FACTOID # 28: Austin, Texas has more people than Alaska.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Harold Macmillan
The Rt Hon Harold Macmillan
Harold Macmillan

In office
11 January 1957 – 19 October 1963
Deputy Rab Butler
Preceded by Sir Anthony Eden
Succeeded by Sir Alec Douglas-Home

In office
20 December 1955 – 13 January 1957
Prime Minister Anthony Eden
Preceded by Rab Butler
Succeeded by Peter Thorneycroft

Born 10 February 1894
Brixton, London, England
Died 29 December 1986, age 92
Chelwood Gate, Sussex, England
Political party Conservative
Religion Church of England [1]

Maurice Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton, OM, PC (10 February 189429 December 1986), was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 to 1963. Harold Macmillan Official Portrait File links The following pages link to this file: Harold Macmillan ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the the United Kingdom. ... January 11 is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 19 is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... Richard Austen Butler, Baron Butler of Saffron Walden, KG, CH, PC, DL (9 December 1902 – 8 March 1982), who invariably signed his name R. A. Butler and was familiarly known as Rab, was a British Conservative politician. ... Robert Anthony Eden, 1st Earl of Avon, KG, MC, PC (June 12, 1897– January 14, 1977), British politician, was Foreign Secretary for three periods between 1935 and 1955, including World War II and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1955 to 1957. ... Alexander Frederick Douglas-Home1, Baron Home of the Hirsel, KT, PC (July 2, 1903 – October 9, 1995), 14th Earl of Home from 1951 to 1963, was a British Conservative (actually SUP) politician, and served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom for a year from October 1963 to October 1964. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British cabinet minister responsible for all financial matters. ... December 20 is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert Anthony Eden, 1st Earl of Avon, KG, MC, PC (June 12, 1897– January 14, 1977), British politician, was Foreign Secretary for three periods between 1935 and 1955, including World War II and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1955 to 1957. ... Richard Austen Butler, Baron Butler of Saffron Walden, KG, CH, PC, DL (9 December 1902 – 8 March 1982), who invariably signed his name R. A. Butler and was familiarly known as Rab, was a British Conservative politician. ... George Edward Peter Thorneycroft, Baron Thorneycroft (1909-1994) was a British Conservative politician. ... February 10 is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Brixton is an area of South London, part of the London Borough of Lambeth. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sussex is a historic county in South East England corresponding roughly in area to the ancient Kingdom of Sussex. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... For other Orders see Order of Merit (disambiguation). ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... February 10 is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the the United Kingdom. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ...


Nicknamed 'Supermac', he did not use his first name and was known as Harold Macmillan before elevation to the peerage. // A nickname is a short, clever, cute, derogatory, or otherwise substitute name for a person or things real name (for example, Bob, Rob, Robby, Robbie, Robi, Robin, Bobby, Rab, Rabbie, Bert, Bertie, Butch, Bobbers, Bobert, Beto, Bobadito, and Robban (in Sweden), are all nicknames for Robert). ... Super-Mac was the subject of a cartoon - Introducing Super-Mac - in the Evening Standard in London, England, on 6 November 1958 [1] by Vicky (Victor Weisz, 1913-1966). ...


When asked what represented the greatest challenge for a statesman, Macmillan replied: “Events, my dear boy, events”. [1]

Contents

Early life

Harold Macmillan was born in Brixton, London, England to Maurice Crawford Macmillan (1853-1936) and Helen Artie Tarleton Belles (1856-1937). His paternal grandfather, Daniel Macmillan (1813-1857), was the Scottish crofter who would go on to found Macmillan Publishers. Harold was educated at Eton but expelled - according to Woodrow Wyatt - for buggery, though an alternative version is that he left due to illness.[2] He attended Balliol College, Oxford, although he only completed two years of his classics degree—taking a first in Mods—before the outbreak of the First World War. He served with distinction as a captain in the Grenadier Guards during the war and was wounded on three occasions. During the Battle of the Somme, he spent an entire day wounded and lying in a foxhole with a bullet in his pelvis, reading the Greek writer Aeschylus in the original language.[3] Brixton is an area of South London, part of the London Borough of Lambeth. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... 1853 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1813 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Motto: (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity(English) Wha daur meddle wi me? (Scots)[1] Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots[2] Government  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I... The Scottish croft is a small agricultural land holding of a type which has been subject to special legislation in the United Kingdom since 1886. ... Macmillan Publishers Ltd, also known as The Macmillan Group, is a privately-held international publishing company owned by Georg von Holtzbrinck Publishing Group. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (privately funded and independent) for male students, founded in 1440 by Henry VI. It is located in Eton, Berkshire, near Windsor in England, situated north of Windsor... Woodrow Lyle Wyatt, Baron Wyatt of Weeford (July 4, 1918 – December 7, 1997), was a British Labour politician, published author, journalist and broadcaster. ... Anal sex or anal intercourse is a form of human sexual behavior. ... College name Balliol College Named after John de Balliol Established 1263 Sister College St Johns Master Andrew Graham JCR President Jack Hawkins Undergraduates 403 MCR President Chelsea Payne Graduates 228 Homepage Boatclub Balliol College, founded in 1263, is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... The Grenadier Guards is the most senior regiment of the Guards Division of the British Army, and, as such, is the most senior regiment of infantry. ... Combatants British Empire United Kingdom Australia Canada New Zealand Newfoundland South Africa France German Empire Commanders Douglas Haig Joseph Joffre Max von Gallwitz Fritz von Below Strength 13 British and 11 French divisions (initial) 51 British and 48 French divisions (final) 10½ divisions (initial) 50 divisions (final) Casualties 419,654... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Bust of Aeschylus from the Capitoline Museums, Rome Aeschylus (525 BC—456 BC; Greek: Ασχύλος) was a playwright of Ancient Greece. ...


Macmillan lost so many of his fellow students during the war that afterwards he refused to return to Oxford, saying the university would never be the same.


He was a director of the Great Western Railway before rail nationalisation. The original Bristol Temple Meads station, first terminus of the GWR, is the building to the left of this picture The Great Western Railway (GWR) was a British railway company, linking South West England, the West Country and South Wales with London. ...


Marriage

He married Lady Dorothy Cavendish, daughter of Victor Cavendish, 9th Duke of Devonshire in 1920. Between 1929 and 1935 Lady Dorothy had a long affair with the Conservative politician Robert Boothby, in the public view of Westminster and established society. Boothby was widely rumoured to have been the father of Macmillan's youngest daughter Sarah. The stress caused by this may have contributed to Macmillan's nervous breakdown in 1931. [4] Lady Dorothy died in 1966, aged 65. The Lady Dorothy Evelyn Macmillan (28 July 1900–21 May 1966) was a daughter of the 9th Duke and Duchess of Devonshire. ... The Duke of Devonshire As Governor General The Most Noble Victor Christian William Cavendish, 9th Duke of Devonshire (London May 31, 1868–May 6, 1938 Chatsworth House), was a Liberal Unionist Member of Parliament for West Derbyshire (1891-1908), Governor General of Canada (1916-1921), and Colonial Secretary (1922-1924). ... Blue plaque in Eaton Square, London Robert John Graham Boothby, 1st Baron Boothby, KBE (also known as Bob Boothby) (12 February 1900 – 16 July 1986) was a Conservative politician. ...


They had four children:

The Right Honourable Maurice Victor Macmillan, Viscount Macmillan of Ovenden (27 January 1921–10 March 1984) was a Conservative politician and Member of Parliament. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for full calendar). ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lady Ann Caroline Macmillan (1923 - ) was the daughter of Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton and his wife Lady Dorothy Cavendish. ... {{year nav|1939 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Right Honourable Lady Catherine Amery (1926-1991) is the daughter of the British politician and publisher Harold Macmillan, 1st Earl of Stockton and his wife, the former Lady Dorothy Cavendish. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sarah Macmillan (1930-1970) was the only daughter of Lady Dorothy Macmillan and Robert Boothby. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link is to a full 1930 calendar). ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ...

Political career (1924-1957)

Elected to the House of Commons in 1924 for Stockton-on-Tees, he lost his seat in 1929, only to return in 1931. Macmillan spent the 1930s on the backbenches, with his anti-appeasement ideals and sharp criticism of Stanley Baldwin and Neville Chamberlain serving to isolate him. The House of Commons is a component of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, which also includes the Sovereign and the House of Lords. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Stockton-on-Tees is a former constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl Baldwin of Bewdley, KG, PC (3 August 1867–14 December 1947) was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom on three separate occasions. ... Arthur Neville Chamberlain(18 March 1869 – 9 November 1940), known as Neville Chamberlain, was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1937 to 1940. ...


In the Second World War he at last attained office, serving in the wartime coalition government in the Ministry of Supply and the Colonial Ministry before attaining real power upon being sent to North Africa in 1942 as British government representative to the Allies in the Mediterranean. During this assignment Macmillan worked closely with Dwight Eisenhower, a friendship that would prove crucial in his later career. Dwight David Ike Eisenhower (October 14, 1890–March 28, 1969), American soldier and politician, was the 34th President of the United States (1953–1961) and supreme commander of the Allied forces in Europe during World War II, with the rank of General of the Army. ...


He returned to England after the war and was Secretary of State for Air for two months in 1945. He lost his seat in the landslide Labour victory that year, but soon returned to parliament in a November 1945 by-election in Bromley. Bromley is a former borough constituency in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ...


With the Conservative victory in 1951 he became Minister of Housing under Winston Churchill and fulfilled his conference promise to build 300,000 houses per year. He then served as Minister of Defence from October 1954. By this time he had lost the wire-rimmed glasses, toothy grin and brylcreemed hair of wartime photographs, and instead grew his hair thick and glossy, had his teeth capped and walked with the ramrod bearing of a former Guards officer, acquiring the distinguished appearance of his later career. 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... Churchill redirects here. ... The Secretary of State for Defence is the senior United Kingdom government minister in charge of the Ministry of Defence. ... Original Brylcreem Brylcreem (pronounced brill-cream) is a brand name of mens hair groom. ...


He then served as Foreign Secretary in April-December 1955 and Chancellor of the Exchequer 1955-1957 under Anthony Eden. In the latter job he insisted that Eden's de facto deputy Rab Butler not be treated as senior to him, and threatened resignation until he was allowed to cut bread and milk subsidies. During the Suez Crisis in the description of opposition Labour Shadow Chancellor Harold Wilson, MacMillan was "First In, First Out" : first very supportive of the invasion, then a prime mover in Britain's withdrawal in the wake of the financial crisis. The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British cabinet minister responsible for all financial matters. ... Robert Anthony Eden, 1st Earl of Avon, KG, MC, PC (June 12, 1897– January 14, 1977), British politician, was Foreign Secretary for three periods between 1935 and 1955, including World War II and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1955 to 1957. ... Richard Austen Butler, Baron Butler of Saffron Walden, KG, CH, PC, DL (9 December 1902 – 8 March 1982), who invariably signed his name R. A. Butler and was familiarly known as Rab, was a British Conservative politician. ...


Harold Macmillan became Prime Minister and leader of the Conservative Party after Eden's resignation in January 1957, surprising observers with his appointment over the favourite, Rab Butler.


Prime Minister (1957-1963)

Independent nuclear deterrent

Following the technical failures of a British independent nuclear deterrent with the Blue Streak and the Blue Steel projects, and the unilateral cancellation of the Skybolt missile system by US Defence Secretary Robert McNamara, Macmillan negotiated the delivering of American Polaris missiles to the UK under the Nassau agreement in December 1962. Previously he had agreed to base 60 Thor missiles in Britain under joint control, and since late 1957 the American McMahon Act had been eased to allow Britain more access to nuclear technology. These negotiations were the basis for Peter Cook's satire of Macmillan in Beyond the Fringe. The Blue Streak missile was a British ballistic missile designed in 1955. ... Blue Steel Type nuclear stand-off missile Nationality UK Era Cold War Launch platform Aircraft Target History Builder Avro Date of design Production period Service duration 1963-1969 Operators UK RAF Variants Number built Specifications Type Diameter 0. ... The Polaris Missile was a submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) carrying a nuclear warhead developed during the Cold War for the United States Navy. ... The Nassau Agreement was a treaty negotiated between President John F. Kennedy for the United States and Prime Minister Harold Macmillan for the United Kingdom. ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ... Thor-Ablestar Thor was the United Statess first operational ballistic missile. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The McMahon Act is an informal name for the Atomic Energy Act of 1946 which determined, in the wake of World War II how the United States government would control and manage the nuclear technology it had developed. ... Peter Edward Cook (17 November 1937 – 9 January 1995) was an English satirist, writer and comedian. ... Album of Beyond the Fringe Published by EMI in 1996 Beyond the Fringe was a British comedy stage revue written and performed by Peter Cook, Dudley Moore, Alan Bennett and Jonathan Miller. ...


Macmillan was a force in the successful negotiations leading to the signing of the 1962 Partial Test Ban Treaty by Britain, the United States and the Soviet Union. His previous attempt to create an agreement at the May 1960 summit in Paris had collapsed due to the Gary Powers affair. 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ... The Treaty Banning poop, in Outer Space, and Under Water, often abbreviated as the Partial Test Ban Treaty (PTBT), Limited Test Ban Treaty (LTBT), or Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (NTBT), although the former also refers to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), is a treaty intended to obtain an agreement... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... The U–2 Crisis of 1960 occurred when an American U–2 spy plane was shot down over the Soviet Union. ...


EEC

Britain's application to join the EEC was vetoed by Charles de Gaulle (29 January 1963), in part due to de Gaulle's fear that "the end would be a colossal Atlantic Community dependent on America" and in part in anger at the Anglo-American nuclear deal. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ...


Economy

Macmillan brought the monetary concerns of the Exchequer into office; the economy was his prime concern. However, Britain's balance of payments problems led to the imposition of a wage freeze in 1961 and this caused the government to lose popularity and led to a series of by-election defeats. He organised a major cabinet change in July 1962, but continued to lose support from within his party. The cabinet changes were widely seen as a sign of panic, and the young Liberal MP Jeremy Thorpe said of Macmillan's dismissal of so many of his colleagues, "greater love hath no man than this, than to lay down his friends for his life". The balance of payments is a measure of the payments that flow from one exports and imports of goods, services, and financial capital, as well financial transfers. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ...


His One Nation approach to the economy was to seek high employment. This contrasted with his mainly monetarist Treasury ministers who argued that the support of sterling required strict controls on money and hence an unavoidable rise in unemployment. Their advice was rejected and in January 1958 the three Treasury ministers Peter Thorneycroft, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Nigel Birch, Economic Secretary to the Treasury, and Enoch Powell, the Financial Secretary to the Treasury, resigned. Macmillan brushed aside this incident as "a little local difficulty". One Nation, One Nation Conservatism, or Tory Democracy is a term used in political debate in the United Kingdom and sometimes Canada to refer to the moderate wing of the Conservative Party, and the Red Tory wing of the original Progressive Conservative Party in Canada who like to describe themselves... Monetarism is a set of views concerning the determination of national income and monetary economics. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Edward Peter Thorneycroft, Baron Thorneycroft (1909-1994) was a British Conservative politician. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British cabinet minister responsible for all financial matters. ... Evelyn Nigel Chetwode Birch, Baron Rhyl commonly known as Nigel Birch, PC, OBE (1906 – 8 March 1981) was a British Conservative politician. ... This article is about various offices in the government of the United Kingdom. ... Simon Heffers biography of Enoch Powell, published in 1999 John Enoch Powell, MBE, PC, (June 16, 1912 – February 8, 1998) was a right-wing British politician and Conservative Party Member of Parliament (MP) between 1950 and February 1974, and an Ulster Unionist MP between October 1974 and 1987. ... Financial Secretary to the Treasury is a junior Ministerial post in the UK Treasury. ...


Macmillan supported the creation of the National Incomes Commission as a means to institute controls on income as part of his growth-without-inflation policy. A further series of subtle indicators and controls were also introduced during his premiership.


Foreign policy

Macmillan also took close control of foreign policy. He worked to narrow the post-Suez rift with the United States, where his wartime friendship with Dwight D. Eisenhower was key; the two had a productive conference in Bermuda as early as March 1957. The cordial relationship remained after the election of John F. Kennedy. Macmillan also saw the value of rapprochement with Europe and sought belated entry to the European Economic Community (EEC), and explored the possibility of a European Free Trade Area (EFTA). Combatants Israel United Kingdom France Egypt Commanders Moshe Dayan Charles Keightley Pierre Barjot Gamal Abdel Nasser Strength 175,000 Israeli 45,000 British 34,000 French 70,000 Casualties 197 Israeli KIA 56 British KIA 91 British WIA 10 French KIA 43 French WIA 650 KIA 2,900 WIA 2... D. D. Eisenhower during WWII Dwight David Eisenhower (born David Dwight Eisenhower, October 14, 1890 - March 28, 1969), nicknamed Ike, was an American soldier and politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953-1961). ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), also referred to as John F. Kennedy, JFK, John Kennedy or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th president of the United States. ... The European Community (EC), most important of three European Communities, was originally founded on March 25, 1957 by the signing of the Treaty of Rome under the name of European Economic Community. ... The European Free Trade Association (EFTA) was established on May 3, 1960 as an alternative for European states that were not allowed or did not wish to join the European Community (now the European Union). ...

Harold Macmillan and President Kennedy in Florida in 1962
Harold Macmillan and President Kennedy in Florida in 1962

Macmillan's term saw the first phase of the African independence movement, beginning with the granting of independence to the Gold Coast, as Ghana, in 1957. His celebrated "wind of change" speech (February 1960) is considered a landmark in this process. Ghana and Malaya were granted independence in 1957, Nigeria in 1960 and Kenya in 1963. However in the Middle East Macmillan ensured Britain remained a force, intervening over Iraq in 1958 and 1960 and becoming involved in the affairs of Oman. Image File history File links Cm0136_John_F_Kennedy_1962_touring_Key_West_NAS.jpg‎ John F Kennedy 1962 touring Key West NAS with UK PM Harold Macmillan. ... Image File history File links Cm0136_John_F_Kennedy_1962_touring_Key_West_NAS.jpg‎ John F Kennedy 1962 touring Key West NAS with UK PM Harold Macmillan. ... JFK redirects here. ... Flag of Gold Coast Map from 1896 of the British Gold Coast Colony. ... The Wind of Change speech was a historically-important address made by British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan to the Parliament of South Africa, on 3 February 1960 in Cape Town. ... Map of Peninsular Malaysia Peninsular Malaysia (Malay: Semenanjung Malaysia) is the part of Malaysia which lies on the Malay Peninsula, and shares a land border with Thailand in the north. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Election victory (1959)

He led the Conservatives to victory in the October 1959 general election, increasing his party's majority from 67 to 107 seats. The successful campaign was based on the economic improvements achieved, the slogan "Life's Better Under the Conservatives" was matched by Macmillan's own remark, "indeed let us be frank about it - most of our people have never had it so good." [5], usually paraphrased as "You've never had it so good". This United Kingdom general election was held on October 8, 1959, and marked a third successive victory for the ruling Conservative party, led by Harold MacMillan. ...


Critics contended that the actual economic growth rate was weak and distorted by increased defence spending.[citation needed]


Trivia

The Supermac label was applied by cartoonist Victor 'Vicky' Weisz. It was intended as mockery, but backfired, coming to be used in a neutral or friendly fashion. Weisz tried to label him with other names, including "Mac the Knife" (at the time of widespread cabinet changes in 1962; see below), but none of these caught on. Umax Technologies is a manufacturer of computer products including scanners, mice, flash drives and computer networking products. ... Victor Weisz (25 April 1913–22 February 1966) was a German political cartoonist, drawing under the name of Vicky. ...

See also: Mack the Knife

Macmillan had a reputation for being unflappable and witty in public, though he did admit to his wife that he was terrified before each Prime Minister's Question Time (usually on a Tuesday) in the Commons. On September 29, 1960, Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev twice interrupted a speech by Macmillan at the United Nations by shouting out "we will bury you" and pounding his desk. Macmillan famously replied, "I should like that to be translated if he wants to say anything". [6] Mack the Knife, originally Die Moritat von Mackie Messer, is a song composed by Kurt Weill with lyrics by Bertolt Brecht for their music drama Die Dreigroschenoper, or, as it is known in English, The Threepenny Opera. ... September 29 is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... Soviet redirects here. ... Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev (Russian: ; IPA: , in English, , or , occasionally ); surname more accurately romanized as Khrushchyov; April 17 [O.S. April 5] 1894–September 11, 1971) was the leader of the Soviet Union after the death of Joseph Stalin. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ...


Responding to a remark made by Harold Wilson about not having boots in which to go to school, Macmillan retorted: "If Mr Wilson did not have boots to go to school, it is because he was too big for them!"


On 26 November 1950, Lady Dorothy Macmillan's brother Edward Cavendish, 10th Duke of Devonshire, had a heart attack. He died while being attended by John Bodkin Adams, who was later cleared of murdering a patient. Although the duke had not seen a doctor in the 14 days before his death, the coroner was not notified. Adams signed the death certificate himself. Thirteen days earlier, Edith Alice Morrell — another patient of Adams — had died. Adams was tried in 1957 for her murder but acquitted. November 26 is the 330th day (331st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Edward Cavendish, 10th Duke of Devonshire The Most Noble Edward William Spencer Cavendish, 10th Duke of Devonshire (6 May 1895–26 November 1950), known as Marquess of Hartington (1908–1938), was Member of Parliament for West Derbyshire and a Minister in Winston Churchills wartime government. ... John Bodkin Adams, (January 21, 1899–July 4, 1983) was a general practitioner in Eastbourne cleared of murdering one of his patients. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


His nephew, Andrew Cavendish, 11th Duke of Devonshire was appointed as Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Commonwealth Relations from 1960 to 1962, Minister of State at the Commonwealth Relations Office from 1962 to 1963, and Minister for Colonial Affairs from 1963 to 1964. He described these appointments by his uncle as "the greatest act of nepotism ever", saying "I think we'd given him some good [game] shooting". The Duke in old age with his son, the future 12th Duke of Devonshire The Most Noble Andrew Robert Buxton Cavendish, 11th Duke of Devonshire, KG, MC, PC (January 2, 1920 – May 3, 2004) was a minister in the government of his uncle, British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan, from 1960... The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) is the United Kingdom government department responsible for promoting the interests of the United Kingdom abroad. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Nepotism This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Retirement and death (1963-1986)

The Profumo affair of spring and summer 1963 permanently damaged the credibility of Macmillan's government. He survived a Parliamentary vote with a majority of 69, one less than had been thought necessary for his survival, and was afterwards joined in the smoking-room only by his son and son-in-law, not by any Cabinet minister. Nonetheless, Butler and Maudling (who was very popular with backbench MPs at that time) declined to push for his resignation, especially after a tide of support from Conservative activists around the country. The Profumo Affair was a political scandal from 1963 in the United Kingdom that is named after the then-Secretary of State for War John Profumo. ...


However, the affair may have exacerbated Macmillan's ill-health. He was taken ill on the eve of the Conservative Party Conference, diagnosed incorrectly with inoperable prostate cancer. Consequently, he resigned on 18 October 1963. He was succeeded by the Foreign Secretary Alec Douglas-Home in a controversial move; it was alleged that Macmillan had pulled strings and utilised the party's grandees, nicknamed "The Magic Circle", to ensure that Butler was not chosen as his successor. October 18 is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years). ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... Alexander Frederick Douglas-Home1, Baron Home of the Hirsel, KT, PC (July 2, 1903 – October 9, 1995), 14th Earl of Home from 1951 to 1963, was a British Conservative (actually SUP) politician, and served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom for a year from October 1963 to October 1964. ...


Macmillan initially refused a peerage and retired from politics in September 1964. He did, however, accept the distinction of the Order of Merit from The Queen. After retiring, he took up the chairmanship of his family's publishing house, Macmillan Publishers. He then brought out a six-volume autobiography; the read was described by his political enemy Enoch Powell as inducing "a sensation akin to that of chewing on cardboard". His wartime diaries, published after his death, were much better-received. 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... For other Orders see Order of Merit (disambiguation). ... Macmillan Publishers Ltd, also known as The Macmillan Group, is a privately-held international publishing company owned by Georg von Holtzbrinck Publishing Group. ...


Over the next 20 years he made the occasional political intervention, particularly after Margaret Thatcher became Tory leader and Macmillan's premiership came under attack from the monetarists in the party. Macmillan is commonly thought to have likened Thatcher's policy of privatisation to "selling the family silver". In fact what he did say (at a dinner of the Tory Reform Group at the Carlton Club on November 8 1985) was that the sale of assets was commonplace amongst individuals or states when they encountered financial difficulties: "First of all the Georgian silver goes. And then all that nice furniture that used to be in the salon. Then the Canalettos go." Profitable parts of the steel industry and the railways had been privatised, along with British Telecom: "They were like two Rembrandts still left."[7] Macmillan's speech was much commented on and a few days later Macmillan made a speech in the Lords to clarify what he had meant: Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (born 13 October 1925), is the former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, in office from 1979 to 1990. ... Monetarism is a set of views concerning the determination of national income and monetary economics. ... Privatization (sometimes privatisation, denationalization, or — especially in India — disinvestment) is the process of transferring property, from public ownership to private ownership. ... The Tory Reform Group (TRG) is a group within the United Kingdoms Conservative Party, that uphold the One Nation Tory vision, which they describe[citation needed] as being the promotion of: Social justice Political progress Prosperity for all // Europe The TRG is commonly seen as being pro-European. ... The Carlton Club is a gentlemens club in London. ... ... The Stonemasons Yard, painted 1726-30. ... BT Group plc (formerly British Telecommunications plc) which trades as BT (also previously as British Telecom and is still commonly known as such amongst the general public) is the privatised UK state telecommunications operator. ... The Rembrandts are a band formed by Phil Sōlem and Danny Wilde in 1989. ...

When I ventured the other day to criticise the system I was, I am afraid, misunderstood. As a Conservative, I am naturally in favour of returning into private ownership and private management all those means of production and distribution which are now controlled by state capitalism. I am sure they will be more efficient. What I ventured to question was the using of these huge sums as if they were income.[8]

In 1984 he finally accepted a peerage and was created Earl of Stockton and Viscount Macmillan of Ovenden. In the last month of his life, he observed: Means of production (abbreviated MoP; German: Produktionsmittel), also called means of labour are the materials, tools and other instruments used by workers to make products. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

"Sixty-three years ago ... the unemployment figure [in Stockton-on-Tees] was then 29%. Last November [1986] ... the unemployment [there] is 28%. A rather sad end to one's life."

In the House of Lords in the 1980s he praised the miners then on strike, asserting that they had "beaten the Kaiser's Army" and "beaten Hitler's Army". Historian Andrew Roberts checked each of the three occasions on which Macmillan was wounded in the First World War; on each of these the miners had also been on strike. Andrew Roberts Andrew Roberts (born on January 13, 1963) is a conservative UK historian. ...


Macmillan died at Birch Grove in Sussex in 1986 aged 92 years and 322 days — the greatest age attained by a British Prime Minister until surpassed by James Callaghan on 26 March 2005. Leonard James Callaghan, Baron Callaghan of Cardiff, KG, PC (27 March 1912 – 26 March 2005), was Labour Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1976 to 1979. ...


Titles from birth to death

The Macmillan family graves in 2000 at St.Giles Church, Horsted Keynes. Harold Macmillan's grave is on the right.
The Macmillan family graves in 2000 at St.Giles Church, Horsted Keynes. Harold Macmillan's grave is on the right.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... February 10 is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... October 29 is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... October 29 is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... July 26 is the 207th day (208th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 158 days remaining. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday. ... July 26 is the 207th day (208th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 158 days remaining. ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... April 2 is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 273 days remaining. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... April 2 is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 273 days remaining. ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... February 24 is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... February 24 is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Notes

  1. ^ http://www.policyreview.org/oct05/bering.html
  2. ^ Ball, Simon "The Guardsmen, Harold Macmillan, Three Friends and the World They Made", (London, Harper Collins), 2004
  3. ^ Lawton, John (1992). 1963: Five Hundred Days. Sevenoaks: Hodder and Stoughton. ISBN 0-340-50846-9. 
  4. ^ Parris, Matthew (1997). Great Parliamentary Scandals: Four Centuries of Calumny, Smear & Innuendo. London: Robson Books. ISBN 1-86105-152-2. 
  5. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/july/20/newsid_3728000/3728225.stm Harold MacMillan, Speech in Bedford, 20 July 1957
  6. ^ BBC News, 28 October 2002, When the diplomatic mask slips
  7. ^ Alan Watkins, A Conservative Coup (Duckworth, 1992), p. 105.
  8. ^ 468 H.L. Deb., cc.390-1, 14 November 1985. Quoted in Watkins, p. 106.

External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Harold Macmillan
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Harold Macmillan
  • BBC Harold Macmillan obituary
  • Some Harold Macmillan quotes

Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Cabinets

For a full list of Ministerial office-holders, see Conservative Government 1957-1964. Members of the Cabinet are in bold face. ...


January 1957 - October 1959

Change David Patrick Maxwell Fyfe, 1st Earl of Kilmuir (1900-1967) was an important British politician and jurist. ... This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... The Right Honourable Robert Arthur James Gascoyne-Cecil, 5th Marquess of Salisbury, KG (August 27, 1893–February 23, 1972) was a grandson of the great 3rd Marquess. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as presiding officer of the Privy Council. ... Richard Austen Butler, Baron Butler of Saffron Walden, KG, CH, PC, DL (9 December 1902 – 8 March 1982), who invariably signed his name R. A. Butler and was familiarly known as Rab, was a British Conservative politician. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department (the Home Secretary) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... George Edward Peter Thorneycroft, Baron Thorneycroft (1909-1994) was a British Conservative politician. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British cabinet minister responsible for all financial matters. ... John Selwyn Brooke Lloyd, Baron Selwyn-Lloyd (28 July 1904 - 18 May 1978), known for most of his career as Selwyn Lloyd, was a British Conservative politician. ... The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... Alan Tindal Lennox-Boyd, 1st Viscount Boyd of Merton CH PC (November 18, 1904–March 8, 1983), was a Conservative Party British politician. ... The Secretary of State for the Colonies or Colonial Secretary was the British Cabinet official in charge of managing the various British colonies. ... Alexander Frederick Douglas-Home1, Baron Home of the Hirsel, KT, PC (July 2, 1903 – October 9, 1995), 14th Earl of Home from 1951 to 1963, was a British Conservative (actually SUP) politician, and served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom for a year from October 1963 to October 1964. ... The Secretary of State for Commonwealth Relations was a British Cabinet office existing between 1947 and 1966, responsible for dealing with British relationship with members of the Commonwealth of Nations (its former colonies). ... David McAdam Eccles, 1st Viscount Eccles PC KCVO (September 18, 1904–February 24, 1999) was a British peer. ... The President of the Board of Trade the title of a cabinet position in the United Kingdom government. ... Charles Hill, Baron Hill of Luton (15 January 1904 —22 August 1989) M.D., was an English administrator, doctor and television executive. ... The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is, in modern times, a sinecure office in the British government. ... Quintin McGarel Hogg, Baron Hailsham of St Marylebone, KG, CH, PC, QC (October 9, 1907 – October 12, 2001), formerly 2nd Viscount Hailsham (1950–1963), was a British Conservative politician. ... John Scott Maclay, 1st Viscount Muirshiel, KT, CH CMG PC (1905-1992) was a National Liberal and Unionist MP. Maclay was a son of James Paton Maclay, 1st Baron Maclay. ... The Secretary of State for Scotland (Rùnaire Stàite na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is the chief minister in the government of the United Kingdom with responsibilites for Scotland, at the head of the Scotland Office (formerly The Scottish Office). ... The Right Honourable Derick Heathcoat Amory, 1st Viscount Amory (26 December 1899–20 January 1981) was a British Conservative politician. ... The Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food was a UK cabinet position, responsible for the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food. ... The Right Honourable Iain Macleod, PC (1913 – 1970) was a UK Conservative politician. ... Minister of Labour re-directs here. ... Harold Arthur Watkinson, 1st Viscount Watkinson PC CH (25 January 1910 – 19 December 1995) was a British Conservative politician and businessman. ... Duncan Edwin Sandys, Baron Duncan-Sandys1 (January 24, 1908-November 26, 1987) was a British politician and a minister in successive Conservative governments. ... The post of Minister of Defence was responsible for co-ordination of defence and security from its creation in 1940 until its abolition in 1964. ... Percy Herbert Mills (1890-1968) was an English politician. ... Henry Brooke, Baron Brooke of Cumnor (9 April 1903 - 29 March 1984) was a British Conservative politician. ...

  • March 1957 - Lord Home succeeds Lord Salisbury as Lord President, remaining also Commonwealth Relations Secretary.
  • September 1957 - Lord Hailsham succeeds Lord Home as Lord President, Home remaining Commonwealth Relations Secretary. Geoffrey Lloyd succeeds Hailsham as Minister of Education. The Chief Secretary to the Treasury, Reginald Maudling, enters the Cabinet.
  • January 1958 - Derick Heathcoat Amory succeeds Peter Thorneycroft as Chancellor of the Exchequer. John Hare succeeds Amory as Minister of Agriculture.

1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Geoffrey William Geoffrey-Lloyd, Baron Geoffrey-Lloyd PC (17 January 1902 - 12 September 1984 was a British Conservative politician. ... Rt. ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Hugh Hare, 1st Viscount Blakenham OBE PC (January 22, 1911–March 7, 1982) was a British peer and statesman, the son of Richard Hare, 4th Earl of Listowel. ...

October 1959 - July 1960

A prime minister is the most senior minister of a cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... David Patrick Maxwell Fyfe, 1st Earl of Kilmuir (1900-1967) was an important British politician and jurist. ... This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... Alexander Frederick Douglas-Home1, Baron Home of the Hirsel, KT, PC (July 2, 1903 – October 9, 1995), 14th Earl of Home from 1951 to 1963, was a British Conservative (actually SUP) politician, and served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom for a year from October 1963 to October 1964. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as presiding officer of the Privy Council. ... The Secretary of State for Commonwealth Relations was a British Cabinet office existing between 1947 and 1966, responsible for dealing with British relationship with members of the Commonwealth of Nations (its former colonies). ... Quintin McGarel Hogg, Baron Hailsham of St Marylebone, KG, CH, PC, QC (October 9, 1907 – October 12, 2001), formerly 2nd Viscount Hailsham (1950–1963), was a British Conservative politician. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... The Right Honourable Derick Heathcoat Amory, 1st Viscount Amory (26 December 1899–20 January 1981) was a British Conservative politician. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British cabinet minister responsible for all financial matters. ... Richard Austen Butler, Baron Butler of Saffron Walden, KG, CH, PC, DL (9 December 1902 – 8 March 1982), who invariably signed his name R. A. Butler and was familiarly known as Rab, was a British Conservative politician. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department (the Home Secretary) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... John Selwyn Brooke Lloyd, Baron Selwyn-Lloyd (28 July 1904 - 18 May 1978), known for most of his career as Selwyn Lloyd, was a British Conservative politician. ... The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... The Right Honourable Iain Macleod, PC (1913 – 1970) was a UK Conservative politician. ... The Secretary of State for the Colonies or Colonial Secretary was the British Cabinet official in charge of managing the various British colonies. ... Rt. ... The President of the Board of Trade the title of a cabinet position in the United Kingdom government. ... Charles Hill, Baron Hill of Luton (15 January 1904 —22 August 1989) M.D., was an English administrator, doctor and television executive. ... The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is, in modern times, a sinecure office in the British government. ... David McAdam Eccles, 1st Viscount Eccles PC KCVO (September 18, 1904–February 24, 1999) was a British peer. ... The Secretary of State for Education and Skills is the chief minister of the Department for Education and Skills in the United Kingdom government. ... Percy Herbert Mills (1890-1968) was an English politician. ... In the United Kingdom, there are at least five Secretaries to the Treasury, officials officially acting as secretaries to the Treasury board. ... (Alfred) Ernest Marples, Baron Marples (9 December 1907 – 6 July 1978) was a British politician. ... The government role of Minister for Transport is common to several countries: The British Secretary of State for Transport The Canadian Minister of Transport The Irish Minister for Transport This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Duncan Edwin Sandys, Baron Duncan-Sandys1 (January 24, 1908-November 26, 1987) was a British politician and a minister in successive Conservative governments. ... The Ministry of Aviation was a department of the United Kingdom government, established in 1959. ... Harold Arthur Watkinson, 1st Viscount Watkinson PC CH (25 January 1910 – 19 December 1995) was a British Conservative politician and businessman. ... The post of Minister of Defence was responsible for co-ordination of defence and security from its creation in 1940 until its abolition in 1964. ... John Scott Maclay, 1st Viscount Muirshiel, KT, CH CMG PC (1905-1992) was a National Liberal and Unionist MP. Maclay was a son of James Paton Maclay, 1st Baron Maclay. ... The Secretary of State for Scotland (Rùnaire Stàite na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is the chief minister in the government of the United Kingdom with responsibilites for Scotland, at the head of the Scotland Office (formerly The Scottish Office). ... Sir Edward Richard George Heath, KG, MBE (9 July 1916 – 17 July 2005), soldier and politician, was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975. ... Minister of Labour re-directs here. ... John Hugh Hare, 1st Viscount Blakenham OBE PC (January 22, 1911–March 7, 1982) was a British peer and statesman, the son of Richard Hare, 4th Earl of Listowel. ... The Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food was a UK cabinet position, responsible for the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food. ... Henry Brooke, Baron Brooke of Cumnor (9 April 1903 - 29 March 1984) was a British Conservative politician. ...

July 1960 - October 1961

David Patrick Maxwell Fyfe, 1st Earl of Kilmuir (1900-1967) was an important British politician and jurist. ... This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... Quintin McGarel Hogg, Baron Hailsham of St Marylebone, KG, CH, PC, QC (October 9, 1907 – October 12, 2001), formerly 2nd Viscount Hailsham (1950–1963), was a British Conservative politician. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as presiding officer of the Privy Council. ... Sir Edward Richard George Heath, KG, MBE (9 July 1916 – 17 July 2005), soldier and politician, was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... John Selwyn Brooke Lloyd, Baron Selwyn-Lloyd (28 July 1904 - 18 May 1978), known for most of his career as Selwyn Lloyd, was a British Conservative politician. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British cabinet minister responsible for all financial matters. ... Richard Austen Butler, Baron Butler of Saffron Walden, KG, CH, PC, DL (9 December 1902 – 8 March 1982), who invariably signed his name R. A. Butler and was familiarly known as Rab, was a British Conservative politician. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department (the Home Secretary) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... Alexander Frederick Douglas-Home1, Baron Home of the Hirsel, KT, PC (July 2, 1903 – October 9, 1995), 14th Earl of Home from 1951 to 1963, was a British Conservative (actually SUP) politician, and served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom for a year from October 1963 to October 1964. ... The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... The Right Honourable Iain Macleod, PC (1913 – 1970) was a UK Conservative politician. ... The Secretary of State for the Colonies or Colonial Secretary was the British Cabinet official in charge of managing the various British colonies. ... Duncan Edwin Sandys, Baron Duncan-Sandys1 (January 24, 1908-November 26, 1987) was a British politician and a minister in successive Conservative governments. ... The Secretary of State for Commonwealth Relations was a British Cabinet office existing between 1947 and 1966, responsible for dealing with British relationship with members of the Commonwealth of Nations (its former colonies). ... Rt. ... The President of the Board of Trade the title of a cabinet position in the United Kingdom government. ... Charles Hill, Baron Hill of Luton (15 January 1904 —22 August 1989) M.D., was an English administrator, doctor and television executive. ... The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is, in modern times, a sinecure office in the British government. ... David McAdam Eccles, 1st Viscount Eccles PC KCVO (September 18, 1904–February 24, 1999) was a British peer. ... The Secretary of State for Education and Skills is the chief minister of the Department for Education and Skills in the United Kingdom government. ... Quintin McGarel Hogg, Baron Hailsham of St Marylebone, KG, CH, PC, QC (October 9, 1907 – October 12, 2001), formerly 2nd Viscount Hailsham (1950–1963), was a British Conservative politician. ... Percy Herbert Mills (1890-1968) was an English politician. ... In the United Kingdom, there are at least five Secretaries to the Treasury, officials officially acting as secretaries to the Treasury board. ... (Alfred) Ernest Marples, Baron Marples (9 December 1907 – 6 July 1978) was a British politician. ... George Edward Peter Thorneycroft, Baron Thorneycroft (1909-1994) was a British Conservative politician. ... Harold Arthur Watkinson, 1st Viscount Watkinson PC CH (25 January 1910 – 19 December 1995) was a British Conservative politician and businessman. ... The post of Minister of Defence was responsible for co-ordination of defence and security from its creation in 1940 until its abolition in 1964. ... John Scott Maclay, 1st Viscount Muirshiel, KT, CH CMG PC (1905-1992) was a National Liberal and Unionist MP. Maclay was a son of James Paton Maclay, 1st Baron Maclay. ... The Secretary of State for Scotland (Rùnaire Stàite na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is the chief minister in the government of the United Kingdom with responsibilites for Scotland, at the head of the Scotland Office (formerly The Scottish Office). ... John Hugh Hare, 1st Viscount Blakenham OBE PC (January 22, 1911–March 7, 1982) was a British peer and statesman, the son of Richard Hare, 4th Earl of Listowel. ... Minister of Labour re-directs here. ... Arthur Christopher John Soames, Baron Soames (October 12, 1920-September 16, 1987) was the last Governor of Zimbabwe. ... The Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food was a UK cabinet position, responsible for the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food. ... Henry Brooke, Baron Brooke of Cumnor (9 April 1903 - 29 March 1984) was a British Conservative politician. ...

October 1961 - July 1962

David Patrick Maxwell Fyfe, 1st Earl of Kilmuir (1900-1967) was an important British politician and jurist. ... This article or section needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... Quintin McGarel Hogg, Baron Hailsham of St Marylebone, KG, CH, PC, QC (October 9, 1907 – October 12, 2001), formerly 2nd Viscount Hailsham (1950–1963), was a British Conservative politician. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as presiding officer of the Privy Council. ... Sir Edward Richard George Heath, KG, MBE (9 July 1916 – 17 July 2005), soldier and politician, was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1970 to 1974 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1965 to 1975. ... The Lord Privy Seal or Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal is one of the traditional sinecure offices in the British Cabinet. ... John Selwyn Brooke Lloyd, Baron Selwyn-Lloyd (28 July 1904 - 18 May 1978), known for most of his career as Selwyn Lloyd, was a British Conservative politician. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British cabinet minister responsible for all financial matters. ... Richard Austen Butler, Baron Butler of Saffron Walden, KG, CH, PC, DL (9 December 1902 – 8 March 1982), who invariably signed his name R. A. Butler and was familiarly known as Rab, was a British Conservative politician. ... The Secretary of State for the Home Department (the Home Secretary) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... Alexander Frederick Douglas-Home1, Baron Home of the Hirsel, KT, PC (July 2, 1903 – October 9, 1995), 14th Earl of Home from 1951 to 1963, was a British Conservative (actually SUP) politician, and served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom for a year from October 1963 to October 1964. ... The position of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs was created in the United Kingdoms governmental reorganization of 1782, in which the Northern and Southern Departments became the Home and Foreign Offices. ... The Right Honourable Iain Macleod, PC (1913 – 1970) was a UK Conservative politician. ... The Secretary of State for the Colonies or Colonial Secretary was the British Cabinet official in charge of managing the various British colonies. ... Duncan Edwin Sandys, Baron Duncan-Sandys1 (January 24, 1908-November 26, 1987) was a British politician and a minister in successive Conservative governments. ... The Secretary of State for Commonwealth Relations was a British Cabinet office existing between 1947 and 1966, responsible for dealing with British relationship with members of the Commonwealth of Nations (its former colonies). ... Frederick James Erroll President of the Board of Trade 9 October 1961 - 20 October 1963) ... The President of the Board of Trade the title of a cabinet position in the United Kingdom government. ... The Right Honourable Iain Macleod, PC (1913 – 1970) was a UK Conservative politician. ... The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is, in modern times, a sinecure office in the British government. ... David McAdam Eccles, 1st Viscount Eccles PC KCVO (September 18, 1904–February 24, 1999) was a British peer. ... The Secretary of State for Education and Skills is the chief minister of the Department for Education and Skills in the United Kingdom government. ... Henry Brooke, Baron Brooke of Cumnor (9 April 1903 - 29 March 1984) was a British Conservative politician. ... In the United Kingdom, there are at least five Secretaries to the Treasury, officials officially acting as secretaries to the Treasury board. ... (Alfred) Ernest Marples, Baron Marples (9 December 1907 – 6 July 1978) was a British politician. ... George Edward Peter Thorneycroft, Baron Thorneycroft (1909-1994) was a British Conservative politician. ... Harold Arthur Watkinson, 1st Viscount Watkinson PC CH (25 January 1910 – 19 December 1995) was a British Conservative politician and businessman. ... The post of Minister of Defence was responsible for co-ordination of defence and security from its creation in 1940 until its abolition in 1964. ... John Scott Maclay, 1st Viscount Muirshiel, KT, CH CMG PC (1905-1992) was a National Liberal and Unionist MP. Maclay was a son of James Paton Maclay, 1st Baron Maclay. ... The Secretary of State for Scotland (Rùnaire Stàite na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is the chief minister in the government of the United Kingdom with responsibilites for Scotland, at the head of the Scotland Office (formerly The Scottish Office). ... John Hugh Hare, 1st Viscount Blakenham OBE PC (January 22, 1911–March 7, 1982) was a British peer and statesman, the son of Richard Hare, 4th Earl of Listowel. ... Minister of Labour re-directs here. ... Arthur Christopher John Soames, Baron Soames (October 12, 1920-September 16, 1987) was the last Governor of Zimbabwe. ... The Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food was a UK cabinet position, responsible for the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food. ... Charles Hill, Baron Hill of Luton (15 January 1904 —22 August 1989) M.D., was an English administrator, doctor and television executive. ... Percy Herbert Mills (1890-1968) was an English politician. ...

July 1962 - October 1963

In a radical reshuffle dubbed "The Night of the Long Knives", Macmillan sacked a third of his Cabinet and instituted many other changes. The epithet Night of the Long Knives is given to July 13, 1962, when the British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan sacked the following members of his Cabinet: Lord Kilmuir — Lord Chancellor Selwyn Lloyd — Chancellor of the Exchequer David Eccles — Minister of Education Harold Arthur Watkinson — Minister of Defence John Scott...

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Robert Strother Stewart
Member of Parliament for Stockton-on-Tees
1924–1929
Succeeded by
Frederick Fox Riley
Preceded by
Frederick Fox Riley
Member of Parliament for Stockton-on-Tees
1931–1945
Succeeded by
George Chetwynd
Preceded by
Sir Edward Campbell
Member of Parliament for Bromley
1945–1964
Succeeded by
John Hunt
Political offices
Preceded by
Sir Archibald Sinclair
Secretary of State for Air
1945
Succeeded by
The Viscount Stansgate
Preceded by
The Earl Alexander of Tunis
Minister of Defence
1954–1955
Succeeded by
Selwyn Lloyd
Preceded by
Sir Anthony Eden
Foreign Secretary
1955
Succeeded by
Selwyn Lloyd
Preceded by
Rab Butler
Chancellor of the Exchequer
1955–1957
Succeeded by
Peter Thorneycroft
Preceded by
Sir Anthony Eden
Leader of the British Conservative Party
1957–1963
Succeeded by
The Earl of Home
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
1957–1963
Peerage of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
New Creation
Earl of Stockton
1984–1986
Succeeded by
Alexander Macmillan

  Results from FactBites:
 
Harold Macmillan (843 words)
Harold Macmillan was half-American by parentage, the son of a publisher who had raised the family from a humble background.
In 1940 Macmillan was appointed a junior minister, and in 1942 became the Resident Minister at Allied Forces HQ in the Mediterranean, where he became a friend of General Eisenhower.
Macmillan's handling of the Profumo Affair scandal was judged to be poor.
Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Harold Macmillan (768 words)
Maurice Harold Macmillan (February 10, 1894 - December 29, 1986) was a British Conservative politician and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1957 to 1963.
Macmillan supported the creation of the National Incomes Commission[?] as a means to institute controls on income as part of his growth without inflation policy, a further series of sublte indicators and controls were also introduced during his premiership.
Macmillan also took close control of foreign policy, he worked to narrow the rift post-Suez with the U.S., where he wartime friendship with Eisenhower was useful and the two had a pleasant conference in Bermuda as early as March 1957.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m