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Encyclopedia > Harald Harefoot
Harold Harefoot
King of England
Reign November 12, 1035March 17, 1040
Born c. 1015
Died March 17, 1040
England
Buried St Clement Danes Church, Westminster
Predecessor Canute the Great
Successor Harthacanute
Father Canute the Great
Mother Ælgifu

Harold Harefoot, also Harold I, (c. 1015–March 17, 1040) was King of England from 1035 to 1040. He was said to be the son of Canute the Great, King of England, of Denmark, of Norway, some of Sweden, by his handfast wife Aelgifu of Northampton, although there was some skepticism that he was Canute's son.[1] He earned the name "Harefoot" for his speed, and the skill of his huntsmanship.[citation needed] November 12 is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 49 days remaining. ... Events Harthacanute becomes king of Denmark. ... March 17 is the 76th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (77th in Leap years). ... Events March War of Independence of Western Xia occurred. ... March 17 is the 76th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (77th in Leap years). ... Events March War of Independence of Western Xia occurred. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq... Italic textOranges and lemons! // Headline text St Clement Danes at night St Clement Danes is a church in the City of Westminster, London. ... Westminster is a district within the City of Westminster in London. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Harthacanute (sometimes Hardicanute, Hardecanute; Danish Hardeknud, Canute the Hardy) (1018/1019–June 8, 1042) was a King of Denmark (1035–1042) and England (1035–1037, 1040–1042). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Aelgifu (also called Aelfgifu or Elgifu or Aelfgitha) was the wife of Canute the Great in the 11th century. ... March 17 is the 76th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (77th in Leap years). ... Events March War of Independence of Western Xia occurred. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq... Events Harthacanute becomes king of Denmark. ... Events March War of Independence of Western Xia occurred. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Aelgifu (also called Aelfgifu or Elgifu or Aelfgitha) was the wife of Canute the Great in the 11th century. ...


Upon Canute's death (November 12, 1035), Harold's younger half-brother Harthacanute, the son of Canute and his queen, Emma of Normandy, was legitimate heir to the thrones of both the Danes and the English, but was unable to travel to his coronation, because his Danish kingdom was under threat of invasion by King Magnus I of Norway and King Anund Jacob of Sweden. England's magnates[2] favoured the idea of installing Harold Harefoot temporarily as regent, due to the difficulty of Harthacanute's absence, and despite the opposition of Godwin the Earl of Wessex and the Queen, they succeeded. November 12 is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 49 days remaining. ... Events Harthacanute becomes king of Denmark. ... Harthacanute (sometimes Hardicanute, Hardecanute; Danish Hardeknud, Canute the Hardy) (1018/1019–June 8, 1042) was a King of Denmark (1035–1042) and England (1035–1037, 1040–1042). ... Emma (c. ... This article is a list of rulers of Norway up until the present, including: The Norwegian kingdom (with the Faroe Islands) The Union with Iceland and Greenland (1262-1814) The Norwegian kingdom (with Iceland, Greenland and the Faroe Islands 1262-1814) The Union of Sweden and Norway (1319-1343) The... Magnus I (1024 - October 25, 1047) was a King of Norway (1035 - 1047) and king of Denmark (1042 - 1047). ... Sweden is a constitutional monarchy with a representative democracy based on a parliamentary system. ... Coin minted for Anund Jakob Anund Jakob (referred to as Emund Kolbränna during his time) was King of Sweden 1022-1050. ... // High public office A regent, from the Latin regens who reigns is anyone who acts as head of state, especially if not the monarch (who has higher titles). ... Godwin (sometimes Godwine) (c. ... The Earl of Wessex is an Earl in the English and later British nobility. ...


Harold survived an attempt to unseat him led by his half-brothers Alfred the Aetheling and Edward the Confessor, Emma's sons by the long-dead Ethelred the Unready, in 1036. Harold died at Oxford on March 17, 1040,[1] just as Harthacanute was preparing an invasion force of Danes, and was buried at the abbey of Westminster,[3], largely rebuilt by Edward the Confessor. His body was subsequently exhumed, beheaded, and thrown into a fen bordering the Thames when Harthacanute assumed the throne in June, 1040.[4] His supporters later rescued the body, to be buried in a church fittingly named St Clement Danes. Edward the Confessor or Eadweard III (c. ... Ethelred the Unready (c. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ... The Abbeys western façade The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to as Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral, in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... A fen is a sere, a phase in the natural ecological succession from the open water of a lake to (for example) woodland. ... The Thames River is the name of a river in Ontario, Canada and one in Connecticut, United States of America. ... Italic textOranges and lemons! // Headline text St Clement Danes at night St Clement Danes is a church in the City of Westminster, London. ...

Contents

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Assumes the throne

In 1037, Emma of Normandy fled to Bruges, in Flanders, and Harold "was everywhere chosen as king".[1] Harold himself is somewhat obscure; the historian Frank Stenton considered it probable that his mother Aelgifu was "the real ruler of England" for part or all of his reign.[5] Sometimes referred to as the Venice of the North, Bruges has many waterways that run through the city. ... Flanders (Dutch: Vlaanderen) has several main meanings: the social, cultural and linguistical, scientific and educational, economical and political community of the Flemings; some prefer to call this the Flemish community (others refer to this as the Flemish nation) which is, with over 6 million inhabitants, the majority of all Belgians... Sir Frank Merry Stenton (1880–September 15, 1967) was a noted 20th century historian of Anglo-Saxon England. ...


With the north at least on Harold's side, in adherance to the terms of a deal, which Godwin was part of, Emma was settled in Winchester, with Harthacanute's huscarls. Harold soon "sent and had taken from her all the best treasures" of Canute the Great[6], and the Kingdom of Enlgand was practically his. Winchester is a historic city in southern England, with a population of around 40,000 within a 3 mile radius of its centre. ... Housecarls were household troops, personal warriors and equivalent to a royal bodyguard to Scandinavian kings. ...


According to the Encomium Emmae, though, the Archbishop of Canterbury refused to crown Harold Harefoot. There is evidence that Aelgifu of Northampton was attempting to secure her son's position through bribes to the nobles.[3] Queen Emma of Normandy receiving the Encomium Emmae, with her sons Harthacanute and Edward the Confessor in the background. ... Arms of the see of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior clergyman of the established Church of England and symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ...

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Alfred and Edward's invasion

In 1036, Alfred the Aetheling, Emma's son by the long dead Ethelred, returned to the kingdom from exile in Normandy with his brother Edward the Confessor, with some show of arms. With his bodyguard, according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle he intended to visit his mother, Emma, in Winchester, but he may have made this journey for anything other than a family reunion. As the "murmur was very much in favour of Harold", Alfred was captured on the direction of Godwin, now apparently on Harold's side at this point, and the men loyal to Harefoot blinded him. He subsequently died soon after due to the severity of the wounds, his bodyguard similarly treated.[6] Ethelred the Unready (c. ... Mont Saint Michel, one of the famous symbols of Normandy. ... Edward the Confessor or Eadweard III (c. ...

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Offspring

Harold apparently had a son, Elfwine, who became a monk on the continent when he was older.[3] Aelfgifu of Northampton disappears with no trace at this space in time. According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Harold Harefoot ruled for 4 years and 16 weeks, by which calculation he would have begun ruling a fortnight after the death of Canute. [7] In J. R. R. Tolkiens Middle-earth legendarium, Elfwine the Fair was the nineteenth King of Rohan. ... A monk is a person who practices asceticism, the conditioning of mind and body in favor of the spirit. ... The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle is a collection of annals narrating the history of the English and their settlement in Britain. ...

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References

  1. ^ a b c The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, 1035–40, M. Swanton translation (1996).
  2. ^ "Earl Leofric and almost all the thegns north of the Thames, and the men of the fleet in London"
  3. ^ a b c
  4. ^ This may have been motivated partly in response to the murder of Alfred, Harthacanute's half-brother, and partly for his perceived theft of the crown.
  5. ^ Stenton, page 421.
  6. ^ a b Frank Stenton, Anglo-Saxon England, Oxford University Press (1998 paperback), pages 420–421; quoted segments from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.
  7. ^ ASC manuscript E, 1039 (1040); for the calculation, see Swanton's translation, page 161, note 18.
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External links

  • Harold Harefoot At Find A Grave
Preceded by:
Canute the Great
King of England
10351040
Succeeded by:
Harthacanute

 
 

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