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Encyclopedia > Happy Hardcore
Happy Hardcore
Stylistic origins
Cultural origins
Typical instruments
Mainstream popularity 1996 Medium
1999 Small
2006-present Medium-Strong
Subgenres
UK Hardcore, Freeform
Fusion genres
none
Other topics
Electronic musical instrumentComputer music

Happy hardcore is a form of dance music typified by a very fast tempo (usually around 165–180 BPM), often coupled with male or female vocals, and sentimental lyrics. Its characteristically 4/4 beat "happy" sound distinguishes it from most other forms of breakbeat hardcore, which tend to be "darker". In its original incarnation, it was often characterized by piano riffs, synth stabs and spacey effects. This genre of music is closely related to the typically Dutch genre of Gabber. Happy hardcore evolved from rave music around 19911993, as the original house music-based rave became faster and began to include breakbeats, evolving into breakbeat hardcore. Happy hardcore is a form of dance music typified by a very fast tempo (usually around 165–180 BPM), often coupled with male or female vocals, and sentimental lyrics. ... For other uses, see Rave (disambiguation). ... For the 1994 novel by Irvine Welsh, see The Acid House. ... Bouncy techno (also known as happy gabber, funcore, tartan techno- see terminology) is a rave hardcore dance music style that developed from around 1992, mostly emanating from the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. ... Gabber (IPA pronunciation: ), gabba, or hardcore, is a style of electronic music and a subgenre of hardcore techno. ... This article is about a music style. ... Synth redirects here. ... A Boss DR-202 Drum Machine A drum machine is an electronic musical instrument designed to imitate the sound of drums and/or other percussion instruments. ... In the field of electronic music, a sequencer was traditionally a device or piece of software that allows the user to record, play back and edit musical patterns. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... An AKAI MPC2000 sampler Playing a Yamaha SU10 Sampler A sampler is an electronic music instrument closely related to a synthesizer. ... This is a list of electronic music genres, sub-genres and styles, though for the latter, not all possess their own article (in which case, see the main genre article). ... UK Hardcore is a broad term to describe the evolved United Kingdom rave hardcore lineage 4/4-kick drum and breakbeat fueled sound, which emerged there around the start of the 1990s and grew in strength during the 21st century. ... Freeform Hardcore coming from its sister genre happy hardcore was introduced in 1999. ... Telharmonium, created by Thaddeus Cahill 1897 Luigi Russolo and his assistant Ugo Piatti with their Intonarumori, 1913 Léon Theremin and his Theremin, 1919 Trautonium, 1928 An electronic musical instrument is a musical instrument that produces its sounds using electronics. ... Computer music is music generated with, or composed with the aid of, computers. ... Dance music is music composed specifically to facilitate or accompany dancing. ... Beats per minute (bpm) is a unit typically used as either a measure of tempo in music, or a measure of ones heart rate. ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... The time signature (also known as meter signature) is a notational convention used in Western musical notation to specify how many beats are in each measure and what note value constitutes one beat. ... Breakbeat hardcore (popularly known as rave music, originally referred to as simply hardcore in the United Kingdom, with old school hardcore a common term in the 21st century) is a style of electronic music that primarily uses breakbeats for its rhythm lines. ... Pianoforte redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Gabber, gabba (pronounced gahba or gahbuhr in Dutch), or hardcore, is a subgenre of electronic music that is a subgenre of hardcore techno. ... For other uses, see Rave (disambiguation). ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... House music is a style of electronic dance music that was developed by dance club DJs in Chicago in the early to mid-1980s. ... Breakbeat hardcore (popularly known as rave music, originally referred to as simply hardcore in the United Kingdom, with old school hardcore a common term in the 21st century) is a style of electronic music that primarily uses breakbeats for its rhythm lines. ...


In the UK, happy hardcore was at its peak between 1994 and 1997. In the more recent past happy hardcore has made a large re-emergence into the mainstream, more specifically it has received coverage in Mixmag. It has spawned various new record labels in the United States, Canada, the UK, and Japan and continues to grow in popularity. In 2002, the compilation series Bonkers was relaunched after a 3 year hiatus and have proved to be successful, releasing eight compilations between 2002 and 2005. The 21st century sound of the genre is notable by the lack of the bouncy synths and piano lines that were trademarks of the genre in the 90s. The genre now has a more euphoric trance feel to it not too dissimilar to the sound of the late 90s trance that was popular in Ibiza at the time, albeit at a higher tempo. Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... March 2007 issue Mixmag styles itself as, the worlds biggest dance music and clubbing magazine, with a circulation of 41,757 and a readership of 304,000. ... In the music industry, a record label can be a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... The Bonkers series is the leading happy hardcore compilation series in the UK. The first release was in 1996 on record label React (now Resist), it was available on 2xCD or 2xTC formats. ...

Contents

Development of Happy Hardcore

By mid-to-late 1992, hardcore breakbeat was shifting to its darker elements. The "cheesier" elements of the hardcore scene (sped up vocals (sometimes pitched up), choruses, rolling piano lines, synth stabs, 'bouncy' kicks with slight distortion etc.), which were being blamed by the purists for the commercialization of the music, had started to be eliminated by the new breed of ravers, who wanted to take the music back to the underground with darker, more minimal tracks. Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ...


Some producers (Luna-C (who was one of the men behind the Smart E's), Slipmatt (of SL2), Red Alert & Mike Slammer, Brisk, DJ Vibes, Wishdokta, etc.), however, utilized these elements for their own sound. This pushed forward the genre so that there were now polyrhythmic breakbeats, half-speed dub-bass and no 4/4 kick drum (which attracted many black ravers, who promptly introduced MCs into the scene). But, apart from this, the E-rush of hardcore continued for quite some time, just as the music was still getting faster and faster. Dark side and the happier tunes were being played together at the same raves, the same pirate stations, etc. Born Christopher Howell, May 1, 1973, Luna-C is a DJ and producer, most well known for his work in hardcore music. ... Luna-C (born Christopher Howell), May 1, 1973, is a British DJ and record producer, known for his work in hardcore music. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... SL2 was the name of a popular and pioneering hardcore/rave outfit from London, England. ... DJ Vibes is from the United Kingdom and is a happy hardcore musician. ... Rap redirects here. ...


Slipmatt's "SMD #1" was quite a culture shock to most of the ravers. It was not euphoric and it was most definitely not dark. It increased the intensity of the happiest, cheesiest treble elements of rave and was loved by some and hated by many. It also reintroduced the 4/4 kick drum, had fewer snare breaks and a more techno-influenced bassline. It had a profound influence on the whole of the hardcore scene. After several months, the darker tunes were dying and being replaced by the bittersweet nature of ambient jungle/drum'n'bass. Some of the once happier tunes had darkened up a bit and turned the bass right up and ragga jungle and jump-up jungle itself had arrived. The other happy ravers (still using the jungle-style rhythms for a while) gradually took Slipmatt's lead and happy hardcore was born. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


By late 1994, happy hardcore had broken away from Jungle (which was now accepted by the mainstream) and had its own network of DJs (Slipmatt, DJ Force & Styles, Sy, Silvester & Wishdokta, DJ CJ, Hixxy, Brisk, Clarkee, SadSack, etc.) labels (Kniteforce, Slammin Vinyl) and clubs/raves (Die Hard, United Dance, Southern Exposure, Dreamscape, etc.) It was rejected by the dance mainstream and had its own media and pirate radio, plus heavy exposure through the Leeds-based radio station Kiss FM / Galaxy 105. Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... The Dielectric Club was a nightclub behind and below a snooker club at 37-43 Rutland Street Leicester LE1 1RE. It was situated over two floors and had a bar serving soft drinks (as no drinks licence was held). ... The term Pirate Radio usually refers to illegal or unregulated radio transmission. ...


In this course of time 19951997 the music was still evolving. There were now almost no breakbeats and the music had become faster and stompy, with a progressive rhythm often with a piano undertone. The scene was now set for the genre's merge with bouncy techno and 4-beat. Around 1999 various UK rave culture publications started announcing the largely mistaken "death" of Hardcore; many would argue that it had instead just gone back to its underground roots. Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Bouncy techno (also known as happy gabber, funcore, tartan techno- see terminology) is a rave hardcore dance music style that developed from around 1992, mostly emanating from the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. ... 4-beat (also known as hardcore or happy hardcore) is a breakbeat style of music circa 1993, that evolved from breakbeat hardcore emanating from the United Kingdom rave scene. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ...

Tiny Tot - Discoland (1995) Image File history File links Tiny_Tot_-_Discoland_(Raveland_Mix). ...

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Nakatomi - Children of the Night (1996) Image File history File links Nakatomi_-_Children_of_the_Night. ...

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Scott Brown - Elysium+ (2002) Image File history File links Scott_Brown_-_Elysium. ...

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Also around this time the UK Happy Hardcore had started taking influences from the mainstream trance tunes heard virtually everywhere. While this move attracted new listeners it also began to alienate some of its long time producers, many of which switched to producing Hard house or simply retired. It was this merging of trance influences with hardcore that caused the birth of a new genre Freeform Hardcore. This style of music blended the earlier dark influences, the breakbeats, as well as various trance influences. Freeform also created its own network of DJs and producers most noticeably CLSM, Sharkey, AMS, Kevin Energy. Hard house is a style of electronic music that evolved from mixing techno and house music in the 1990s. ... Freeform Hardcore coming from its sister genre happy hardcore was introduced in 1999. ... CLSM is an upfront hardcore group from the UK fronted by Jon Doe and Gavin Spong. ... Sharkey at a rave in Rochester, New York. ...


The Change

Happy Hardcore had a slow period of growth and popularity from 1998–2001 which can be seen in the number of happy hardcore artists and producers leaving happy hardcore for other genres of music and some record labels stopping production.


2001–2003 saw a revival, with the Trance sound that it had been strongly influenced with since its decline. With new clubs and DJs including the famous HTID, and later the BBC features, the new sound was really in the making within the bedrooms and studios in 2000–2001. The new tech is, needless to say, an unbelievable tribute to the original groundbreakers.


Although, during the revival the original sounds of Happy Hardcore were long gone, as the music had transformed into strong Trance-influenced music under the name of UK Hardcore. By 2005 there were elements of Happy Hardcore returning and it is growing stronger once again.


Artists, DJs and producers

Well known hardcore DJs who work together: Bang! were a British happy hardcore from the late 1990s consisting of producer Nick Arnold and female vocalist Jo James. ... DJ Dougal (real name Paul Clarke) is a happy hardcore artist. ... Grant Nelson Professor of Law Born Mitchell, South Dakota, 1939 B.A. University of Minnesota, 1960 J.D. University of Minnesota, 1963 UCLA Law faculty since 1991 Grant Nelson teaches Real Estate Finance, Advanced Real Estate Transactions, Property, Land Use Regulation, and Remedies. ... Ian Hicks, better known as DJ Hixxy, is a DJ and musician from Portsmouth, England. ... Sharkey at a rave in Rochester, New York. ... Scott Brown is one of the largest Hardcore trance producers, being around right from the start, and contributing to its evolution. ... Sy is the stage name of Simon Cranny, a British hardcore techno producer and DJ. He is known for his hardcore tunes but to begin with he was DJing hip-hop and house music back in 1989. ... Daydreaming redirects here. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Darren Styles, born Darren Mew (1975 in Colchester, Essex) is a British DJ, Record Producer and Song Writer, who achieved success touring at events such as Hardcore Heaven and Hardcore Paradise. ... Mark Breeze, also known as DJ Breeze (real name Mark Brady), is a happy hardcore producer based in the United Kingdom. ... Stu Allan is a British dance music DJ who worked for Piccadilly Radio and Key 103 in Manchester in the 1980s and 1990s. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Anabolic Frolic in a promotional photo. ... Music sample: Scooter are a successful German dance band, who have sold over 12 million records and have earned 60 gold and platinum awards. ...

  • Brisk & Ham
  • Sy & Unknown
  • Force & Styles / Force & The Evolution
  • Styles & Breeze

Darren Styles, born Darren Mew (1975 in Colchester, Essex) is a British DJ, Record Producer and Song Writer, who achieved success touring at events such as Hardcore Heaven and Hardcore Paradise. ... Mark Breeze, also known as DJ Breeze (real name Mark Brady), is a happy hardcore producer based in the United Kingdom. ...

See also

This is a list of electronic music genres, sub-genres and styles, though for the latter, not all possess their own article (in which case, see the main genre article). ... UK Hardcore is a broad term to describe the evolved United Kingdom rave hardcore lineage 4/4-kick drum and breakbeat fueled sound, which emerged there around the start of the 1990s and grew in strength during the 21st century. ...

External links

  • HappyHardcore.com
  • DanceNetRadio
  • Happy Hardcore Music Archive
Problems playing the files? See media help. ... Bouncy techno (also known as happy gabber, funcore, tartan techno- see terminology) is a rave hardcore dance music style that developed from around 1992, mostly emanating from the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. ... Breakbeat hardcore (popularly known as rave music, originally referred to as simply hardcore in the United Kingdom, with old school hardcore a common term in the 21st century) is a style of electronic music that primarily uses breakbeats for its rhythm lines. ... Breakcore is a genre of electronic dance music which uses rearranged, cut-up breakbeats to create extreme sounds. ... Digital hardcore is a music genre or style that was first defined by Alec Empire. ... Freeform Hardcore coming from its sister genre happy hardcore was introduced in 1999. ... Gabber (IPA pronunciation: ), gabba, or hardcore, is a style of electronic music and a subgenre of hardcore techno. ... Hardcore Breaks is a genre of electronic music written in the style of old skool rave music or breakbeat hardcore using modern technology. ... Mákina, Bakalao, and Poky are electronic music genres originated in Spain, similar in sound to UK Hardcore, but with certain elements of bouncy techno among and other differences. ... Industrial hardcore is a term used to describe the crossover of hardcore techno and rhythmic noise. ... Speedbass was a genre formed by a group of DJs, spinning a wide mix of genres. ... Speedcore is a form of hardcore techno that is typically identified by its high rate of beats per minute and aggressive themes. ... Terrorcore, terror (or in Dutch and French: terreur) is a music genre. ... Electronic dance music is a broad set of percussive music genres that largely inherit from 1970s disco music and, to some extent, the experimental pop music of Kraftwerk. ... This is a list of electronic music genres, sub-genres and styles, though for the latter, not all possess their own article (in which case, see the main genre article). ... Ambient music is a musical genre in which sound is more important than notes. ... This article is about breakbeat, the electronic dance music genre. ... Drum and bass (commonly abbreviated to d&b, DnB, dnb, dnb, drum n bass and drum & bass) is a type of electronic dance music also known as jungle. ... Electro, short for electro funk (also known as robot hip hop and Electro hop) is an electronic style of hip hop directly influenced by Kraftwerk and funk records (unlike earlier rap records which were closer to disco). ... Hardcore (sometimes ardcore) is a term that has been used to describe a variety of related electronic dance music styles over almost two decades. ... House music is a style of electronic dance music that was developed by dance club DJs in Chicago in the early to mid-1980s. ... Synthpop is a subgenre of New Wave in which the synthesizer is the dominant musical instrument. ... For the comic book character previously known as Techno, see Fixer (comics). ... Trance is a style of electronic music that developed in the 1990s. ... Trip hop (also known as the Bristol sound) is a term coined by United Kingdom dance magazine Mixmag, to describe a musical trend in the mid-1990s; trip hop is downtempo electronic music that grew out of Englands hip hop and house scenes. ... UK garage (also known as UKG or just garage) refers to several different varieties of modern electronic dance music generally connected to the evolution of house in the United Kingdom in the mid 1990s. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Hardcore gets happy on The Final Chapter (398 words)
Hardcore, the bad boy of techno music, surfaced in the late '80s and early '90s, and with the popularity of groups such as the Prodigy, the genre became all the rage in London.
One significant offshoot that evolved from hardcore is happy hardcore, which stands on the lighter side of its fiercer relatives.
Happy hardcore is repetitious and thrives on its ability to take listeners on a voyage of pure dance tracks it takes adrenaline and a love of dance to get into this album.
What Happy Hardcore is (1046 words)
Happy hardcore also features lots of break beats, although they are being dropped in favour of more techno sounds and stompy dutch inspired kicks.
Happy Hardcore is still on the 160, with loads of vocals and piano to lift it up and give it strength.
The reason for happy hardcore's tough climb to success on this side of the pond is mostly due to the unavailability of hardcore vinyl.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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