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Encyclopedia > Hannah Arendt
Western Philosophers
20th-century philosophy
Hannah Arendt
Name: Hannah Arendt
Birth: October 14, 1906 (Linden, Germany)
Death: December 4, 1975 (New York, United States)
School/tradition: Phenomenology
Main interests: Politics, Metaphysics, Epistemology, Greek philosophy, technology, Ontology, modernity, philosophy of history
Influences: Pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Jesus, Paul, Duns Scotus, Saint Augustine, Machiavelli, Montesquieu, Kant, Tocqueville, Marx, Heidegger, Russell, Jaspers, Benjamin
Influenced: Jürgen Habermas, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Giorgio Agamben , Seyla Benhabib, Elisabeth Young-Bruehl

Hannah Arendt (October 14, 1906December 4, 1975) was a German Jewish political theorist. She has often been described as a philosopher, although she always refused that label on the grounds that philosophy is concerned with "man in the singular". She described herself instead as a political theorist because her work centers on the fact that "men, not Man, live on the earth and inhabit the world." It has been suggested that Contemporary philosophy be merged into this article or section. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Linden is one of three English names for a genus of trees, Tilia, also known as lime and basswood. ... December 4th redirects here. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... NY redirects here. ... This article is about the philosophical movement. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Politics is the process by which groups of people make decisions. ... Plato (Left) and Aristotle (right), by Raphael (Stanza della Segnatura, Rome) Metaphysics is the branch of philosophy concerned with explaining the ultimate nature of reality, being, and the world. ... It has been suggested that Meta-epistemology be merged into this article or section. ... Greek philosophy focused on the role of reason and inquiry. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... // In philosophy, ontology (from the Greek , genitive : of being (part. ... Modernity is a term used to describe the condition of being modern. Since the term modern is used to describe a wide range of periods, modernity must be understood in its context. ... Philosophy of History is an area of philosophy concerning the eventual significance, if any, of human history. ... Pre-Socratic philosophers are often very hard to pin down, and it is sometimes very difficult to determine the actual line of argument they used in supporting their particular views. ... This page is about the ancient Greek philosopher. ... PLATO was one of the first generalized Computer assisted instruction systems, originally built by the University of Illinois (U of I) and later taken over by Control Data Corporation (CDC), who provided the machines it ran on. ... Aristotle (Greek: AristotélÄ“s) (384 BC – 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Look up Paul in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Blessed John Duns Scotus (c. ... “Augustinus” redirects here. ... Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli (May 3, 1469 – June 21, 1527) was an Italian political philosopher, musician, poet, and romantic comedic playwright. ... Montesquieu in 1728. ... “Kant” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Tocqueville (disambiguation) Alexis de Tocqueville Alexis-Charles-Henri Clérel de Tocqueville (Verneuil-sur-Seine, ÃŽle-de-France, July 29, 1805– Cannes, April 16, 1859) was a French political thinker and historian. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a German philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... Martin Heidegger (September 26, 1889 – May 26, 1976) (pronounced ) was a highly influential German philosopher. ... Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 3rd Earl Russell, OM, FRS, (18 May 1872 – 2 February 1970), was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, advocate for social reform, and pacifist. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Walter Bendix Schönflies Benjamin (July 15, 1892 – September 27, 1940) was a German Marxist literary critic, essayist, translator, and philosopher. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Maurice Merleau-Ponty (March 14, 1908 – May 4, 1961) was a French phenomenologist philosopher, strongly influenced by Edmund Husserl. ... Giorgio Agamben (born 1942) is an Italian philosopher who teaches at the Università IUAV di Venezia. ... Seyla Benhabib (born 1950, Istanbul) is a Turkish professor of political science and philosophy at Yale and director of the program in Ethics, Politics, and Economics, and a well-known contemporary philosopher. ... Elisabeth Young-Bruehl (born 1946 as Elisabeth Young) is an American academic and psychotherapist, currently a practicing psychoanalyst in New York City and on the faculty of the Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... December 4th redirects here. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A political theorist is someone who engages in political theory. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... Niccolò Machiavelli, ca 1500, became the key figure in realistic political theory, crucial to political science Political Science is the systematic study of the allocation and transfer of power in decision making. ...

Contents

Biography

Hannah Arendt was born into a family of secular Jews in the city of Linden (now part of Hanover), and grew up in Königsberg and Berlin. Hanover (German: , IPA: ), on the river Leine, is the capital of the federal state of Lower Saxony (Niedersachsen), Germany. ... Former German name of the city of Kaliningrad. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ...


At the University of Marburg, she studied philosophy with Martin Heidegger, with whom she embarked on a long, stormy romantic relationship that was criticized because of Heidegger's membership in the Nazi party. University of Marburg - Department of Social Sciences and University library The old university The University of Marburg (German: Philipps-Universität Marburg Philips University, Marburg), was founded in 1527 by Landgrave Philipp I of Hesse (usually called the Magnanimous, although the updated meaning haughty is sometimes given) as the... Martin Heidegger (September 26, 1889 – May 26, 1976) (pronounced ) was a highly influential German philosopher. ... National Socialism redirects here. ...


In the wake of one of their breakups, Arendt moved to Heidelberg, where she wrote her dissertation on the concept of love in the thought of Saint Augustine, under the existentialist philosopher-psychologist Karl Jaspers. Heidelberg is a city in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. ... This article is about the thesis in dialectics and academia. ... “Augustinus” redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


She married Günther Stern, later knowns as Günther Anders, in 1929 in Berlin (they divorced in 1937). Günther Anders (born Günther Stern) (Breslau, July 12, 1902 - Vienna, December 17, 1992) was a German philosopher. ... Günther Anders (Günther Stern) (WrocÅ‚aw, July 12th, 1902 - Vienna, December 17th, 1992) was a German philosopher. ...


The dissertation was published the same year, but Arendt was prevented from habilitating, a prerequisite for teaching in German universities, because she was Jewish. She worked for some time researching anti-Semitism before being interrogated by the Gestapo, and thereupon fled Germany for Paris. Here she met and befriended the literary critic and Marxist philosopher Walter Benjamin, her first husband's cousin. While in France, Arendt worked to support and aid Jewish refugees. Habilitation is a term used within the university system in Germany, Austria, and some other European countries such as the German-speaking part of Switzerland, in Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary and Slovenia. ... The Eternal Jew: 1937 German poster. ... This article or section includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) The Eiffel Tower in Paris, as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ... Marxism takes its name from the praxis (the synthesis of philosophy and political action) of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. ... Walter Bendix Schönflies Benjamin (July 15, 1892 – September 27, 1940) was a German Marxist literary critic, essayist, translator, and philosopher. ...


However, with the German military occupation of parts of France following the French declaration of war during World War II, and the deportation of Jews to Nazi concentration camps, Arendt was forced to flee France. In 1940, she married the German poet and Marxist philosopher Heinrich Blücher. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... See also the related List of German concentration camps Concentration camp in Nazi Germany. ... Marxism is the political practice and social theory based on the works of Karl Marx, a 19th century philosopher, economist, journalist, and revolutionary, along with Friedrich Engels. ... Image:Arendt-blucher. ...


In 1941, Arendt escaped with her husband and her mother to the United States with the assistance of the American diplomat Hiram Bingham IV, who illegally issued visas to her and around 2500 other Jewish refugees. She then became active in the German-Jewish community in New York and wrote for the weekly Aufbau. She worked as the Executive Secretary for Jewish Cultural Reconstruction, Inc. As US Vice Consul in France during World War II, Hiram Bingham IV helped save over 2500 lives by granting Jews visas to escape the country. ... Aufbau is a weekly published by the German-Jewish community in New York, and founded in 1934. ...


After World War II she returned to Germany and worked for Youth Aliyah. Later she resumed relations with Heidegger, and testified on his behalf in a German denazification hearing. She became a close friend of Jaspers and his Jewish wife,[1] developing a deep intellectual friendship with him and began corresponding with Mary McCarthy.[2] In 1950, she became a naturalized citizen of the United States. Arendt served as a visiting scholar at the University of California, Berkeley, Princeton University, Columbia University, and Northwestern University. She also served as a professor on the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago, as well as at The New School in New York City, and served as a fellow at Yale University and Wesleyan University. In 1959, she became the first woman appointed to a full professorship at Princeton. The Youth Aliyah is a Jewish organisation who saved 22. ... Denazification (German: Entnazifizierung) was an Allied initiative to rid German and Austrian society, culture, press, economy, judiciary and politics of any remnants of the Nazi regime. ... Mary Therese McCarthy (June 21, 1912 – October 25, 1989) was an American author and critic. ... Naturalization is the process whereby a person becomes a national of a nation, or a citizen of a country, other than the one of his birth. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey, in the United States of America. ... Columbia University is a private research university in the United States. ... Northwestern University is a private, coeducational, non-sectarian research university located in Evanston and Chicago, Illinois. ... The Committee on Social Thought, one of several PhD-granting committees at the University of Chicago, was started in 1941 by the historian John U. Nef along with economist Frank Knight, anthropologist Robert Redfield, and University President Robert Maynard Hutchins. ... The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ... The New School is an institution of higher learning in New York City, located around Greenwich Village in Lower Manhattan. ... “Yale” redirects here. ... Wesleyan University is a private liberal arts college founded in 1831 and located in Middletown, Connecticut. ...


On her death at age 69 in 1975, Arendt was buried at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, where her husband taught for many years. For other meanings of the word Bard, see Bard (disambiguation). ... Annandale-on-Hudson is a hamlet in Dutchess County, New York, USA, in the Hudson Valley in the Town of Red Hook, across the Hudson River from Kingston. ...


Arendt was instrumental in the creation of Structured Liberal Education (SLE) at Stanford University. She wrote a letter to the then president of Stanford University to convince the university to enact Mark Mancall's vision of a residentially-based humanities program. Structured Liberal Education (SLE) is a department at Stanford University that offers an alternative three-course sequence for freshmen to fulfill their IHUM and PWR requirements. ... Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly known as Stanford University (or simply Stanford), is a private university located approximately 37 miles (60 kilometers) southeast of San Francisco and approximately 20 miles northwest of San José in Stanford, California. ...


Works

Arendt's work deals with the nature of power, and the subjects of politics, authority, and totalitarianism. Much of her work focuses on affirming a conception of freedom which is synonymous with collective political action among equals. Much of the recent sociological debate on power revolves around the issue of constraining and/or enabling nature of power. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Politics is the process by which groups of people make decisions. ... Authority- is a very talented rocknroll band out of Columbia, S.C. This power rock trio has its roots in rock, funk, hardcore, and a dash of hip hop. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Totalitarianism is a term employed by political scientists, especially those in the field of comparative politics, to describe modern regimes in which the state regulates nearly every aspect of public and private behavior. ...


Arendt theorizes freedom as public and associative, drawing on examples from the Greek "polis," American townships, the Paris Commune, and the civil rights movements of the 1960's (among others) to illustrate this conception of freedom. A polis (πόλις, pronunciation pol-is) plural: poleis (πόλεις) is a city, a city-state and also citizenship and body of citizens. ... The term township is used to denote a lower level territorial subdivision. ... Le Père Duchesne looking at the statue of Napoleon I on top of the Vendome column: Eh ben ! bougre de canaille, on va donc te foutre en bas comme ta crapule de neveu !… (Well now! buggering rascal, we will knock you the fuck off just like your crook of... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Another key concept in her work is "natality," the capacity to bring something new into the world, such as the founding of a government that endures.


Arguably her most influential work, The Human Condition (1958) distinguishes labour, work, and action, and explores the implications of these distinctions. Her theory of political action is extensively developed in this work. The Human Condition, published in 1958, is one of the central theoretical works of the philosopher Hannah Arendt. ...


Her first major book was The Origins of Totalitarianism, which traced the roots of Stalinist Communism and Nazism in both anti-Semitism and imperialism. The book was controversial because it suggested an essential identity between the two phenomena, which some believe to be separate in both origins and nature. The Origins of Totalitarianism is a book by Hannah Arendt, dedicated to her husband Heinrich Blücher. ... Stalinism is a brand of political theory, and the political and economic system implemented by Joseph Stalin in the Soviet Union. ... Communism is an ideology that seeks to establish a classless, stateless social organization based on common ownership of the means of production. ... National Socialism redirects here. ... The Eternal Jew: 1937 German poster. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


In her reporting of the Eichmann trial for The New Yorker, which evolved into the book Eichmann in Jerusalem, she coined the phrase "the banality of evil." She raised the question whether evil is radical or simply a function of banality - the tendency of ordinary people to obey orders and conform to mass opinion without critically thinking about the results of their action or inaction. This work created a great deal of controversy and animosity toward Arendt in the Jewish community. The book was translated into Hebrew just recently, many decades after it was written. Otto Adolf Eichmann (known as Adolf Eichmann; March 19, 1906 – June 1, 1962) was a high-ranking Nazi and SS Obersturmbannführer (equivalent to Lieutenant Colonel). ... The New Yorker is an American magazine that publishes reportage, criticism, essays, cartoons, poetry and fiction. ... The cover of Eichmann in Jerusalem by Hannah Arendt Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil is a book written by political theorist Hannah Arendt, originally published in 1963. ... In religion evil refers to anything against the will or law of the god(s). ... The Banality of Evil is a phrase coined in 1963 by Hannah Arendt in her work Eichmann in Jerusalem to describe the thesis that the great evils in history generally, and the Holocaust in particular, were not executed by fanatics or sociopaths but rather by very ordinary people who accepted...


Her final book, The Life of the Mind, was incomplete when she died, but is still widely read in its current form. Stemming from her Gifford Lectures, this book focuses on the mental faculties of thinking and willing (in a sense moving beyond her previous work concerning the vita activa). In her discussion of thinking, she focuses mainly on Socrates and his notion of thinking as a solitary dialogue between me and myself. This appropriation of Socrates leads her to introduce novel concepts of conscience (which gives no positive prescriptions, but instead tells me what I cannot do if I would remain friends with myself when I re-enter the two-in-one of thought where I must render an account of my actions to myself) and morality (an entirely negative enterprise concerned with non-participation in certain actions for the sake of remaining friends with one's self). In her volume on Willing, Arendt, relying heavily on Augustine's notion of the will, discusses the will as an absolutely free mental faculty that makes new beginnings possible. In the third volume, Arendt was planning to engage the faculty of judgment by appropriating Kant's Critique of Judgment, however she never lived to write it. Nevertheless, although we will never fully understand her notion of judging, Arendt did leave us with essays ("Thinking and Moral Considerations," "Some Questions on Moral Philosophy," and "The Crisis in Culture,") and lectures (Lectures on Kant's Political Philosophy ) concerning her thoughts on this mental faculty. The Gifford Lectures were established by the will of Adam Lord Gifford (d. ...


Commemoration

Academic Genealogy
Notable teachers Notable students
Martin Heidegger
Karl Jaspers
Elisabeth Young-Bruehl
Leon Botstein
Herman Sinaiko

253 Mathilde, a C-type asteroid. ... 100027 Hannaharendt is an asteroid. ... This is a list of named asteroids, with links to the Wikipedia articles on the people, places, characters and concepts that they are named after. ... Martin Heidegger (September 26, 1889 – May 26, 1976) (pronounced ) was a highly influential German philosopher. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Elisabeth Young-Bruehl (born 1946 as Elisabeth Young) is an American academic and psychotherapist, currently a practicing psychoanalyst in New York City and on the faculty of the Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research. ... Leon Botstein, as photographed during a February 2004 interview with WXBC Radio Bard. ...

Selected works

  • Der Liebesbegriff bei Augustin. Versuch einer philosophischen Interpretation (1929)
  • The Origins of Totalitarianism (1951)
  • Rahel Varnhagen: The Life of a Jewish Woman (1958)
  • The Human Condition (1958)
  • Between Past and Future (1961)
  • On Revolution (1962)
  • Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil (1963)
  • Men in Dark Times (1968)
  • Crises of the Republic: Lying in Politics; Civil Disobedience; On Violence; Thoughts on Politics and Revolution (1969)
    "Civil Disobedience" originally appeared, in somewhat different form, in The New Yorker. Versions of the other essays originally appeared in The New York Review of Books.
  • The Jew as Pariah: Jewish Identity and Politics in the Modern Age, (Edited by Ron H. Feldman, 1978)
  • Life of the Mind (1978)
  • Love and Saint Augustine. Edited and with an Interpretive Essay by Joanna Vecchiarelli Scott and Judith Chelius Scott. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1996/1998..
  • Responsibility and Judgment. Edited and with an introduction by Jerome Kohn. Schocken Books. 2003.
  • Essays in Understanding, 1930-1954: Formation, Exile, and Totalitarianism. Edited by Jerome Kohn. Schocken Books. 2005.
  • On Violence. Harvest Books. 1970.
  • Lectures on Kant's Political Philosophy. Edited and with an Interpretive Essay by Ronald Beiner. The University of Chicago Press. 1992.
  • The Promise of Politics. Edited and with an Introduction by Jerome Kohn. Schocken Books. 2005.
  • The Jewish Writings. Edited by Jerome Kohn and Ron H. Feldman. Schocken Books. 2007.

The Origins of Totalitarianism is a book by Hannah Arendt, dedicated to her husband Heinrich Blücher. ... Rahel Varnhagen née Levin (b. ... The Human Condition, published in 1958, is one of the central theoretical works of the philosopher Hannah Arendt. ... The cover of Eichmann in Jerusalem by Hannah Arendt Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil is a book written by political theorist Hannah Arendt, originally published in 1963. ...

Further reading

  • Elisabeth Young-Bruehl (1982), Hannah Arendt: For Love of the World, Yale University Press, ISBN 0-300-02660-9. (Paperback reprint edition, September 10, 1983, ISBN 0-300-03099-1; Second edition October 11, 2004 ISBN 0-300-10588-6.)
  • Villa, Dana ed. (2000), The Cambridge Companion to Hannah Arendt, Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0-521-64198-5 (hb).
  • Harms, Klaus: Hannah Arendt und Hans Jonas. Grundlagen einer philosophischen Theologie der Weltverantwortung. Berlin: WiKu-Verlag (2003). ISBN 3-936749-84-1. (de)
  • Elzbieta Ettinger: Hannah Arendt/Martin Heidegger, Yale University Press (1997). ISBN 0-300-07254-6.
  • Young-Bruehl, Elisabeth. Why Arendt Matters. New Haven, CT; London: Yale University Press, 2006 (hardcover, ISBN 0-300-12044-3).
  • Dietz, Mary G. "Turning Operations: Feminism, Arendt, and Politics", Routledge (2002). ISBN 0-415-93244-0.
  • Julia Kristeva. Hannah Arendt. Trans. Ross Guberman. Columbia University Press. 2001.
  • Seyla Benhabib. The Reluctant Modernism of Hannah Arendt. Rowan and Littlefield Publishers. 2003.
  • Jennifer Nedelsky and Ronald Beiner, ed. Judgment, Imagination, and Politics: Themes from Kant and Arendt. Rowan and Littlefield Publishers. 2001.

Elisabeth Young-Bruehl (born 1946 as Elisabeth Young) is an American academic and psychotherapist, currently a practicing psychoanalyst in New York City and on the faculty of the Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Hannah Arendt & Karl Jaspers (1992) Correspondence 1926-1969, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, ISBN 0-15-107887-4
  2. ^ Hannah Arendt & Mary McCarthy (1995) Between Friends: The Correspondence of Hannah Arendt and Mary McCarthy 1949-1975, Secker & Warburg, ISBN 0-436-20251-4
  3. ^ All aboard the Arendt express, Haaretz, 4 May 2007

Haaretz (Hebrew: (help· info), The Land) is an Israeli newspaper, founded in 1919. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...

External links

  • Crises of Our Republics, Hannah Arendt Centennary Conference at Yale University, September 29 - 30, 2006.
  • Thinking In Dark Times:The Legacy of Hannah Arendt, Hannah Arendt Centennary Conference at Bard College, October 27 - 29, 2006.
  • Hannah Arendt Organization, clearinghouse for information on and about Hannah Arendt
  • Hannah Arendt (1906-1975) at the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
  • The American Library of Congress has The Role of Experience in Hannah Arendt's Political Thought: Three Essays by Jerome Kohn, Director, Hannah Arendt Center,New School University. With link to Arendt's papers.
  • International Hannah Arendt Newsletter
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Hannah Arendt
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Hannah Arendt
  • European Graduate School - Hannah Arendt
  • "Arendt's Judgment" by Mark Greif in Dissent (magazine).
  • "Thinking Out Loud" Review of a book of essays on Arendt, in Lingua Franca.
  • Hannah Arendt Institute for the Research on Totalitarianism at the Technical University of Dresden
  • The philosophical Madonna On the occasion of the 30th anniversary of Hannah Arendt's death, Daniel Cohn-Bendit recalls his relationship with the great philosopher and reflects on her and on his generation at signandsight.com
  • Hannah Arendt Thinking Space. Art Exhibtion Berlin 2006
  • Hannah Arendt at Jewish Virtual Library
  • Hannah Arendt: Biography at FemBio*Find-A-Grave profile for Hannah Arendt
  • Snowblind: Martin Heidegger & Hannah Arendt
  • Thinking with Body and Soul: Interview with the historian Joachim Fest about Hannah Arendt, by Volker Maria Neumann, February 2006.
  • Dossier: Hannah Arendt(German Education Server)
  • The Hannah Arendt Collection (From Stevenson Library at Bard College) - Catalog of ArchiveHannah Arendt’s personal library at Bard College
  • Benjamin Balint, Hannah Arendt, 100 Years Later, The Forward. On the occasion of the centenary of her birth
  • Hannah Arendt and the Study of Evil, NPR audio interview with Elisabeth Young-Bruehl on the centenary of Arendt's birth
  • Jacoby, Russell. "Hannah Arendt's Fame Rests on the Wrong Foundation", The Chronicle of Higher Education, Vol. 53, Issue 16, p. B13 (December 8, 2006).
  • Warning against Menachem Begin, Letters to the Editor New York Times December 4, 1948.
  • Hannah Arendt, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

Other Languages The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy is an online encyclopedia on philosophical topics and philosophers founded by James Fieser in 1995. ... The Library of Congress is the de facto national library of the United States and the research arm of the United States Congress. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Wikimedia Commons (also called Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... Dissent Magazine is a left-wing magazine that was started in 1954 by Irving Howe and Lewis Coser. ... Lingua franca, literally Frankish language in Italian, was originally a mixed language consisting largely of Italian plus a vocabulary drawn from Turkish, Persian, French, Greek and Arabic and used for communication throughout the Middle East. ... Joachim C. Fest (December 8, 1926 – September 11, 2006) was a German journalist and author, best known in English-speaking countries for his work with Albert Speer while writing his memoirs and his biography of Adolf Hitler. ...

  • (French) Article on Hannah Arendt
  • (Portuguese) Profile, collection of articles, and quotations on Hannah Arendt
  • (Russian) On Revolution. H. Arendt Portal
  • (Persian) Heidegger the Fox - Hannah Arendt
Persondata
NAME Arendt, Hannah
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Jewish-American political theorist
DATE OF BIRTH October 14, 1906
PLACE OF BIRTH Linden, Germany
DATE OF DEATH December 4, 1975
PLACE OF DEATH New York, United States

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A political theorist is someone who engages in political theory. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Linden is one of three English names for a genus of trees, Tilia, also known as lime and basswood. ... December 4th redirects here. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... NY redirects here. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Hannah Arendt (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) (13669 words)
Hannah Arendt, one of the leading political thinkers of the twentieth century, was born in 1906 in Hanover and died in New York in 1975.
Hannah Arendt was one of the seminal political thinkers of the twentieth century.
Arendt's concern with judgment as the faculty of retrospective assessment that allows meaning to be redeemed from the past originated in her attempt to come to terms with the twin political tragedies of the twentieth century, Nazism and Stalinism.
Hannah Arendt [Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy] (7110 words)
Hannah Arendt is a most challenging figure for anyone wishing to understand the body of her work in political philosophy.
Arendt argues that it is precisely the recognition of labor as contrary to freedom, and thus to what is distinctively human, which underlay the institution of slavery amongst the ancient Greeks; it was the attempt to exclude labor from the conditions of human life.
Arendt's concern with thinking and judgement as political faculties stretches back to her earliest works, and were addressed subsequently in a number of essays written during the 1950s and 1960s.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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