FACTOID # 9: The bookmobile capital of America is Kentucky.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Harlan Ellison
Harlan Ellison

Vol.2 cover to a collection of stories illustrated by Dark Horse Comics
Born Harlan Jay Ellison
May 27, 1934 (1934-05-27) (age 74)
Cleveland, Ohio
Pen name Cordwainer Bird
Nalrah Nosille
Sley Harson[1]
Occupation Author, screenwriter
Nationality American
Genres Speculative fiction, science fiction, fantasy, crime, mystery, horror, film and television criticism, essayist
Literary movement New Wave

Harlan Jay Ellison (born May 27, 1934) is a prolific American writer of short stories, novellas, teleplays, essays, and criticism. His literary and television work has received many awards. He wrote for the original series of both The Outer Limits and Star Trek; edited the multiple-award-winning short story anthology series Dangerous Visions; and served as creative consultant to the science fiction TV series The New Twilight Zone and Babylon 5. Image File history File links Author Harlan Ellison, 2000. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... A pen name or nom de plume is a pseudonym adopted by an author. ... This article is about work. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... Screenwriters, scenarists, or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... In English usage, nationality is the legal relationship between a person and a country. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... Speculative fiction - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... Look up mystery in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... “Horror story” redirects here. ... An essayist is an author who writes compositions which can be about any particular subject. ... ... New Wave science fiction was characterised by a high degree of experimentation, both in form and in content, and a highbrow and self-consciously literary or artistic sensibility previously comparatively alien to the science fiction aesthetic. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... Neil Richard Gaiman (IPA: ) (born November 10, 1960[2]) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... This article is in need of attention. ... A novella is a short, narrative, prose fiction work. ... A screenplay or script is a blueprint for producing a motion picture. ... Essay, a short work that treats of a topic from an authors personal point of view, often taking into account subjective experiences and personal reflections upon them. ... A critic (derived from the ancient Greek word krites meaning a judge) is a person who offers a value judgement or an interpretation. ... The Outer Limits is an American television series. ... The starship Enterprise as it appeared on Star Trek Star Trek is a culturally significant science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry in the 1960s. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Dangerous Visions (ISBN 0-425-06176-0) was a path-breaking science fiction short story anthology edited by Harlan Ellison and published in 1967. ... Creative consultant is a credit that has - particuarly in the past - been given to screenwriters who have “doctored” a movie screenplay. ... The New Twilight Zone is the popular nickname for the 1985 revival of Rod Serlings acclaimed 1950/60s television series, The Twilight Zone; it was officially titled the same as the original. ... Babylon 5 is an epic American science fiction television series created, produced, and largely written by J. Michael Straczynski. ...


Ellison's most famous stories were published within the speculative fiction genre, and he has won multiple Hugo and Nebula awards. He was also very active in the science fiction community (a founding member of the Cleveland Science Fiction Society, he edited its fanzine as a teenager), and gives colorful and confrontational talks at science fiction conventions. In the 1960s, he served as the Science Fiction Writers of America's first vice president. He prefers not to place his works in a genre, but will use the term "speculative fiction" to describe his work. Speculative fiction - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... Science fiction fandom or SF fandom is the community of people actively interested in science fiction and fantasy literature, and in contact with one another based upon that interest. ... A fanzine (see also: zine) is a nonprofessional publication produced by fans of a particular cultural phenomenon (such as a literary or musical genre) for the pleasure of others who share their interest. ... Science fiction conventions are gatherings of the community of fans (called science fiction fandom) of various forms of speculative fiction including science fiction and fantasy. ... Science Fiction Writers of America, or SFWA, (SFWA is pronounced seff-wah) was founded in 1965 by Damon Knight and James Blish. ...


Ellison's fantasy work, however, is generally better aligned with surrealism or magic realism than space opera-type science fiction. There is also a strong ethical current running through his work, half of which is nonfiction, including social activism and criticism of the arts. For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... Max Ernst. ... Magic realism (or magical realism) is an artistic genre in which magical elements or illogical scenarios appear in an otherwise realistic or even normal setting. ... Classic pulp space opera cover, with the usual cliché elements. ... Ethics is a general term for what is often described as the science (study) of morality. In philosophy, ethical behavior is that which is good or right. ... Non-fiction is a truthful account or representation of a subject which is composed of facts. ... Social activists are people who act as the conscience and voice of many individuals within a society. ...


Fiercely protective of his work, he has on several occasions sought (and won) legal action against copyright infringements. He occasionally uses the pseudonym Cordwainer Bird for reasons explained in the "Controversy" section, below. The Cathach of St. ...

Contents

Biography

Early life and career

Ellison was born in Cleveland, Ohio in 1934. His Jewish-American family subsequently moved to Painesville, Ohio, but returned to Cleveland in 1949, following the death of his father. As a child, he had a brief career performing in minstrel shows. He frequently ran away from home, taking an array of odd jobs — including, by the time he was eighteen (by his own account), "tuna fisherman off the coast of Galveston, itinerant crop-picker down in New Orleans, hired gun for a wealthy neurotic, dynamite truck driver in North Carolina, short order cook, cab driver, lithographer, book salesman, floorwalker in a department store, door-to-door brush salesman, and as a youngster, he appeared in several productions at the Cleveland Play House".[1] Cleveland redirects here. ... A Jewish American (also commonly American Jew) is an American (a citizen of the United States) of Jewish descent or religion who maintains a connection to the Jewish community, either through actively practicing Judaism or through cultural and historical affiliation. ... Painesville is a city located in Lake County, Ohio. ... The minstrel show, or minstrelsy, is an indigenous form of American entertainment consisting of comic skits, variety acts, dancing, and music, usually performed by white people in blackface. ... A Long Island fisherman cleans his nets A fisherman is someone who gathers fish, shellfish, or other animals from a body of water. ... Galveston redirects here. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... // There are two major types of truck drivers: Owner operators are individuals that own the trucks they drive and can either lease their trucks by contract with a trucking company to haul freight for that company using their trucks or haul loads for a number of companies and is self... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Cooks in training in Paris A cook is a person employed to prepare food for consumption. ... Lithography is a method for printing on a smooth surface, as well as a method of manufacturing semiconductor and MEMS devices. ... The interior of a typical Macy*s department store. ... Door-to-door selling is a technique used in sales, it is one of the most difficult forms of selling. ... Cleveland Play House is a theater complex in the Fairfax neighborhood of Cleveland, Ohio. ...


Ellison attended Ohio State University for 18 months before being expelled. He has said that the expulsion was a result of his hitting a professor who had denigrated his writing ability, and that over the next forty-odd years he had sent that professor a copy of every story he published.[2] The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Ohio. ...


Ellison moved to New York City in 1955 to pursue a writing career, primarily in science fiction. Over the next two years, he published more than 100 short stories and articles. In 1957, Ellison decided to write about youth gangs. To research the issue, he joined a street gang in the Red Hook, Brooklyn area, under the name "Cheech Beldone". His subsequent writings on the subject include the novel, Web of the City/Rumble, and the collection, The Deadly Streets, and also compose part of his memoir, Memos from Purgatory. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Youth Gangs or street gangs are an emerging problem in most modern countries like New Zealand, South Africa, USA, and Australia wheres young youth are fighting or flooding(overpopulating) areas to claim turf or territory for themselves against other rival or enemy youth gangs. ... A gang is a group of individuals who share a common identity and, in current usage, engage in illegal activities. ... A Holland-Style Factory Building in Red Hook Red Hook circa 1875 Red Hook is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. ... Web of the City (originally entitled Rumble) is the first novel written by author Harlan Ellison. ... As a literary genre, a memoir (from the French: mémoire from the Latin memoria, meaning memory), or a reminiscence, forms a subclass of autobiography, although it is an older form of writing. ... Memos from Purgatory is Harlan Ellisons account of his experience with kid gangs in a period where he joined one to research them for a book. ...


Ellison was drafted into the army, serving from 1957 to 1959. In 1960 he returned to New York, living at 95 Christopher Street in Greenwich Village. Moving to Chicago, Ellison wrote for William Hamling's Rogue magazine. As a book editor at Hamling's Regency Books, he published novels and anthologies by such writers as B. Traven, Kurt Vonnegut, Robert Bloch and Philip José Farmer. The United States Army is the largest, and by some standards oldest, established branch of the armed forces of the United States and is one of seven uniformed services. ... Christopher Street is a street in New Yorks West Village that was at the center of the gay rights movement in the late 1970s. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... William Lawrence Hamling was a Chicago-based publisher active from the 1950s into the 1970s. ... This article is about a magazine, for other uses of the term see Rogue. ... An anthology is a collection of literary works, originally of poems, but in recent years its usage has broadened to be applied to collections of short stories and comic strips. ... B. Traven (d. ... Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... Robert Albert Bloch (April 5, 1917, Chicago-September 23, 1994, Los Angeles) was a prolific American writer. ... Philip José Farmer (born January 26, 1918) is an American author, principally known for his science fiction and fantasy novels and short stories. ...


In the late 1950s, Ellison wrote a number of erotic stories, such as "God Bless the Ugly Virgin" and "Tramp", which were later reprinted in Los Angeles-based magazines. That was the beginning of his use of the name Cordwainer Bird as a pseudonym. The name was later used in July and August of 1957, in two journals, each of which had accepted two of his stories. In each journal, one story was published under the name Harlan Ellison, and the other under Cordwainer Bird. Later, as discussed in the Controversy section below, he used the pseudonym for material when he disagreed with its use or editing. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This stub was created in response to some concerns voiced about the original article, and will be replaced by a longer article shortly. ...


Hollywood and beyond

Ellison moved to California in 1962, and subsequently began to sell scripts to television shows like Burke's Law, Route 66, The Outer Limits, Star Trek and Cimarron Strip. His Memos from Purgatory was adapted into an episode of The Alfred Hitchcock Hour. Ellison's scripts "Demon with a Glass Hand" (for The Outer Limits) and "The City on the Edge of Forever" (for Star Trek) won Best Original Teleplay awards from the Writers Guild of America; each is often cited as one of the best of its series. Burkes Law 1963 series intro card Amos Burke Burkes Law was a detective series which ran on ABC from 1963 to 1966 and was revived on CBS in the 1990s. ... Route 66 was an American TV series in which two young men traveled across America. ... The Outer Limits is an American television series. ... The starship Enterprise as it appeared on Star Trek Star Trek is a culturally significant science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry in the 1960s. ... Cimarron Strip (1967-68) was a lavish weekly 90-minute US western television series (75 minutes excluding commercial breaks) starring Stuart Whitman as Marshal Jim Crown. ... Alfred Hitchcock Presents was a half-hour anthology series hosted by Alfred Hitchcock. ... Demon with a Glass Hand is a widely referenced episode of The Outer Limits television series, based on a script by Harlan Ellison. ... The City on the Edge of Forever is the penultimate episode of the first season of Star Trek. ... Annual awards given out by the Writers Guild of America for outstanding achievements in film, TV, or radio writing. ...


During the late 1960s, Ellison wrote a column about television for the Los Angeles Free Press. Titled "The Glass Teat", the column addressed political and social issues and their portrayal on television at the time. The columns have been reprinted in two collections, The Glass Teat and The Other Glass Teat. The Los Angeles Free Press (often called “the Freep” and the LAFP) was among the most widely distributed underground newspapers of the 1960s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Glass Teat: Essays of Opinion on Television is a 1970 compilation of essays written by Harlan Ellison for the Los Angeles Free Press on the current state of television. ...


He was a participant in the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, led by Martin Luther King, Jr.[3] John Lewis (on right in trench coat) and Hosea Williams (on the left) lead marchers across the Edmund Pettus Bridge,March 7, 1965 The Selma to Montgomery marches, which included Bloody Sunday, were three marches that marked the political and emotional peak of the American civil rights movement. ... Selma is a city in Alabama located on the banks of the Alabama River in Dallas County, Alabama, of which it is the county seat. ... Coordinates: , Country State County Montgomery Incorporated December 3, 1819 Government  - Mayor Bobby Bright Area  - City  156. ... Martin Luther King redirects here. ...


In 1966, in an article that Esquire Magazine would later name as the best magazine piece ever written, the journalist Gay Talese wrote about the goings-on around the enigmatic Frank Sinatra. The article, entitled "Frank Sinatra Has a Cold," briefly describes a clash between the young Harlan Ellison and Frank Sinatra, when the crooner suddenly took exception to Ellison's boots during a billiards game. Esquire is a magazine for men owned by the Hearst Corporation. ... Gay Talese Gay Talese (born February 7, 1932) is an American author. ... The cover to Gay Taleses profile. ... Sinatra redirects here. ...


Ellison continued to publish short pieces, fiction and nonfiction, in various publications, and some of his most famous stories were written in this period. ""Repent, Harlequin!" Said the Ticktockman" (1965) is a celebration of civil disobedience against repressive authority. "I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream" (1967) is an allegory of Hell, where five humans are tormented by an all-knowing computer throughout eternity. The story was the basis of a 1995 computer game, with Ellison participating in the game's design and providing the voice of the god-computer AM. "A Boy and His Dog" examines the nature of friendship and love in a violent, post-apocalyptic world. It was made into the 1975 film of the same name, starring Don Johnson. Repent, Harlequin! Said the Ticktockman is a short story by speculative fiction writer Harlan Ellison. ... For the 1995 computer game, see I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream (computer game). ... I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream was a critically acclaimed adventure game based upon Harlan Ellison’s class short story of the same name about an evil computer named AM that has destroyed all of humanity except for five people he has been keeping alive and torturing for... Apocalyptic science fiction is a sub-genre of science fiction that is concerned with the end of civilization, through nuclear war, plague, or some other general disaster. ... A Boy and His Dog is a 1975 post-apocalyptic science fiction film directed by L. Q. Jones and based on the Harlan Ellison short story of the same title, which originally appeared in 1969. ... For other persons named Don Johnson, see Don Johnson (disambiguation). ...


Ellison has won ten Hugo Awards, four Nebula Awards, and five Bram Stoker Awards (presented by the Horror Writers Association) including the Lifetime Achievement Award in 1996. The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... The Bram Stoker Award is a recognition presented by the Horror Writers Association (HWA) for superior achievement in horror writing. ...


He has also been honored with the Edgar Award by the Mystery Writers of America twice, the Georges Méliès fantasy film award twice, and the Silver Pen for Journalism by International PEN, the international writers' union. He was presented with the first Living Legend Award by the International Horror Guild at the 1995 World Horror Convention. He is also the only author in Hollywood ever to win the Writers Guild of America Award for Most Outstanding Teleplay (solo work) four times, most recently for "Paladin of the Lost Hour" in 1987. The Edgar Allan Poe Awards (popularly called the Edgars), named after Edgar Allan Poe, are presented every year by the Mystery Writers of America. ... Mystery Writers of America is an organization for mystery writers, based in New York. ... Georges Méliès (December 8, 1861 – January 21, 1938), full name Marie-Georges-Jean Méliès, was a French filmmaker famous for leading many technical and narrative developments in the earliest cinema. ... Fantasy films are films with fantastic themes, usually involving magic, supernatural events, make-believe creatures, or exotic fantasy worlds. ... Logo of International PEN International PEN, the worldwide association of writers, was founded in 1921 to promote friendship and intellectual co-operation among writers everywhere; to emphasise the role of literature in the development of mutual understanding and world culture; to fight for freedom of expression; and to act as... // The World Horror Convention is an annual professional gathering of the World Horror Society and other interested parties. ... Annual awards given out by the Writers Guild of America for outstanding achievements in film, TV, or radio writing. ... Paladin of the Lost Hour is a novelette and an episode of the television series The New Twilight Zone both written by Harlan Ellison. ...


In March 1998, the National Women's Committee of Brandeis University honored him with their 1998 Words, Wit, Wisdom award. In 1990, Ellison was honored by International PEN for continuing commitment to artistic freedom and the battle against censorship. Brandeis University is a private university located in Waltham, Massachusetts, United States. ...


He also edited the influential science fiction anthology Dangerous Visions (1967), which collected stories commissioned by Ellison, accompanied by his commentary-laden biographical sketches of the authors. He challenged the authors to write stories at the edge of the genre. Many of the stories went beyond the traditional boundaries of science fiction pioneered by respected old school editors such as John W. Campbell, Jr. As an editor, Ellison was influenced and inspired by experimentation in the popular literature of the time, such as the beats. A sequel, Again Dangerous Visions, was published in 1972. A third volume, The Last Dangerous Visions, has been repeatedly postponed (see Controversy). Dangerous Visions (ISBN 0-425-06176-0) was a path-breaking science fiction short story anthology edited by Harlan Ellison and published in 1967. ... Old school, variously spelled old skool, oldschool or oldskool, is a slang term referring to an older school of thinking or acting and to old objects in general, within the context of newer, more modern times. ... The cover of , volume 1, with a picture of Campbell drawn by Frank Kelly Freas John Wood Campbell, Jr. ... Beats redirects here. ...


Ellison served as creative consultant to the science fiction TV series The Twilight Zone (1980s version) and Babylon 5. As a member of the Screen Actors Guild (SAG), he has voiceover credits for shows including The Pirates of Dark Water, Mother Goose and Grimm, Space Cases, Phantom 2040, and Babylon 5, as well as making an onscreen appearance in the Babylon 5 episode "The Face of the Enemy". The Twilight Zone title. ... Babylon 5 is an epic American science fiction television series created, produced, and largely written by J. Michael Straczynski. ... The Screen Actors Guild (SAG) is an American labor union representing over 120,000 film and television principal performers and background performers worldwide. ... The Pirates of Dark Water is a fantasy animated series produced by Hanna-Barbera and Turner Entertainment in the early 1990s. ... Space Cases is a science fiction television series that aired on Nickelodeon for two seasons. ... Phantom 2040 is an animated science fiction television series loosely based on the comic strip hero The Phantom, created by Lee Falk. ... List of Babylon 5 episodes The Face of the Enemy is an 17th episode from the fourth season of the science-fiction television series Babylon 5. ...


Ellison has commented on a great many movies and television programs (see The Glass Teat and The Other Glass Teat for television criticism and commentary; see Harlan Ellison's Watching for movie criticism and commentary), both negatively and positively. He believes that "quality" and "popularity" are not synonymous, and is well-known for his vociferous disdain for anything he believes is bad. The Glass Teat: Essays of Opinion on Television is a 1970 compilation of essays written by Harlan Ellison for the Los Angeles Free Press on the current state of television. ... Harlan Ellisons Watching Harlan Ellisons Watching (ISBN 0887330673) is a 1989 compilation of 25 years worth of essays and film reviews written by Harlan Ellison for Cinema magazine, the Los Angeles Free Press, Starlog magazine, and The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction among others. ... Film criticism is the analysis and evaluation of films, individually and collectively. ...


He does all his writing on a manual Olympia typewriter, and has a substantial distaste for personal computers and most of the internet. Mechanical desktop typewriters, such as this Underwood Five, were long time standards of government agencies, newsrooms, and sales offices. ...


For two years, beginning in 1986, Ellison took over as host of the Friday-night radio program, Hour 25, on Pacifica Radio station KPFK-FM, Los Angeles, after the death of Mike Hodel, the show's founder and original host. Ellison had been a frequent and favorite guest on the long-running program. In one episode, he brought in his typewriter and proceeded to write a new short story live on the air (he titled the story "Hitler Painted Roses"). Hour 25 also served as the inspiration for his story, "The Hour That Stretches". Hour 25 is a radio program focusing on science fiction. ... Pacifica Radio Network. ... KPFK (90. ... Hour 25 is a radio program focusing on science fiction. ...


Ellison's 1992 novelette "The Man Who Rowed Christopher Columbus Ashore" was selected for inclusion in the 1993 edition of The Best American Short Stories. Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator, colonizer, and explorer and one of the first Europeans to explore the Americas after the Vikings. ...


Ellison was hired as a writer for Walt Disney Studios, but was fired on his first day after being overheard by Roy O. Disney in the studio commissary joking about making a pornographic animated film featuring Disney characters. He recounted this incident in his book Stalking the Nightmare, as part 3 of an essay titled "The 3 Most Important Things in Life". Disney redirects here. ... Roy Oliver Disney (June 24, 1893–December 20, 1971) was, with his younger brother Walt Disney, co-founder of what is now The Walt Disney Company. ... Porn redirects here. ... The bouncing ball animation (below) consists of these 6 frames. ...


Ellison has provided vocal narration to numerous audiobooks, both of his own writing and others. Ellison has helped narrate books by authors such as Orson Scott Card, Arthur C. Clarke, Jack Williamson and Terry Pratchett. Cassette recording of Patrick OBrians The Mauritius Command done by Patrick Tull An audiobook is a recording that is primarily of the spoken word as opposed to music. ... Orson Scott Card (born August 24, 1951)[1] is a bestselling American author, as well as being a critic, political writer, and speaker. ... Sri Lankabhimanya Sir Arthur Charles Clarke, CBE (16 December 1917–19 March 2008), was a British science fiction author, inventor, and futurist, most famous for the novel 2001: A Space Odyssey, written in collaboration with director Stanley Kubrick, a collaboration which led also to the film of the same name... John Stewart Williamson (April 29, 1908 – November 10, 2006), who wrote as Jack Williamson (and occasionally under the pseudonym Will Stewart) was a U.S. writer considered by many the Dean of Science Fiction. [1] // Williamson spent his early childhood in western Texas. ... Terence David John Pratchett, OBE (born 28 April 1948) is a British fantasy and science fiction author, best known for his Discworld series. ...


Ellison lives in Los Angeles, California with Susan, his fifth wife. In 1994, he suffered a heart attack and was hospitalized for quadruple coronary artery bypass surgery. Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Heart attack redirects here. ... Early in a coronary artery bypass surgery during vein harvesting from the legs (left of image) and the establishment of bypass (placement of the aortic cannula) (bottom of image). ...


In 2006, Harlan Ellison received the title of SFWA Grand Master from the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. The Board of Directors and past Presidents of SFWA inducted Ellison as the newest Grand Master at the Nebula Awards Weekend in May of that year. Science Fiction Writers of America, or SFWA (pronounced // or //), was founded in 1965 by Damon Knight. ... Chairman of the Board redirects here. ...


Controversies

Ellison has a reputation for being abrasive and argumentative.[4] He has generally agreed with this assessment, and a dust jacket from one of Ellison's own books includes a passage that described him as "possibly the most contentious person on Earth". Ellison is also well known for being fiercely litigious and his numerous grievance filings and lawsuit attempts have been characterized as both justifiable and possibly frivolous. These traits have attracted some controversy, especially among science fiction and fantasy fans. His friend Isaac Asimov noted that, "Harlan uses his gifts for colorful and variegated invective on those who irritate him — intrusive fans, obdurate editors, callous publishers, offensive strangers." The dust jacket (sometimes dust wrapper, abbreviated dj or dw) of a hardback book is the paper, usually illustrated and including front and back flaps, that protects the binding of the book from scratches. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... Isaac Asimov (January 2?, 1920?[1] – April 6, 1992), pronounced , originally Исаак Озимов but now transcribed into Russian as Айзек Азимов [1], was a Russian-born American author and professor of biochemistry, a highly successful writer, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. ...


His outspoken reputation earned him frequent appearances as a panelist on Politically Incorrect, and a regular spot on the fledgling Sci-Fi Channel where he was given an opportunity to express his views on whatever he chose to talk about. Ellison's segments, of which some transcripts are available, were broadcast from 1994 to 1997. Some found this ironic, as Ellison has derided the term "sci-fi" as a "hideous neologism" that "sounds like crickets fucking." (Forrest J. Ackerman, who coined the term, responded by producing buttons bearing the slogan, "I love the sound of crickets making love.") Politically Incorrect was a late-night, half-hour political talk show hosted by Bill Maher that ran from 1993 to 2002. ... SCI FI (originally The Sci-Fi Channel, sometimes rendered SCI FI Channel) is an American cable television channel, launched in early 1992,[1] that specializes in science fiction, fantasy, horror, and paranormal programming. ... Forrest J Ackerman (born November 24, 1916 in Los Angeles, California) is a legendary science fiction fan and collector of science fiction-related memorabilia. ...


Cordwainer Bird

Ellison has on occasion used the pseudonym Cordwainer Bird to alert members of the public to situations in which he feels his creative contribution to a project has been mangled beyond repair by others, typically Hollywood producers or studios. (See, e.g., Alan Smithee.) The first such work to which he signed the name was "The Price of Doom," an episode of Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (though it was misspelled as Cord Wainer Bird in the credits). The "Cordwainer Bird" moniker is a tribute to fellow SF writer Paul M. A. Linebarger, better known by his pen name, Cordwainer Smith. The origin of the word "cordwainer" is shoemaker (from working with cordovan leather for shoes). The term used by Linebarger was meant to imply the industriousness of the pulp author. Ellison has said, in interviews and in his writing, that his version of the pseudonym was meant to mean "a shoemaker for birds". Since he has used the pseudonym mainly for works he wants to distance himself from, it may be understood to mean that "this work is for the birds". Stephen King once said he thought that it meant that Ellison was giving people who mangled his work a literary version of "the bird" (given credence by Ellison himself in his own essay titled "Somehow, I Don't Think We're in Kansas, Toto", describing his experience with the Starlost television series). Alan Smithee, Allen Smithee, Alan Smythee, and Adam Smithee are pseudonyms used between 1968 and 1999 by Hollywood film directors who wanted to be dissociated from a film for which they no longer wanted credit. ... Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea was a 1960s American Science Fiction television series based on the 1961 film of the same name. ... A pen name or nom de plume is a pseudonym adopted by an author. ... Cordwainer Smith – pronounced CORDwainer Smith – was the pseudonym used by American author Paul Myron Anthony Linebarger (July 11, 1913 – August 6, 1966) for his science fiction works. ... A cordwainer (or cordovan) is somebody who makes shoes and other articles from fine soft leather. ... For other uses, see Leather (disambiguation). ... This article is about inexpensive fiction magazines. ... For other persons named Stephen King, see Stephen King (disambiguation). ... The finger. ... The Starlost is a Canadian-produced science fiction television series devised by writer Harlan Ellison and broadcast in 1973 on CTV in Canada and on NBC in the United States. ...


The Terminator

After James Cameron in an interview [5] about his movie The Terminator mentioned that he had been inspired by two episodes ("Soldier" [6] and "Demon with a Glass Hand") [7] of the 1960s Television series The Outer Limits — both written by Ellison — Ellison successfully sued Cameron. Ellison settled out of court and the film's end credits now include the simple statement: "Acknowledgment to the works of Harlan Ellison." The physical landscape of "Soldier" is directly plagiarized in "The Terminator" as is the basic story. "Demon With A Glass Hand" is also very representative of "The Terminator." These similarities include: (as stated) the futures's physical landscape, the "Soldier" from the future who ultimately protects a family and a Soldier who chases him through time. In "Soldier" cats direct troop movements. In "The Terminator" dogs protect humans.[8] For other persons named James Cameron, see James Cameron (disambiguation). ... This article is about the first film in the series. ... Soldier is an episode of the original The Outer Limits television show. ... Demon with a Glass Hand is a widely referenced episode of The Outer Limits television series, based on a script by Harlan Ellison. ... The Outer Limits is an American television series. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Starlost

The screenplay for his projected television series The Starlost was also given a Writers Guild Award, though the actual series, produced in 1972-73, was so altered by the producers that Ellison had his name removed from the credits and replaced with the pseudonym "Cordwainer Bird" (see above). Ellison was the first author to win the Writers Guild Award three times. The Starlost was a Canadian-produced science fiction television series devised by writer Harlan Ellison and broadcast in 1973 on CTV in Canada and on NBC in the United States. ...


Star Trek

Ellison has been vocal for many years in his criticism of how Star Trek creator and producer Gene Roddenberry (and others) rewrote much of his original script for the episode "The City on the Edge of Forever". Ellison's original work included a subplot involving drug dealing aboard the Enterprise and other elements that Roddenberry rejected for various reasons. Despite the award-winning, classic status of the episode (on which Ellison retained credit rather than using his "Cordwainer Bird" nom-de-plume), Ellison continued to be critical of how his work was treated by Roddenberry, decades after the fact. Ellison's original script was eventually reprinted in the 1976 collection Six Science Fiction Plays, edited by Roger Elwood. In 1995, White Wolf Publishing released Harlan Ellison's The City on the Edge of Forever, a book that included the original script, several story treatments, and an extensive introductory essay by Ellison explaining his position regarding the situation which resulted in what he called a "fatally inept treatment" of his work. Both the filmed episode and the original script won prestigious awards, the episode winning the 1968 Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation and the script winning a Writers Guild of America Award. Eugene Wesley Gene Roddenberry, (August 19, 1921 – October 24, 1991) was an American screenwriter and producer. ... The City on the Edge of Forever is the penultimate episode of the first season of Star Trek. ... Panamanian motor vessel Gatun during the largest cocaine bust in United States Coast Guard history (20 tons), off the coast of Panama. ... The USS Enterprise, (NCC-1701) is a fictional starship in the television series Star Trek, which chronicles the vessels mission to explore strange new worlds; to seek out new life and new civilizations; to boldly go where no man has gone before under the command of Captain James T... Roger Elwood (born 1933) is an American science fiction writer and editor. ... The logo of White Wolf Publishing, one of White Wolf, Inc. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... The Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation is one of the annual Hugo Award categories, presented by members of the World Science Fiction Convention. ... Annual awards given out by the Writers Guild of America for outstanding achievements in film, TV, or radio writing. ...


The Last Dangerous Visions

The Last Dangerous Visions, the third volume of the anthology series, has become something of a legend in science fiction as the genre's most famous unpublished book. It was originally announced for publication in 1973, but other work demanded Ellison's attention and the anthology has not seen print to date. He has come under criticism for his treatment of some writers who submitted their stories to him, of which some estimate to be nearly 150 (many of the authors have died in the subsequent three-and-a-half decades since the anthology was first announced). In 1993 Ellison threatened to sue New England Science Fiction Association (NESFA) for publishing "Himself in Anachron", a short story written by Cordwainer Smith and sold to Ellison for the book by his widow,[9] but later reached an amicable settlement.[10] The Last Dangerous Visions was planned to be a sequel to the science fiction short story anthologies Dangerous Visions and Again, Dangerous Visions. ... The New England Science Fiction Association, NESFA, is a science fiction club, founded in 1967. ... Cordwainer Smith – pronounced CORDwainer Smith – was the pseudonym used by American author Paul Myron Anthony Linebarger (July 11, 1913 – August 6, 1966) for his science fiction works. ...


British science fiction author Christopher Priest critiqued Ellison's editorial practices in an article entitled "The Book on the Edge of Forever"[11], later expanded into a book. Priest documented a half-dozen instances in which Ellison promised TLDV would appear within a year of the statement, but did not fulfill those promises. Priest claims he submitted a story at Ellison's request which Ellison retained for several months until Priest himself withdrew the story and demanded that Ellison return the manuscript.[11] Ellison has a record of fulfilling obligations in other instances (though sometimes, as with Harlan Ellison's Hornbook for Mirage Press, several decades after the contract was signed), including to writers whose stories he solicited, and has expressed outrage at other editors who have acted unprofessionally. Christopher Priest (born 1943) is an English science fiction writer, whose notable works include Inverted World[1974], Fugue for a Darkening Island[1973] (US title Darkening Island, The Prestige[1975], and The Separation[2002]. His novels have won the BSFA award (three times), the Arthur C. Clarke Award, and the... Harlan Ellisons Hornbook (ISBN 978-0892962396) is a 1990 compilation of columns written by Harlan Ellison for several counterculture newspapers in Los Angeles, USA, mostly for the Los Angeles Free Press and the in 1972 and 1973. ... Jack Laurence Chalker (December 17, 1944 - February 11, 2005) was an American science fiction author. ...


I, Robot

I, Robot - the Illustrated Screenplay

Shortly after the release of Star Wars (1977), Ben Roberts contacted Ellison to develop a script based on Isaac Asimov's "I, Robot" short story collection for Warner Brothers studio. In a meeting with the head of the Warner film studio, Bob Shapiro, Ellison concluded that Shapiro was commenting on the script without having read it, and accused him of having the "intellectual capacity of an artichoke". Shortly afterward, Ellison was dropped from the project. Progress on the film came to a dead end, as the executive refused to let Ellison become involved again with the project, but subsequent scripts were less satisfactory to potential directors. After a change in studio heads, Warner Brothers studio agreed to allow Ellison's script to be published as a serial in Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine and in book form.[12] The 2004 film was conceived and produced with no connection to the Ellison script. Gentleman Ben Roberts (born 3 November 1956) is an English professional poker player based in London. ... Isaac Asimov (January 2?, 1920?[1] – April 6, 1992), pronounced , originally Исаак Озимов but now transcribed into Russian as Айзек Азимов [1], was a Russian-born American author and professor of biochemistry, a highly successful writer, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. ... I, Robot is a collection of nine English language science fiction short stories by Isaac Asimov, first published by Gnome Press in 1950 in an edition of 5,000 copies. ... Warner Bros. ... Asimovs Science Fiction is a science fiction magazine, first published in 1977 as Isaac Asimovs Science Fiction Magazine or IASFM for short. ... For other uses, see I, Robot (disambiguation). ...


Allegations of assault on Charles Platt

In the 1980s, there was a widely-publicized incident in which Ellison assaulted author and critic Charles Platt at the Nebula Awards banquet.[13] Platt did not pursue legal action against Ellison, and the two men signed a "non-aggression pact" later, promising never to discuss the incident again nor to have any contact with one another. In the following years, according to Platt, Ellison has often publicly boasted about the incident.[14]


Back to the Future

In 1985, Ellison was interviewed for Starlog magazine's 100th issue (spotlighting who they felt were the 100 Most Important People in Science Fiction) and infamously called the popular movie Back to the Future a "piece of shit," which garnered an unprecedented amount of negative fan mail for the magazine. (He has since changed his mind about the film, having enjoyed the sequels very much.)[citation needed]. Starlog is a monthly science-fiction film magazine published by Starlog Group Inc. ... This article is about the first film in the Back to the Future trilogy. ... Fan mail is mail sent to a public figure, especially a celebrity, by their admirers or fans. // Fan mail may be in the form of letters, cards, artworks, gifts, and so on; depending on the recipient, it may also be possible to send fan mail via E-mail. ...


alt.binaries.e-book lawsuit

Ellison again came into the public eye with his April 24, 2000 lawsuit against Stephen Robertson for posting four of his stories to the newsgroup "alt.binaries.e-book" without authorization. Included as defendants in the lawsuit were AOL and RemarQ, internet service providers whose only involvement was running Usenet servers carrying the group in question, who Ellison claimed had failed to stop the alleged copyright infringement in accordance with the "Notice and Takedown Procedure" outlined in the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act. Robertson and RemarQ settled the lawsuit with Ellison, though he pressed on with his suit against AOL. The AOL suit was settled in June 2004 under conditions that were not made public. is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... A newsgroup is a repository usually within the Usenet system, for messages posted from many users at different locations. ... For other uses, see AOL (disambiguation). ... “ISP” redirects here. ... The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) is a United States copyright law which implements two 1996 WIPO treaties. ...


Lawsuit against Fantagraphics

On September 20, 2006, Ellison filed a defamation suit against Fantagraphics, a comic book publisher, claiming they had defamed him in their book Comics As Art (We told you so). is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Slander and Libel redirect here. ... Fantagraphics Books is an American publisher of alternative comics, underground comics, classic comic strip anthologies, magazines, and graphic novels located in the Maple Leaf neighborhood of Seattle, Washington. ...


This book, an account of the history of Fantagraphics, discussed an event in 1980 where Ellison gave an interview with Fantagraphics. In this interview, in his typical no-holds-barred fashion, Ellison referred to comic book writer Michael Fleisher, calling him "bugfuck" and "derango". Fleisher sued Ellison and Fantagraphics for libel, but lost the lawsuit on December 9, 1986.[15] A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Michael Mike Fleisher is an American comic book writer. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ...


Ellison, after reading unpublished drafts of the book on Fantagraphics's website, believed that he had been defamed by several anecdotes related to this incident. He filed suit in the Superior Court for the State of California, in Santa Monica. Fantagraphics attempted to have the lawsuit dismissed. In their motion to dismiss, Fantagraphics argued that the statements were both their personal opinions and generally believed to be true anecdotes. In law, and more specifically, in the Anglo-American common law legal tradition, a superior court is a court of general jurisdiction over all, or major, civil and criminal cases. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... A legal motion is a procedural device in law to bring a limited, contested matter before a court for decision. ...


On February 12, 2007, the presiding judge in the lawsuit ruled against Fantagraphics' anti-SLAPP motion for dismissal of the case.[16] On June 29, 2007, Ellison posted on his web site that the litigation had been resolved[17] pending Fantagraphics' removal of all references to the case from their website.[18] No money or apologies changed hands in the settlement. The details of the settlement were posted on August 17, 2007.[19] is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Strategic lawsuits against public participation, (SLAPP) refers to litigation filed by a large corporation (or in some cases, a wealthy individual) to silence a less powerful critic by so severely burdening them with the cost of a legal defense that they abandon their criticism. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


With Connie Willis at Hugo Awards 2006

On August 26, 2006, during the 64th World Science Fiction Convention, Ellison grabbed Connie Willis' breast while on stage at the Hugo Awards ceremony.[20] Ellen Datlow described this as "a schtick of Harlan acting like a baby".[21] Patrick Nielsen Hayden described this as "pathetic and nasty and sad and most of us didn't want to watch it".[22] is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The logo of L.A.con IV The 64th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon) will be L.A.con IV, which will be held in Los Angeles, United States 23-27 August, 2006. ... Connie Willis at Clarion West, 1998 Constance Elaine Trimmer Willis (born 31 December 1945) is an American science fiction writer. ... The Hugo Award is given every year for the best science fiction or fantasy stories of the previous year, and for related areas in fandom, art and dramatic presentation. ... Ellen Datlow (born 1949) is an American speculative fiction editor and anthologist. ... Patrick Nielsen Hayden is a science fiction editor and fanzine writer. ...


Ellison did not respond until three days later when he wrote on his message board, "I was unaware of any problem proceeding from my intendedly-childlike grabbing of Connie Willis's left breast, as she was exhorting me to behave." He also posted that "I'm glad, at last, to have transcended your expectations. I stand naked and defenseless before your absolutely correct chiding." By August 31 his contrition seemed to be waning, as he posted: "Would you be slightly less self-righteous and chiding if I told you there was NO grab…there was NO grope…there was NO fondle...there was the slightest touch. A shtick, a gag between friends, absolutely NO sexual content. How about it, Mark: after playing straight man to Connie's very frequently demeaning public jackanapery toward me — including treating me with considerable disrespect at the Grand Master Awards Weekend, where she put a chair down in front of her lectern as Master of Ceremonies, and made me sit there like a naughty child throughout her long 'roast' of my life and career — for more than 25 years, without once complaining, whaddaya think, Mark, am I even a leetle bit entitled to think that Connie likes to play, and geez ain't it sad that as long as SHE sets the rules for play, and I'm the village idiot, she's cool … but gawd forbid I change the rules and play MY way for a change …", and complained that Willis had not called him to discuss the matter.[23] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A Master of Ceremonies or MC (sometimes spelled emcee), sometimes called a compere or an MJ for microphone jockey, is the host of an official public or private staged event or other performance. ...


Bibliography

Novels and novellas

  • Web of the City (1958) (originally published as Rumble)
  • The Man with Nine Lives (1960) (as this novel has never been reprinted there is no edition in existence bearing the author's preferred title The Sound of a Scythe)
  • Spider Kiss (1961) (originally published as Rockabilly)
  • Doomsman (1967)
  • The Starlost #1: Phoenix Without Ashes (1975) (adaptation by Edward Bryant of Ellison's TV pilot script)
  • All the Lies That are My Life (1980) (later included in the author's 1980 collection Shatterday)
  • Run for the Stars (1991) (a 1957 novella here republished in a preferred text edition as part of a Tor Double)
  • Mefisto in Onyx (1993) (later included in the author's 1997 collection Slippage)

Web of the City (originally entitled Rumble) is the first novel written by author Harlan Ellison. ... Jan. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Spider Kiss (originally entitled Rockabilly) is a 1961 novel by author Harlan Ellison. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... The Starlost was a Canadian-produced science fiction television series devised by writer Harlan Ellison and broadcast in 1973 on CTV in Canada and on NBC in the United States. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Edward Winslow Bryant Jr. ... A television pilot is a test episode of an intended television series. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the book by Harlan Ellison. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the short story collection by Harlan Ellison. ...

Short story collections

Jan. ... Jan. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gentleman Junkie and Other Stories of the Hung-Up Generation is an early collection of short stories by Harlan Ellison, originally published in paperback in 1961. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ellison Wonderland is a collection of short stories by author Harlan Ellison that was originally published in 1962. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sherman Oaks is a district of the San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles, California. ... Paingod and Other Delusions is a collection of short stories by author Harlan Ellison. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... For the 1995 computer game, see I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream (computer game). ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A short story collection by Harlan Ellison published in 1969, The Beast that Shouted Love at the Heart of the World contains one of the authors most famous stories, A Boy and His Dog. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... Approaching Oblivion is a collection of short stories by author Harlan Ellison. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Subtitled A Pantheon of Gods, this 1975 collection of short stories by Harlan Ellison addresses the theme of modern-day deities that have replaced the older, more traditional ones. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A 1975 short story collection by American author Harlan Ellison, No Doors, No Windows contains mostly suspense and crime tales along with a very long introduction by Ellison. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Strange Wine is a 1978 short story collection by Harlan Ellison. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the book by Harlan Ellison. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Stalking the Nightmare is a 1982 short story and essay collection by Harlan Ellison. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Angry Candy is a 1998 collection of short stories by Harlan Ellison that is loosely organized around the theme of death. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Mind Fields is a book featuring paintings by the Polish artist Jacek Yerka and short stories by the American author Harlan Ellison. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Jacek Yerka Polish born artist in 1952, Jacek Yerka is a genius/mastermind whose surrealist paintings inspire vast imagination and utmost envy for the worlds he creates. ... This article is about the short story collection by Harlan Ellison. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... This article is about the year. ...

Retrospectives and omnibus collections

  • Alone Against Tomorrow: a 10-Year Survey (1971) (published in the UK in two volumes as All the Sounds of Fear (1973) and The Time of the Eye (1974))
  • The Fantasies of Harlan Ellison (1979) (contains Paingod and Other Delusions (1965) and I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream (1967))
  • The Essential Ellison: a 35-Year Retrospective (1987) (edited by Terry Dowling with Richard Delap and Rick Berry)
  • Dreams With Sharp Teeth (1991) (contains I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream (1967), Deathbird Stories (1975) and Shatterday (1980))
  • Edgeworks. 1 (1996) (contains Over the Edge (1970) and An Edge in My Voice (1985))
  • Edgeworks. 2 (1996) (contains Spider Kiss (1961) and Stalking the Nightmare (1982))
  • Edgeworks. 3 (1997) (contains The Harlan Ellison Hornbook (1990) and Harlan Ellison's Movie (1990))
  • Edgeworks. 4 (1997) (contains Love Ain't Nothing But Sex Misspelled (1968) and The Beast That Shouted Love at the Heart of the World (1969))
  • The Essential Ellison: a 50-Year Retrospective Revised & Expanded (2001) (edited by Terry Dowling with Richard Delap and Rick Berry)

Note: the White Wolf Edgeworks Series was originally scheduled to consist of 31 titles reprinted over the course of 20 omnibus volumes. Although an ISBN was created for Edgeworks. 5 (1998), which was to contain both Glass Teat books, this title never appeared. The series is noted for its numerous typographical errors.[2] A collection of short stories published in 1971, Alone Against Tomorrow includes some of Harlan Ellisons most famous work. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 1987. ... Terence William (Terry) Dowling (21 March 1947, Sydney, New South Wales), is an Australian writer, freelance journalist, award-winning critic, editor, game designer and reviewer. ... Richard Delap (1942-1987) was a US science fiction writer, editor, and reviewer. ... Rick Berry {b. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... This article is about the year. ... This article is about the year. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... This article is about the year. ... Terence William (Terry) Dowling (21 March 1947, Sydney, New South Wales), is an Australian writer, freelance journalist, award-winning critic, editor, game designer and reviewer. ... Richard Delap (1942-1987) was a US science fiction writer, editor, and reviewer. ... Rick Berry {b. ... The International Standard Book Number, or ISBN (sometimes pronounced is-ben), is a unique[1] identifier for books, intended to be used commercially. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... It has been suggested that Fat finger be merged into this article or section. ...


Nonfiction

Memos from Purgatory is Harlan Ellisons account of his experience with kid gangs in a period where he joined one to research them for a book. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Glass Teat: Essays of Opinion on Television is a 1970 compilation of essays written by Harlan Ellison for the Los Angeles Free Press on the current state of television. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Andrew Calvin Andy Porter, Ph. ... This article is about the year. ... This article is about the year. ... Harlan Ellisons Watching Harlan Ellisons Watching (ISBN 0887330673) is a 1989 compilation of 25 years worth of essays and film reviews written by Harlan Ellison for Cinema magazine, the Los Angeles Free Press, Starlog magazine, and The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction among others. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... The Harlan Ellison Hornbook (ISBN 978-0892962396) is a 1990 compilation of columns written by Harlan Ellison for several counterculture newspapers in Los Angeles, mostly for the Los Angeles Free Press and the in 1972 and 1973. ... This article is about the year. ...

Published screenplays and teleplays

See also The Starlost #1: Phoenix without Ashes (1975), the novelization by Edward Bryant of the teleplay for the pilot episode of The Starlost, which includes a lengthy afterword by Ellison describing what happened during production of the series. I, Robot is a collection of nine English language science fiction short stories by Isaac Asimov, first published by Gnome Press in 1950 in an edition of 5,000 copies. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Isaac Asimov (January 2?, 1920?[1] – April 6, 1992), pronounced , originally Исаак Озимов but now transcribed into Russian as Айзек Азимов [1], was a Russian-born American author and professor of biochemistry, a highly successful writer, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. ... The City on the Edge of Forever is a first season episode of Star Trek: The Original Series. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Roger Elwood (born 1933) is an American science fiction writer and editor. ... This article is about the year. ... A weekly newspaper is a publication that is published on a non-daily schedule - usually once a week, although twice-a-week papers are also common. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year 1987. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... James Coburn in Sam Peckinpahs Cross of Iron (1977). ... Our Man Flint is a 1966 action film which stars James Coburn as Derek Flint. ... This article is about the year 1987. ... This article is about the year. ... The Whimper of Whipped Dogs has been used as the title for two unrelated works by author Harlan Ellison. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Young Lawyers was a television drama that was aired in the United States by the ABC network as part of its 1970-71 lineup. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Young Lawyers was a television drama that was aired in the United States by the ABC network as part of its 1970-71 lineup. ... F&SF April 1971, special Poul Anderson issue. ... Harlan Ellisons Watching Harlan Ellisons Watching (ISBN 0887330673) is a 1989 compilation of 25 years worth of essays and film reviews written by Harlan Ellison for Cinema magazine, the Los Angeles Free Press, Starlog magazine, and The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction among others. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... The Starlost was a Canadian-produced science fiction television series devised by writer Harlan Ellison and broadcast in 1973 on CTV in Canada and on NBC in the United States. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Edward Winslow Bryant Jr. ... The Starlost was a Canadian-produced science fiction television series devised by writer Harlan Ellison and broadcast in 1973 on CTV in Canada and on NBC in the United States. ...


Anthologies edited

Dangerous Visions (ISBN 0-425-06176-0) was a path-breaking science fiction short story anthology edited by Harlan Ellison and published in 1967. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dangerous Visions was a path-breaking science fiction short story anthology edited by Harlan Ellison and published in 1967. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Harry Clement Stubbs (May 30, 1922 - October 29, 2003), better known by the pen name Hal Clement, was an American science fiction writer, a leader of the subgenre hard science fiction. ... Frank Patrick Herbert (October 8, 1920 – February 11, 1986) was a critically acclaimed and commercially successful American science fiction author. ... Ursula Kroeber Le Guin [ˌɜɹsələ ˌkɹobɜɹ ləˈgWɪn] (born October 21, 1929) is an American author. ... Theodore Sturgeon (February 26, 1918 Staten Island, New York – May 8, 1985) was an American science fiction author. ... At the 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005 Robert Silverberg (January 15, 1935, Brooklyn, New York) is a prolific American author best known for writing science fiction, a multiple winner of both the Hugo and Nebula Awards. ...

Selected short stories

The Avengers is a superhero team that appear in the fictional Marvel Universe. ... Incredible Hulk, The Hulk and The Incredible Hulk redirect here. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... A Boy and His Dog is a 1975 post-apocalyptic science fiction film directed by L. Q. Jones and based on the Harlan Ellison short story of the same title, which originally appeared in 1969. ... The Deathbird is a well-known novelette by Harlan Ellison. ... This is a short story giving an idea of how some people live forever. ... A series of extremely short stories on abstract and basically unrelated topics (similar to The Region Between). Categories: Literary stubs ... For the 1995 computer game, see I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream (computer game). ... The CD-ROM (an abbreviation for Compact Disc Read-Only Memory (ROM)) is a non-volatile optical data storage medium using the same physical format as audio compact discs, readable by a computer with a CD-ROM drive. ... Jeffty Is Five is a science fiction short story written by Harlan Ellison, first published in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction in 1977. ... In Harlan Ellisons 1969 anthology, Dangerous Visions, he presents a collection of several different views of science fiction and fantasy, through 34 authors (himself included). ... Repent, Harlequin! Said the Ticktockman is a short story by speculative fiction writer Harlan Ellison. ... Shatterday is an episode of the television series The New Twilight Zone. ... The New Twilight Zone is the popular nickname for the 1985 revival of Rod Serlings acclaimed 1950/60s television series, The Twilight Zone; it was officially titled the same as the original. ... List of The Outer Limits episodes Soldier is an episode of the original The Outer Limits television show. ... The Outer Limits is an American television series. ... This article is about the first film in the series. ... The Outer Limits is an American television series. ... Demon with a Glass Hand is a widely referenced episode of The Outer Limits television series, based on a script by Harlan Ellison. ... For other persons named James Cameron, see James Cameron (disambiguation). ... The Whimper of Whipped Dogs has been used as the title for two unrelated works by author Harlan Ellison. ... The Dragon on the Bookshelf is a short story by Harlan Ellison and Robert Silverberg. ... Grail may refer to: Holy Grail Grail (web browser) The grail community of Pinner, England is a group of Catholic women, who have translated the Psalms in a renowned version. ...

Recent uncollected stories

Since the publication of the author's last collection of previously uncollected stories, Slippage (1997), Ellison has published the following works of fiction: This article is about the short story collection by Harlan Ellison. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...

  • Objects of Desire in the Mirror are Closer Than They Appear (1999) (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction October/November issue)
  • The Toad Prince or, Sex Queen of the Martian Pleasure-Domes (1999) (Amazing Stories issue 600)
  • From A to Z, In the Sarsaparilla Alphabet (2001) (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction February issue)
  • Incognita, Inc. (2001) (Realms of Fantasy August issue)
  • Never Send to Know for Whom the Lettuce Wilts (2002) (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction January issue)
  • Goodbye to All That (2002) (McSweeney's Mammoth Treasury of Thrilling Tales anthology edited by Michael Chabon)
  • Loose Cannon, or Rubber Duckies from Space (2004) (Amazing Stories issue 603)
  • Prologue to the Endeavor: Luck be a Lady Tonight (2006) (The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction September issue)

NOTES: Objects... was later included in the 2001 revised and expanded edition of The Essential Ellison. From A to Z... was later scheduled to be included in Deathbird Stories: 25th Anniversary Edition. This edition never appeared. The Toad Prince,... is a novelette which, according to the author's afterword, was originally written in the early-90s. Incognita, Inc. was commissioned the previous year by Hemispheres, the inflight magazine of United Airlines. It was also reprinted in 2001 in The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror: Fourteenth Annual Collection edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling and most recently in 2007 in Summer Chills edited by Stephen Jones. Never Send to Know... is a heavily revised, expanded and retitled version of an Ellison story originally published in 1956. It was also included in the 2001 reprint collection Troublemakers. Goodbye to All That was originally written in the mid-90s for the Harlan Ellison's Dream Corridor comic series, but was not included at the time due to the series ceasing publication. It was finally incorporated into the series in March 2007 as part of Harlan Ellison's Dream Corridor: Volume Two. Loose Cannon is a 200 word piece of flash fiction accompanied by an 800 word introduction by Neil Gaiman as part of the magazine's series of 1,000 words inspired by a painting. Luck be a Lady Tonight is an article in which Ellison sets down the challenge of adapting an idea of his into a short story; an idea which Ellison himself was unable over the years to turn into a work of fiction. Three writers were ultimately commissioned by the magazine's editor and their stories appeared in the same issue alongside Ellison's essay of proposal.[4] Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... This article is about the year. ... This article is about the year. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Michael Chabon (born May 24, 1963) is an American author and one of the most celebrated writers of his generation. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... United Airlines is a major airline of the United States. ... Ellen Datlow (born 1949) is an American speculative fiction editor and anthologist. ... Terri Windling is an influential fantasy editor, artist, essayist, and author of the novel The Wood Wife (1996), winner of the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for best novel. ... Stephen Jones (musician), musician and video artist (see Severed Heads) Stephen Jones (Baby Bird), aka Baby Bird, British musician and novelist Stephen Jones (geneticist), Canadian Geneticist Stephen Jones (attorney), Republican activist and attorney, defended Harawese Moore and Timothy McVeigh in court. ... // Flash fiction is fiction characterized by its extreme brevity, as measured by its length in words. ... Neil Richard Gaiman (IPA: ) (born November 10, 1960[2]) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ...


Graphic story adaptations

Harlan Ellison's Dream Corridor #5 the cover inspired the story "The Museum On Cyclops Avenue"

Several stories have been adapted and collected into comic book stories for Dark Horse Comics. They can be found in two volumes. For each issue of the comic there was a new original story based on the cover. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

  • New stories (partial list)
    • "The Museum on Cyclops Avenue"
    • "Chatting with Anubis"

Computer games

I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream was a critically acclaimed adventure game based upon Harlan Ellison’s class short story of the same name about an evil computer named AM that has destroyed all of humanity except for five people he has been keeping alive and torturing for...

Audio recordings (selection)

First released in 1983 as an extremely limited edition vinyl album, On The Road With Ellison Volume 1 was reissued on CD in 2001 by Deep Shag Records. ... Deep Shag Records is a CD reissue label started in 1999 in Atlanta, GA. The label has an eclectic selection of releases, including 80s new wave, spoken word, comedy, 80s metal and psychobilly cowpunk. ... Released in 2004 by Deep Shag Records, On The Road With Ellison Volume 2 is a collection of humorous and thought provoking moments from the vaults of Harlan Ellison. ... Deep Shag Records is a CD reissue label started in 1999 in Atlanta, GA. The label has an eclectic selection of releases, including 80s new wave, spoken word, comedy, 80s metal and psychobilly cowpunk. ... Released in 2007 by Deep Shag Records, On The Road With Ellison Volume 3 is a collection of humorous and thought provoking moments from the vaults of Harlan Ellison. ... Deep Shag Records is a CD reissue label started in 1999 in Atlanta, GA. The label has an eclectic selection of releases, including 80s new wave, spoken word, comedy, 80s metal and psychobilly cowpunk. ...

Memoirs

On the May 30, 2008 broadcast of the PRI radio program Studio 360, Ellison announced that he had signed with a "major publisher" to produce his memoirs. The tentative title is Working Without A Net. Public Radio International (PRI) is a Minneapolis-based American public radio organization, with locations in Boston, New York, and London. ... Studio 360 is a national American public weekly radio program about arts and culture hosted by Kurt Andersen and produced by Public Radio International and WNYC in New York City. ...


Dreams with Sharp Teeth (Film)

On Thursday, 19 April 2007, Dreams with Sharp Teeth, a new film by the producers of Werner Herzog’s “Grizzly Man,” received its first public screening at the Writers Guild Theatre in Los Angeles. [24] is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Werner Herzog (born Werner Stipetić on September 5, 1942) is a critically and internationally acclaimed German film director, screenwriter, actor, and opera director. ... Grizzly Man is a 2005 documentary film by German director Werner Herzog. ...


In 1981, then-24-year-old producer Erik Nelson began shooting footage of Ellison while the author was at work on his typewriter. The footage was meant for a PBS segment set to air in March of that year. Ellison allowed Nelson to repeatedly film and interview him over subsequent years, stating that he thought Nelson to be "a fan working on a student project", and has stated that he never suspected that the film would amount to a serious production on such a professional level. Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ...


The result of those sessions, and subsequent sessions spanning decades from the original, have been culled and edited, with additions from contemporaries of Ellison into what has become a documentary following a rough arc of Ellison’s life and activities.


The film's screenings have been met with critical acclaim by contemporaries of llison and Nelson[citation needed], and the production company is currently searching for distribution to bring it to a larger audience.


Awards won

(Paragraph repeated from above; for accompanying links, see first iteration.)


He has won the Hugo Award eight and a half times; the Nebula Award three times; the Bram Stoker Award, presented by the Horror Writers Association, five times (including the Lifetime Achievement Award in 1996); the Edgar Award of the Mystery Writers of America twice; the Georges Méliès fantasy film award twice; and was awarded the Silver Pen for Journalism by International PEN, the international writers' union. He was presented with the first Living Legend Award by the International Horror Guild at the 1995 World Horror Convention. He is also the only author in Hollywood ever to win the Writers Guild of America Award for Most Outstanding Teleplay (solo work) four times, most recently for "Paladin of the Lost Hour" in 1987. In March 1998, the National Women's Committee of Brandeis University honored him with their 1998 Words, Wit, Wisdom award. In 1990, Ellison was honored by International PEN for continuing commitment to artistic freedom and the battle against censorship. Some of the specific occasions are listed below.


Bradbury award

The Bradbury Award was given by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America in 2000 to Harlan Ellison and Yuri Rasovsky for the radio series 2000X. Bradbury can refer to several places and people. ... Science Fiction Writers of America, or SFWA (pronounced // or //), was founded in 1965 by Damon Knight. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... 2000X is a dramatic anthology series released by NPR and produced by The Hollywood Theater of the Ear. ...


Bram Stoker Award

  • The Essential Ellison (best collection, 1987)
  • Harlan Ellison's Watching (best non-fiction, 1989 — tie)
  • Mefisto in Onyx (best novella, 1993 — tie)
  • Chatting With Anubis (best short story, 1995)
  • Life achievement award, 1995
  • I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream (best other media — audio, 1999)

The Bram Stoker Award is a recognition presented by the Horror Writers Association (HWA) for superior achievement in horror writing. ... Harlan Ellisons Watching Harlan Ellisons Watching (ISBN 0887330673) is a 1989 compilation of 25 years worth of essays and film reviews written by Harlan Ellison for Cinema magazine, the Los Angeles Free Press, Starlog magazine, and The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction among others. ... For the 1995 computer game, see I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream (computer game). ...

Hugo Award

The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ... Repent, Harlequin! Said the Ticktockman is a short story by speculative fiction writer Harlan Ellison. ... For the 1995 computer game, see I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream (computer game). ... The City on the Edge of Forever is a first season episode of Star Trek: The Original Series. ... Dangerous Visions (ISBN 0-425-06176-0) was a path-breaking science fiction short story anthology edited by Harlan Ellison and published in 1967. ... Dangerous Visions was a path-breaking science fiction short story anthology edited by Harlan Ellison and published in 1967. ... The Deathbird is a well-known novelette by Harlan Ellison. ... A Boy and His Dog is a 1975 post-apocalyptic science fiction film directed by L. Q. Jones and based on the Harlan Ellison short story of the same title, which originally appeared in 1969. ... L.Q. Jones (born August 19, 1927 in Beaumont, Texas) is an American character actor and film director, best-known for his work in the films of Sam Peckinpah. ... Jeffty Is Five is a science fiction short story written by Harlan Ellison, first published in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction in 1977. ... Paladin of the Lost Hour is a novelette and an episode of the television series The New Twilight Zone both written by Harlan Ellison. ...

Locus Poll Award

  • The Region Between (best short fiction, 1970)
  • Basilisk (best short fiction, 1972)
  • Again, Dangerous Visions (best anthology, 1972)
  • The Deathbird (best short fiction, 1974)
  • Adrift Just Off the Islets of Langerhans: Latitude 38° 54' N, Longitude 77° 00' 13" W (best novelette, 1975)
  • Croatoan (best short story, 1976)
  • Jeffty Is Five (best short story, 1978)
  • Count the Clock That Tells the Time (best short story, 1979)
  • Djinn, No Chaser (best novellette, 1983)
  • Sleepless Nights in the Procrustean Bed (best related non-fiction, 1985)
  • Medea - Harlan's World|Medea: Harlan's World (best anthology, 1986)
  • Paladin of the Lost Hour (best novelette, 1986)
  • With Virgil Oddum at the East Pole (best short story, 1986)
  • Angry Candy (best collection, 1989)
  • The Function of Dream Sleep (best novellette, 1989)
  • Eidolons (best short story, 1989)
  • Mefisto in Onyx (best novella, 1994)
  • Slippage (best collection, 1998)

The Locus Awards are presented to winners of Locus Magazines annual readers poll, which was established in the early 70s specifically to provide recommendations and suggestions to Hugo Awards voters. ... Dangerous Visions was a path-breaking science fiction short story anthology edited by Harlan Ellison and published in 1967. ... The Deathbird is a well-known novelette by Harlan Ellison. ... In this short story by Harlan Ellison, the narrator is forced by a hysterical girlfriend to go into the sewers to find her aborted child, which he had just flushed into New Yorks sewers. ... Jeffty Is Five is a science fiction short story written by Harlan Ellison, first published in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction in 1977. ... Angry Candy is a 1998 collection of short stories by Harlan Ellison that is loosely organized around the theme of death. ... This article is about the short story collection by Harlan Ellison. ...

Nebula Award

The Nebula is an award given each year by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), for the best science fiction/fantasy fiction published in the United States during the two previous years (see rolling eligibility below). ... Repent, Harlequin! Said the Ticktockman is a short story by speculative fiction writer Harlan Ellison. ... A Boy and His Dog is a 1975 post-apocalyptic science fiction film directed by L. Q. Jones and based on the Harlan Ellison short story of the same title, which originally appeared in 1969. ... Jeffty Is Five is a science fiction short story written by Harlan Ellison, first published in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction in 1977. ... The Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award is an award given by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. ... Location in Maricopa County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: Country United States State Arizona Counties Maricopa Incorporated November 29, 1894 Government  - Mayor Hugh Hallman Area  - City  39. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Additional reading

William F. Nolan is one of The Group of United States science fiction authors responsible for most of the scripts for the television show The Twilight Zone. ...

Parodies and pastiches of Ellison

Ellison is such a distinctive personality that many other science-fiction authors have inserted characters into their works who are thinly-disguised parodies of Ellison the man; some of these parodies are good-natured, while others are hostile.


One of the more benevolent parodies of Ellison is the main character in a mystery novel by an author who is better known for science fiction: Murder at the A.B.A. by Isaac Asimov (The title refers to the annual convention of the American Booksellers Association). The novel's main character and narrator is an author named "Darius Just", who finds himself serving as an amateur sleuth to solve the murder of a fellow author at the convention. Asimov intended the name "Darius Just" as a pun on "Dry As Dust", and the protagonist is a slightly exaggerated pastiche of Ellison himself. Ellison has objected to the depiction: Darius Just is only five feet (1.52 m) tall, whereas Ellison is four inches (10 cm) taller at about 5 ft 4 in (1.63 m). Just reappears in the Black Widowers mystery short story "The Woman in the Bar", which is unrelated to the novel, and after Asimov's death in the pastiche "The Last Story" by Charles Ardai. Mystery fiction is a distinct subgenre of detective fiction that entails the occurrence of an unknown event which requires the protagonist to make known (or solve). ... Murder at the ABA (1976) is a mystery novel by Isaac Asimov, following the adventures of a writer and amateur detective named Darius Just (whom Asimov modeled on his friend Harlan Ellison). ... Isaac Asimov (January 2?, 1920?[1] – April 6, 1992), pronounced , originally Исаак Озимов but now transcribed into Russian as Айзек Азимов [1], was a Russian-born American author and professor of biochemistry, a highly successful writer, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. ... The American Booksellers Association is a non-profit industry association founded in 1900 that promotes independent bookstores. ... A protagonist is the main figure of a piece of literature or drama and has the main part or role. ... Starting in 1971, Isaac Asimov wrote a series of mystery short stories about a men-only dinner club called the Black Widowers. ... The word pastiche describes a literary or other artistic genre. ... Charles Ardai (born 1969) is an entrepreneur, writer, and editor. ...


Ben Bova's comic-SF novel The Starcrossed was inspired by Ellison's and Bova's experience on the Canada-produced miniseries The Starlost. In Bova's novel, a 3D television projection system has been developed, and a new show is produced to encourage people to buy the new sets. The producers hire a famous writer named Ron Gabriel to write the show; the character is a thinly disguised Ellison. Although Bova is a friend of Ellison's, and his portrayal of Gabriel is admiring and sympathetic, the novel is broad comedy, and should not be read as a true roman a clef. Ellison has given his own non-fiction account of his Starlost experience in a lengthy essay titled "Somehow, I Don't Think We're in Kansas, Toto". Benjamin William Bova (born November 8, 1932) is an American science fiction author and editor. ... The Starlost was a Canadian-produced science fiction television series devised by writer Harlan Ellison and broadcast in 1973 on CTV in Canada and on NBC in the United States. ... A roman clef or roman (French for novel with a key) is a novel describing real-life events behind a fa ade of fiction. ...


Ellison was paid a bizarre homage by writer Mike Friedrich and artist Dick Dillin in the May 1971 issue of the comic book Justice League of America. In a hallucinatory story called "The Most Dangerous Dreams of All," the literary efforts of a flashy, insecure writer named Harlequin Ellis somehow become reality for the members of the JLA. Mike Friedrich is an American comic book writer and publisher best known for his work at Marvel and DC Comics, and for publishing the anthology series Star*Reach one of the first independent comics. ... Richard Allen Dick Dillin (b. ... The Justice League is a DC Comics superhero team. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


In the Ron Goulart novel Galaxy Jane, a birdman character by the name of Harlan Grzyb (author of I Have No Perch But I Must Sing and editor of Dangerous Birdcages) rages about the terrible things others have done to his script for the film Galaxy Jane. Ron Goulart (born 1933) is an American pop-culture historian and mystery, fantasy, and science fiction author. ...


In The Dark Knight Returns, Frank Miller featured Ellison by name as a television talking head. His only dialog is elliptical, prophesying a world where "[we'll] be eating our own babies for breakfast." Ellison and Miller are friends, the latter drawing the cover and writing the introduction for the stand-alone publication of Mefisto in Onyx. The Dark Knight Returns (commonly abbreviated to DKR) is a superhero comic book story published by DC Comics between 1985 and 1986, starring Batman and was written and drawn by Frank Miller. ... This article is about Frank Miller, the comic book writer and artist and movie writer and director. ... Talking head can refer to: In Sex Toys, the Talking Headâ„¢ Vibrator is a rabbit vibrator with MP3 playback and voice recording capability. ...


In a somewhat less sympathetic vein, Ellison serves as a partial basis for a composite character in Sharyn McCrumb's Bimbos of the Death Sun. The novel is a satirical look at Science Fiction and Fantasy fandom and Conventions. Sharyn McCrumb (born Sharyn Elaine Arwood February 26, 1948, Wilmington, North Carolina) is an American writer whose books celebrate the history and folklore of Appalachia. ... Bimbos of the Death Sun is a 1988 mystery novel by Sharyn McCrumb. ... Fandom (from the noun fan and the affix -dom, as in kingdom, dukedom, etc. ...


David Gerrold, in his 1980 Star Trek novel The Galactic Whirlpool, makes mention of "Ellison's Star," a particularly unpredictable and "angry" White Dwarf star. David Gerrold, born Jerrold David Friedman (January 24, 1944), in Chicago, Illinois, is an award-winning science fiction author who started his career in 1966 as a college student by submitting an unsolicited story outline for the television series Star Trek. ... This article is about the entire Star Trek franchise. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


In an episode of the animated television show Freakazoid! entitled "And Fanboy is His Name," Freakazoid offers Fanboy "his very own Harlan Ellison" (as a slow, slightly dischordant version of For He's A Jolly Good Fellow plays on the soundtrack) in an attempt to convince Fanboy to stop following him. Steven Spielberg presents Freakazoid! is an American animated television series, produced by Amblin Entertainment and Warner Bros. ... For Hes A Jolly Good Fellow is a British and American song which is sung to congratulate a person on a significant event, such as a retirement. ...


In the 1970s, students at the University of Michigan produced a narrated slide show called "The City on the Edge of Whatever," which was a spoof of "The City on the Edge of Forever." Occasionally screened at Star Trek conventions, it featured an irate writer named "Arlan Hellison" who screamed at his producers, "Art defilers! Script assassins!" The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, U-M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan. ... Slideshow is a modern concatenation of Slide Show. A slideshow is a display of a series of chosen images, which is done for artistic or instructional purposes. ...


Yet another Ellison-character appears throughout a 1971 novel by David Gerrold and Larry Niven, The Flying Sorcerers. The pantheon of gods in this delightful and zany story are all named after various SF writers. Ellison becomes Elcin, "The small, but mighty god of thunder" who will "Rain lightning down upon the heads" of those who "deny the power of the gods". David Gerrold, born Jerrold David Friedman (January 24, 1944), in Chicago, Illinois, is an award-winning science fiction author who started his career in 1966 as a college student by submitting an unsolicited story outline for the television series Star Trek. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


References

  1. ^ Ellison, Harlan (July 23, 2002). Harlan Ellison's "I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream": A Study Guide from Gale's "Short Stories for Students". The Gale Group, 27. 
  2. ^ Levy, Michael (November 2002). "Books in Review, "Of Stories and the Man."". Science Fiction Studies 29 (Part 3). 
  3. ^ Salm, Arthur. "Dangerous visions", San Diego Union-Tribune, 2005-03-20. Retrieved on 2007-09-03. 
  4. ^ Theodore Sturgeon, in his Introduction to "i have no mouth and i must scream", Pyramid Paperback, April, 1967, final paragraph, in which he describes H.E. as: "...a man on the move, and he is moving fast. He is, on these pages and everywhere else he goes, colorful, intrusive, ABRASIVE... and one hell of a writer".
  5. ^ James Cameron
  6. ^ SCIFI.COM | The Outer Limits
  7. ^ SCIFI.COM | The Outer Limits
  8. ^ Repent, Harlan! or James Cameron was Wobbed. Pulp and Dagger (November 21, 2004). Retrieved on 2008-02-22.
  9. ^ "ConFrancisco Continued" (November 1993). Ansible 76. ISSN 0265-9816. 
  10. ^ "Infinitely Improbable" (December 1993). Ansible 77. ISSN 0265-9816. 
  11. ^ a b Priest, Christopher. THE LAST DEADLOSS VISIONS (TXT). Retrieved on 2006-03-11.
  12. ^ from Harlan Ellison's introduction to I Robot: The Illustrated Screenplay, ISBN 0-446-67062-6
  13. ^ Cusack, Richard. BUGFUCK! (TXT). Retrieved on 2006-07-30.
  14. ^ "The Ellison Appreciation Society" (December 1993). Ansible 77. ISSN 0265-9816. 
  15. ^ The Insanity Offense (HTM). Retrieved on 2007-03-01.
  16. ^ Harlan Ellison sues Fantagraphics (HTM). Retrieved on 2007-03-01.
  17. ^ IT IS FINISHED (HTM). Retrieved on 2007-08-01.
  18. ^ Feud shoe waiting to drop (HTM). Retrieved on 2007-08-01.
  19. ^ You Boys Play Nice Now (HTM).
  20. ^ Sanderson, Larry. Hugo Awards - Harlan and Connie - 2006 (HTM). Retrieved on 2006-09-03.
  21. ^ Unca Harlan's Art Deco Pavilion: Archives
  22. ^ Patrick Nielsen Hayden - LAcon IV
  23. ^ Ellison, Harlan. Unca Harlan's Art Deco Dining Pavilion (HTM). Retrieved on 2006-09-20.
  24. ^ Dreams with Sharp Teeth | Documentary Films .NET

The San Diego Union-Tribune is a daily newspaper published in San Diego, California by the Copley Press. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

  • Leigh Blackmore, Ellison/Dowling/Dann: A Bibliographic Checklist (R'lyeh Texts, 1996).

This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...

See also

This is a list of some (not all notable) authors in the horror fiction genre. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Harlan Ellison
  • Ellison Webderland Official website
  • Harlan Ellison Islets of Langerhans
  • The Ellison Bulletin Board Discussion forum
  • Radio Interview on Comic Zone
  • Darkhorse comics titles
  • Harlan Ellison at the Internet Movie Database
  • Harlan Ellison article at Memory Alpha, a Star Trek wiki
  • Urban Legends Reference Pages: Disney (Harlan Ellison)
  • Harlan Ellison at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database
  • |2000X website
  • Harlan Ellison @ Deep Shag Records
  • Review of Dreams With Sharp Teeth documentary
  • excerpt from Dreams With Sharp Teeth, Harlan Ellison On Getting Paid
  • The Onion A.V. Club Interview, Part One
  • The Onion A.V. Club Interview, Part Two
Preceded by
Dennis O'Neil
Daredevil writer
1984
(with Arthur Byron Cover)
Succeeded by
Dennis O'Neil
Persondata
NAME Ellison, Harlan Jay
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Bird, Cordwainer; Nosille, Nalrah
SHORT DESCRIPTION American science fiction author, screenwriter, noted futurist
DATE OF BIRTH May 27, 1934 (1934-05-27) (age 74)
PLACE OF BIRTH Cleveland, Ohio
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... This article is about the website. ... This article is about the entire Star Trek franchise. ... Wiki wiki redirects here. ... The Internet Speculative Fiction Database is a database of bibliographic information on science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction. ... Dennis Denny ONeil is a comic book writer and editor, principally for Marvel Comics and DC Comics in the 1970s, 80s, and 90s, and Group Editor for the Batman family of books until his retirement. ... For other uses, see Daredevil (comics). ... Arthur Byron Cover (born 1950) is a science fiction author. ... Dennis Denny ONeil is a comic book writer and editor, principally for Marvel Comics and DC Comics in the 1970s, 80s, and 90s, and Group Editor for the Batman family of books until his retirement. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cleveland redirects here. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Deep Shag® Records - Harlan Ellison (1101 words)
Ellison worked as a consultant and host for the radio series 2000X, a series of 26 one-hour dramatized radio adaptations of famous SF stories for The Hollywood Theater of the Ear.
Ellison’s classic story “‘Repent, Harlequin!’ Said the Ticktockman” was included as part of this significant series, starring Robin Williams, with the author in the role of Narrator.
Harlan Ellison was awarded the Ray Bradbury Award For Drama Series: For Program Host and Creative Consultant: NPR Presentation of 2000X.
Harlan Ellison - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3375 words)
Ellison was drafted into the army and served from 1957 to 1959.
Ellison settled for several hundred thousand dollars, and the film's end credits now include the simple statement: "Acknowledgement to the works of Harlan Ellison." The episodes in question were called "Soldier" and "Demon with a Glass Hand".
Ellison has said, in interviews and in his writing, that his version of the pseudonym was meant to mean "a shoemaker for birds".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m