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Encyclopedia > Harold Stirling Vanderbilt

Harold Stirling Vanderbilt, born July 6, 1884 - died July 4, 1970, was a member of the prominent United States Vanderbilt family who was a railroad executive, a champion yachtsman and a champion bridge player. July 6 is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 178 days remaining. ... 1884 is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar). ... July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... This article details the family of Cornelius Vanderbilt. ... Yachting is a noncommercial boating activity. ... Contract bridge, usually known simply as bridge, is a trick-taking card game for four players who form two partnerships, or sides. The partners on each side sit opposite one another. ...

Harold Stirling Vanderbilt
Harold Stirling Vanderbilt

Born in Oakdale, New York, the third child and second son of William Kissam Vanderbilt and Alva Erskine Smith, to family and friends he was known by the nickname "Mike." He was a brother to William Kissam Vanderbilt II and Consuelo Vanderbilt. Born to great wealth, he was raised in Vanderbilt mansions, traveled to Europe frequently, and sailed around the world on yachts owned by his father. This image is a book cover. ... This image is a book cover. ... Oakdale is a census-designated place located in Suffolk County, New York. ... William Kissam Vanderbilt (December 12, 1849 – July 22, 1920) was a member of the prominent United States Vanderbilt family. ... Alva Erskine Smith Vanderbilt Belmont ( January 17, 1853 - January 26, 1933) was a multi-millionaire American socialite and a major funder of the womens suffrage movement. ... William Kissam Vanderbilt II (March 2, 1878 – January 8, 1944) was a motor racing enthusiast and yachtsman and a member of the prominent United States Vanderbilt family. ... Consuelo Vanderbilt (March 2, 1877 - December 6, 1964) was a member of the United States Vanderbilt family seen as the penultimate marital prize of the Victorian age and an international emblem for socially advantageous marriages. ... From the late 1870s to the 1920s the Vanderbilt clan employed Americas best Beaux-Arts architects and decorators to build an unequalled string of New York townhouses and East Coast palaces in the United States. ...


Educated by tutors and at private schools, Harold Vanderbilt attended Harvard Law School, graduating in 1910. He then joined the New York Central Railroad Company, the centerpiece of his family's vast railway empire of which his father was president. On his father's passing in 1920, thirty-six-year-old Harold Vanderbilt inherited a multi-million dollar fortune that included the Idle Hour summer estate at Oakdale on Long Island, New York plus equity in the following railway companies: Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... Harvard Law School (HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... The New York Central Railroad, known simply as the New York Central in its publicity and with the AAR reporting mark of NYC, was a railroad operating in the North-Eastern United States. ... a small section of Oakdale, NY ... Oakdale is a census-designated place located in Suffolk County, New York. ... This article is about Long Island in New York State. ...

Yachting was a major sport and pastime for the wealthy families. As a boy, Harold Vanderbilt spent part of his summers at his family's vacation mansions, the Idle Hour estate in Long Island, New York on the banks of the Connetquot River, and Marble House at Newport, Rhode Island. As an adult, he pursued his interest in yachting, winning six "King's Cups" and five "Astor Cups" at regattas between 1922 and 1938. In 1925, he built his own luxurious vacation home at Palm Beach, Florida that he called "El Solano." In 1930 he built a second Florida mansion, the same year that he achieved the pinnacle of Yacht racing success by winning the America's Cup. His victory put him on the cover of the September 15th issue of Time magazine. Held every three years, Harold Vanderbilt won the prestigious event three times in a row, taking it again in 1934 and 1937. His wife, Gertrude "Gertie" Lewis Conway became the first female to compete as a full-fledged team member in an America's Cup yacht race. They both were elected to the America's Cup Hall of Fame. 1918 map The New York Central Railroad (AAR reporting mark NYC), known simply as the New York Central in its publicity, was a railroad operating in the North-Eastern United States. ... The New York Central Railroad, known simply as the New York Central in its publicity and with the AAR reporting mark of NYC, was a railroad operating in the North-Eastern United States. ... An 1847 map of Lower Manhattan; the only railroad in Manhattan is the New York and Harlem Railroad. ... a small section of Oakdale, NY ... Marble House, Newport, Rhode Island. ... A side street in Newport, Rhode Island, showing the historic buildings near the waterfront Newport is a city located in Newport County, Rhode Island, about 30 miles (48 km) south of Providence. ... Palm Beach is a town located in Palm Beach County, Florida, 65 miles north of Miami. ... Inshore yacht racing on Sydney Harbour, Australia Yacht racing is the sport of competitive sailing. ... The Americas Cup is the most famous and most prestigious competition in the sport of yachting, and the oldest active trophy in international sports, predating the FA Cup by two decades and the Modern Olympics by 45 years. ... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ...


Vanderbilt was also a card game enthusiast who, in 1925, invented the scoring system by which the game of contract bridge drove auction bridge into utter oblivion. Three years later, he heavily endowed the Vanderbilt Trophy which goes to the winners of the national team-of-four championship. In 1932 and again in 1940, he was part of a team that won his own trophy. He also penned several books on the subject of bridge, most notably "The Vanderbilt Club". Contract bridge, usually known simply as bridge, is a trick-taking card game for four players who form two partnerships, or sides. The partners on each side sit opposite one another. ...


Not one to rest on his laurels, Vanderbilt also invented the first forcing club bidding system which has perenially dominated world championship play ever since. Italian club, Polish club, Precision club, and all other forcing club systems are an outgrowth of the Vanderbilt Club.


In 1969, the World Bridge Federation made Vanderbilt its first honorary member. When a Bridge Hall Of Fame was inaugurated in 1964, Vanderbilt was one of the first of three persons elected. His trophy remains one of the most prized in the game.


In addition to sailing, Vanderbilt was a licensed pilot, acquiring a Sikorsky S-43 "Flying Boat" in 1938. But beyond leisure activities, Harold Vanderbilt had a keen interest in the success of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, founded in 1873 through the financial sponsorship of his great-grandfather, Cornelius Vanderbilt. A longtime member of the university's Board of Trust, he served as its president between 1955 and 1968. He helped guide the institution through a time in history when racial integration of the student body was a divisive and explosive issue. The university annually offers the "Harold Stirling Vanderbilt Scholarship" and on the grounds in front of Buttrick Hall, a lifelike statue was erected in his honor. Vanderbilt University Vanderbilt University (colloquially known as Vandy) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational university in Nashville, Tennessee. ... The Nashville skyline Nashville is the capital of the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Cornelius Vanderbilt Cornelius Vanderbilt (May 27, 1794 – January 4, 1877) was a U.S. entrepreneur who built his wealth in shipping and railroads and was the patriarch of the Vanderbilt family. ... Racial integration, or simply integration, in United States usage, includes desegregation (the process of ending systematic racial segregation). ...


Following the death of his brother William, he became president of New York Central Railroad Company. Unfortunately, Harold Vanderbilt paid too little attention to the family's railway business and failed to adequately diversify as technology rapidly changed the world. He was the last of the Vanderbilts to head up the railroad, losing control of the company in 1954.


In 1963, Harold Vanderbilt assisted the Preservation Society of Newport County in acquiring the Marble House summer estate in Newport, Rhode Island sold by his mother more than thirty years earlier. Successful in their bid, the property was converted into a museum.


Harld Stirling Vanderbilt passed away in 1970. He and his wife are interred at Saint Mary's Cemetery in Portsmouth, Rhode Island, their graves marked with only a simple flat stone. Location of Portsmouth, Rhode Island. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Harold Stirling Vanderbilt - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (815 words)
Harold Stirling Vanderbilt, born July 6, 1884 - died July 4, 1970, was a member of the prominent United States Vanderbilt family who was a railroad executive, a champion yachtsman and a champion bridge player.
Born in Oakdale, New York, the third child and second son of William Kissam Vanderbilt and Alva Erskine Smith, to family and friends he was known by the nickname "Mike." He was a brother to William Kissam Vanderbilt II and Consuelo Vanderbilt.
Vanderbilt was also a card game enthusiast who, in 1925, invented the scoring system by which the game of contract bridge drove auction bridge into utter oblivion.
William Kissam Vanderbilt II - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1117 words)
Vanderbilt was educated by tutors and at private schools and sent to study at Harvard University but dropped out after the first year.
Vanderbilt and his wife Virginia had a son, William Kissam Vanderbilt III and daughters Muriel and Consuelo, the latter named for her aunt.
Willie Kissam Vanderbilt II died in early 1944 of a heart ailment and was interred in the family mausoleum at the Moravian Cemetery on Staten Island, New York.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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