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Encyclopedia > Hans Adolf Krebs

Sir Hans Adolf Krebs (August 25, 1900November 22, 1981) was a German, later British medical doctor and biochemist. Krebs is best known for his identification of the citric acid cycle, also known as the Krebs cycle, the key sequence of metabolic chemical reactions that produces energy in cells. August 25 is the 237th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (238th in leap years), with 128 days remaining. ... 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The word physician should not be confused with physicist, which means a scientist in the area of physics. ... Biochemistry is the chemistry of life. ... The citric acid cycle (also known as the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the TCA cycle, or the Krebs cycle) is a series of chemical reactions of central importance in all living cells that utilize oxygen as part of cellular respiration. ...


Life

He was born in Hildesheim, Germany, to Alma and Georg Krebs. His father, Georg, was an ear, nose, and throat surgeon. Hans went to school in Hildesheim and studied medicine at the University of Göttingen from 1918–1923. He gained his Ph.D. at the University of Hamburg in 1925, then studied chemistry in Berlin for one year, where he later became an assistant of Otto Warburg at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Biology until 1930. Because of his Jewish heritage he was barred from practicing medicine in Germany and he immigrated to England in 1933. He was invited to Cambridge, where he worked in the biochemistry department under Sir Frederick Gowland Hopkins (1861–1947). Krebs became professor of biochemistry at the University of Sheffield in 1945. Krebs' area of interest was intermediary metabolism. He identified the urea cycle in 1932. In 1937, he identified the citric acid cycle, which is still often called Krebs cycle. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1953 for his work on the citric acid cycle. He was elected Honorary Fellow of Girton College, Cambridge University in 1979. Krebs died in Oxford, England in 1981. His son, Sir John Krebs, is also a distinguished scientist. â–¶ (help· info) is a city in Lower Saxony, Germany. ... Otolaryngology is the branch of medicine that specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of ear, nose, throat, and head & neck disorders. ... Intraoperative X-Ray of a Humerus fixated by Kirschner wires Surgery (from the Greek meaning hand work) is the medical specialty that treats diseases or injuries by operative manual and instrumental treatment. ... Medicine is the branch of health science and the sector of public life concerned with maintaining or restoring human health through the study, diagnosis, treatment and possible prevention of disease and injury. ... The Georg-August University of Göttingen (Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, often called the Georgia Augusta) was founded in 1734 by George II, King of Great Britain and Elector of Hanover, and opened in 1737. ... The University of Hamburg was founded on the 1 April 1919 by Wilhelm Stern and others. ... Chemistry (from Greek χημεία khemeia meaning alchemy, see below for possible origins of this word) is the science of matter at the atomic to molecular scale, dealing primarily with collections of atoms (such as molecules, crystals, and metals). ... Berlin is the capital city and a state of Germany. ... Kaiser Wilhelm Institute (in German Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gesellschaft) was the name of a number of scientific institutes in Germany before World War II. After 1945 they were re-organised and renamed as Max Planck Institutes. ... Shown within Cambridgeshire Geography Status City (1951) Region East of England Admin. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The University of Sheffield is a leading university, located in Sheffield, UK. // History The University of Sheffield was originally formed by the merger of three colleges. ... Metabolism (from Greek μεταβολισμός metabolismos) is the biochemical modification of chemical compounds in living organisms and cells. ... The Urea Cycle is a cycle of biochemical reactions occurring in many animal organisms that produces urea from ammonia. ... The citric acid cycle (also known as the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the TCA cycle, or the Krebs cycle) is a series of chemical reactions of central importance in all living cells that utilize oxygen as part of cellular respiration. ... List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physiology or Medicine from 1901 to the present day. ... Full name Girton College Motto - Named after Girton Village Previous names The College for Women (1869), Girton College (1872) Established 1869 Sister College Somerville College Mistress Dame Marylin Strathern Location Huntingdon Road Undergraduates 503 Graduates 201 Homepage Boatclub Girton College lies on the extremity of Cambridge Girton College was established... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with one of the most selective sets of entry requirements in the United Kingdom. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq... Sir John Richard Krebs (born 1945) is a British biologist and a Fellow of the Royal Society. ...


Timeline

  • 1900 Born in Germany
  • 1918 Began medical school
  • 1923 Graduated from medical school
  • 1925 Graduated with Ph.D. from University of Hamburg
  • 1932 Identification of Urea Cycle
  • 1933 Emigration to the United Kingdom
  • 1937 Identification of Citric Acid Cycle or "Krebs Cycle"
  • 1945 Became a Professor at University of Sheffield
  • 1953 Won the Nobel Prize in Medicine
  • 1958 Knighted
  • 1981 Died in the United Kingdom

The University of Hamburg was founded on the 1 April 1919 by Wilhelm Stern and others. ... The Urea Cycle is a cycle of biochemical reactions occurring in many animal organisms that produces urea from ammonia. ... The citric acid cycle (also known as the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the TCA cycle, or the Krebs cycle) is a series of chemical reactions of central importance in all living cells that utilize oxygen as part of cellular respiration. ... The University of Sheffield is a leading university, located in Sheffield, UK. // History The University of Sheffield was originally formed by the merger of three colleges. ...

External link

  • Nobel Prize: Krebs

  Results from FactBites:
 
Hans Adolf Krebs - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (315 words)
Krebs is best known for his identification of the citric acid cycle, also known as the Krebs cycle, the key sequence of metabolic chemical reactions that produces energy in cells.
Hans went to school in Hildesheim and studied medicine at the University of Göttingen from 1918–1923.
Krebs became professor of biochemistry at the University of Sheffield in 1945.
Hans Adolf Krebs Biography | scit_0612_package.xml (594 words)
Hans Adolf Krebs won the 1953 Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine, which he shared with American biochemist Fritz Albert Lipmann (1899-1986), for his studies of intermediary metabolism, especially his discovery of the metabolic pathway known as the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, or Krebs cycle, the major source of energy in living organisms.
Krebs was also involved in the discovery of the metabolic pathway known as the urea cycle.
Krebs was born in Hildesheim in Hanover, Germany.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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