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Encyclopedia > Hanover College

Coordinates: 38°42′44″N, 85°27′39″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Hanover College

logo of Hanover College This work is copyrighted. ...

Motto Philosophia pietati ancillans ("knowledge in service of piety/faith")
Established 1827
Type private coeducational liberal arts
Endowment $150.8 million[1]
President Dr. Russell Nichols
Faculty 100
Students 1,062
Undergraduates 1,062
Location Hanover, IN, USA
Campus small town: 650 acres (2.6 km²)
Athletics 16 Division III NCAA teams
Colors Scarlet Red and Royal Blue
Mascot Panther
Affiliations Presbyterian Church (USA)
Website www.hanover.edu

Hanover College is a coeducational liberal arts college, located in Hanover, Indiana, near the banks of the Ohio River. The college is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church (USA). The college was founded in 1827 by Rev. John Finley Crowe, making it the oldest private college in Indiana. The Hanover athletic teams participate in the Heartland Collegiate Athletic Conference. Hanover College has a long tradition of high academic standards and quality education through small classes taught by experienced professors. Graduates of Hanover are known as Hanoverians. A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Hanover is a town located in Jefferson County, Indiana, along the Ohio River. ... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Scarlet (from the Persian saqirlat or latin astacus= crayfish) is a color with a hue between red and orange. ... Royal blue is a lighter shade of blue. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Emblem of the PC(USA) The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) or PC(USA) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States. ... A Web site (or colloquially, Website) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on a Web server, usually accessible via the Internet or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML, that is almost always accessible via HTTP... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... Hanover is a town located in Jefferson County, Indiana, along the Ohio River. ... Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... Emblem of the PC(USA) The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) or PC(USA) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... The Heartland Collegiate Athletic Conference (HCAC) is an intercollegiate athletic conference affiliated with the NCAAs Division III. Member institutions are located in Indiana, Kentucky and Ohio. ...

Contents

History

Official Seal of Hanover College

Originally founded in 1827 by Rev. John Finley Crowe, Hanover College experienced a turbulent early period, but has become an institution of liberal arts education. In 2002, the College celebrated its 175 anniversary. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1009x940, 177 KB) Official Seal of Hanover College. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1009x940, 177 KB) Official Seal of Hanover College. ...


In the early 19th century, groups of devout, learned men traveled along the Ohio River, bringing the Christian gospel and education to the growing western frontier. Five miles west of Madison, Indiana the Rev. John Finley Crowe served as pastor of the Hanover Presbyterian Church. He opened the Hanover Academy January 1, 1827, in a small log cabin near his home. Two years later, the State of Indiana granted a charter to the Academy. On November 9, 1829, the Academy’s Board of Trustees accepted a proposal by the Presbyterian Synod of Indiana to adopt the school provided a theological department was established. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... Madison is a city in Jefferson County, Indiana, along the Ohio River. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... November 9 is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


A two-story brick building was built to house both the Academy and the new Indiana Seminary. The State of Indiana issued a new charter to the Academy, creating Hanover College effective January 1, 1833. Under this charter, the College’s Board of Trustees is independent of ecclesiastical control, but has formally adopted for Hanover the standards for Presbyterian colleges, an association that continues to this day. Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


In the 1830s, the College Edifice (now the Hanover Presbyterian Church) was the center of a bustling, three-acre campus. In 1834, 119 students attended Hanover Preparatory School (formerly Hanover Academy) and 101 students attended Hanover College, astonishing growth from the six students of only seven years earlier. Events and Trends Electromagnetic induction discovered by Michael Faraday Dutch-speaking farmers known as Voortrekkers emigrate northwards from the Cape Colony Croquet invented in Ireland Railroad construction begins in earnest in the United States Egba refugees fleeing the Yoruba civil wars found the city of Abeokuta in south-west Nigeria... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


In 1843 both the College’s president and its trustees accepted a proposal from Madison city leaders to move Hanover College. The trustees dissolved the Hanover charter and established Madison University. However, John Finley Crowe purchased the College property and established the Hanover Classical and Mathematical School. Only four months after Madison University was founded, its president had resigned and its students began to return to Crowe’s school. By May 1844, all of Madison’s students and faculty had made the trip five miles to the west. Jan. ...


Hanover College was officially restored when Indiana’s legislature granted a new charter to the College Christmas Day. Thus, Crowe, a man who served the College for more than 30 years as a faculty member and who refused to ever allow his name to be placed in nomination for its presidency, is quite accurately described as "twice the founder of Hanover College." Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... Joseph and Mary with baby Jesus, at the first Christmas Christmas (literally, the Mass of Christ) is a holiday in the Christian calendar, usually observed on December 25, which celebrates the birth of Jesus. ...


The Board of Trustees voted in 1849 to purchase a 200-acre farm one-half mile to the east of Hanover’s campus. This land, overlooking the Ohio River, serves as the centerpiece of the College campus today. By the mid-1850s, Classic Hall was constructed on a bluff known as the Point, and College classes were moved to that location. "Old Classic" would be Hanover’s signature building for more than 90 years. Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... // Production of steel revolutionized by invention of the Bessemer process Benjamin Silliman fractionates petroleum by distillation for the first time First transatlantic telegraph cable laid First safety elevator installed by Elisha Otis Railroads begin to supplant canals in the United States as a primary means of transporting goods. ...


The Civil War, especially the Confederate maneuvers known as Morgan's Raid, came close to campus; faculty and student were alerted that the troops might try to burn Classic Hall. This article is becoming very long. ... Some Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was organized in February 1861 to defend the newly formed Confederate States of America from military action by the United States government. ... Confederate Brigadier General John Hunt Morgan Morgans Raid was a highly publicized incursion by Confederate cavalry into the Northern states of Indiana and Ohio during the American Civil War. ...


In 1870, Presbyterian Church officials proposed that Hanover College be merged with Wabash College, with Hanover becoming a women’s school. The Hanover Board of Trustees rejected that proposal, as well as one from businessmen in 1873 that would have moved the College to Indianapolis and renamed it Johnson University. 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Wabash College is a small private liberal arts college for men, located in Crawfordsville, Indiana. ...


During the first 50 years of Hanover College’s existence, only nine presidents served, none for longer than nine years; five served three years or less. Daniel Webster Fisher would lead Hanover until his retirement in 1907. He was followed in the presidency by William A. Millis (1908-1929), Albert G. Parker Jr. (1929-1958), John E. Horner (1959-1987) and Russell Nichols (1987-2007), Sue DeWine (2007-). Remarkably, the College has had only five presidents in the last 122 years. 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ...


This stability of leadership ushered in a new era of growth and success. Fisher oversaw the construction of five buildings, including Hendricks Library. Named for Thomas Hendricks, an alumnus who had served as U.S. vice president and now called Hendricks Hall, it remains the oldest classroom building on Hanover’s campus. Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819–November 25, 1885) was a Representative and a Senator from Indiana and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States. ... A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ...


Albert G. Parker Jr. was inaugurated as Hanover’s 12th president November 27, 1929, less than one month after the stock market crash that precipitated the Great Depression. The economic hard times cut investment revenues and operational expenses had to be closely monitored. But this challenge provided the College with one of its greatest rewards. 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... A stock market is a market for the trading of company stock, and derivatives of same; both of these are securities listed on a stock exchange as well as those only traded privately. ... The Great Depression was a time of economic down turn, which started after the stock market crash on October 29, 1929, known as Black Tuesday. ...


On December 7, 1941, the attack on Pearl Harbor plunged the United States into World War II. In just two years, Hanover’s enrollment would plummet to 164 students, only 20 of them men. To make matters worse, in the early morning of December 19, a huge fire destroyed most of Classic Hall. By 1946, the postwar enrollment at Hanover had more than rebounded. It had ballooned to 679 students and the first great construction period of the College’s history was under way. December 7 is the 341st day (342nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the movie, see 1941 (film). ... Combatants United States Empire of Japan Commanders Husband Kimmel (USN), Walter Short (USA) Chuichi Nagumo (IJN), Mitsuo Fuchida (IJNAS), Shigekazu Shimazaki (IJNAS) Strength 8 battleships, 8 cruisers, 29 destroyers, 9 submarines, ~50 other ships, ~390 planes 6 aircraft carriers, 9 destroyers, 2 battleships, 2 heavy cruisers, 1 light cruiser, 8... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... December 19 is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ...


Parker had announced that he would retire as Hanover’s president September 1, 1958. His death on March 22 while still in office came as a great shock to all. Hanover was temporarily without a president, but John E. Horner assumed the office in the fall and was inaugurated the following May. September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years). ... Year 1958 (MCMLVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 22 is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Under Horner’s 29-year leadership, Hanover enjoyed unprecedented growth in its academic program, financial standing and student enrollment. Soon after his arrival, he encouraged faculty members considering curricular reform. The result was the Hanover Plan, begun in fall 1962. It divided the academic year into two 14-week terms, in which students took three classes, and a five-week Spring Term, in which students took one course of specialized, intensive study. With some modifications, it still serves as Hanover’s curricular model today.


By the mid-1960s, the campus expanded to more than 500 acres of land, enrollment topped 1,000 students, and Hanover’s assets approached $15 million. The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ...


In the late afternoon of April 3, 1974, a tornado roared through campus with devastating results. This tornado was part of the Super Outbreak of tornadoes that struck 13 states and one Canadian province that day. No one was killed or seriously injured, but 32 of the College’s 33 buildings were damaged, including two that were completely destroyed and six that sustained major structural damage. Hundreds of trees were down, completely blocking every campus road. All utilities were knocked out and communication with those off campus was nearly impossible. April 3 is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 272 days remaining. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... A tornado in central Oklahoma. ... 1Time from first tornado to last tornado 2Most severe tornado damage; see Fujita Scale The Super Outbreak is the largest tornado outbreak on record. ... Canada consists of ten provinces and three territories. ...


Government officials estimated the damage at $10 million. Some wondered if Hanover College could survive. The Hanoverians, led by Horner, sprung into action. Winter Term ended one week early and students were dismissed, but many of them stayed to help faculty, staff and others clear the debris. The Board of Trustees met April 5 in emergency session and vowed to lead the efforts in rebuilding and improving Hanover College – and to do so without any federal disaster assistance, continuing Hanover’s tradition of financial independence. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Board of directors. ... April 5 is the 95th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (96th in leap years). ...


Within a week, roads were passable and major services restored. Contributions poured in to cover Hanover’s $1 million in uninsurable losses, a figure that would be raised in just three months. Spring Term opened April 22 with full enrollment, only 19 days after the tornado. An editorial in The Indianapolis Star described the effort as "a private miracle." By spring 1975, replanting efforts completed Hanover’s recovery. The Indianapolis Star is a daily newspaper which began publishing on June 6, 1903. ... 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ...


When Horner retired in 1987, Hanover’s endowment was more than $40 million. Russell Nichols was inaugurated as Hanover’s 14th president September 26, 1987. He quickly began a series of initiatives to improve the Hanover experience for students both inside and outside the classroom. 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 26 is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The number of full-time faculty was increased over a five-year period from 72 to 94, lowering the student-faculty ratio and allowing for more independent research and study. Six new academic majors were added. Each room in every living unit was equipped with a direct-dial telephone, ending years of having a campus operator direct all calls. Academic scholarships for incoming and returning students were increased. An academic major, major concentration, concentration, or simply major is a mainly U.S. and Canadian term for a college or university students main field of specialization during his or her undergraduate studies. ... A telephone operator at work on a private switchboard A telephone operator is either a person who provides assistance to a telephone caller, usually in the placing of operator assisted telephone calls such as calls from a pay phone, collect calls (called reversed-charge calls in the UK), calls which... Note: The term scholarship can mean either the methods employed by scholars (see scholarly method) or an award of access to an institution and/or money for an individual for the purposes of furthering their education. ...


The last few years brought several new triumphs. They include the 1995 opening of the $11 million Horner Health and Recreation Center, named for the president emeritus and his wife, and the 2000 dedication of a $23 million Science Center, which enabled all of the College’s five natural sciences to be housed in the same facility. The term natural science as the way in which different fields of study are defined is determined as much by historical convention as by the present day meaning of the words. ...


In May of 2006, Nichols announced his plans to retire at the conclusion of the 2007 academic year. His accomplishments include the revision of the curriculum which expanded study abroad offerings. Additionally, he oversaw implementation of the Center for Business Preparation, an innovation program designed to link liberal arts education with business. In 2004, Hanover was awarded $11.4 million to start the Rivers Institute, a multidisciplinary center to study all aspects of rivers throughout the world. May is the fifth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Studying abroad is the act of a student pursuing educational opportunities in a foreign country. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Second World War frigate class, see River class frigate The Murray River in Australia A waterfall on the Ova da Fedoz, Switzerland A river is a large natural waterway. ...


On March 17, 2007, President Nichols announced the election of Dr. Susan DeWine as president of Hanover College by the Board of Trustees. Dr. DeWine is the former provost at Marietta College in Marietta, Ohio, and will be the 15th president of Hanover College. March 17 is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the CE era. ... Marietta College is a co-educational private college in Marietta, Ohio, which was the first permanent settlement of the Northwest Territory. ... Marietta is the name of several places in the United States of America: Marietta, Florida Marietta, Georgia (a suburb of Atlanta) Marietta, Illinois Marietta, Minnesota Marietta, Mississippi Marietta, New York Marietta, North Carolina Marietta, Ohio Marietta, Oklahoma Marietta, Pennsylvania Marietta, South Carolina Marietta, Texas Marietta, Wisconsin Marietta-Alderwood, Washington Marietta... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ...


Grounds

Hanover College is situated on 650 acres of land overlooking the Ohio River, featuring several climbing paths and cliffs, as well as the only view of the Ohio from which three different bends in the river can be seen. The campus is characterized by the Georgian style architecture. The quad is crowned by the Parker Auditorium, named for the former Hanover College President, Albert Parker. Cincinnati, Ohio is a well known city along the Ohio River, historically known for its riverboats. ... A Georgian house in Salisbury Georgian architecture is the name given in English-speaking countries to the architectural styles current between about 1720 and 1840, named after the four British monarchs named George. ...

Parker Auditorium at Hanover College

In the 1940s the college turned down plans to rebuild the Sigma Chi fraternity house designed by Frank Lloyd Wright because it did not match the Georgian Architecture. Image File history File linksMetadata ParkerAuditorium. ... Image File history File linksMetadata ParkerAuditorium. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867—April 9, 1959) was one of the most prominent and influential architects of his era. ...


Much of the campus was heavily damaged in the April 3, 1974 tornado Super Outbreak, including several buildings that were destroyed. Damage to 32 of the 33 buildings totaled over $10 million. The campus lost hundreds of mature trees, destroying much of the natural beauty of this landmark [1]. Remarkably, the campus reopened, having restored roads and buildings, after 19 days. April 3 is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 272 days remaining. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... A tornado in central Oklahoma. ... 1Time from first tornado to last tornado 2Most severe tornado damage; see Fujita Scale The Super Outbreak is the largest tornado outbreak on record. ...


Fraternal organizations

There are nine national fraternities and sororities, including:

Former houses include: Alpha Delta Pi (ΑΔΠ) was founded May 15, 1851 at Wesleyan College in Macon, Georgia making it the first female fraternal organization. ... Beta Theta Pi (ΒΘΠ) is a college social fraternity founded at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, USA, where it is part of the Miami Triad which includes Phi Delta Theta and Sigma Chi. ... Kappa Alpha Theta (ΚΑΘ) is an international womens fraternity founded on January 27, 1870 at DePauw University. ... ΛΧΑ (Lambda Chi Alpha), headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, is one of the largest mens general fraternities in North America with more than 250,000 initiated members and chapters (called Zetas) at more than 300 universities. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Phi Delta Theta (ΦΔΘ) is an international fraternity founded in 1848 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... Phi Mu (ΦΜ) is the second oldest secret organization for women in the United States. ... Chi Omega (ΧΩ) is the largest womens fraternal organization in the National Panhellenic Conference[1]. Chi Omega boasts over 171 active collegiate chapters and hundreds of alumnae chapters. ...

This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

Presidents of Hanover College

  1. James Blythe, D.D. 1832-1836
  2. Duncan McAuley March to July, 1838
  3. Erasmus D. MacMaster, D.D 1838-1843
  4. Sylvester Scovel, D.D. 1846-1849
  5. Thomas E. Thomas, D.D. 1849-1854
  6. Jonathan Edwards, D.D., LL.D. 1855-1857
  7. James Wood, D.D. 1859-1866
  8. George D. Archibald, D.D. 1868-1870
  9. George C. Heckman, D.D. 1870-1879
  10. Daniel Fisher, D.D., LL.D. 1879-1907
  11. William A. Millis, A.M., LL.D. 1908-1929
  12. Albert Parker, B.D., Ph.D. 1929-1958
  13. John Horner, Ph.D. 1958-1987
  14. Russell Nichols, Ph.D. 1987-Present
  15. Sue DeWine, Ph.D., President-elect

Notable alumni

Stanley Coulter (June 2, 1853–June 26, 1943) was an American biologist, brother of J. M. Coulter, born at Ningpo, China, and educated at Hanover College. ... Purdue University (Purdue) is a land-grant, public university in West Lafayette, Indiana, United States. ... Woodrow Woody Tracy Harrelson (born July 23, 1961) is an American Emmy Award winning and Academy Award nominated actor. ... Cheers was an American situation comedy produced by Charles-Burrows-Charles Productions in association with Paramount Television for NBC. Cheers was created by the team of James Burrows, Glen Charles, and Les Charles. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819–November 25, 1885) was a Representative and a Senator from Indiana and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States. ... Seal of the office of the Vice-President of the United States The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the President. ... Walter LaFeber (born 1933, Walkerton, Indiana) is Marie Underhill Noll Professor and a Steven Weisse Presidential Teaching Fellow of History at Cornell University. ... Cornell University is a private university located in Ithaca, New York, USA. Its two medical campuses are in New York City and Education City, Qatar. ... Statue of President Patterson which sits in the main courtyard in front of Patterson Office Tower. ... The University of Kentucky, also referred to as UK, is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... Michael Richard Mike Pence (born June 7, 1959) is a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from Indianas 6th District (see map). ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... Carol Shields, CC , OM , D.Litt. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... LucasArts is an American video game developer and publisher. ... Lucasfilm Ltd. ... Harvey Washington Wiley Harvey Washington Wiley (October 30, 1844, Kent, Indiana - June 30, 1930, Washington, D.C.) was a noted chemist involved with the passage of the landmark Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906. ... The Pure Food and Drug Act of June 30, 1906 is a United States federal law that provided for federal inspection of meat products, and forbide the manufacture, sale, or transportation of adulterated food products or poisonous patent medicines. ... Jim Leonard (1910-December 2, 1993) was a two sport star at Notre Dame University during the 1930s, both as pitcher on baseball and fullback on football. ... Close to Home may refer to: Close to Home (TV series), an American television show Close to Home (comic strip), a syndicated comic strip Close to Home (soap opera), a New Zealand television show Close to Home (film), a 2001 movie Close to Home (film) - 2005, a 2005 Isreali movie...

External links

  • Official website
  • Official athletics website
  • Campus map
  • Center for Business Preparation

References

  1. ^ 2006 NACUBO endowment study. National Association of College and University Business Officers. Retrieved on 2007-04-26.

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