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Encyclopedia > Hannibal Hamlin
Hannibal Hamlin


In office
March 4, 1861 – March 4, 1865
President Abraham Lincoln
Preceded by John C. Breckinridge
Succeeded by Andrew Johnson

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Maine's 6th district
In office
March 4, 1843 – March 3, 1847
Preceded by Alfred Marshall
Succeeded by James S. Wiley

In office
June 8, 1848 – January 7, 1857
March 4, 1857January 17, 1861
March 4, 1869March 3, 1881
Preceded by Wyman B. S. Moor
Amos Nourse
Lot M. Morrill
Succeeded by Amos Nourse
Lot M. Morrill
Eugene Hale

In office
January 8, 1857 – February 25, 1857
Preceded by Samuel Wells
Succeeded by Joseph H. Williams

Born August 27, 1809
Paris, Maine
Died July 4, 1891 (aged 81)
Bangor, Maine
Political party Democratic
Republican
Spouse Ellen Vesta Emery Hamlin

Hannibal Hamlin (August 27, 1809July 4, 1891) was the fifteenth Vice President of the United States, serving under President Abraham Lincoln from 1861-1865. He was the first Vice President from the Republican Party. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2896x3347, 867 KB) Hannibal Hamlin, circa 1860-65. ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS,[2] Veep, or VP) is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1865 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... Maines 6th congressional district is obsolete. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... James Sullivan Wiley (January 22, 1808 - December 21, 1891) was a U.S. Representative from Maine. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Wyman Bradbury Seavy Moor (November 11, 1811–March 10, 1869) was an American politician and lawyer from the U.S. state of Maine. ... Amos Nourse (December 17, 1794–April 7, 1877) was a medical doctor and U.S. Senator for a very short term from the state of Maine. ... Lot Myrick Morrill (May 13, 1813 – January 10, 1883) was an American statesman who served as Governor of Maine, and in the United States Senate and as Secretary of the Treasury. ... Amos Nourse (December 17, 1794–April 7, 1877) was a medical doctor and U.S. Senator for a very short term from the state of Maine. ... Lot Myrick Morrill (May 13, 1813 – January 10, 1883) was an American statesman who served as Governor of Maine, and in the United States Senate and as Secretary of the Treasury. ... Eugene Hale (6 June 1836 - 27 October 1918) was a United States Senator from Maine. ... This is a list of Governors of Maine since statehood in 1820. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Paris is a town located in Oxford County, Maine. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other places with the same name, see Bangor. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... GOP redirects here. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS,[2] Veep, or VP) is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... GOP redirects here. ...


Prior to his election in 1860, Hamlin served in the United States Senate, the House of Representatives, and, briefly, as Governor of Maine. The United States presidential election of 1860 set the stage for the American Civil War. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... This is a list of Governors of Maine since statehood in 1820. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ...

Contents

Early life

Hamlin was born on Paris Hill (National Historic District) in Paris, Maine, in Oxford County, a descendant of James Hamlin in the sixth generation who had settled in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1639 and a great nephew of Senator Samuel Livermore II of New Hampshire.[citation needed] He attended the district schools and Hebron Academy there, and later managed his father's farm. For the next few years he worked at several jobs: schoolmaster, cook, woodcutter, surveyor, manager of a weekly newspaper in Paris, and a compositor at a printer's office. He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1833. He began practicing in Hampden, a suburb of Bangor, where he lived until 1848. Paris is a town located in Oxford County, Maine. ... Location in the state of Maine Formed 1805 Seat South Paris Area  - Total  - Water 5,634 km² (2,175 mi²) 252 km² (97 mi²) 4. ... A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony Capital Charlestown, Boston History  - Established 1629  - New England Confederation 1643  - Dominion of New England 1686  - Province of Massachusetts Bay 1692  - Disestablished 1692 The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on... Hebron Academy is a private, co-ed, college preparatory boarding school located in the small town of Hebron, Maine. ... For other uses, see Farm (disambiguation). ... Movable metal type Typesetting involves the presentation of textual material in an aesthetic form on paper or some other media. ... Hampden is a town located in Penobscot County, Maine. ... For other places with the same name, see Bangor. ...


Political beginnings

Hamlin's political career began in 1836, when he began a term in the Maine House of Representatives after being elected the year before. He served in the Aroostook War, which took place in 1839. Hamlin unsuccessfully ran for the United States House of Representatives in 1840 and left the state House in 1841. He later served two terms in the United States House of Representatives, from 1843-1847. He was elected to fill a Senate vacancy in 1848 and to a full term in 1851. A Democrat at the beginning of his career, Hamlin supported the candidacy of Franklin Pierce in 1852. The debating chamber of the Maine House of Representatives inside the State House The Maine House of Representatives is the lower house of the Maine Legislature. ... Combatants United States of America British Empire/British North America Strength 3,000–10,000 3,000–10,000 Casualties 38 incidental deaths The Aroostook War, also called the Pork and Beans War,the Lumberjacks War or the Northeastern Boundary Dispute, was an undeclared confrontation in 1838-39 between... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Franklin Pierce (November 23, 1804 – October 8, 1869) was an American politician and the fourteenth President of the United States, serving from 1853 to 1857. ...


From the very beginning of his service in Congress he was prominent as an opponent of the extension of slavery; he was a conspicuous supporter of the Wilmot Proviso, and spoke against the Compromise Measures of 1850. In 1854 he strongly opposed the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which repealed the Missouri Compromise. After the Democratic Party endorsed that repeal at the Cincinnati Convention two years later, on June 12, 1856 he withdrew from the Democratic Party and joined the newly organized Republican Party, causing a national sensation. The Wilmot Proviso was introduced on August 8, 1846 in the House of Representatives as a rider on a $2 million appropriations bill intended for the final negotiations to resolve the Mexican-American War. ... Henry Clay takes the floor of the Old Senate Chamber; Millard Fillmore presides as Calhoun and Webster look on. ... This 1856 map shows slave states (grey), free states (red), and US territories (green) with Kansas in center (white). ... The United States in 1820. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... is the 163rd day of the year (164th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... GOP redirects here. ...


The Republicans nominated him for Governor of Maine in the same year, and having carried the election by a large majority he was inaugurated in this office on the January 8, 1857. In the latter part of February, however, he resigned the governorship, and was again a member of the Senate from 1857 to January 1861. GOP redirects here. ... This is a list of Governors of Maine since statehood in 1820. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...

Hamlin in his younger years

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (622x756, 162 KB) http://hdl. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (622x756, 162 KB) http://hdl. ...

Vice Presidency

In 1860, he became vice president. While Vice President he was not necessarily one of the chief advisers to President Abraham Lincoln, although he urged both the Emancipation Proclamation and the arming of African Americans. He strongly supported Joseph Hooker's appointment as commander of the Army of The Potomac, which was a dismal failure. It is believed that this was among the decisions that along with his identification with the Radical Republicans caused him to be dropped from the ticket in 1864. Lincoln left no record of why he was switching his Vice-President. He chose Andrew Johnson, who was a member of the Democratic Party and a southerner. Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Emancipation Proclamation Reproduction of the Emancipation Proclamation at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, Ohio The Emancipation Proclamation consists of two executive orders issued by United States President Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War. ... African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... For the English botanist, see Joseph Dalton Hooker. ... Frémont (left), 1856 Republican parade banner The Radical Republicans were the remaining faction of American politicians within the Republican party during the American Civil War and Reconstruction following an 1864 exodus of pro-Lincoln Republicans into the creation of the National Union Party. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The U.S. Southern states or the South, also known colloquially as Dixie, constitute a distinctive region covering a large portion of the United States, with its own unique heritage, historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ...

Hamlin in his elder years

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 446 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (567 × 762 pixel, file size: 46 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 446 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (567 × 762 pixel, file size: 46 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ...

Later life

Hamlin served in the Senate from 1869 to 1881. In June 1881, President James Garfield nominated him for the post of ambassador to Spain, in which capacity he served from 1881 to 1882. After he completed the posting he retired from public life. James Abram Garfield (November 19, 1831–September 19, 1881) was a major general in the United States Army, member of the U.S. House of Representatives, and the twentieth President of the United States. ... // ^ John Jay proceeded to post but was not formally received at court. ...


Family

He had three sons, Charles Hamlin, Cyrus Hamlin, and Hannibal Emery Hamlin. Charles and Cyrus served in the Union forces during the Civil War. Charles and sister Sarah were present at Ford's Theater the night of Lincoln's assassination. Hannibal Emery Hamlin was Maine Attorney General from 1905 to 1908. Hannibal Hamlin's great-granddaughter Sally Hamlin was a child actor who made many spoken word recordings for the Victor Talking Machine Company in the early years of the 20th century. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Fords Theatre in the 19th century Fords Theatre in Washington, D.C. was the site of the assassination of U.S. President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865. ... Assassination of Abraham Lincoln From left to right: Major Henry Rathbone, Clara Harris, Mary Todd Lincoln, Abraham Lincoln, and John Wilkes Booth. ... G. Steven Rowe is the current attorney general of the state of Maine, United States, since 2001. ... Sally Hamlin (born Sarah Emery Hamlin, 1902, Brooklyn, New York, USA) was a child actor and recording artist. ... The term child actor is generally applied to a child acting in motion pictures or television, but also to an adult who began his or her acting career as a child; to avoid confusion the latter is also called a former child actor. ... Spoken word is a form of music or artistic performance in which lyrics, poetry, or stories are spoken rather than sung. ... Victor logo with the famous Nipper dog. ...


There are biographies of Hamlin by his grandson Charles E. Hamlin (published 1899, reprinted 1971) and by H. Draper Hunt (published 1969).


Miscellaneous

Hamlin County, South Dakota is named in his honor, as is Hamlin, West Virginia, the county seat of Lincoln County and Hamlin, New York. There are statues in Hamlin's likeness in the United States Capitol and in a public park (Norumbega Mall) in Bangor. There is also a building on the University of Maine Campus, in Orono, named Hannibal Hamlin Hall. Hamlin County is a county located in the U.S. state of South Dakota. ... Hamlin is a town located in Lincoln County, West Virginia. ... Lincoln County is a county located in the state of West Virginia. ... Hamlin is a town located in Monroe County, New York. ... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the seat of government for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... Norumbega (or Norumbègue, Nurumbega, etc) was a legendary settlement in northeastern North America. ...


External links

The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ...

References

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Alfred Marshall
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Maine's 6th congressional district

March 4, 1843March 3, 1847 (obsolete district)
Succeeded by
James S. Wiley
United States Senate
Preceded by
Wyman B. S. Moor
United States Senator (Class 1) from Maine
June 8, 1848January 7, 1857
Served alongside: James W. Bradbury and William P. Fessenden
Succeeded by
Amos Nourse
Political offices
Preceded by
Samuel Wells
Governor of Maine
January 8, 1857February 25, 1857
Succeeded by
Joseph H. Williams
United States Senate
Preceded by
Amos Nourse
United States Senator (Class 1) from Maine
March 4, 1857January 17, 1861
Served alongside: William P. Fessenden
Succeeded by
Lot M. Morrill
Political offices
Preceded by
William L. Dayton
Republican Party vice presidential candidate
1860 (won)
Succeeded by
Andrew Johnson(1)
Preceded by
John C. Breckinridge
Vice President of the United States
March 4, 1861March 4, 1865
United States Senate
Preceded by
Lot M. Morrill
United States Senator (Class 1) from Maine
March 4, 1869March 3, 1881
Served alongside: William P. Fessenden, Lot M. Morrill and James G. Blaine
Succeeded by
Eugene Hale
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Lucius Fairchild
United States Minister to Spain
June 30, 1881October 17, 1882
Succeeded by
John W. Foster
Notes and references
1. Lincoln and Johnson ran on the National Union ticket in 1864.
Persondata
NAME Hamlin, Hannibal
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION first Republican to serve as Vice President of the United States
DATE OF BIRTH August 27, 1809(1809-08-27)
PLACE OF BIRTH Paris, Maine, USA
DATE OF DEATH July 4, 1891
PLACE OF DEATH Bangor, Maine, U.S.


Hannibal Hamlin was governer of Spain for around a month. Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... These are tables of congressional delegations from Maine to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... Maines 6th congressional district is obsolete. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... James Sullivan Wiley (January 22, 1808 - December 21, 1891) was a U.S. Representative from Maine. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Wyman Bradbury Seavy Moor (November 11, 1811–March 10, 1869) was an American politician and lawyer from the U.S. state of Maine. ... Maine was admitted to the Union on March 15, 1820. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... James Ware Bradbury (June 10, 1802–January 6, 1901) was a United States Senator from Maine. ... William Pitt Fessenden (October 16, 1806 – September 8, 1869) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... Amos Nourse (December 17, 1794–April 7, 1877) was a medical doctor and U.S. Senator for a very short term from the state of Maine. ... This is a list of Governors of Maine since statehood in 1820. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Amos Nourse (December 17, 1794–April 7, 1877) was a medical doctor and U.S. Senator for a very short term from the state of Maine. ... Maine was admitted to the Union on March 15, 1820. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1857 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... William Pitt Fessenden (October 16, 1806 – September 8, 1869) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... Lot Myrick Morrill (May 13, 1813 – January 10, 1883) was an American statesman who served as Governor of Maine, and in the United States Senate and as Secretary of the Treasury. ... William Lewis Dayton (February 17, 1807 – December 1, 1864) was an American politician. ... This is a list of the candidates for the offices of President of the United States and Vice President of the United States of the Republican Party of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS,[2] Veep, or VP) is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1865 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Lot Myrick Morrill (May 13, 1813 – January 10, 1883) was an American statesman who served as Governor of Maine, and in the United States Senate and as Secretary of the Treasury. ... Maine was admitted to the Union on March 15, 1820. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... William Pitt Fessenden (October 16, 1806 – September 8, 1869) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... Lot Myrick Morrill (May 13, 1813 – January 10, 1883) was an American statesman who served as Governor of Maine, and in the United States Senate and as Secretary of the Treasury. ... James Gillespie Blaine (January 31, 1830 – January 27, 1893) was a U.S. Representative, Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, U.S. Senator from Maine and a two-time United States Secretary of State. ... Eugene Hale (6 June 1836 - 27 October 1918) was a United States Senator from Maine. ... Lucius Fairchild Lucius Fairchild (December 27, 1831 – May 23, 1896) was an American politician, army general, and diplomat. ... // ^ John Jay proceeded to post but was not formally received at court. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Portrait of U.S. Secretary of State John W. Foster John Watson Foster (March 2, 1836 – November 15, 1917) was an American military man, journalist and diplomat. ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS,[2] Veep, or VP) is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... For other persons named John Adams, see John Adams (disambiguation). ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... This article discusses Aaron Burr (1756-1836), the U.S. politician. ... George Clinton (July 26, 1739 – April 20, 1812) was an American soldier and politician. ... Elbridge Thomas Gerry (pronounced ) (July 17, 1744 – November 23, 1814) was an American statesman and diplomat. ... Daniel D. Tompkins (June 21, 1774 – June 11, 1825) was an entrepreneur, jurist, Congressman, Governor of New York, and the sixth Vice President of the United States. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 – November 19, 1850) was the ninth Vice President of the United States, serving in the administration of Martin Van Buren. ... John Tyler, Jr. ... For other persons named George Dallas, see George Dallas (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Mallard Fillmore. ... William Rufus DeVane King William Rufus DeVane King (April 7, 1786–April 18, 1853) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and the thirteenth Vice President of the United States. ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other persons named Henry Wilson, see Henry Wilson (disambiguation). ... William Almon Wheeler (June 30, 1819 – June 4, 1887) was a Representative from New York and the nineteenth Vice President of the United States. ... Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886) was an American politician who served as the 21st President of the United States. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819 – November 25, 1885)[1] was a U.S. Representative and a Senator from Indiana, a Governor of Indiana, and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States (serving with Grover Cleveland). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Adlai E. Stevenson I Adlai Ewing Stevenson I (October 23, 1835 – June 14, 1914) was a Representative from Illinois and the twenty-third Vice President of the United States. ... Garret Augustus Hobart (June 3, 1844–November 21, 1899) was the twenty-fourth Vice President of the United States. ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... Charles Warren Fairbanks (May 11, 1852 – June 4, 1918) was a Senator from Indiana and the twenty-sixth Vice President of the United States. ... James Schoolcraft Sherman (October 24, 1855 – October 30, 1912) was a Representative from New York and the 27th Vice President of the United States. ... Thomas R. Marshall Thomas Riley Marshall (March 14, 1854 – June 1, 1925) was an American politician who served as the twenty-eighth Vice President of the United States of America under Woodrow Wilson from 1913 to 1921. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... Charles Gates Dawes (August 27, 1865 – April 23, 1951) was an American banker and politician who was the 30th Vice President of the United States. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... John Nance Garner IV (November 22, 1868 – November 7, 1967) was a Representative from Texas and the thirty-second Vice President of the United States (1933-41). ... Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) was the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941–45), the 11th Secretary of Agriculture (1933–40), and the 10th Secretary of Commerce (1945–46). ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... Alben William Barkley (November 24, 1877 – April 30, 1956) was a Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives and the United States Senate from Kentucky, and the thirty-fifth Vice President of the United States. ... Nixon redirects here. ... LBJ redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hubert Humphrey (disambiguation). ... Spiro Theodore Agnew (November 9, 1918 – September 17, 1996) was the thirty-ninth Vice President of the United States serving under President Richard M. Nixon, and the fifty-fifth Governor of Maryland. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979) was an American Vice President, governor of New York State, philanthropist and businessman. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... James Danforth[1][2] Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) is an American politician and a former Senator from the state of Indiana. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... This is a list of the candidates for the offices of President of the United States and Vice President of the United States of the Republican Party of the United States. ... William Lewis Dayton (February 17, 1807 – December 1, 1864) was an American politician. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other persons named Henry Wilson, see Henry Wilson (disambiguation). ... William Almon Wheeler (June 30, 1819 – June 4, 1887) was a Representative from New York and the nineteenth Vice President of the United States. ... Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886) was an American politician who served as the 21st President of the United States. ... For other persons with similar names, see John Logan. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Whitelaw Reid Whitelaw Reid (October 27, 1837 - December 15, 1912) was a U.S. politician and newspaper editor, as well as the author of a popular history of Ohio in the Civil War. ... Garret Augustus Hobart (June 3, 1844–November 21, 1899) was the twenty-fourth Vice President of the United States. ... For other persons named Theodore Roosevelt, see Theodore Roosevelt (disambiguation). ... Charles Warren Fairbanks (May 11, 1852 – June 4, 1918) was a Senator from Indiana and the twenty-sixth Vice President of the United States. ... James Schoolcraft Sherman (October 24, 1855 – October 30, 1912) was a Representative from New York and the 27th Vice President of the United States. ... Nicholas Murray Butler Nicholas Murray Butler (April 2, 1862 – December 7, 1947) was an American philosopher, diplomat, and educator. ... Charles Warren Fairbanks (May 11, 1852 – June 4, 1918) was a Senator from Indiana and the twenty-sixth Vice President of the United States. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... Charles Gates Dawes (August 27, 1865 – April 23, 1951) was an American banker and politician who was the 30th Vice President of the United States. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Frank Knox William Franklin Frank Knox (January 1, 1874–April 28, 1944) was the Secretary of the Navy under Franklin D. Roosevelt during most of World War II. He was also the Republican vice presidential candidate in 1936. ... Charles L. McNary Charles Linza McNary (June 12, 1874 - February 25, 1944) was a U.S. Republican politician from Oregon, best known for serving as Minority Leader of the United States Senate from 1933 to 1944. ... John William Bricker (September 6, 1893 – March 22, 1986) was a United States politician from Ohio. ... For the swing saxophonist and occasional singer, see Earle Warren Earl Warren (March 19, 1891 – July 9, 1974) was a California district attorney of Alameda County, the 20th Attorney General of California, the 30th Governor of California, and the 14th Chief Justice of the United States (from 1953 to 1969). ... Nixon redirects here. ... Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. ... William Edward Miller (March 22, 1914 – June 24, 1983), was an American politician. ... Spiro Theodore Agnew (November 9, 1918 – September 17, 1996) was the thirty-ninth Vice President of the United States serving under President Richard M. Nixon, and the fifty-fifth Governor of Maryland. ... § Robert Joseph Dole (born July 22, 1923) was a United States Senator from Kansas from 1969-1996, serving part of that time as United States Senate Majority Leader. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... James Danforth[1][2] Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) is an American politician and a former Senator from the state of Indiana. ... Jack French Kemp Jr. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... Maine was admitted to the Union on March 15, 1820. ... This is the first page of a two-page letter written to Holmes by Thomas Jefferson on April 22, 1820. ... Albion Keith Parris (January 19, 1788–February 11, 1857) was an American politician and jurist of Maine. ... This is the first page of a two-page letter written to Holmes by Thomas Jefferson on April 22, 1820. ... Ether Shepley (November 2, 1789—1877) was an American politician. ... Judah Dana (April 25, 1772–December 27, 1845) was a Maine statesman and U.S. Senator. ... Reuel Williams (June 2, 1783–July 25, 1862) was a U.S. Senator from Maine. ... John Fairfield (January 30, 1797–December 24, 1847) was a U.S. politician from Maine. ... Wyman Bradbury Seavy Moor (November 11, 1811–March 10, 1869) was an American politician and lawyer from the U.S. state of Maine. ... Amos Nourse (December 17, 1794–April 7, 1877) was a medical doctor and U.S. Senator for a very short term from the state of Maine. ... Lot Myrick Morrill (May 13, 1813 – January 10, 1883) was an American statesman who served as Governor of Maine, and in the United States Senate and as Secretary of the Treasury. ... Eugene Hale (6 June 1836 - 27 October 1918) was a United States Senator from Maine. ... Charles Fletcher Johnson (February 14, 1859–February 15, 1930) was a Democratic U.S. Senator from Maine from 1911 until 1917. ... Frederick Hale (1874–1963) was Republican U.S. Senator from Maine. ... Owen Brewster Ralph Owen Brewster (February 22, 1888–December 25, 1961) was an American politician from Maine. ... Frederick George Payne (July 24, 1904 - June 15, 1978) was a Republican politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... Edmund Muskie (March 28, 1914 – March 26, 1996) was an American Democratic politician from Maine. ... For other persons with a similar name, see George Mitchell George John Mitchell, GBE (born August 20, 1933) is a former Democratic Party politician and United States Senator from the state of Maine, and currently serves as Chairman of the global law firm DLA Piper US LLP and also as... Olympia Jean Bouchles Snowe (born February 21, 1947 in Augusta, Maine) is a Republican politician and the senior United States Senator from Maine. ... John Chandler (February 1, 1762—September 25, 1841) was an American politician and soldier of Maine. ... Categories: People stubs | United States Senators | 1793 births | 1880 deaths | Members of the U.S. House of Representatives ... John Ruggles (October 8, 1789—June 20, 1874) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. ... James Ware Bradbury (June 10, 1802–January 6, 1901) was a United States Senator from Maine. ... William Pitt Fessenden (October 16, 1806 – September 8, 1869) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... Nathan Allen Farwell (February 24, 1812 – December 9, 1893) was a politician, businessman and United States Senator from Maine. ... William Pitt Fessenden (October 16, 1806 – September 8, 1869) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... Lot Myrick Morrill (May 13, 1813 – January 10, 1883) was an American statesman who served as Governor of Maine, and in the United States Senate and as Secretary of the Treasury. ... James Gillespie Blaine (January 31, 1830 – January 27, 1893) was a U.S. Representative, Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, U.S. Senator from Maine and a two-time United States Secretary of State. ... William Pierce Frye William Pierce Frye (September 2, 1830 – August 8, 1911) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... Obadiah Gardner (September 13, 1852—July 24, 1938) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... Edwin Chick Burleigh (November 27, 1843–June 16, 1916) was an American politican from the state of Maine. ... Bert Manfred Fernald (April 3, 1858–August 23, 1926) was a Maine politician who served as Governor of and U.S. Senator from that state. ... Arthur Robinson Gould (March 16, 1857–July 24, 1946) was a United States Senator from Maine. ... Wallace Humphrey White, Jr. ... Margaret Chase Smith (December 14, 1897–May 29, 1995) was a Republican Senator from Maine, and one of the most successful politicians in Maine history. ... Categories: Stub | 1924 births | United States Senators ... William Sebastian Cohen (1940- ) is an author and American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... Susan Margaret Collins (born December 7, 1952, in Caribou, Maine) is an American politician, the junior U.S. Senator from Maine and a Republican. ... This is a list of Governors of Maine since statehood in 1820. ... William King (1768-1862) was an American merchant, ship-builder, and statesman from Bath, Maine. ... William Durkee Williamson (July 31, 1779 - May 27, 1846) was a Democratic-Republican governor of the U.S. state of Maine who served from May 29, 1821 to December 5, 1821. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Albion Keith Parris (January 19, 1788–February 11, 1857) was an American politician and jurist of Maine. ... Enoch Lincoln (December 28, 1788 - October 8, 1829) was a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts and from Maine, son of [[Levi Lincoln [1749-1820] and brother of Levi Lincoln [1782-1868]]]. Born in Worcester, Massachusetts, Lincoln was graduated from Harvard University in 1807. ... Joshua Gilman Hall (November 5, 1828 - October 31, 1898) was a U.S. Representative from New Hampshire. ... Edward Kent (January 8, 1802–May 19, 1877) was the Governor of the U.S. state of Maine during the Aroostook War. ... John Fairfield (January 30, 1797–December 24, 1847) was a U.S. politician from Maine. ... Edward Kent (January 8, 1802–May 19, 1877) was the Governor of the U.S. state of Maine during the Aroostook War. ... John Fairfield (January 30, 1797–December 24, 1847) was a U.S. politician from Maine. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Hugh Johnston Anderson (May 10, 1801 - May 31, 1881) was a United States Representative from Maine. ... John Hubbard was a native of Readfield, Maine. ... Anson P. Morrill Anson Peaslee Morrill (June 10, 1803–July 4, 1887) was an American statesman. ... Lot Myrick Morrill (May 13, 1813 – January 10, 1883) was an American statesman who served as Governor of Maine, and in the United States Senate and as Secretary of the Treasury. ... Israel Washburn, Jr. ... Abner Coburn (March 22, 1803-January 4, 1885), was the Governor of Maine from 1863 to 1864 and a prominent individual in Skowhegan, Maine until his death. ... Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain (September 8, 1828 – February 24, 1914) was an American college professor from the State of Maine, who volunteered during the American Civil War to join the Union Army without the benefit of any formal military education, and became a highly respected and decorated Union officer, reaching the... Sidney Perham (March 27, 1819 – April 10, 1907) was a U.S. Representative and Governor of Maine and was an activist in the temperance movement. ... Nelson Dingley, Jr. ... Dr. Alonozo Garcelon (May 6, 1813 – December 8, 1906) was a Governor of Maine, an American Civil War surgeon general, and a founder of Bates College in Lewiston, Maine. ... Harris Merrill Plaisted (November 2, 1828 - January 31, 1898) was a U.S. Representative from Maine. ... Edwin Chick Burleigh (November 27, 1843–June 16, 1916) was an American politican from the state of Maine. ... Llewellyn Powers (October 14, 1836 - July 28, 1908) was a U.S. Representative from Maine. ... John Fremont Hill (1855-1912) was an American capitalist and public official, born at Eliot, Me. ... Bert Manfred Fernald (April 3, 1858–August 23, 1926) was a Maine politician who served as Governor of and U.S. Senator from that state. ... Carl E. Milliken was born on July 13, 1877 in Pittsfield, Maine. ... Frederic Parkhurst was born in Bangor in 1864. ... Percival Proctor Baxter (November 22, 1876 – June 12, 1969) was a Republican governor of the U.S. state of Maine who served from 1921 to 1925. ... Owen Brewster Ralph Owen Brewster (February 22, 1888–December 25, 1961) was an American politician from Maine. ... Sumner Sewall (June 17, 1897 – January 25, 1965) was a U.S. Republican politician and airline executive who served as the Governor of Maine from 1941 to 1945. ... Horace Augustus Hildreth was born on December 2, 1902 in Gardiner, Maine, the son of an attorney. ... Frederick George Payne (July 24, 1904 - June 15, 1978) was a Republican politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... Nathaniel Mervin Haskell (born September 27, 1912 in Pittsfield, Maine; died February 7, 1983 in Portland, Maine) is a former Maine Republican politician. ... Burton Melvin Cross (born November 15, 1902 in Gardiner, Maine; died October 22, 1998 in Augusta, Maine) is a former Maine Republican politician. ... Edmund Muskie (March 28, 1914 – March 26, 1996) was an American Democratic politician from Maine. ... Clinton Amos Clauson (born March 25, 1895 in Mitchell, Iowa; died 1959 in Maine) was a Democratic Party politician linked most to Maine. ... ... Kenneth Merwin Curtis (born February 8, 1931 in Leeds, Maine) is a former democratic politician, and is currently a principal in the law firm of Curtis Thaxter Stevens Broder & Micoleau Limited Liability Company, P.A. Curtis was a Lieutenant Commander in the U.S. Navy and received his law degree... James Bernard Longley (April 22, 1924-August 16, 1980), U.S. politician, He served as Governor of Maine from 1975 to 1979, and was the first Independent to serve as the states Governor. ... Joseph Edward Brennan (born November 2, 1934) is an American politician from Maine and a Democrat. ... John Rettie Jock McKernan, Jr. ... Angus King Angus S. King, Jr. ... John Elias Baldacci (born January 30, 1955) is the current Governor of the U.S. State of Maine. ... The Cabinet meets in the Cabinet Room on May 16, 2001. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS,[2] Veep, or VP) is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2850x3742, 1215 KB) Description Abraham Lincoln, 16th President of the United States of America. ... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... William Henry Seward, Sr. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... William Pitt Fessenden (October 16, 1806 – September 8, 1869) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Maine. ... Hugh McCulloch Hugh McCulloch (December 7, 1808 – May 24, 1895) was an American statesman who served two non-consecutive terms as U.S. Treasury Secretary, serving under three presidents. ... The Secretary of War was a member of the United States Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... Simon Cameron Simon Cameron (March 8, 1799 – June 26, 1889) was United States Secretary of War for Abraham Lincoln from 1861 to 1862. ... The Running Machine An 1864 cartoon featuring Stanton, William Fessenden, Abraham Lincoln, William Seward and Gideon Welles takes a swing at the Lincoln administration. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice (see 28 U.S.C. Â§ 503) concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Note: This article is about the American lawyer. ... James Speed (March 11, 1812–June 25, 1887) was a American lawyer, politician and professor. ... The United States Postmaster General is the executive head of the United States Postal Service. ... Montgomery Blair (May 10, 1813–July 27, 1883), son of Francis Preston Blair and elder brother of Francis Preston Blair, Jr. ... William Dennison, Jr. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... Gideon Welles (July 1, 1802–February 11, 1878) was the United States Secretary of the Navy from 1861 to 1869, including the entire duration of the American Civil War: his dedication to naval blockades was one of the key reasons for the Norths victory over the South. ... The United States Secretary of the Interior is the head of the United States Department of the Interior, concerned with such matters as national parks and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Caleb Blood Smith (April 16, 1808 – January 7, 1864) was an American journalist and politician, serving in the Cabinet of Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War. ... John Palmer Usher (1816 - 1889) was a U.S. administrator. ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS,[2] Veep, or VP) is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Paris is a town located in Oxford County, Maine. ... ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other places with the same name, see Bangor. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American...


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Hamlin, Hannibal (1109 words)
Hannibal Hamlin (August 27, 1809 – July 4, 1891) was an American politician from the state of Maine.
Hamlin was born on Paris Hill (National Historic District) in Paris, Maine, in Oxford County, a descendant of James Hamlin who had settled in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1639.
Hamlin was isolated as Vice President, was not a part of the Kitchen Cabinet, and did not object to Johnson's substitution on the ticket.
Hannibal Hamlin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (644 words)
Hannibal Hamlin (August 27, 1809 July 4, 1891) was an American politician from the U.S. state of Maine.
Hamlin was born in the Paris Hill district of South Paris, Maine, in Oxford County.
Hamlin served in the Senate from 1869 to 1881.
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