cartoon, is an illustration or comic strip containing a political or social message. ... Thomas Nast (September 27, 1840 – December 7, 1902) was a famous German-American caricaturist and editorial cartoonist in the 19th century and is considered to be the father of American political cartooning. ...


Around the Civil War

So as not to upset its wide readership in the South, Harper’s took a moderate editorial position on the issue of slavery. For this it was called by the more hawkish publications “Harper’s Weakly.” The Weekly supported the Stephen A. Douglas presidential campaign against Abraham Lincoln, but as the American Civil War broke out, Lincoln and the Union received full and loyal support of the publication. Arguably, some of the most important articles and illustrations came from the Weekly’s reporting on the war. It published many renderings in woodcut, by artists such as Alfred Waud, which are now important archives. Slave redirects here. ... Stephen Arnold Douglas (nicknamed the Little Giant because he was short but was considered by many a giant in politics) was an American politician from the western state of Illinois, and was the Democratic Party nominee for President in 1860. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Four horsemen of the Apocalypse by Albrecht Dürer Ukiyo-e woodcut, Ishiyama Moon by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1889) Woodcut is a relief printing artistic technique in printmaking in which an image is carved into the surface of a block of wood, with the printing parts remaining level with the surface... Alfred Waud (photograph by Timothy H. OSullivan). ...

Typical center spread from an 1862 publication of Harper's Weekly with depictions of the Battle of Yorktown as sketched by their "special artists."

Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders George B. McClellan John B. Magruder Joseph E. Johnston Strength 146,000 11,000 Casualties 182 300 The Battle of Yorktown was fought from April 5 to May 4, 1862, as part of the Peninsula Campaign of the American Civil...

"President maker"

Harper's Weekly Inauguration Number 1897
Harper's Weekly Inauguration Number 1897

After the war, Harper's Weekly became more supportive of the Republican Party, playing an important role in the election of Ulysses Grant in 1868 and 1872. In the 1870s, cartoonist Thomas Nast began an aggressive campaign in the journal against the corrupt New York political leader William “Boss” Tweed. Nast turned down a $500,000 bribe to end his attack,[1] and eventually Tweed was arrested in 1873 and convicted of fraud. Nast and the Weekly also played an important part in securing Rutherford B. Hayes’ 1876 presidential election. Later on Hayes remarked that Nast was "the most powerful, single-handed aid [he] had."[2] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 398 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (405 × 610 pixel, file size: 435 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Harpers Weekly Inauguration Number 1897 by George Wharton Edwards Harpers Weekly Halftone, colored, 1897-03-13 Image measurement Height: 15. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 398 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (405 × 610 pixel, file size: 435 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Harpers Weekly Inauguration Number 1897 by George Wharton Edwards Harpers Weekly Halftone, colored, 1897-03-13 Image measurement Height: 15. ... Ulysses Simpson Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American Civil War General and the 18th (1869–1877) President of the United States. ... William Magear Boss Tweed (April 3, 1823 – April 12, 1878) was an American politician and head of Tammany Hall, the name given to the Democratic Party political machine that played a major role in the history of 19th century New York City politics. ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the nineteenth President of the United States (1877–1881). ...


In 1884, however, Nast supported the Democratic candidate, Grover Cleveland for president. In doing so, Nast helped Cleveland become the first Democratic president since 1856. In the words of the artist's grandson, Thomas Nast St Hill, "it was generally conceded that Nast's support won Cleveland the small margin by which he was elected. In this his last national political campaign, Nast had, in fact, 'made a president.'"[3] Nevertheless, changing editorial policies at the journal since the death of Fletcher Harper in 1877 had placed constraints on Nast, and his contributions became less frequent. Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908), the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States, was the only President to serve non-consecutive terms (1885–1889 and 1893–1897). ...


Nast's final contribution to Harper's Weekly was his Christmas illustration in December 1886. In the words of journalist Henry Watterson, "in quitting Harper's Weekly, Nast lost his forum: in losing him, Harper's Weekly lost its political importance."[4] Henry Watterson (also known as Marse Henry) (February 16, 1840 - December 22, 1921) was a famous United States journalist who founded the Louisville Courier-Journal. ...


After 1900, Harper’s Weekly devoted more print to political and social issues, and featured articles by some of the more prominent political figures of the time, such as Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson. Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856–February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Paine, 1974, pp. 181-182
  2. ^ Paine, 1974, p. 349
  3. ^ Nast & St. Hill, 1974, p. 33.
  4. ^ Paine, 1974, p. 528

References

  • Nast, T., & St. Hill, T. N. (1974). Thomas Nast: Cartoons and Illustrations. New York: Dover Publications. ISBN 0-486-23067-8
  • Paine, Albert Bigelow (1974). Th. Nast, His Period and His Pictures. Princeton: Pyne Press. ISBN 0878610790

External links

  • Virginia Civil War Archive - online images including illustrations produced for the Harper's Weekly during 1861-1865 and which relate specifically to the Commonwealth of Virginia's involvement in the Civil War.
  • Free Access for Issues 1861-1865
  • HarpWeek – for-fee electronic full-text access and index of Harper's Weekly issues from 1857 to 1912
  • Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers – Over 90% of all Harper's Weekly originals (old newspapers) available for purchase - from 1857 to 1912 (Choose the Harper's Weekly Category).

 
 

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