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Encyclopedia > Hard and soft G

A hard g vs a soft g is a feature that occurs in many languages, including English, in which there are two sounds both represented by the letter "g". A hard g is a velar stop /g/ represented by "g", and a soft g is an affricate /dʒ/ or a fricative /ʒ/ or something else represented by "g", too. The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A velar stop or velar plosive is a type of consonant. ... An affricate is a consonant that begins like a stop (most often an alveovelar, such as [t] or [d]) and that doesnt have a release of its own, but opens directly into a fricative (or, in one language, into a trill). ... Note: This page contains phonetic information presented in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) using Unicode. ...


English

In English, the hard g is the sound of the "g" /g/ in "get", "give" and "gallon", as distinct from the soft "g" /dʒ/ in "gentle" and "giant". The soft g usually occurs when the "g" comes before the letters "e", "i" and "y" (with notable exceptions), while the hard "g" can occur anywhere.


Other languages

In French, "g" has a hard form /g/ that occurs before "a", "o" and "u", like in English, and a soft "g" which is /ʒ/ which occurs before "e", "i" and "y". The phoneme /g/ can occur before "e", "i" and "y" by putting a "u" after it (e.g. "gentil" /ʒɔ̃ti/, "guerre" /gɛʁ/. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In Luganda, "g" has a hard form /g/ that occurs before "a", "e", "o", "u" and "w", and a soft "g" /dʒ/ which occurs before "i" and "y". To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


References


     
     

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