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Encyclopedia > Harold Abrahams
Olympic medal record
Men's athletics
Gold 1924 Paris 100 metres
Silver 1924 Paris 4x100 m relay

Harold Maurice Abrahams (December 15, 1899January 14, 1978) was a Jewish British athlete. He was an Olympic champion in 1924 in the 100 metre dash, a feat depicted in the 1981 movie Chariots of Fire. A womens 400 metre hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track. ... The Games of the VIII Olympiad were held in 1924 in Paris, France. ... Athletics Medal Winners at the 1924 Paris Olympics Categories: Athletics at the Olympics | 1924 Summer Olympics ... The Games of the VIII Olympiad were held in 1924 in Paris, France. ... Athletics Medal Winners at the 1924 Paris Olympics Categories: Athletics at the Olympics | 1924 Summer Olympics ... December 15 is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... January 14 is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... A womens 400 metre hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track. ... The Games of the VIII Olympiad were held in 1924 in Paris, France. ... 100 m is the classic sprints race distance. ... Chariots of Fire is a British film released in 1981. ...

Contents

Biography

Born in Bedford as the son of a Lithuanian Jew[1], he was the younger brother of another British athlete, the Olympic long jumper Sir Sidney Abrahams. He was educated at Repton School and then at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, before training as a lawyer. Bedford is the county town of the English county of Bedfordshire. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Long jumper at the GE Money Grand Prix in Helsinki, July 2005. ... Sir Sidney Solomon Abrahams (11 February 1885 - 14 May 1957), nicknamed Solly, was a British Olympic athlete and Chief Justice of Ceylon (Sri Lanka). ... Repton School, founded in 1557, is one of the most famous co-educational public schools in the UK, located in the village of Repton, in Derbyshire, England. ... Full name Gonville and Caius College Motto Named after Edmund Gonville & John Caius Previous names Gonville Hall (1348), Gonville & Caius (1557) Established 1348, refounded 1557 Sister College(s) Brasenose College Master Sir Christopher Hum Location Trinity St Undergraduates 468 Postgraduates 291 Homepage Boatclub Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge is a... The University of Cambridge, located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ...


A sprinter and long jumper since his youth, he continued to compete in sport while studying at Cambridge. He earned a place in the 1920 Olympic team. These games were no great success for Abrahams who was eliminated in the quarter-finals of both the 100m and 200m, and he finished twentieth in the long jump. As a part of the British relay team, he took fourth place in the 4 x 100 m. Long jumper at the GE Money Grand Prix in Helsinki, July 2005. ... Shown within Cambridgeshire Geography Status: City (1951) Region: East of England Admin. ... The 1920 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the VII Olympiad, were held in 1920 in Antwerp, Belgium. ... During a relay race, members of a team take turns swimming or running (usually with a baton) parts of a circuit or performing a certain action. ...


After dominating the national long jump and sprint events, Abrahams was an outsider for the medals at the 1924 Olympics in Paris, France. With the encouragement of his brother, Abrahams employed coach Sam Mussabini - the first British athlete to do so[2]. For six months, Mussabini at Abrahams direction emphasized the 100-metre, with the 200-metre as secondary - through vigorous training, Abrahams perfected his start, stride, and form. One month before the 1924 Games, Abrahams set the English record in the long jump (24'2 1/2"), a record which stood for the next 32 years. The same day he ran the 100-yard in 9.6 seconds, but the time was not submitted as a record because the track was on a slight downhill[3]. The Games of the VIII Olympiad were held in 1924 in Paris, France. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ...


Abrahams won the 100m, beating all the American favourites (including the 1920 Gold medal winner Charlie Paddock). In third place was Arthur Porritt, later Governor-General of New Zealand - whose name was changed to "Tom Watson" in Chariots of Fire. The Paris Olympics 100m dash took place at 7pm on 7 July 1924 - Abrahams and Porritt dined together at 7pm on 7th July every year thereafter, until Abrahams' death. In the 200 metre race, he reached the final, in which he placed sixth and last. (Eric Liddell also ran the 200m and finished in third place). As an opening runner for the 4 x 100 m team, Abrahams won a second Olympic medal, a silver; Abrahams did not compete in the long jump. Charles (Charlie) William Paddock (November 8, 1900 – July 21, 1943) was an American athlete and two-fold Olympic champion. ... Arthur Espie Porritt, Baron Porritt, GCMG, GCVO, CBE (August 10, 1900 - January 1, 1994) was a New Zealand physician, statesman and athlete. ... Flag of the Governor-General of New Zealand. ... July 7 is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 177 days remaining. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Eric Henry Liddell, circa 1923. ...


A foot injury forced Abrahams to end his career the following year. He returned to his legal career, but subsequently served as an athletics journalist for forty years, also commentating the sport for the BBC radio. He latterly served as the chairman for the Amateur Athletic Association The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion... The Amateur Athletic Association of England (formerly simply the Amateur Athletic Association) or AAA (pronounced three As) is the oldest athletics organization in the UK, having been established in 1880. ...


Harold Abrahams died in Enfield on 14 January 1978, aged 78 years. His funeral serves as the framing device for Chariots of Fire. Abrahams is buried at Saint John the Baptist Churchyard in Great Amwell, Hertfordshire[4] The London Borough of Enfield is the most northerly London borough and forms part of Outer London. ... January 14 is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Chariots of Fire is a British film released in 1981. ... Amwell (Great and Little), is a village in the county of Hertfordshire, England, located 1½ miles (S.E. by S.) from Ware, and about 20 miles north of London. ... Hertfordshire (pronounced Hartfordshire and abbreviated as Herts) is an inland county in the United Kingdom and part of the East of England Government Office region. ...


Quotations

  • "I have always believed that Harold Abrahams was the only European sprinter who could have run with Jesse Owens, Ralph Metcalfe, and the other great sprinters from the U.S. He was in their class, not only because of natural gifts - his magnificent physique, his splendei racing temperament, his flair for the big occasion; but because he understood athletics, and had given more brainpower and more will power to the subject than any other runner of his day." - Philip Noel-Baker, Britain's 1912 Olympic captain and a Nobel Prize winner, reflecting in 1948 on Abrahams' athleticism[5]

James Cleveland Jesse Owens (September 12, 1913 – March 31, 1980) was an American track and field athlete. ... Ralph Harold Metcalfe (May 30, 1910 - October 10, 1978) was an American athlete who jointly held the world record for the 100 metre sprint. ... Philip John Noel-Baker, Baron Noel-Baker (November 1, 1889 - October 8, 1982) was a politician, diplomat, academic and outstanding amateur athlete who received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1959. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ...

Reference

  1. ^ http://www.times-olympics.co.uk/historyheroes/stgbo01.html
  2. ^ http://www.sportinglife.com/olympics/best_of_british/story_get.dor?STORY_NAME=others/00/08/22/OLYMPICS_Abrahams.html
  3. ^ http://www.jewsinsports.org/olympics.asp?ID=511
  4. ^ http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=6378561
  5. ^ http://www.jewsinsports.org/olympics.asp?ID=511

External links

  • Bio at Jewish Sports
Olympic champions in men's 100 m
1896: Tom Burke | 1900: Frank Jarvis | 1904: Archie Hahn | 1908: Reggie Walker | 1912: Ralph Craig | 1920: Charlie Paddock | 1924: Harold Abrahams | 1928: Percy Williams | 1932: Eddie Tolan | 1936: Jesse Owens | 1948: Harrison Dillard | 1952: Lindy Remigino | 1956: Bobby Joe Morrow | 1960: Armin Hary | 1964: Bob Hayes | 1968: Jim Hines | 1972: Valeri Borzov | 1976: Hasely Crawford | 1980: Allan Wells | 1984: Carl Lewis | 1988: Carl Lewis | 1992: Linford Christie | 1996: Donovan Bailey | 2000: Maurice Greene | 2004: Justin Gatlin
Inter-war British Olympic champions in men's athletics
1920: Albert Hill (800 m & 1500 m) | 1920 Percy Hodge (3000 m steeplechase) | 1924: Harold Abrahams (100 m) | 1924: Eric Liddell (400 m) | 1924 & 1928 Douglas Lowe (800 m) | 1928 David Burghley (400 m hurdles) | 1932 Thomas Hampson (800 m) | 1932 Thomas Green (50 km walk) | 1936 Harold Whitlock (50 km walk)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Harold Abrahams - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (281 words)
Harold Maurice Abrahams (December 15, 1899 - January 14, 1978) was a British and (English) athlete.
These Games were no great success; Abrahams was eliminated in the quarter-finals of both the 100 m and 200 m, and he finished 20th in the long jump.
After dominating the national long jump and sprint events, Abrahams was an outsider for the medals at the 1924 Olympics in Paris, France.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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