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Encyclopedia > Happy Chandler
Albert Benjamin "Happy" Chandler


In office
December 13, 1955 – December 8, 1959
Preceded by Lawrence W. Wetherby
Succeeded by Bert T. Combs

In office
1939 – 1945
Preceded by M. M. Logan
Succeeded by William A. Stanfill
Constituency Kentucky

In office
December 10, 1935 – October 9, 1939
Preceded by Ruby Laffoon
Succeeded by Keen Johnson

Born July 14, 1898
Corydon, Kentucky[1]
Died June 15, 1991 (aged 92)
Versailles, Kentucky
Political party Democrat[1]
Spouse Mildred Watkins-Chandler
Occupation Lawyer
Religion Episcopalian[2]

Albert Benjamin "Happy" Chandler, Sr. (July 14, 1898June 15, 1991) was twice governor of Kentucky, a U.S. Senator, the 2nd Commissioner of Major League Baseball, and a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame. His jovial attitude earned him the nickname "Happy," which stuck for the remainder of his life.[3] Senator Albert Chandler source File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This is a list of Governors of Kentucky: See also Kentucky Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Kentucky ... December 13 is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lawerence Winchester Wetherby (January 2, 1908 - March 27, 1994) served as Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky and as Governor of Kentucky upon the resignation of Governor Earle C. Clements as Clements went to the United States Senate. ... Bert T. Combs (August 13, 1911-December 4, 1991),born in Clay County, Kentucky, was the Democratic Governor of Kentucky from 1959 through 1963. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Marvel Mills Logan (January 7, 1874 - October 3, 1939), a Democrat, served as a member of the United States Senate from Kentucky. ... William Abner Stanfill (January 16, 1892 - June 12, 1971) was briefly a member of the United States Senate from Kentucky. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... This is a list of Governors of Kentucky: See also Kentucky Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Kentucky ... December 10 is the 344th day (345th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, 21 days before the next year. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ruby Laffoon (15th January, 1869 - 01 March 1941) was a Democratic Governor of Kentucky from 1931 - 1935. ... Keen Johnson (January 12, 1896 - February 7, 1970) served as Governor of Kentucky 1939-1943. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Corydon is a city located in Henderson County, Kentucky. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Versailles is a city located in Woodford County, Kentucky. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... A lawyer, according to Blacks Law Dictionary, is a person learned in the law; as an attorney, counsel or solicitor; a person licensed to practice law. ... This article is about the Episcopal Church in the United States. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... This is a list of Governors of Kentucky: See also Kentucky Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Kentucky ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... In 1920, the owners of Major League Baseball, in order to reestablish confidence of fans in the sport following the Black Sox Scandal, established the office of Commissioner of Baseball. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related...


Chandler's first term as governor is still regarded as one of the most productive of any Kentucky governor.[4] Following on this success, he unsuccessfully tried to unseat Senate Majority Leader and fellow Kentuckian Alben Barkley, but was appointed to the Senate shortly after the election due to the death of the state's junior senator. He would later resign this position to become Commissioner of Baseball, steering it through the difficult period of integration, which many concede led to his not being offered a second contract for the position. Instead, twenty years after his first term as governor of Kentucky, Chandler returned to the Governor's Mansion using the slogan "Be Like Your Pappy and Vote For Happy."[5] Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Senate Majority and Minority Leaders (also called Senate Floor Leaders) are two United States Senators... Alben William Barkley (November 24, 1877–April 30, 1956) was a Representative and a Senator from Kentucky and the thirty_fifth Vice President of the United States. ... Children at a parade in North College Hill, Ohio Racial integration, or simply integration includes desegregation (the process of ending systematic racial segregation). ...


Later in life, Chandler's commitment to civil rights was questioned as he supported Dixiecrat Strom Thurmond's bid for President. Having been elected to his first term at the age of 37, Kentucky's "Boy Governor" was both the last surviving governor of any U.S. state to serve before 1939 and the last living Senator to have served before 1940 by the time of his death in 1991. Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of the...

Contents

Early life

Chandler was born July 14, 1898 in Corydon, Henderson County Kentucky the son of Joseph Sephus and Callie Saunders-Chandler. His childhood was a difficult one. According to his autobiography, his earliest memory was his mother abandoning the family when he was four years old.[6] Though cared for by his father and other relatives, by age eight, he was selling newspapers to supplement the family's income. At sixteen, his fourteen-year-old brother died after falling from a tree while picking cherries.[6] is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Corydon is a city located in Henderson County, Kentucky. ... Henderson County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Cover of the first English edition of 1793 of Benjamin Franklins autobiography. ...


Chandler graduated high school in 1917, and, against his father's wishes, enrolled at Transylvania University in Lexington, Kentucky, with only "a red sweater, a five dollar bill, and a smile." During his matriculation, he starred in three sports, captaining the basketball and baseball teams, and playing quarterback on the football team. He also joined the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity after being denied membership in Kappa Alpha. Throughout his educational career, he worked odd jobs to support himself. In the fall semester of 1918, with his nation in the midst of World War I, Chandler volunteered to serve in the Student Army Training Corps, although the corps disbanded with the signing of an armistice in November.[6] Transylvania University is a private liberal arts college related by covenant to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) located in Lexington, Kentucky, with approximately 1,100 students. ... Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ... The five dollar bill is a common denomination of a number of currencies. ... Basketball is a team sport in which two teams of five active players each try to score points against one another by throwing a ball through a high hoop (the basket) under organized rules. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Memorial Stadium, St. ... Navy quarterback Aaron Polanco sets up to throw. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ... The Kappa Alpha Order is a collegiate order of Christian knights. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


Chandler graduated from Transylvania in 1921, taking with him both a bachelor's degree and his life-long nickname, "Happy," which he was given because of his jovial attitude.[7] From there, Chandler studied at Harvard Law School, coaching high school athletics to earn money. He returned to Lexington in 1922, attaining a Bachelor of Laws from the University of Kentucky two years later. Again, he funded his education by coaching high school sports in nearby Versailles.[3] For the next five years, Chandler was an assistant football coach at Centre College in Danville, simultaneously practicing law in Versailles.[3] Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... The degree of Bachelor of Laws is the principal academic degree in law in the majority of common law countries other than the United States, where it has been replaced by the Juris Doctor degree. ... The University of Kentucky, also referred to as UK, is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... Versailles is a city located in Woodford County, Kentucky. ... Centre College is an accredited, private, four-year liberal arts college located in Danville, Kentucky, USA, a community of about 15,000 in Boyle County, approximately 35 miles (56. ... Danville is a city in Boyle County, Kentucky, United States. ...


While representing Margaret Hall, an Episcopal girls school, Chandler met Keysville, Virginia native Mildred Watkins. He eventually persuaded his new love to break her engagement to another man. Despite Watkins' eventual confession of having been married previously and being the mother of a two-year-old daughter, the two married on November 12, 1925. Chandler immediately adopted Watkins' daughter, Marcella, and the couple eventually had three children together: Mimi, Ben and Dan.[6] Keysville is a town located in Charlotte County, Virginia. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Early political career

Chandler's career in politics began with an appointment by Judge Ben Williams to the post of master commissioner of the Woodford County Circuit Court in 1928. Only a year later, he was elected to represent Kentucky's 22nd Senate District in the Kentucky General Assembly. He made a name for himself primarily on two issues: the repeal of parimutuel betting and a plan to build a hydroelectric dam on Cumberland Falls. Chandler opposed both proposals, and both eventually failed.[6] Woodford County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... The Kentucky State Capitol Building in Frankfort, KY The Kentucky General Assembly, also called the Kentucky Legislature, is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... Parimutuel betting (from the French language: pari mutuel, mutual betting) is a betting system in which all bets of a particular type are placed together in a pool; taxes and a house take are removed, and payoff odds are calculated by sharing the pool among all placed bets. ... Cumberland Falls by day. ...


Split with Governor Laffoon

In 1931, Chandler was elected lieutenant governor of the state by a wide margin.[3] Although Chandler and the elected governor, Ruby Laffoon were both Democrats, Chandler soon split with his running mate and ended up working against many of his programs, particularly on the issue of a state sales tax, which Laffoon supported but Chandler opposed.[7] As lieutenant governor, Chandler also served as the presiding officer in the state senate, though his political opponents passed measures to limit his customary powers in retaliation for his split with Laffoon.[7] The office of Lieutentant Governor of Kentucky has existed under the last three of Kentuckys four constitutions, beginning in 1797. ... Ruby Laffoon (15th January, 1869 - 01 March 1941) was a Democratic Governor of Kentucky from 1931 - 1935. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... A sales tax is a consumption tax charged at the point of purchase for certain goods and services. ...


Laffoon had hand-picked Thomas Rhea to succeed him as governor, but Chandler had other ideas. Advised by political allies, Chandler made the boldest move of his political career. Acting as governor while Laffoon was out of the state – as provided by the Kentucky Constitution at the time – Chandler called the legislature into special session and pushed through a bill calling for candidates for governor to be chosen by primaries rather than elected at the party conventions. This bucking of the political machine made him a hero in the eyes of many voters.[7] The Constitution of Kentucky is the document that governs the Commonwealth of Kentucky, United States. ... A primary election is an election in which voters in a jurisdiction select candidates for a subsequent election (nominating primary). ... In this 1899 cartoon from Puck, all of New York City politics revolves around boss Richard Croker A political machine is an unofficial system of a political organization based on patronage, the spoils system, behind-the-scenes control, and longstanding political ties within the structure of a representative democracy. ...


First term as governor

Chandler did succeed in his bid for governor in 1935, defeating Rhea in a runoff primary and disposing of Republican challenger King Swope by a hefty margin. At a mere 37 years old, Chandler was dubbed the "Boy Governor." As promised, he quickly oversaw the repeal of the state's sales tax, compensating for the financial loss to the state by raising excise and income taxes.[4] The 1935 repeal of Kentucky's prohibition amendment gave Chandler a further source of revenue – a tax on whiskey. Frugality and fiscal responsibility became hallmarks of Chandler's administration. The Government Reorganization Act of 1936 so streamlined the state's bureaucracy that Chandler was able to cut the state's outstanding debt by 75%, a whopping $28.5 million.[7] The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... An excise is an indirect tax or duty levied on items within a country. ... Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income... Whisky (or whiskey) is an alcoholic beverage distilled from grain, often including malt, which has then been aged in wooden barrels. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      This article is about the sociological concept. ...


Chandler increased spending on several projects and proposals throughout his term, however. He supported the state's Old Age Pension Law[8] and created a pension fund for the state's teachers. In 1936, he allocated $2 million to improve the state's rural roads and led the state to participate in the federal Rural Electrification Act. He also provided for free textbooks for students in public schools, and dramatically increased funding for schools, colleges, and universities in the state. By the end of Chandler's first year in office, University of Kentucky president Frank L. McVey proclaimed that "much more has been accomplished than would have been thought possible."[7] FDR (Center) signs the Rural Electrification Act with Representative John Rankin (Left) and Senator William Norris (right) The Rural Electrification Act of 1936 provided federal funding for installation of electrical distribution systems to serve rural areas of the United States. ...


Chandler's heroics continued during the Ohio River flood of 1937, when he personally supervised the evacuation of a partly-flooded penitentiary in Frankfort.[7] Though he opposed the closed shop and sit-down strike tactics used by the state's labor unions, Chandler also earned a reputation as a friend of organized labor by creating a state Department of Industrial Relations and supporting the federal Child Labor Amendment, though it was never ratified.[7] During his tenure as governor, he earned Doctor of Laws degrees from Transylvania in 1936 and the University of Kentucky College of Law in 1937.[3] This article is the current U.S. Collaboration of the Week. ... A prison is a place in which people are confined and deprived of a range of liberties. ... Frankfort is the capital of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, a state of the United States of America. ... A closed shop is a business or industrial establishment whose employees are required to be union members or to agree to join the union within a specified time after being hired. ... A sitdown strike is a form of civil disobedience in which an organized group of workers, usually employed at a factory or other centralized location, take possession of the workplace by sitting down at their stations, effectively preventing their employers from replacing them with scab labor or, in some cases... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers... The Child Labor Amendment was, and remains, a proposed—and technically still-pending—amendment to the United States Constitution offered by Republican Ohio Congressman Israel Moore Foster during the 68th Congress in the form of House Joint Resolution No. ... Doctor of Laws (Latin: Legum Doctor, LL.D) is a doctorate-level academic degree in law. ... The College of Law is a college of the University of Kentucky located within Central Campus along South Limestone. ...


Service in the United States Senate

In 1938, while still serving as governor, Chandler challenged Senate Majority Leader (and future Vice President) Alben Barkley in the Democratic primary for Barkley's seat in Congress. Though Chandler lost to the very popular Barkley, President Franklin D. Roosevelt felt compelled to make a trip to the state to support Barkley's candidacy.[4] Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Senate Majority and Minority Leaders (also called Senate Floor Leaders) are two United States Senators... Seal of the office of the Vice-President of the United States The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the President. ... Alben William Barkley (November 24, 1877–April 30, 1956) was a Representative and a Senator from Kentucky and the thirty_fifth Vice President of the United States. ... FDR redirects here. ...


Chandler would get his chance at the Senate soon enough, however. In 1939, the state's junior Senator, M. M. Logan, died. Under an arrangement with Lieutenant Governor Keen Johnson, Chandler resigned his position, elevating Johnson to the governorship. Johnson, in turn, appointed Chandler to fill Logan's seat in the Senate. Chandler retained the seat in a special election in 1940, and was re-elected to a full term in 1942, defeating former ally John Y. Brown.[7] Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Marvel Mills Logan (January 7, 1874 - October 3, 1939), a Democrat, served as a member of the United States Senate from Kentucky. ... Keen Johnson (January 12, 1896 - February 7, 1970) served as Governor of Kentucky 1939-1943. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Young Brown, Sr. ...


During his tenure in the Senate, Chandler usually backed the policies of President Roosevelt.[7] As a member of the Senate's Military Affairs Committee, he was vocal in his opposition to prioritizing the European front over defeating Japan in World War II.[7] He and five other senators toured American military bases, successfully lobbying to strengthen those in the Aleutian Islands area.[9] It was also during his time in the Senate that he developed a friendship with comedian Bob Hope.[10] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Aleutians seen from space The Aleutian Islands (possibly from Chukchi aliat, island) are a chain of more than 300 small volcanic islands forming an island arc in the Northern Pacific Ocean, occupying an area of 6,821 sq mi (17,666 km²) and extending about 1,200 mi (1,900... Bob Hope, KBE (May 29, 1903 – July 27, 2003), born Leslie Townes Hope, was an English-Born American entertainer who appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway, on radio and television, in movies, and in performing tours for U.S. Military personnel, well known for his good natured humor and career longevity. ...


Commissioner of Baseball

When baseball's first commissioner, Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis, died in 1944, an official in the War Department began campaigning for Chandler's election to the post. Despite being the last candidate put forth in the April 1945 meetings, he was elected by a unanimous vote of the team owners, and resigned his Senate seat in October of that year.[11] In 1920, the owners of Major League Baseball, in order to reestablish confidence of fans in the sport following the Black Sox Scandal, established the office of Commissioner of Baseball. ... Kenesaw Mountain Landis Kenesaw Mountain Landis (November 20, 1866 – November 25, 1944) was an American jurist who served as a federal judge from 1905 to 1922, and subsequently as the first commissioner of Major League Baseball. ... Line drawing of the Department of Wars seal. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1945 throughout the world. ...


Chandler clashed with Brooklyn Dodgers manager Leo "the Lip" Durocher over Durocher's association with gambling figures and his marriage to actress Laraine Day, which came amid allegations from Day's ex-husband that Durocher had stolen her away from him.[12] Before the start of the 1947 season, Chandler suspended Durocher for the entire season, citing "conduct detrimental to baseball."[13] The Dodgers went on to win the pennant that season under replacement manager Burt Shotton.[12] The Brooklyn Dodgers were a Major League Baseball team that played from 1890-1957. ... Leo Ernest Durocher (July 27, 1905 — October 7, 1991), nicknamed Leo the Lip, was an American infielder and manager in Major League Baseball. ... Actress Laraine Day American actress Laraine Day (b. ... Burton Edwin Shotton (October 18, 1884 - July 29, 1962) was an American player, manager, coach and scout in Major League Baseball. ...


Chandler became known as "the players' commissioner" for his work on their behalf.[14] During his service, he presided over the establishment of a pension fund for players, but his most significant contribution was overseeing the initial steps toward integration of the major leagues, beginning with the debut of Jackie Robinson with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. This move was controversial with some team owners and was credited by many in the sports community with Chandler's failure to be selected for another term as Commissioner after the expiration of his first one in 1951.[7] Children at a parade in North College Hill, Ohio Racial integration, or simply integration includes desegregation (the process of ending systematic racial segregation). ... For the basketball player, see Jackie Robinson (basketball). ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899-1910), (1913) Brooklyn Grooms... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1951 throughout the world. ...


Second term as governor

After being forced out as Commissioner of Baseball, Chandler returned to Versailles and continued to practice law. His hiatus from public life would be short lived, however. While prohibited by the Kentucky Constitution from serving consecutive terms as governor, nothing prohibited Chandler from seeking a second gubernatorial term in 1955, twenty years after his first bid. He secured the Democratic nomination over challenger Bert T. Combs, and took the general election from Republican Edwin R. Denny by landslide.[4] The Constitution of Kentucky is the document that governs the Commonwealth of Kentucky, United States. ... Bert T. Combs (August 13, 1911-December 4, 1991),born in Clay County, Kentucky, was the Democratic Governor of Kentucky from 1959 through 1963. ...


Much had changed in the years since Chandler's first term as governor. In 1948, he had embraced the "Dixiecrats," a Southern faction that had broken from the national Democratic Party, and their segregationist presidential nominee, Strom Thurmond.[15] This move had alienated him from some in his own party at the state level as well.[4] Nevertheless, he was able to make positive changes in the state in his second term, continuing his themes of improving education and public works. He oversaw the establishment of the University of Kentucky Medical Center which bears his name. Having already integrated baseball, in 1956, Chandler used National Guard troops to enforce racial integration of schools in two Kentucky towns.[4] The States Rights Democratic Party, usually known as the Dixiecrat Party, was a short-lived splinter group that broke from the Democratic Party in 1948. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ... Look up Public works in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Chandler Medical Center at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Kentucky is comprised of the following: Centers of Excellence: This includes the Centers for Rural Health, Critical Care Centers, the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging among numerous other units. ... The United States National Guard is a component of the United States Army (the Army National Guard) and the United States Air Force (the Air National Guard). ... Children at a parade in North College Hill, Ohio Racial integration, or simply integration includes desegregation (the process of ending systematic racial segregation). ...


Later career

Chandler remained active in Kentucky politics long after his final term as governor ended. He lost the Democratic gubernatorial primary to Edward T. Breathitt in 1963, and to Henry Ward in 1967. After the 1967 primary loss, Chandler jumped parties to support Republican Louie B. Nunn, who won the election.[7] Edward Thompson Ned Breathitt Jr. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Henry Ward was a Democrat who held posts in Democratic state administrations in Kentucky and was the Democratic nominee for Governor of Kentucky in 1967. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Louie Broady Nunn, (March 8, 1924-January 29, 2004) a native of Park in Barren County was Governor of Kentucky from 1967 to 1971. ...


In his last years, Chandler remained active as a member of the Boards of Trustees of both Transylvania University and the University of Kentucky.[7] During a meeting of the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees finance committee on April 5, 1988, Chandler drew the ire of several student groups by using a racial epithet. During a discussion of the university's 1985 decision to dispose of its investments in South Africa, Chandler, a member of the Board, remarked "You know Zimbabwe's all nigger now. There aren't any whites."[16] He later apologized for his comments.[17] is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... An epithet (Greek - επιθετον and Latin - epitheton; literally meaning imposed) is a descriptive word or phrase. ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ...


Legacy

Chandler was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1982.[18] At age 89, he collaborated with author Vance Trimble to pen his autobiography, Heroes, Plain Folks, and Skunks. Kentucky governors still host a breakfast at the Governor's Mansion on the morning of the Kentucky Derby, a tradition started by Governor and Mrs. Chandler in 1936.[19] The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... This article is currently under construction // This year in baseball Events January 13 - Hank Aaron and Frank Robinson become the 12th and 13th players elected to the Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association of America in their first year of eligibility. ... The Kentucky Derby is a Grade I stakes race for three-year-old thoroughbred horses, held annually in Louisville, Kentucky, on the first Saturday in May, capping the two-week-long Kentucky Derby Festival. ...


Chandler died in Versailles, Kentucky on June 15, 1991, one day after his 93rd birthday.[20] According to his family, he died of a heart attack.[21] He was buried at the Pisgah Church Cemetery in Versailles.[1] At the time of his death, Chandler was the earliest U.S. governor of any state still living; he had held that distinction since the death of Alfred M. Landon. After Chandler's death, the title was passed to Harold E. Stassen. He was also the last survivng U.S. Senator from the 1930s. Versailles is a city located in Woodford County, Kentucky. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Acute myocardial infarction (AMI or MI), more commonly known as a heart attack, is a disease state that occurs when the blood supply to a part of the heart is interrupted. ... Alfred Mossman Alf Landon (September 9, 1887 - October 12, 1987) was an American Republican politician from Kansas, notable nationally for his 1936 nomination as the Republican opponent of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. ... Harold Edward Stassen (April 13, 1907 - March 4, 2001) was the 25th Governor of Minnesota from 1939 to 1943. ...


Happy's grandson, Ben Chandler, is currently a member of the United States House of Representatives and formerly served as Kentucky State Auditor and Attorney General of Kentucky. Ben Chandler ran for Governor of Kentucky in 2003 as the Democratic nominee but lost to Republican candidate Ernie Fletcher. According to Ben, until he was 13 he aspired to be a baseball player just as his grandfather.[22] Rep. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... State auditors are executive officers of U.S. states. ... Attorney General of Kentucky is the chief law officer in the state of Kentucky. ... This is a list of Governors of Kentucky: See also Kentucky Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Kentucky ... Ernest Lee (Ernie) Fletcher (born November 12, 1952) has served as governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky since 2003. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c CHANDLER, Albert Benjamin (Happy), (1898 - 1991). United States Congress. Retrieved on 2007-01-29.
  2. ^ Kentucky Governor Albert Benjamin Chandler. National Governors Association. Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  3. ^ a b c d e Powell, Robert A. (1976). "Albert Benjamin Chandler", Kentucky Governors. Danville, Kentucky: Bluegrass Printing Company. ISBN B0006CPOVM. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f (1992) "Chandler, Albert Benjamin", in Kleber, John E.: The Kentucky Encyclopedia, Associate editors: Thomas D. Clark, Lowell H. Harrison, and James C. Klotter, Lexington, Kentucky: The University Press of Kentucky. ISBN 0813117720. 
  5. ^ (April 1955) "Music All The Day". 'Time'. Retrieved on 2007-04-27. 
  6. ^ a b c d e Chandler, Happy; Trimble, Vance H. (1989). Heroes, Plain Folks, and Skunks: The Life and Times of Happy Chandler, foreword by Bob Hope, Chicago, Illinois: Bonus Books, Inc.. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n (2004) "Albert Benjamin Chandler 1935-1939, 1955-1959)", in Lowell H. Harrison: Kentucky's Governors. Lexington, Kentucky: The University Press of Kentucky. ISBN 0813123267. 
  8. ^ (1987) The Encyclopedia of Kentucky. New York, New York: Somerset Publishers. ISBN 0403099811. 
  9. ^ Albert Benjamin "Happy" Chandler. Gizeh Shriners of British Columbia. Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  10. ^ Regalado, Samuel O. (Spring 1990). "Review of Heroes, Plain Folks, and Skunks: The Life and Times of Happy Chandler" (PDF). 'Journal of Sports History' 17 (1). Retrieved on 2007-03-02. 
  11. ^ Albert Benjamin "Happy" Chandler. Major League Baseball. Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  12. ^ a b Rogers, Thomas (1991-10-08). In Memory of Leo Durocher. The New York Times. Retrieved on 2007-06-06.
  13. ^ Heller, Dick. "Dodgers handled unrest to start '47", The Washington Times, 2006-04-10. 
  14. ^ Kosin, Phil (October 1985). "Diamond Classics". ABA Journal 71 (10): 35. 
  15. ^ "Chandler, Happy". Encyclopædia Britannica. (2007). 
  16. ^ SPORTS PEOPLE; Chandler Criticized. The New York Times (1988-04-07). Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  17. ^ "Ex-Ky. Gov. Happy Chandler Rapped for Racial Slur at Univ. of Ky. Trustee Meet", Jet, 1988-04-25. 
  18. ^ Happy Chandler. National Baseball Hall of Fame. Retrieved on 2007-01-29.
  19. ^ Brammer, Jack. "Tradition of Governor's Derby Breakfast has come a long way", Lexington Herald-Leader, 2004-04-30. 
  20. ^ "In Memoriam: Ex-Kentucky Governor Happy Chandler". All Things Considered. National Public Radio, Washington, D.C.. 1991-06-15.
  21. ^ Happy Chandler's Obit. The Deadball Era. Retrieved on 2007-06-01.
  22. ^ Courtney Kinney, Ben Chandler: Spoiled brat or gutsy guy?, The Kentucky Post, September 20, 2003.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Danville is a city in Boyle County, Kentucky, United States. ... Thomas Dionysius Clark (July 14, 1903 - June 28, 2005) was perhaps Kentuckys most notable historian. ... Lowell Hayes Harrison is an American Historian specializing in Kentucky. ... Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ... Time (whose trademark is capitalized TIME) is a weekly American newsmagazine, similar to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... Bob Hope, KBE (May 29, 1903 – July 27, 2003), born Leslie Townes Hope, was an English-Born American entertainer who appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway, on radio and television, in movies, and in performing tours for U.S. Military personnel, well known for his good natured humor and career longevity. ... Flag Seal Nickname: The Windy City Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location Location in Chicagoland and northern Illinois Coordinates , Government Country State Counties United States Illinois Cook, DuPage Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 606. ... Lowell Hayes Harrison is an American Historian specializing in Kentucky. ... Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Times[1] is a daily broadsheet newspaper published in Washington, D.C., United States. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jet magazine is a popular African-American publication founded in Chicago, Illinois in 1951 by John H. Johnson of Johnson Publishing Company. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Lexington Herald-Leader is a newspaper owned by The McClatchy Company and based in the U.S. city of Lexington, Kentucky. ... All Things Considered (ATC), is a news radio program in the United States, broadcast on the National Public Radio network. ... “NPR” redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - D.C. Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 1 is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Video of Happy Chandler singing "My Old Kentucky Home" at a University of Kentucky basketball game in the early 1980s
  • Happy Chandler's plaque at the National Baseball Hall of Fame
Preceded by
James Breathitt, Jr.
Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky
1931 – 1935
Succeeded by
Keen Johnson
Preceded by
Ruby Laffoon
Democratic nominee for Governor of Kentucky
1935 – 1935
Governor of Kentucky
1935 – 1939
Preceded by
M. M. Logan
United States Senator (Class 2) from Kentucky
October 10, 1939 – November 1, 1945
Served alongside: Alben Barkley
Succeeded by
William A. Stanfill
Preceded by
Kenesaw Mountain Landis
Commissioner of Baseball
1945 – 1951
Succeeded by
Ford Frick
Preceded by
Lawrence Wetherby
Democratic nominee for Governor of Kentucky
1955 – 1955
Succeeded by
Bert T. Combs
Governor of Kentucky
1955 – 1959
Preceded by
Alfred M. Landon
Earliest serving US governor
1987 – 1991
Succeeded by
Harold E. Stassen
Preceded by
John Danaher
Most Senior Living U.S. Senator
(Sitting or Former)

September 22, 1990 – June 15, 1991
Succeeded by
Joseph Ball
Persondata
NAME Chandler, Albert Benjamin
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Chandler, Happy
SHORT DESCRIPTION Governor of Kentucky, Baseball Commissioner
DATE OF BIRTH July 14, 1898
PLACE OF BIRTH Corydon, Kentucky
DATE OF DEATH June 15, 1991
PLACE OF DEATH Versailles, Kentucky

  Results from FactBites:
 
Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal (2158 words)
Chandler was born July 14, 1898 in Corydon, Henderson County Kentucky the son of Joseph Sephus and Callie Saunders-Chandler.
Chandler retained the seat in a special election in 1940, and was re-elected to a full term in 1942, defeating former ally John Y. Brown.
Happy's grandson, Ben Chandler, is currently a member of the United States House of Representatives and formerly served as Kentucky State Auditor and Attorney General of Kentucky.
Happy Chandler - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (440 words)
Chandler resigned from the Senate to become Commissioner of Major League Baseball in 1945 and remained in that post until 1951; during his service in this office he oversaw the initial steps toward integration of the major leagues, beginning with the debut of Jackie Robinson with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947.
Chandler lost in the 1963 Democratic primary for governor to Edward T. Breathitt and that was his final serious campaign.
Chandler was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1982.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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