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Encyclopedia > Harold Ross

Harold Wallace Ross (November 6, 1892 - December 6, 1951) was an American journalist and founder of The New Yorker magazine, which he edited from 1925 to his death. November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... 1892 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... The New Yorkers first cover, which is reprinted most years on the magazines anniversary. ... 1925 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Born in Aspen, Colorado to George and Ida (Martin) Ross, he was the son of an Irish immigrant and a schoolteacher. When he was eight, the family left Aspen because of the collapse in the price of silver, moving to Redcliff and Silverton, Colorado, then to Salt Lake City, Utah. In Utah, he worked on the high school paper and was a stringer for the Salt Lake City Tribute. The young Ross had journalism in the blood, dropping out of school at thirteen and running away to his uncle's in Denver where he worked for The Denver Post. Though he returned to his family, he did not return to school, instead getting a job at the Salt Lake Telegram. View south along Galena Street in downtown Aspen. ... The town of Red Cliff, seen from across the Eagle River Red Cliff (sometimes spelled Redcliff) is a town located in Eagle County, Colorado. ... Silverton is a town located in San Juan County, Colorado. ... ... Denver skyline, 1999. ... The Denver Post is a daily newspaper published in Denver, Colorado. ...


By the time he was twenty-five he had worked for at least seven different papers, including the Marysville, California Appeal; the Sacramento Union; the Panama Star and Herald; the New Orleans Item; the Atlanta Journal, the Hudson Observer in Hoboken, New Jersey; the Brooklyn Eagle; and the San Francisco Call. Marysville is the county seat of Yuba County, California, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 12,268. ... City nickname: The Big Tomato Location Location of Sacramento in California Government County Sacramento Mayor Heather Fargo Physical characteristics Area      Land      Water 99. ... New Orleans (local pronunciations: , , or ) (French: La Nouvelle-Orléans, pronounced in standard French accent) is a major U.S. port city and the largest city in the U.S. state of Louisiana. ... The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is the only major daily newspaper of Atlanta and metro Atlanta. ... Image of Hoboken taken by NASA (red line shows where Hoboken is). ... The Brooklyn Eagle, also called The Brooklyn Daily Eagle was a daily newspaper published in Brooklyn, New York from 1841 to 1955. ...


In Atlanta, he covered the murder trial of Leo Frank, one of the of "trials of the century". Atlanta is the capital and largest city of Georgia, a state of the United States of America. ... Lucille and Leo Frank at Franks trial. ...


In World War I, he enlisted in the U.S. Army Eighteenth Engineers Railway Regiment. In France, he edited the regimental journal and went to Paris to work for the Stars and Stripes, serving from February 1918 to April 1919. On the Stars and Stripes, he met Alexander Woollcott, Franklin Pierce Adams, and Jane Grant, who would become the first Mrs. Ross. World War I was primarily a European conflict with many facets: immense human sacrifice, stalemate trench warfare, and the use of new, devastating weapons - tanks, aircraft, machine guns, and poison gas World War I, also known as the First World War, the Great War, the War of the Nations and... Flag ratio: 10:19; nicknames: Stars and Stripes, Old Glory The flag of the United States of America consists of thirteen equal horizontal stripes of red (top and bottom) alternating with white; there is a blue rectangle in the upper hoist-side corner bearing 50 small, white, five-pointed stars... 1918 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... April is the fourth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four with the length of 30 days. ... 1919 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Alexander Woollcott, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1939 Alexander Humphreys Woollcott (January 19, 1887 - January 23, 1943) was a critic and commentator for The New Yorker magazine, and a member of the Algonquin Round Table. ... Franklin Pierce Adams (November 15, 1881 - March 23, 1960), was an American columnist (under the pen name F.P.A.), writer, and wit, part of the famous Algonquin Round Table of the 1920s and 1930s. ...


After the war, he returned to New York City and assumed the editorship of a magazine for veterans, The Home Sector. It folded in 1920 and was absorbed by the American Legion Weekly. He then spent a few weeks at Judge, a humorous magazine. These magazines were where Ross planned a new journal, one with metropolitan sensibilities and a sophisticated tone. This would be The New Yorker, the first issue of which was dated February 21, 1925. It was a partnership between Ross and yeast heir Raoul Fleishmann; they established the F-R Publishing Company to publish the magazine. Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... 1920 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events WIKIPEDIA EATS VAGINA January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... The New Yorkers first cover, which is reprinted most years on the magazines anniversary. ... February 21 is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1925 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Ross, who was said to resemble "a dishonest Abe Lincoln" was a genius at attracting talent to his new magazine, featuring writers such as James Thurber, E.B. White, Katherine Angell, S.J. Perelman, Janet Flanner (aka "Genet"), Wolcott Gibbs, Alexander Woollcott, Robert Benchley and Dorothy Parker. Ross worked extremely long hours and ruined all three of his marriages as a result. He was a careful and conscientious editor who strived to keep his magazine clear and concise. One famous query to his writers was "Who that?" because Ross believed the only two people everyone in the English-speaking world was familiar with were Harry Houdini and Sherlock Holmes. Very aware of his limited education, his bible was Fowler's Modern English Usage. He edited every issue of the magazine from the first until his death--a total of 1,399 issues. He would be succeeded as editor by William Shawn. Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... James Grover Thurber (December 8, 1894–November 2, 1961) was a U.S. humorist and cartoonist. ... Elwyn Brooks White (July 11, 1899–October 1, 1985) was an American essayist, author, and noted prose stylist. ... Sidney Joseph Perelman, almost always known as S. J. Perelman (February 1, 1904 – October 17, 1979), was a United States humorist, author, and screenwriter. ... Janet Flanner (March 13, 1892 - November 7, 1978) was an American writer and journalist who served as the Paris correspondent of the New Yorker magazine from its inception in 1925 until she retired in 1975. ... Wolcott Gibbs (born 1902) is most noted as a humourist, parodist, drama critic and short story writer for The New Yorker magazine from 1927 until his death in 1958. ... Alexander Woollcott, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1939 Alexander Humphreys Woollcott (January 19, 1887 - January 23, 1943) was a critic and commentator for The New Yorker magazine, and a member of the Algonquin Round Table. ... Robert Charles Benchley (September 15, 1889 in Worcester, Massachusetts – November 21, 1945) was an American humorist, newspaper columnist, film actor, and drama editor. ... Dorothy Parker, also known as Dot Parker or Dottie Parker, was born Dorothy Rothschild in the West End district of Long Branch, New Jersey, on August 22, 1893. ... Harry Houdini became world-renowned for his stunts and feats of escapology even moreso than his magical illusions. ... Sherlock Holmes Sherlock Holmes (1854–1957, according to William S. Baring-Gould) is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, created by British author and physician Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... Fowlers Modern English Usage, often referred to simply as Fowler, is a style guide to British English usage. ... William Shawn (August 31, 1907-December 8, 1992) was an American magazine editor who edited The New Yorker from 1952 until 1987. ...


He died in Boston, Massachusetts during an operation to remove cancer. For other instances of Boston, see Boston (disambiguation) Boston is the capital and largest city in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States. ...


He kept up a volumnious correspondence, which is available to researchers at the New York Public Library. New York Public Library, central block, built 1897–1911, Carrère and Hastings, architects (June 2003) The New York Public Library (NYPL), one of three public library systems serving New York City, is one of the leading libraries in the United States. ...


Bibliography

  • Thomas Kunkel. Genius in Disguise: Harold Ross of the New Yorker. New York: Random House, 1995. ISBN 0679418377.
  • James Thurber. The Years With Ross. Boston: Little, Brown, 1959. ISBN 0060959711 (2001 reprint).
  • Ben Yagoda. About Town: The New Yorker and the World It Made. New York: Scribners, 2000. ISBN 0684816059.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Harold Ross - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (593 words)
Harold Wallace Ross (November 6, 1892 - December 6, 1951) was an American journalist and founder of The New Yorker magazine, which he edited from 1925 to his death.
Born in Aspen, Colorado to George and Ida (Martin) Ross, he was the son of an Irish immigrant and a schoolteacher.
Ross, who was said to resemble "a dishonest Abe Lincoln" was a genius at attracting talent to his new magazine, featuring writers such as James Thurber, E.B. White, Katherine Angell, S.J. Perelman, Janet Flanner (aka "Genet"), Wolcott Gibbs, Alexander Woollcott, Robert Benchley and Dorothy Parker.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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