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Encyclopedia > Harper's Bazaar
Harper's Bazaar

Cover of October 3, 1868 issue Harpers Bizarre was an American pop-rock band of the 1960s, best known for their Broadway/choirboy sound and their remake of Simon & Garfunkels The 59th Street Bridge Song (Feelin Groovy). ...

Editor-in-Chief Glenda Bailey
Categories Fashion
Frequency Monthly
Publisher Hearst Corporation
First issue 1867
Country United States
Language English
Website www.harpersbazaar.com/

Harper's Bazaar is a well-known American fashion magazine, first published in 1867. Harper's Bazaar considers itself to be the style resource for "the well-dressed woman and the well-dressed mind". Hearst Tower, in September 2006 The Hearst Corporation is a privately-held American-based media conglomerate based in the Hearst Tower in New York City, USA. Founded by William Randolph Hearst as an owner of newspapers, the companys holdings now include a wide variety of media. ... For other uses, see Fashion (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Aimed at members of the upper-middle class and upper classes, Bazaar assembles photographers, artists, designers and writers to deliver a "sophisticated" perspective into the world of fashion, beauty and popular culture on a monthly basis. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Middle Class. ... Upper class is a concept in sociology that refers to the group of people at the top of a social hierarchy. ... A photographer at the Calgary Folk Music Festival Paparazzi at the Tribeca Film Festival A photographer is a person who takes a photograph using a camera. ... The definition of an artist is wide-ranging and covers a broad spectrum of activities to do with creating art, practicing the arts and/or demonstrating an art. ... Brief introduction on the history of fashion design and designers Fashion design is the art dedicated to the creation of wearing apparel and lifestyle. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ...

Contents

History

Since its debut in 1867 as America's first fashion magazine, the pages of Harper's Bazaar, first called Harper's Bazar, has been home to talent such as: Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the magazine as a published medium. ...

When Harper’s Bazaar began publication it was a weekly magazine catering to women in the middle and upper class. They showcased fashion from Germany and Paris in a newspaper design format. It wasn’t until 1901 that Harper’s moved to a monthly issued magazine which it maintains today. Now Harper's Bazaar is owned and operated by the Hearst Corporation in the U.S. and The National Magazine Company in the U.K. Carmel Snow (born 1887 - died 1961) was an Irish fashion journalist, best know as the editor of the American Vogue from 1934 to 1958. ... Carrie Donovan was the former style editor for The New York Times Magazine who is best known for her work in Old Navy commercials where she wore her trademark large spectacles and declared the merchandise was Fabulous!. Categories: People stubs ... Diana Vreeland (July 29, 1906 in Paris, France – August 22, 1989) was a noted columnist and editor in the field of fashion. ... Elizabeth Tilberis, (b 1947 – d 1999) born Elizabeth Jane Kelly, known professionally throughout her career as Liz Tilberis, was a British fashion magazine editor of Manx and English ancestry. ... Alexey Brodovich/Brodovitch (1898-1971) is Russian emigrant photographer and designer who worked in Paris, then America, at the beginning of the twentieth century. ... Louise Emma Augusta Dahl (November 19, 1895 in San Francisco, California – December 11, 1989) was a photographer, known primarily for her work for Harpers Bazaar with fashion editor Diana Vreeland. ... For other uses, see Man Ray (disambiguation). ... Diane Arbus (March 14, 1923 – July 26, 1971) was an American photographer, noted for her portraits of people on the fringes of society, such as tranvestites, dwarves, giants, prostitutes, and ordinary citizens in poses and settings conveying a disturbing uncanniness. ... Cover of Richard Avedons In the American West photo book. ... Robert Franks noted book, The Americans (1958) Robert Frank (born November 9, 1924), born in Zürich, Switzerland, is an important figure in American photography and film. ... Patrick Demarchelier is a French-born fashion photographer. ... Romain de Tirtoff (pseudonym Erté, a French pronunciation of initials ) (November 23, 1892 - 1990) was a French artist and designer. ... Andrew Warhola (August 6, 1928 — February 22, 1987), better known as Andy Warhol, was an American artist who was a central figure in the movement known as Pop art. ... Gloria Rubio y Alatorre, better known as Gloria Guinness (August 27, 1912 - November 9, 1980) was an elegant, earthy socialite (major) and writer (minor) of the mid 20th century. ... Hearst Tower, in September 2006 The Hearst Corporation is a privately-held American-based media conglomerate based in the Hearst Tower in New York City, USA. Founded by William Randolph Hearst as an owner of newspapers, the companys holdings now include a wide variety of media. ...


Harper & Brothers founded the magazine. This company also gave birth to Harper's Magazine and HarperCollins Publishing. Group portrait of the four Harper brothers by Mathew Brady, ca. ... An issue of Harpers Magazine from 1905 Another issue, from November 2004 Harpers Magazine (or simply Harpers) is a monthly magazine of politics and culture. ... HarperCollins is a publishing company owned by News Corporation. ...


Glenda Bailey is the editor-in-chief of U.S. Harper's Bazaar.


Victorian Elegance (1898-1912)


As the turn-of-the-century began in America, Harper's Bazaar began featuring both illustrations and photographs for its covers and inside features of high society and increasingly of fashion.


It's interesting to note that during this late Victorian period, as the women's suffrage movement was gaining momentum (American women did not all win the right to vote until 1920 with the passing of the 19th Amendment), the introduction of more tailored dresses and jackets coincided with women's new sense of feminism. Bazaar also began profiling prominent socialites, such as the Astors and the Griscoms. The Astor family, founded by the German immigrant John Jacob Astor and his wife Sarah Todd, became the wealthiest family in the United States during the 19th century. ...


The Avedon Years (1945-1965)


Richard Avedon began creating fashion portfolios for Harper's Bazaar at the age of 22. His distinctive photographs showed both chic insouciance and boundless vitality. Avedon's women leaped off curbs, roller-skated on the Place de la Concorde, and were seen in nightclubs, enjoying the freedom and fashions of the postwar era. The Place de la Concorde seen from the Pont de la Concorde; in front, the Obelisk, behind, the Rue Royale and the Church of the Madeleine; on the left, the Hôtel de Crillon. ...


He was immortalized in the 1957 film Funny Face by the character Dick Avery (played by Fred Astaire), who asked, "What's wrong with bringing out a girl who has character, spirit, and intelligence?". Funny Face (TV series). ... Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska,[1] was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ...


The Vreeland Years (1936-1962)


When Carmel Snow (former Vogue Editor) saw Mrs. T. Reed Vreeland dancing on the roof of New York's St. Regis Hotel in a white lace Chanel dress and a bolero with roses in her hair one evening in 1936, she knew she'd found Bazaar's newest staffer. Diana, who is said to have invented the word "pizzazz", first came to the attention of readers with her Why Don't You ... ? column. (A typical suggestion: "Why don't you ... wear, like the Duchess of Kent, three enormous diamond stars arranged in your hair in front?") Before long, she became fashion editor, collaborating with photographers Louise Dahl-Wolfe and Richard Avedon and, later, art director Henry Wolf. Her eccentricity, perception and wit, as well as her sharp wit and sweeping pronouncements ("I adore that pink! It's the navy blue of India"), were memorialized in the movie Funny Face, making her, for many, the prototypical fashion-magazine editor.


Alexey Brodovitch (1934-1958)


In 1934, newly installed Bazaar editor Carmel Snow attended an Art Directors Club of New York exhibition curated by 36-year-old graphic designer Alexey Brodovitch and immediately offered Brodovitch a job as Bazaar's art director. Throughout his career at the magazine, Brodovitch, a Russian émigré (by way of Paris), revolutionized magazine design. With his directive "Astonish me," he inspired some of the greatest visual artists of the 20th century (including protégés Irving Penn, Hiro, and, of course, Richard Avedon). Brodovitch's signature use of white space, his innovation of Bazaar's iconic Didot logo, and the cinematic quality that his obsessive cropping brought to layouts (not even the work of Man Ray and Henri Cartier-Bresson was safe from his busy scissors) compelled Truman Capote to write, "What Dom Pérignon was to champagne ... so [Brodovitch] has been to ... photographic design and editorial layout." Sadly, Brodovitch's personal life was less triumphant. Plagued by alcoholism, he left Bazaar in 1958 and eventually moved to the south of France, where he died in 1971. Truman Capote (pronounced ) (30 September 1924 – 25 August 1984) was an American writer whose non-fiction, stories, novels and plays are recognized literary classics, including the novella Breakfast at Tiffanys (1958) and In Cold Blood (1965), which he labeled a non-fiction novel. ...


The Carmel Snow Years (1933-1957)


As of 1933, editor in chief Carmel Snow ( A Former Editor at Vogue) brought photojournalist Martin Munkacsi to a windswept beach to shoot a swimwear spread. As the model ran toward the camera, Munkacsi took the picture that made fashion-magazine history. Until that moment, nearly all fashion was carefully staged on mannequin-like models in a studio. Snow's buoyant spirit (she rarely slept or ate, although she had a lifelong love affair with the three-martini lunch) and wicked sense of adventure brought life to the pages of Bazaar. Snow's genius came from cultivating the best people. Her first big find was art director Alexey Brodovitch, who innovated Bazaar's iconic Didot logo. Brodovitch is perhaps best known for his work with Richard Avedon, who, as a young photographer, was so determined to work at Bazaar that he endured the humiliation of 14 canceled interviews before finally being hired. Snow also unleashed the force of nature known as Diana Vreeland, whom she brought on as fashion editor in 1936. The collaboration of these four visionaries resulted in some of the seminal fashion shoots of the 20th century and ended only with Snow's retirement, at the age of 70, in 1957.


Criticism

Glenda Bailey has been the center of issues in claims of supporting fur and the usage of it as a fashion statement, much like her "archrival", Anna Wintour she has been the center of attention mainly by that of PETA. Anna Wintour (born November 3, 1949, in London) has been the editor-in-chief of American Vogue since 1988. ... Peta can refer to: Peta (prefix), a prefix meaning times 1015 in the International System of Units People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), an animal-rights organization People Eating Tasty Animals, a parody of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals Peta, Greece, a town in the prefecture...


Harper's Bazaar worldwide

In addition to the United States, Bazaar is published in over 21 countries, including Australia, Canada, Czech Republic, Greece, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Venezuela, Lithuania, Russia, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, and the United Kingdom.


Harper's Bazaar UK


In November 1970 the Hearst Corporation’s Harper’s Bazaar UK (founded in 1929) and Queen magazine (which dated from 1862) amalgamated to form Harpers & Queen. The magazine focused on British "high society" and the lives of socialites and the British aristocracy. More recently, it steered gradually away from those narrow interests to focus instead on rock stars and film makers.[1]


It was announced in late 2005 that Harpers and Queen would once again be branded Harper’s Bazaar UK from the March 2006 issue onward, to bring it in line with other titles internationally. The magazine has won several awards, including Consumer Magazine of the Year.


Harper's Bazaar Australia

In November 1970 the Hearst Corporation’s Harper’s Bazaar Au (founded in the early 1930s) The magazine focused on Australian "high society" which mostly came from Britain during the time due to British expansion and Imperialism and the lives of socialites and the Aristocracy.


It has surmounted Vogue and Elle, in numbers in Australia, becoming ever more popular with the general population due to the fact that Harper's Bazaar is considered the one and only Fashion Magazine (first started in 1867). Opinions about the importance of Harper's Bazaar have also been a topic of discussion in Australia as well as New Zealand due to the fact of its low numbers and only ranking that of third in the United States.


In the media

  • The publication's name was the subject of one of sitcom character Archie Bunker's famous malapropisms, when he referred to it as Harper's Brassiere.
  • Winged creatures in Peter David's fantasy novel Sir Apropos of Nothing, said to be the male equivalent of harpies, were called Harpers, and more descriptively, the Harpers Bizarre.
  • In the final shot of the classic Alfred Hitchcock movie Rear Window (1954), Grace Kelly's character is shown reading a non-fiction book called Beyond the High Himalayas. When she notices her boyfriend (James Stewart) is sleeping, she puts it down to read Harper's Bazaar instead.

Information Gender Male Age 50 (in 1974) Date of birth 1924 Date of death Unknown (still alive as of 1983) Occupation Blue Collar (19??-1978) Bar Owner (1979-????) Family Michael Stivic (son-in-law) Joey Stivic (grandson) Alfred Bunker (brother) Barbara Lee Billie Bunker (niece) Katherine Bunker (sister-in-law... This article or section seems to contain too many examples (or examples of poor quality) for an encyclopedia entry. ... Peter Allen David (often abbreviated PAD) (born September 23, 1956) is an American writer, best known for his work in comic books and Star Trek novels. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... In Greek mythology, Harpies (robbers) were first beautiful winged women: Hesiod (Theogony) calls them as two lovely-haired creatures. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... For the 1998 remake, see Rear Window (1998 film). ... For the Mika song, see Grace Kelly (song). ... For other persons named James Stewart, see James Stewart (disambiguation). ...

Editors-in-Chiefs

Carmel Snow (born 1887 - died 1961) was an Irish fashion journalist, best know as the editor of the American Vogue from 1934 to 1958. ... Carrie Donovan was the former style editor for The New York Times Magazine who is best known for her work in Old Navy commercials where she wore her trademark large spectacles and declared the merchandise was Fabulous!. Categories: People stubs ... Diana Vreeland (July 29, 1906 in Paris, France – August 22, 1989) was a noted columnist and editor in the field of fashion. ... Elizabeth Tilberis, (b 1947 – d 1999) born Elizabeth Jane Kelly, known professionally throughout her career as Liz Tilberis, was a British fashion magazine editor of Manx and English ancestry. ... Alexey Brodovich/Brodovitch (1898-1971) is Russian emigrant photographer and designer who worked in Paris, then America, at the beginning of the twentieth century. ...

See also

This is a list of womens magazines, magazines published primarily for a readership of women. ... For other meanings, see vogue. ... ELLE is a famous, worldwide magazine that focuses on womens fashion, beauty, health, and entertainment. ...

References

External links

  • Harper's Bazaar Official Website
  • Harper's Bazaar UK Official Website
  • Harper's Bazaar Australia Official Website
  • Harper's Bazaar Magazine Details

 
 

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