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Encyclopedia > Harold and Maude
Harold and Maude

IMDB 8.0/10 (13,197 votes)
top 250: #239
Produced by Colin Higgins
Charles B. Mulvehill
Written by Colin Higgins
Starring Ruth Gordon
Bud Cort
Vivian Pickles
Eric Christmas
Cyril Cusack
Ellen Geer
G. Wood
Music by Cat Stevens
Distributed by Paramount
Release date(s) December 20, 1971 (USA)
Running time 91 min.
Language English
Budget $1,200,000 (estimated)
IMDb profile

Harold and Maude is a movie directed by Hal Ashby in 1971. The film features both dark and light humor, social satire (including anti-war), promotes the notion of living life to its fullest, and has long had a cult following. The film is number 45 on the American Film Institute's list of 100 Funniest Movies of all time[1], number 42 on Bravo's 100 Funniest Movies and on IMDB's list of the best 250 movies ever made. In 1997, it was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress [2]. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (520x755, 91 KB) Licensing This image is of a movie poster or title card, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the movie or the studio which produced the movie in question. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about actors, films, television shows, television stars, video games and production crew personnel. ... Colin Higgins was born on July 28, 1941 and died of AIDS on August 5, 1988. ... Colin Higgins was born on July 28, 1941 and died of AIDS on August 5, 1988. ... Ruth Gordon (October 30, 1896 – August 28, 1985) was an American actress and screenwriter who was perhaps best known for her role as the oversolicitous neighbor in Roman Polanskis adaptation of Ira Levins novel Rosemarys Baby, for which she won the 1968 Academy Award for Best Supporting... Bud Cort, an American actor, was born Walter Edward Cox on March 29, 1948 in New Rochelle, New York. ... Eric Cuthbert Christmas (b. ... Cyril Cusack (November 26, 1910 — October 7, 1993) was an Irish actor. ... Ellen Geer (Born 1941 in New York City, New York, USA) is an American actress, professor, screenwriter, film director and theatre director. ... George Wood (December 31, 1919–July 24, 2000) was an American film and television actor. ... Cat Stevens (born Steven Demetre Georgiou on July 21, 1948, changed name to Yusuf Islam in 1979) is an English musician, singer-songwriter and a prominent convert to Islam. ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... December 20 is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Film is a term that encompasses motion pictures as individual projects, as well as the field in general. ... Hal Ashby (September 2, 1929 - December 27, 1988) was an American film director and Academy Award winner. ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... A war is a conflict between two or more groups that involve large numbers of individuals. ... Cult film is a colloquial term for a film that has accrued a devoted group of fans. ... The American Film Institute (AFI) is an independent non-profit organization created by the National Endowment for the Arts, which was established in 1967 when President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities Act. ... Bravo is a cable television network owned by NBC Universal. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) [1] is an online database of information about actors, movies, television shows, television stars and video games. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ... The Great Hall interior. ...


The film was a commercial failure when it was released although the critical reception was extremely positive. The screenplay upon which the film was based was written by Colin Higgins, and published as a novel[3] in 1971. The movie was shot in the San Francisco Bay Area. Harold and Maude was also a play on Broadway for some time. A screenplay or script is a blueprint for producing a motion picture. ... Colin Higgins was born on July 28, 1941 and died of AIDS on August 5, 1988. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative in prose. ... USGS Satellite photo of the San Francisco Bay Area. ... Broadway theatre[1] is often considered the highest professional form of theatre in the United States. ...


The movie has given rise to two new words: "Harolding" (hanging around cemeteries) described by Douglas Coupland in "Harolding in West Vancouver" (1996); and "Maudism" or "Maudianism", the philosophy of living each day to the fullest.[4]. This may also have a link to the phonetically-identical philosophy of Modism. Douglas Coupland (born December 30, 1961) is a major Canadian fiction writer as well as a playwright and visual artist. ... West Vancouver is a district municipality in the province of British Columbia. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The entire soundtrack for the movie is by Cat Stevens. Cat Stevens (born Steven Demetre Georgiou on July 21, 1948, changed name to Yusuf Islam in 1979) is an English musician, singer-songwriter and a prominent convert to Islam. ...

Contents

Summary

The film first introduces us to Harold, an alienated young man from a wealthy family who lives in a large mansion with his domineering mother. Harold stages realistic mock-suicides. This has evidently been going on for so long that his mother takes no notice, other than when Harold causes a particular mess with his fake blood. For amusement, Harold attends funerals of people he doesn't know. At these he repeatedly sees Maude, a 79-year-old woman who befriends him. Maude is very much his opposite: a senior citizen, energetic, impulsive, and light-hearted. The two form an unlikely friendship. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Suicide (from Latin sui caedere, to kill oneself) is the act of willfully ending ones own life. ... Human blood smear: a - erythrocytes; b - neutrophil; c - eosinophil; d - lymphocyte. ... Underwater funeral in Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea A funeral is a ceremony marking a persons death. ...


Themes

Hal Ashby, the director of the film, was part of the San Francisco youth culture, and in this film, he posits the doomed youth of the alienated against the vital age of actually believing and caring in something like the Holocaust survivors had to do in order to survive, contrasting nihilism with purpose. Maude's past is revealed in a glimpse of the concentration camp ID number tattooed on her arm. Hal Ashby (September 2, 1929 - December 27, 1988) was an American film director and Academy Award winner. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Popular use of the word youth refers to a person who is neither an adult nor a child, but somewhere in between, scientifically referred to as an adolescent and, in most English speaking countries, commonly referred to as a teen or teenager. ... This article is becoming very long. ... It has been suggested that Internment be merged into this article or section. ... A tattoo is a mark made by inserting pigment into the skin; in technical terms, tattooing is micro-pigment implantation. ...


While Harold is part of a society where he has no personal importance and existentially, he is without meaning, Maude has survived and lives a life rich with meaning. It is this existential crisis, shown against the backdrop of the Vietnam War that we see the difference of how one culture, Harold, is handling one meaningless war, while another has experienced and lived beyond another war that produced a crisis of meaning, the Holocaust. Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...


Clearly a survivor, Maude is also a fabulist and a dreamer; seeing beauty all around her and believing in the innate goodness of the individual people (but neither the state nor the corporate structure). In its strict sense a fable is a short story or folk tale embodying a moral, which may be expressed explicitly at the end as a maxim. ...


Cast

Ruth Gordon (October 30, 1896 – August 28, 1985) was an American actress and screenwriter who was perhaps best known for her role as the oversolicitous neighbor in Roman Polanskis adaptation of Ira Levins novel Rosemarys Baby, for which she won the 1968 Academy Award for Best Supporting... Bud Cort, an American actor, was born Walter Edward Cox on March 29, 1948 in New Rochelle, New York. ... Cyril Cusack (November 26, 1910 — October 7, 1993) was an Irish actor. ... Ellen Geer (Born 1941 in New York City, New York, USA) is an American actress, professor, screenwriter, film director and theatre director. ... Eric Cuthbert Christmas (b. ... George Wood (December 31, 1919–July 24, 2000) was an American film and television actor. ... Tom Skerritt (born on August 25, 1933) is an American actor, born in Detroit, Michigan. ...

Crew

  • Cinematography by: John Alonzo

Music

The soundtrack is by Cat Stevens, and includes two songs, "Don't Be Shy" and "If You Want To Sing Out, Sing Out", which he composed specifically for the movie and which were unavailable for over a decade on vinyl or cassette (they were later released on the compact disc Footsteps in the Dark). There is no official soundtrack for Harold and Maude. Cat Stevens (born Steven Demetre Georgiou on July 21, 1948, changed name to Yusuf Islam in 1979) is an English musician, singer-songwriter and a prominent convert to Islam. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Track listing

These songs are in the order in which they appear in the movie.

  1. "Don't Be Shy"
  2. "On The Road To Find Out"
  3. "I Wish, I Wish"
  4. "Miles From Nowhere"
  5. "Tea For The Tillerman"
  6. "I Think I See The Light"
  7. "Where Do The Children Play?"
  8. "If You Want To Sing Out, Sing Out"
  9. "Trouble"

Trivia

Funeral carriage, Museum of Funeral Customs A hearse is a funeral vehicle, a conveyance for the coffin from e. ... Downtown San Carlos San Carlos, Spanish for Saint Charles, is a city in San Mateo County, California on the San Francisco Peninsula. ... For other Ford Mustang models, see Ford Mustang Variants The Ford Mustang is an American automobile, originally based on the Ford Falcon compact. ... San Mateo County is a county located in the San Francisco Bay Area. ... View out from center of Golden Gate National Cemetery Golden Gate National Cemetery is a U.S. National Cemetery, located in the city of San Bruno, San Mateo County, 12 miles south of San Francisco. ... The San Bruno police station next to the BART station at the Shops at Tanforan. ... The Dumbarton Bridge is the southernmost of the highway bridges that span the San Francisco Bay in California. ... The Hindenburgdamm rail causeway across the Wadden Sea to the island of Sylt in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany In modern usage, a causeway is a road or railway elevated by a bank, usually across a broad body of water or wetland. ... My First Mister is actress Christine Lahtis feature directorial debut, which is the story of an alienated goth teen (Leelee Sobieski) who forms an unlikely friendship with a lonely mens clothing store owner (Albert Brooks). ... Christine Lahti (born April 4, 1950) is an American actress. ... Brooks in The In-Laws, 2003 Albert Brooks (born July 22, 1947 as Albert Lawrence Einstein) is an Academy Award nominated American actor, writer, comedian and director. ... Leelee Sobieski (born Liliane Rudabet Gloria Elsveta Sobieski on June 10, 1983[1]) is an American actress. ... Jean-Claude Carrière (born September 19, 1931 in Colombières-sur-Orb, Hérault, France) is a screenwriter and actor. ... Roy Dupuis (April 21, 1963) is a French-Canadian (Québécois) actor. ... Tim Kasher, Stockholm 2005 The Good Life is an indie rock band on Saddle Creek records. ... Bobby Farrelly is a screenwriter, producer and director from Cumberland, Rhode Island. ... Peter Farrelly is a screenwriter, producer, director and novelist from Cumberland, Rhode Island. ... Theres Something About Mary, released in 1998 by 20th Century Fox, is a combination of romantic comedy and gross-out film directed by Bobby Farrelly and Peter Farrelly (the Farrelly brothers). ... The Perks of Being a Wallflower an epistolary novel written in the 1990s by American novelist Stephen Chbosky. ... Stephen Chbosky (born January 25, 1970) is an American author, editor, screenwriter, and film director. ...

See also

This is a list of counterculture films made in the 1960s and 1970s Dog Star Man (1961-1964) The Misfits (1961) Flaming Creatures (1963) Scorpio Rising (1963) Dr. Strangelove (1964) Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill! (1965) The War Game (1965) Chappaqua (1966) Chelsea Girls (1966) Hallucination Generation (1966) The Wild Angels...

External links

  • Harold and Maude at the Internet Movie Database
  • Harold et Maude at the Internet Movie Database French tv adaptation written by Jean-Claude Carrière and dir. by Jean-Paul Carrère
  • Harold and Maude, the unofficial homepage by Mike Sullivan
  • Kierkegaard's Narrative: Harold and Maude
  • Guide to shoot locations
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Harold and Maude

  Results from FactBites:
 
Harold and Maude (1971) (1798 words)
HAM clearly was the product of its time, as everything about it signifies the worst aspects of the counterculture prevalent in the late Sixties and early Seventies.
Maude has the habit of stealing cars for herself, and we're clearly supposed to think this is cute and acceptable.
Harold and Maude wants to be The Graduate: a poignant and honest look "coming of age" story about a young man who doesn't fit in with the ways society tries to buttonhole him.
The DVD Journal: Harold and Maude (976 words)
To refresh on the plot: Harold (Bud Cort, in his career-defining role) is 20, passive and withdrawn, and obsessed with death.
Maude lives each moment fully, spurning convention and authority with exuberant joy, gradually drawing Harold out of his shell and encouraging him to embrace life.
When Harold asks Maude about an umbrella she has hanging on the wall, she tells him it was something she used to defend herself with at protests and political meetings before she moved to America.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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