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Encyclopedia > Hanging
This article is part of the
Capital punishment series
Issues

Debate
Religious views
Wrongful execution Look up hang in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Death penalty, death sentence, and execution redirect here. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is often the subject of controversy. ... Most major world religions take an ambiguous position on the morality of capital punishment. ... Capital punishment Wrongful execution is a miscarriage of justice occurring when an innocent person is put to death by capital punishment, the death penalty. The possibility of wrongful executions is one of the arguments presented by the opponents of capital punishment; other arguments include failing to deter crime more than...

By region

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More... The only countries in Europe that havent abolished the death penalty yet is Albania, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Latvia and Russia. ... Capital punishment is a legal form of punishment in the Republic of China (Taiwan) so far. ...

Methods

Decapitation
Electrocution
Firing squad
Gas chamber
Hanging
Lethal injection
Shooting
More... Electric chair as used for electrocutions. ... Decapitation (from Latin, caput, capitis, meaning head), or beheading, is the removal of a living organisms head. ... The electric chair is an execution method in which the person being put to death is strapped to a chair and electrocuted through electrodes placed on the body. ... The Third of May by Francisco Goya Execution by firing squad is a method of capital punishment, particularly common in times of war. ... For other uses, see Gas chamber (disambiguation). ... This article is about the execution and euthanasia method. ... Execution by shooting is a form of capital punishment whereby an executed person is shot by a firearm or firearms. ... Electric chair as used for electrocutions. ...

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Hanging is the lethal suspension of a person by a ligature. The Oxford English Dictionary states that hanging in this sense is "specifically to put to death by suspension by the neck," although it formerly also referred to crucifixion. The Oxford English Dictionary print set The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP), and is the most successful dictionary of the English language, (not to be confused with the one-volume Oxford Dictionary of English, formerly New Oxford Dictionary of English, of... For other uses, see Crucifixion (disambiguation). ...


The preferred past tense and past participle in English is hanged, if the question is of a judicial execution, otherwise hung.[1] The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


For lack of a better term, hanging has also been used to describe a method of suicide in which a person applies a ligature to the neck and brings about unconsciousness and then death, by means of partial suspension or partial weight-bearing on the ligature. This method has been most often used in prisons or other institutions, where full suspension support is difficult to devise. The earliest known use in this sense was in A.D. 1300.[2] AD redirects here. ...

Contents

Methods of judicial hanging

See also: Official Table of Drops

There are four ways of performing a judicial hanging — the short drop, suspension hanging, the standard drop, and the long drop. A mechanised form of hanging, the upright jerker, was also experimented with in the 19th century. The Official Table of Drops, published by the British Home Office, is a manual used to calculate the correct length of rope for the long drop hangings. ... The upright jerker was an execution method and device intermittently used in the United States during the 19th century. ...


Short drop

The short drop is done by placing the condemned prisoner on the back of a cart, horse, or other vehicle, with the noose around the neck. The vehicle is then moved away, leaving the person dangling from the rope. The condemned prisoner dies of strangulation. Prior to 1850, it was the main method used. A ladder was also commonly used with the condemned being forced to ascend, after which the noose was tied and the ladder pulled away or turned, leaving the condemned hanging. A stool, which the condemned is required to stand on and is then kicked away, has also been used.


Suspension hanging

Suspension hanging is similar to the long drop, except the gallows themselves are movable, so that the noose can be raised once the condemned is in place. This method is currently used in Iran, where tank gun barrels or mobile cranes are used to hoist the condemned into the air. Similar methods involve running the rope through a pulley to allow the raising of the person. These gallows in Tombstone Courthouse State Historic Park are maintained by Arizona State Parks. ... For the 1948 British film, see Noose (film). ...

Execution of the persons condemned as Abraham Lincoln assassination conspirators, by the standard drop method, July 7, 1865, at Fort McNair in Washington, D.C.
Execution of Stanislaus Lacroix on 21 Mar 1902 in Hull, Quebec, Canada.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1405x1090, 409 KB)Execution of the four persons condemned as conspirators (Mary E. Surratt, Lewis T. Powell, David E. Herold, and George A. Atzerodt), July 7,1865. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1405x1090, 409 KB)Execution of the four persons condemned as conspirators (Mary E. Surratt, Lewis T. Powell, David E. Herold, and George A. Atzerodt), July 7,1865. ... Assassination of Abraham Lincoln From left to right: Major Henry Rathbone, Clara Harris, Mary Todd Lincoln, Abraham Lincoln, and John Wilkes Booth. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1865 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Fort Lesley J. McNair is an American military installation located at the confluence of the Potomac and Anacostia rivers in Washington, District of Columbia, across the Washington Channel from East Potomac Park. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Hull, Québec, as seen from Ottawa Hull is part of the city of Gatineau, Quebec, Canada. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ...

Standard drop

The standard drop, which arrived as calculated in English units, involves a drop of between four and six feet (1.2 to 1.8 m) and came into use in the mid-19th century, in English-speaking countries and those where judicial systems were under English influence. It was considered an advance on the short drop because it was intended to be sufficient to break the person's neck, causing immediate paralysis and immobilization (and probable immediate unconsciousness). This method was used to execute condemned Nazis after the Nuremberg Trials.

Black Jack Ketchum's execution, New Mexico, 1901
Sepia-tone photo from a contemporary postcard showing Tom Ketchum's decapitated body. Caption reads "Body of Black Jack after the hanging showing head snapped off."

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Thomas Edward Ketchum Ketchum Thomas Edward Ketchum, (October 31, 1863 - April 26, 1901) also known as Black Jack was at first an ordinary cowboy and cattle driver who later turned to a life of crime. ... Image File history File links KetchumDecapitated. ... Image File history File links KetchumDecapitated. ... Thomas Edward Ketchum Ketchum Thomas Edward Ketchum, (October 31, 1863 - April 26, 1901) also known as Black Jack was at first an ordinary cowboy and cattle driver who later turned to a life of crime. ...

Long drop

This process, also known as the measured drop, was introduced in 1872 by William Marwood as a scientific advancement to the standard drop. Instead of everyone falling the same standard distance, the person's weight was used to determine how much slack would be provided in the rope so that the distance dropped would be enough to ensure that the neck was broken. William Marwood (1820 - 1883), a cobbler, of Church Lane, Horncastle, Lincolnshire, England at the age of 54 persuaded the governor of Lincoln prison to allow him to conduct an execution. ...


Prior to 1892, the drop was between four and ten feet (about one to three meters), depending on the weight of the body, and was calculated to deliver a force of 1,260 lbf (5,600 newtons or 572 kgf), which fractured the neck at either the 2nd and 3rd or 4th and 5th cervical vertebrae. However, this force resulted in some decapitations, such as the famous case of "Black Jack" Tom Ketchum in New Mexico in 1901. Between 1892 and 1913, the length of the drop was shortened to avoid decapitation. After 1913, other factors were also taken into account, and the force delivered was reduced to about 1,000 lbf (4,400 N or 450 kgf). The decapitation of a female inmate during a botched hanging in 1930 led the state of Arizona to switch to the gas chamber as its primary execution method, on the grounds that it was believed more humane.[3] One of the more recent decapitations as a result of the long drop occurred when Barzan Ibrahim al-Tikriti was hanged in Iraq in 2007. The pound-force is a non-SI unit of force or weight (properly abbreviated lbf or lbf). The pound-force is equal to a mass of one pound multiplied by the standard acceleration due to gravity on Earth (which is defined as exactly 9. ... For other uses, see Newton (disambiguation). ... KGF is the short form of Kolar Gold Fields in Karnataka. ... In vertebrates, cervical vertebrae (singular: vertebra) are those vertebrae immediately behind (caudal to) the skull. ... Decapitation (from Latin, caput, capitis, meaning head), or beheading, is the removal of a living organisms head. ... Thomas Edward Ketchum Ketchum Thomas Edward Ketchum, (October 31, 1863 - April 26, 1901) also known as Black Jack was at first an ordinary cowboy and cattle driver who later turned to a life of crime. ... For other uses, see New Mexico (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... For other uses, see Gas chamber (disambiguation). ... Barzan Ibrahim al-Tikriti Barzan Ibrahim El-Hasan al-Tikriti (17 February 1951 - January 15, 2007 ) (sometimes: Barazan Ibrahim al-Tikriti and Barasan Ibrahem Alhassen) (Arabic: برزان إبراهيم التكريتي) was one of three half-brothers of Saddam Hussein, and the former leader of the Iraqi secret service, Mukhabarat. ...

Suicide by hanging.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (355x636, 64 KB) Giotto di Bondone (1267-1337), Cappella Scrovegni a Padova, Desperation File links The following pages link to this file: Hanging Suicide methods ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (355x636, 64 KB) Giotto di Bondone (1267-1337), Cappella Scrovegni a Padova, Desperation File links The following pages link to this file: Hanging Suicide methods ...

As suicide

Hanging is a common method of suicide. The materials necessary for suicide by hanging are easily available to the average person, compared with firearms or lethal poison. Full suspension is not required, and for this reason hanging is especially commonplace among suicidal prisoners. A type of hanging comparable to full suspension hanging may be obtained by self-strangulation using a ligature of the neck and only partial weight of the body (partial suspension). This method is dependent on unconsciousness produced by arterial blood flow restriction while the breath is held.


In Canada, hanging is the most common method of suicide.[4], and in the U.S., hanging is the second most common method after firearms.[5] In Great Britain, where firearms are less easily available, as of 2001 hanging was the most common method among men and the second-most commonplace among women (after poisoning).[6]

See also: List of people who died by hanging

This is a list of people who died as a result of hanging. ...

Medical effects

Etching by Goya.

A hanging may induce one or more of the following medical conditions: Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x770, 178 KB) Goya, Here neither 1812-15 Etching and aquatint, 158 x 208 mm File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Hanging ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x770, 178 KB) Goya, Here neither 1812-15 Etching and aquatint, 158 x 208 mm File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Hanging ... This article is about Francisco Goya, a Spanish painter. ...

The cause of death in hanging depends on the conditions related to the event. When the body is released from a relatively high position, death is usually caused by severing the spinal cord between C1 and C2, which may be functional decapitation. High cervical fracture frequently occurs in judicial hangings, and in fact the C1-C2 fracture has been called the "hangman's fracture" in medicine, even when it occurs in other circumstances. Usually, accidental C1-C2 fracture victims do not immediately become unconscious; instead death occurs after some minutes.[citation needed] Another process that has been suggested is carotid sinus reflex death. By this theory, the mechanical stimulation of the carotid sinus in the neck brings on terminal cardiac arrest. The carotid artery is a major artery of the head and neck that supplies blood to the head and neck. ... Cerebral ischemia is an ischemic condition where the brain or parts of the brain do not receive enough blood flow to maintain normal neurological function. ... The jugular veins are veins that bring deoxygenated blood from the head back to the heart via the superior vena cava. ... Arteries of the neck. ... The carotid artery is a major artery of the head and neck that supplies blood to the head and neck. ... For other uses, see Neck (disambiguation). ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Spinal cord injury, or myelopathy, is a disturbance of the spinal cord that results in loss of sensation and/or mobility. ... The airways are those parts of the respiratory system through which air flows, to get from the external environment to the alveoli. ... A Hangmans fracture is the colloquial name given to a combination of fracture of the odontoid process of the second cervical vertebra and disruption of the transverse atlantal ligament. ... Arteries of the neck. ...


In the absence of fracture and dislocation, occlusion of blood vessels becomes the major cause of death, rather than asphyxiation. Obstruction of venous drainage of the brain via occlusion of the internal jugular veins leads to cerebral edema and then cerebral ischemia. The face will typically become engorged and cyanotic (turned blue through lack of oxygen). There will be the classic sign of strangulation—petechiae—little blood marks on the face and in the eyes from burst blood capillaries. The tongue may protrude. Suffocation redirects here, for the band, see Suffocation (band). ... Cerebral edema (cerebral oedema in British English) is an excess accumulation of water in the intra- and/or extracellular spaces of the brain. ... Cerebral ischemia is an ischemic condition where the brain or parts of the brain do not receive enough blood flow to maintain normal neurological function. ... Cyanosis refers to the bluish coloration of the skin due to the presence of deoxygenated hemoglobin in blood vessels near the skin surface. ... Petechiae are pinpoint-sized hemorrhages of small capillaries in the skin or mucous membranes. ...


Compromise of the cerebral blood flow may occur by obstruction of the carotid arteries, even though their obstruction requires far more force than the obstruction of jugular veins, since they are seated deeper and they contain blood in much higher pressure compared to the jugular veins. Only 31 newtons (7 lbf or 3.2 kgf) of force may be enough to constrict the carotid arteries to the point of rapid unconsciousness.[citation needed] Where death has occurred through carotid artery obstruction or cervical fracture, the face will typically be pale in color and not show petechiae. There exist many reports and pictures of actual short-drop hangings that seem to show that the person died quickly, while others indicate a slow and agonizing death by strangulation.[7]


When cerebral circulation is severely compromised by any mechanism, arterial or venous, death occurs over four or more minutes from cerebral hypoxia, although the heart may continue to beat for some period after the brain can no longer be resuscitated. The time of death in such cases is a matter of convention. In judicial hangings, death is pronounced at cardiac arrest, which may occur at times from several minutes up to 15 minutes or longer after hanging. During suspension, once the prisoner has lapsed into unconsciousness, rippling movements of the body and limbs may occur for some time which are usually attributed to nervous and muscular reflexes. In Britain, it was normal to leave the body suspended for an hour to ensure death.


After death, the body typically shows marks of suspension: bruising and rope marks on the neck. Moreover, sphincters will relax spontaneously and urine and feces will be evacuated. Forensic experts may often be able to tell if hanging is suicide or homicide, as each leaves a distinctive ligature mark. One of the hints they use is the hyoid bone. If broken, it often means the person has been murdered by manual choking. Also, there have been cases of autoerotic asphyxiation leading to death. Children have accidentally died playing the choking game. The hyoid bone (Os Hyoideum; Lingual Bone) is a bone in the human neck, not articulated to any other bone; it is supported by the muscles of the neck and in turn supports the root of the tongue. ... For choking meaning compression of the neck, see Strangling. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Erotic asphyxiation. ... The choking game, also known by a variety of other names (see end of article), is not technically a game but an activity whereby a state of unconsciousness or near unconsciousness is produced by restricting the supply of oxygenated blood to the brain. ...


Notable references by country (political)

Hanging has been a method of capital punishment in many countries. Death penalty, death sentence, and execution redirect here. ...


Australia

Capital punishment was a part of the legal system of Australia from its early days as a penal colony for the British Empire, until 1985. During the 19th century, crimes that could carry a death sentence included burglary, sheep stealing, forgery, sexual assaults, murder and manslaughter. There is one reported case of someone being executed for "being illegally at large"[citation needed]. During the 19th century, there were about 80 people hanged each year throughout Australia for these crimes. Capital punishment was last used in Australia in 1967, when Ronald Ryan was hanged in Victoria. ... Forgery is the process of making or adapting objects or documents (see false document), with the intention to deceive. ... This article is about a form of sexual violence. ...


Australia abolished the death penalty in all states by 1985.[8] The last man executed by hanging in Australia was Ronald Ryan on 3 February 1967, in Victoria.[9] Ronald Joseph Ryan (c. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... VIC redirects here. ...


Brazil

Death by hanging was the customary method of capital punishment in Brazil throughout its history. Some important national heroes like Tiradentes (1792) were killed by hanging. The last man executed in Brazil was the slave Francisco, in 1876. The death penalty was abolished for all crimes, except for those committed under extraordinary circumstances such as war or military law, in 1890.[10] For the city of Tiradentes, see Tiradentes, Minas Gerais. ...


Bulgaria

Bulgaria's national hero, Vasil Levski, was executed by hanging by the Ottoman court in Sofia in 1873. Every year since Bulgaria's liberation, thousands come with flowers on the date of his death, February 19, to his monument where the gallows stood. Vasil Levski (Bulgarian: Васил Левски, also transliterated as Vassil Levski), born Vasil Ivanov Kunchev (Васил Иванов Кунчев) was a Bulgarian revolutionary, ideologist, strategist and theoretician of the Bulgarian national revolution and leader of the struggle for liberation from Ottoman rule. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... This article is about the capital of Bulgaria. ... Look up Liberation in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The last execution was in 1989, and the death penalty was abolished for all crimes in 1998.[10]


Canada

Historically, hanging was the only method of execution used in Canada and was in use as punishment for all murders until 1961, when murders were reclassified into capital and non-capital offenses. The death penalty was restricted to only apply for certain offenses to the National Defence Act in 1976 and was completely abolished in 1998.[11] The only method used in Canada and by its ancestor English and French governments for capital punishment was hanging. ...


The last hangings in Canada took place on December 11, 1962.[10] is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Germany

In the territories occupied by Nazi Germany from 1939 to 1945, strangulation hanging was a preferred means of public execution, although more criminal executions were performed by guillotine than hanging. The most common sentenced were partisans and black marketeers, whose bodies were usually left hanging for long periods of time. There are also numerous reports of concentration camp inmates being hanged. Hanging was continued in post-war Germany in the British and US Occupation Zones under their jurisdiction, and for Nazi war criminals, until well after (western) Germany itself had abolished the death penalty by the German constitution as adopted in 1949. The German Democratic Republic did not abolish the death penalty until 1987. The last execution in West Germany was carried out by guillotine in Moabit prison 1949. The last known execution in East Germany was in 1982, but by a pistol shot to the neck. Date for the last known hanging is sought.[8] Capital punishment in Germany has not been abolished. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ... Look up partisan in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into underground economy. ... The Basic Law for the Federal Republic of Germany (German: Grundgesetz für die Bundesrepublik Deutschland) is the constitution of modern Germany. ... “East Germany” redirects here. ... This article is about the decapitation device. ...


Hungary

In a newspaper interview in 1957, Nikita Khrushchev commented regarding the failed late-1956 Hungarian revolution that "support by United States ... is rather in the nature of the support that the rope gives to a hanged man.".[12] In keeping with the metaphor, the prime minister of Hungary during the 1956 revolution, Imre Nagy, was secretly tried, executed by hanging, and buried unceremoniously by the new Soviet-backed Hungarian government, in 1958. Nagy was later publicly rehabilitated by Hungary.[13]. Khrushchev redirects here. ... There have been a number of Hungarian Revolutions: 1848 Hungarian Revolution 1919 Hungarian Revolution 1956 Hungarian Revolution This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Imre Nagy. ... Soviet redirects here. ...


Capital punishment was abolished for all crimes in 1990.[8]


India

Nathuram Godse, Mohandas Gandhi’s assassin, was executed by hanging in 1949. Capital punishment is legal in India although rarely used. ... Nathuram Vinayak Godse (Marathi: नथूराम विनायक गोडसे) (May 19, 1910 – November 15, 1949) was the assassin of Mahatma Gandhi. ... “Gandhi” redirects here. ...


The modern Supreme Court of India has suggested that capital punishment should be given only in the "rarest of rare cases".[14] The Supreme Court of India is the highest court of the land as established by Part V, Chapter IV of the Constitution of India. ... Death penalty, death sentence, and execution redirect here. ...


A recent case of capital punishment by hanging is that of Dhananjoy Chatterjee, who was convicted of the 1990 murder and rape of a 14 year old girl in Kolkata in India. The manner in which the crime was committed (the accused bludgeoned the victim with a blunt object and raped her as she was slowly dying) was considered brutal enough by the supreme court to warrant the death penalty. An appeal for clemency was made to the president of India but was turned down. Chatterjee was executed on August 14, 2004, in the first execution in India since 1995.[15] Dhananjoy Chatterjee (August 14, 1965 in Kuludihi, West Bengal, India - August 14, 2004 at Alipore Central Jail in Calcutta, India) was executed by hanging for the rape and murder of 14-year-old Hetal Parekh on March 5, 1990 at her apartment residence in Bhowanipur, where he was a security... , “Calcutta” redirects here. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Iran

As one of several means of capital punishment in Iran, hangings are carried out by using an automotive telescoping crane to hoist the condemned aloft. The death penalty is used for many offenses and is the only punishment for rape, murder and child molestation, with all hangings taking place in public. The country of Iran was second only to China in the number of public executions carried out with 3400 and 159 respectively. ... The country of Iran was second only to China in the number of public executions carried out with 3400 and 159 respectively. ... A modern crawler type derrick crane with outriggers. ...


On July 19, 2005, two boys, Mahmoud Asgari and Ayaz Marhoni, ages 15 and 17 respectively, who had been convicted of the rape of a 13-year-old boy, were publicly hanged at Edalat (Justice) Square in Mashhad, on charges of homosexuality and rape.[16][17] On August 15, 2004, a 16-year-old girl, Atefeh Sahaaleh (a.k.a. Ateqeh Rajabi), was executed for having committed "acts incompatible with chastity".[18] is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mahmoud Asgari (Persian: ) and Ayaz Marhoni (Persian: ) were Iranian teenagers from the province of Khuzestan who were publicly hanged in Edalat (Justice) Square in Mashhad, northeast Iran, on July 19, 2005. ... Mashhad (Persian: , literally the place of martyrdom) is the second largest city in Iran and one of the holiest cities in the Shiah world. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Atefeh Sahaaleh, aged 16 years Atefeh Sahaaleh (1988 to August 15, 2004) was a 16-year-old Iranian girl who was executed in Iran after being sentenced to death by an Iranian judge, Haji Rezai, for allegedly having committed acts incompatible with chastity: Based on judicial records, by the time... Allegory of chastity by Hans Memling. ...


Iraq

See also: Execution of Saddam Hussein

Hanging was used under the regime of Saddam Hussein,[19] but was suspended along with capital punishment in 2003 when the United States-led coalition invaded and overthrew the previous regime. The death penalty was reinstated in May 2005. Capital punishment in Iraq was commonly used by Saddam Hussein to suppress political dissents. ... Saddam Hussein, during his trial in July 2004 Former President of Iraq Saddam Hussein (April 28, 1937 – December 30, 2006) was hanged after being convicted of crimes against humanity by the Iraqi Special Tribunal following his trial for the 1982 murder of 148 Iraqi Shiites in the town of... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ...


In September 2005, three murderers were the first people to be executed since the restoration. Then on March 9, 2006, an official of Iraq's Supreme Judicial Council confirmed that Iraqi authorities had executed the first insurgents by hanging.[20] is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... An insurgency is an armed rebellion against a constituted authority, by any irregular armed force that rises up against an enforced or established authority, government, or administration. ...


Saddam Hussein was sentenced to death by hanging for crimes against humanity[21] on November 5, 2006, and was executed on December 30, 2006 at approximately 6:00 a.m. local time. During the drop, there was an audible crack indicating that his neck was broken, a successful example of a long drop hanging.[22] This article is in need of attention. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


By contrast, Barzan Ibrahim, the head of the Mukhabarat, Saddam's security agency, and Awad Hamed al-Bandar, former chief judge, were executed on January 15, 2007, also by the long drop method, but Barzan was decapitated by the rope at the end of his fall indicating that the drop was too long.[23] Barzan Ibrahim al-Tikriti Barzan Ibrahim El-Hasan al-Tikriti (born 17 February 1951 in Tikrit) (sometimes: Barazan Ibrahim al-Tikriti and Barasan Ibrahem Alhassen) (Arabic: برزان إبراهيم الحسن التكريتي) is one of three half-brothers of Saddam Hussein, and the former leader of the Iraqi secret service, Mukhabarat. ... Awad Hamad al-Bandar (Arabic: ‎; also: Awad Hamad Bandar Alsadoon) (January 2, 1945 - January 15, 2007) was an Iraqi chief judge under Saddam Husseins presidency. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Also, former vice-president Taha Yassin Ramadan had been sentenced to life in prison on November 5, 2006, but the sentence was changed to death by hanging on February 12, 2007.[24] He was the fourth and final man to be executed for the 1982 crimes against humanity on March 20, 2007. This time, the execution went smoothly and without obvious mistake or problem.[25] Taha Yasin Ramadan al-Jizrawi (February 22, 1938 – March 20, 2007) (Arabic: ‎) was the Vice President of Iraq from March 1991 to the fall of Saddam Hussein in April 2003. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


At the Anfal genocide trial, Saddam's cousin Ali Hassan al-Majid (aka Chemical Ali), former defense minister Sultan Hashim Ahmed al-Tay, and former deputy Hussein Rashid Mohammed were sentenced to hang for their role in the Al-Anfal Campaign against the Kurds on June 24, 2007.[26] Ali Hassan al-Majid at an investigative hearing in 2004 Ali Hassan Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (Arabic: ‎ transliteration: , born 1941) is a former Baathist Iraqi Defense Minister and military commander. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Sultan Hashim Ahmad al-Tal. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Israel

Although Israel has provisions in its criminal law to use the death penalty for extraordinary crimes, it has only been used twice, and only once by hanging. On June 1, 1962, Nazi leader Adolf Eichmann was executed by hanging.[10] (Before that, in 1948 Major Meir Tobianski was wrongfully charged with treason, court-martialed and shot. Later he was exonerated). [1] In modern Israel, capital punishment is illegal in almost all circumstances. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Otto Adolf Eichmann (known as Adolf Eichmann; March 19, 1906 – June 1, 1962) was a high-ranking Nazi and SS Obersturmbannführer (equivalent to Lieutenant Colonel). ... Exoneration occurs when a perason waho hars beoen convaicted osf ah crieme irs laeter proved to have been innocent of that crime. ...


Japan

On February 27, 2004, the mastermind of the Sarin gas attack on the Tokyo subway, Shoko Asahara, was found guilty and sentenced to death by hanging. On December 25, 2006, serial killer Hiroaki Hidaka and three others were hanged in Japan. Hanging is the common method of execution in capital punishment cases in Japan, as in the cases of Norio Nagayama[27], Mamoru Takuma[28] and Tsutomu Miyazaki[29]. Capital punishment is legal in Japan as of 2007. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A wanted poster in Japan. ... Shoko Asahara (麻原 彰晃 Asahara Shōkō) (born Chizuo Matsumoto (松本智津夫 Matsumoto Chizuo) on March 2, 1955) is the founder of Japans controversial Buddhist religious group Aum Shinrikyo (now known as Aleph). ... is the 359th day of the year (360th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hiroshi Hidaka , April 1962 - December 25, 2006) was a Japanese serial killer. ... Norio Nagayama , June 27, 1949 - August 1, 1997) was a Japanese serial killer and novelist. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Tsutomu Miyazaki , born August 21, 1962), also known as The Otaku Murderer, The Little Girl Murderer, and Dracula, is a Japanese serial killer. ...


Jordan

Death by hanging is the traditional method of capital punishment in Jordan.


Malaysia

Hanging is the traditional way of capital punishment in Malaysia. In Malaysia, murder, drug trafficking, treason, and waging war against Yang Dipertuan Agong (the king) are capital offenses. ...


Pakistan

More than 3,000 people are on the Pakistan's death row, where hanging is the most common form of execution.[citation needed] Capital punishment is legal in Pakistan . ...


Russia

Similar to many other countries, the Russian Empire used the death penalty for a wide range of crimes. Both legal and moral status of Capital punishment in Russia are currently controversial. ... The subject of this article was previously also known as Russia. ...


The death penalty was officially outlawed shortly after the revolution of 1917, but the government later permitted the use of the penalty for soldiers on the front. In the next several decades, the death penalty was alternatively permitted and prohibited, but during Stalin's reign, the death penalty was used in many cases. The last persons to be sentenced to death by hanging were Andrey Vlasov and 11 other officers of his army on August 1, 1946. Numerous executions from that date forward were carried out by gunshot, which became the standard method of capital punishment in the Soviet Union. Josef Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili (Georgian: , Ioseb Besarionis Dze Jughashvili; Russian: , Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili) (December 18 [O.S. December 6] 1878[1] – March 5, 1953), better known by his adopted name, Joseph Stalin (alternatively transliterated Josef Stalin), was General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Unions Central Committee from... General Andrey Andreyevich Vlasov or Wlassow (Russian: Андрéй Андрéевич Влáсов, September 14 [O.S. September 1] 1900 — August 2, 1946) was a Soviet Army General who collaborated with Nazi Germany during World War II. // Born in Lomakino, Nizhny Novgorod Oblast, Vlasov was originally a student at a Russian seminary. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the Russian Federation the death penalty is still technically allowed but is currently under a moratorium. Motto: none Anthem: Hymn of the Russian Federation Capital Moscow Largest city Moscow Official language(s) Russian Government Semi-presidential Federal republic  - President of Russia Vladimir Putin  - Prime Minister Mikhail Fradkov Independence From the Soviet Union   - Declared June 12, 1991   - Finalized December 25, 1991  Area    - Total 17,075,400 km...


Singapore

In Singapore, mandatory hanging using the long-drop method is currently used as punishment for various crimes, such as drug trafficking, kidnapping and unauthorized possession of firearms.[30] Capital punishment is a legal form of punishment in Singapore. ... Retail selling Street selling is the bottom of the chain and can be accomplished through purchasing from prostitutes, through cloaked retail stores or refuse houses for users in the act located in red-light districts which often also deal in paraphernalia, dealers marketing merriment at night clubs and other events...


A 25-year old Vietnamese-Australian, Nguyen Tuong Van, was hanged on December 2, 2005, after being convicted of drug trafficking in 2002. Numerous efforts from both the Australian government, Queen's Counsels and petitions from organizations such as Amnesty International failed to persuade Singapore to rescind its decision. Nguyen Tuong Van mugshot Van Tuong Nguyen (Vietnamese: Nguyễn Tường Vân, born August 17, 1980) is a Vietnamese-Australian convicted of drug trafficking in Singapore. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For information about The Times satire Queens Counsel, see Queens Counsel (comic strip). ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Amnesty international Amnesty International (commonly known as Amnesty or AI) is an international non-governmental organization which defines its mission as to undertake research and action focused on preventing and ending grave abuses of the rights to physical and mental integrity, freedom of conscience...


A 24-year old Malaysian, Took Leng How, was hanged on November 2, 2006, after being convicted of the murder of Huang Na in 2004. Took Leng How (born 1982, Chinese: 卓良豪 or 杜龍豪, Pinyin: Dù Lóngháo), is a Malaysian convicted of murdering eight-year old Huang Na. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Huang Na (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; 25 September 1996 – 10 October 2004) was an eight-year old Chinese national found dead in a cardboard box at Telok Blangah Hill Park in Singapore. ...


Iwuchukwu Amara Tochi, a Nigerian national was sentenced to death in Singapore for drug trafficking. He was hanged on January 26, 2007. Iwuchukwu Amara Tochi (born in 1986?[1]; died on 2007-01-26) was a Nigerian national convicted of drug trafficking in Singapore. ... Retail selling Street selling is the bottom of the chain and can be accomplished through purchasing from prostitutes, through cloaked retail stores or refuse houses for users in the act located in red-light districts which often also deal in paraphernalia, dealers marketing merriment at night clubs and other events... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


United Kingdom

Detail from a painting by Pisanello, 1436-1438

As a form of judicial execution in England, hanging is thought to date from the Saxon period, approximately around 400. Records of the names of British hangmen begin with Thomas de Warblynton in the 1360s; complete records extend from the 1500s to the last hangmen, Robert Leslie Stewart and Harry Allen, who conducted the last British executions in 1964. Download high resolution version (2536x3071, 888 KB) hhkhk File links The following pages link to this file: Hanging ... Download high resolution version (2536x3071, 888 KB) hhkhk File links The following pages link to this file: Hanging ... Categories: 1911 Britannica | Stub | Italian painters | Gothic painting | 1380 births | 1456 deaths ... Capital punishment in the United Kingdom refers to the use of capital punishment in the United Kingdom and its constituent countries, predating the formation of the United Kingdom itself. ... In the law, the judiciary or judicial system is the system of courts which administer justice in the name of the sovereign or state, a mechanism for the resolution of disputes. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Robert Leslie Stewart (1918-1988), from Edinburgh, was one of Britains last executioners, officiating between 1950 and 1964. ... Harry Allen (1911-1992) was one of Britains last executioners, officiating between 1941 and 1964 when he was the chief executioner at 29 executions and assisted at 40 others. ...


In 1965, Parliament passed the "Murder (Abolition of Death Penalty) Act" abolishing capital punishment for murder. And with the passage of the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 the death penalty was officially abolished for all crimes in both civilian and military cases. Following its complete abolition, the gallows were removed from Wandsworth prison, where they remained in full working order until that year. The Crime and Disorder Act 1998 is a United Kingdom Act of Parliament. ...


The last woman to be hanged was Ruth Ellis on July 13, 1955 by Albert Pierrepoint who was a prominent hangman in the 20th century in England. The last hanging in Great Britain happened in 1964, when Peter Anthony Allen, at Walton Prison in Liverpool, and Gwynne Owen Evans, at Strangeways Prison in Manchester were executed for the murder of John Alan West. For the lesbian activist, see Ruth Ellis (American). ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Albert Pierrepoint (30 March 1905 – 10 July 1992) is the most famous member of a Yorkshire family who provided three of Britains Chief Executioners in the first half of the 20th century. ... Peter Anthony Allen (4 April 1943–13 August 1964) was twenty-one years old when he became one of the two last people in the United Kingdom to be executed. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... Gwynne Owen Evans (1 April 1940–13 August 1964) (real name John Robson Walby or Welaby) was 24 years old when he and his accomplice Peter Anthony Allen became the last men in the United Kingdom to be executed. ... HM Prison Manchester is a British prison. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... John Alan West was a 53 year-old laundry van driver of Workington, Cumbria, England, murdered by two men on 7 April 1964. ...


Silken rope

In the UK, some felons have traditionally been executed by hanging with a silken rope:

  • poachers who killed the "King's royal deer,"[citation needed] as in the Child ballad Geordie (ballad).
  • hereditary peers who committed capital offences[31], as anticipated by the fictional Duke of Denver, brother of Lord Peter Wimsey. The Duke was accused of murder in the novel Clouds of Witness, and if convicted, this execution would have been his fate, after conviction by his peers in a trial in the House of Lords. However, it has been claimed that the execution of Earl Ferrers in 1760 - the only time a peer was hanged after trial by the House of Lords - was carried out with the normal hempen rope instead of a silk one. The writ of execution does not specify a silk rope be used,[32] and the Newgate Calendar makes no mention of the use of such an item[33] - an unusual omission given its highly sensationalist nature.
  • Those who have Freedom of the City of London[34]

A seashell vendor sells seashells which have been taken alive from the water, killing the animal inside. ... The Child Ballads are a collection of 305 ballads from England and Scotland, and their American variants, collected by Francis James Child. ... Geordie is Child ballad 209, existing in many variants. ... The Peerage in the United Kingdom includes several hereditary peers, as well as life peers. ... Capital punishment, also called the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... The fictitious title of Duke of Denver was created by Dorothy Sayers for the elder brother of Lord Peter Wimsey. ... Early paperback edition cover of Murder Must Advertise Lord Peter Death Bredon Wimsey is a fictional character in a series of detective novels and short stories by Dorothy L. Sayers, in which he solves mysteries — usually murder mysteries. ... Clouds of Witness is a 1926 novel by Dorothy L. Sayers, the second in her series featuring Lord Peter Wimsey. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... Laurence Shirley, 4th Earl Ferrers (August 18, 1720 - May 5, 1760) was the last aristocrat hanged in England. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... The Newgate Calendar, subtitled The Malefactors Bloody Register, was a popular work of improving literature in the 18th and 19th centuries. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ...

United States

The two largest mass executions in the U.S., of 38 and 13 men at the same time, respectively, were carried out by hanging. Capital punishment is the legal process which ends the life of a felon. ...


At present, capital punishment varies from state to state; it is outlawed in some states but commonly used in others. However, the death penalty under federal law is applicable in every state. Other forms of capital punishment have largely been replaced by lethal injection in the U.S., where the condemned may choose this as an option. Only lethal injection is used at the federal level and only the states of Washington and New Hampshire still retain hanging as an option. This article is about the execution and euthanasia method. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ...


Laws in Delaware were changed in 1996 to specify lethal injection, except for those convicted prior to 1996, who were allowed to choose hanging. If a choice was not made, or the convict refused to choose injection, then hanging was the default method. This was the case in the 1996 execution of Billy Bailey, the most recent hanging in American history. Since the hanging of Bailey, no Delaware prisoner has fit into this category, thus the practice has ended there de facto, and the gallows have been dismantled. This article is about the U.S. State of Delaware. ... This article is about the execution and euthanasia method. ... Billy Bailey (1947? - January 25, 1996) was a convicted murderer hanged in 1996. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without...


In New Hampshire, if it is found to be 'impractical' to carry out the execution by lethal injection, then the condemned will be hanged, and in Washington the condemned still have an outright choice between hanging and lethal injection.[35] For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ...


Clinton Duffy, who served as Warden of San Quentin Prison in California, presided over ninety executions. He began to oppose the death penalty and after his retirement he wrote a memoir entitled Eighty-eight Men and Two Women in support of the crusade to abolish the death penalty. The book documents several hangings gone wrong and describes how they led his predecessor, Warden James B. Holohan, to persuade the California Legislature to replace hanging with the gas chamber. [36]


Popular culture

  • The word game hangman uses a stick-figure drawing of a hanged person as a method of keeping score; when the figure is complete, the player has lost.
  • In some films (for example, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, Shanghai Noon and Back to the Future Part III), victims are often saved by their accomplices who shoot the rope with a gun just in time. The television show MythBusters asserted that this was not possible, and that it took several well-placed shots to break the rope. In the first Pirates of the Caribbean movie, The Curse of the Black Pearl, Will Turner, a blacksmith apprentice, saves Captain Jack Sparrow by throwing a sword in a spear-like manner, just in time to provide Jack a "platform" to stand on, just after the trap is released.
  • The mandrake plant often has bifurcated roots, which (as in the case of ginseng), has historically caused it to be identified with the human body and figure. It was a common belief in some countries that a mandrake plant would grow in the shadow of a gallows, where the semen of a hanged man dripped on to the earth; this would appear to be the reason for the methods employed by the alchemists who "projected human seed into animal earth". In Germany, the plant is known as the Alraune: the novel (later adapted as a film) Alraune by Hanns Heinz Ewers is based around a soulless woman conceived from a hanged man's semen, the title referring to this myth of the Mandrake's origins.

This article is about the guessing game. ... For the album by Frankee, see The Good, The Bad, The Ugly (Frankee album). ... Shanghai Noon is a 2000 martial arts western comedy film starring Jackie Chan and Owen Wilson. ... For the video game based on this film, see Back to the Future Part III (video game). ... MythBusters is an American popular science television program on the Discovery Channel starring American special effects experts Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman, who use basic elements of the scientific method to test the validity of various rumors, urban legends and news stories in popular culture. ... Mandrake root redirects here. ... Species Subgenus Panax Section Panax Series Notoginseng Panax notoginseng Series Panax Panax bipinnatifidus Panax ginseng Panax japonicus Panax quinquefolius Panax vietnamensis Panax wangianus Panax zingiberensis Section Pseudoginseng Panax pseudoginseng Panax stipuleanatus Subgenus Trifolius Panax trifolius Ginseng field in Wisconsin Ginseng refers to species within Panax, a genus of 11 species... Alraune - The Legend and Fiction (German for Mandrake) is the name given to a female character in fiction. ... Hanns Heinz Ewers (November 3, 1871, Düsseldorf - June 12, 1943, Berlin) was a German actor, poet, philosopher, and writer of short stories and novels. ...

References

  1. ^ hung) - Definitions from Dictionary.com
  2. ^ OED Entry, URL http://dictionary.oed.com/cgi/entry/50102310?query_type=word&queryword=hang&first=1&max_to_show=10&sort_type=alpha&result_place=4&search_id=ytyG-jULKok-8630&hilite=50102310
  3. ^ "Gruesome death in gas chamber pushes Arizona towards injections", New York Times, April 25, 1992 (retrieved 7 January 2008).
  4. ^ "Canadian Injury Data", Statistics Canada. 
  5. ^ Suicide Statistics. URL accessed on 2006-05-16.
  6. ^ Trends in suicide by method in England and Wales, 1979 to 2001 (PDF), Office of National Statistics. URL accessed on 2006-05-16.
  7. ^ How hanging causes death. Retrieved on 2006-04-27.
  8. ^ a b c Countries that have abandoned the use of the death penalty, Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance, November 8, 2005
  9. ^ Death penalty in Australia, New South Wales Council for Civil Liberties
  10. ^ a b c d Capital Punishment Worldwide, MSN Encarta
  11. ^ Susan Munroe, History of Capital Punishment in Canada, About: Canada Online,
  12. ^ Simpson, James (1997). Simpson's Contemporary Quotations. Collins, 672 pages. ISBN 0-06-270137-1. . Not an original thought by Khrushchev, but borrowed from Montesquieu, who thus described the support of the state by financiers.
  13. ^ http://www.rferl.org/featuresarticle/2006/06/3c9b40e0-f493-49d4-a33d-6d93c1580bb1.html
  14. ^ Sakhrani, Monica; Adenwalla, Maharukh; Economic & Political Weekly, "Death Penalty - Case for Its Abolition"
  15. ^ Kumara, Sarath; World Socialist Web Site; "West Bengal carries out first hanging in India in a decade"
  16. ^ Iran executes 2 gay teenagers. Retrieved on 2006-04-27.
  17. ^ Exclusive interview with gay activists in Iran on situation of gays, recent executions of gay teens and the future. Retrieved on 2006-04-27.
  18. ^ IRAN: Amnesty International outraged at reported execution of a 16 year old girl. Amnesty International (2004-08-23). Retrieved on 2008-03-30.
  19. ^ Clark, Richard; The process of Judicial Hanging
  20. ^ "More bombs bring death to Iraq", Mail & Guardian Online, 2006-03-10. Retrieved on 2006-04-27. 
  21. ^ "Saddam Hussein sentenced to death by hanging", CNN.com, 2006-05-11. Retrieved on 2006-05-11. 
  22. ^ "Saddam Hussein Hanging Video Shows Defiance, Taunts and Glee", National Ledger, 2007-01-01. Retrieved on 2007-01-20. 
  23. ^ AP: Saddam’s half brother and ex-official hanged January 15, 2007
  24. ^ Top Saddam aide sentenced to hang February 12, 2007
  25. ^ Saddam's former deputy hanged in Iraq March 20, 2007
  26. ^ Iraq's "Chemical Ali" sentenced to death, MSNBC.com, June 24, 2007. Retrieved on June 24, 2007.
  27. ^ In Secrecy, Japan Hangs a Best-Selling Author, a Killer of 4. New York Times (1997-08-07). Retrieved on 2008-06-17.
  28. ^ Japanese school killer executed. BBC News (2004-09-14). Retrieved on 2008-06-17.
  29. ^ Reports: Japan executes man convicted of killing and mutilating young girls in 1980s. International Herald Tribune (2008-06-17). Retrieved on 2008-06-17.
  30. ^ "Singapore clings to death penalty", Sunday Times (South Africa), 2005-11-21. Retrieved on 2006-04-02. 
  31. ^ Lords Hansard text for 12 February 1998, Hansard, Col. 1350
  32. ^ Writ of Execution - Laurence, Earl Ferrers
  33. ^ The Newgate Calendar - Laurence, Earl Ferrers
  34. ^ Freedom of the City - History, City of London
  35. ^ Section 630.5, Procedures in Capital Murder. Retrieved on 2006-04-27.
  36. ^ Duffy, Clinton (1926). Eighty-Eight Men and Two Women. 

The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Montesquieu can refer to: Charles de Secondat, Baron de Montesquieu Several communes of France: Montesquieu, in the Hérault département Montesquieu, in the Lot-et-Garonne département Montesquieu, in the Tarn-et-Garonne département This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Amnesty international Amnesty International (commonly known as Amnesty or AI) is an international non-governmental organization which defines its mission as to undertake research and action focused on preventing and ending grave abuses of the rights to physical and mental integrity, freedom of conscience... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 79th day of the year (80th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The International Herald Tribune is a widely read English language international newspaper. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Hanging

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Erotic asphyxiation. ... Death penalty, death sentence, and execution redirect here. ... A death erection or terminal erection[1] is a post-mortem erection, technically a priapism, observed in the corpses of human males who have been executed, particularly by hanging. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... These gallows in Tombstone Courthouse State Historic Park are maintained by Arizona State Parks. ... This article is about the guessing game. ... The Hand of Glory is the dried and pickled hand of a man who has been hanged, often specified as being the left (Latin: sinister) hand, or else, if the man were hanged for murder, the hand that did the deed. ... Hanging Judge is an unofficial term for a judge who has gained renown for his or her eagerness to hand out harsh sentences, especially death by hanging. ... Hangmans knot The hangmans knot or hangmans noose (also known as a collar during Elizabethan times) is a well-known knot most often associated with its use in hanging. ... John (Jack) Ketch (died 1686) was an executioner employed by King Charles II. He became famous through the way he performed his duties during the tumults of the 1680s, when he was often mentioned in broadsheet accounts that circulated throughout the Kingdom of England. ... This is a list of notable people who died as a result of hanging. ... For incidents of suicide depicted in fiction, see List of suicides in fiction. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... The Official Table of Drops, published by the British Home Office, is a manual used to calculate the correct length of rope for the long drop hangings. ... // Dule or Dool trees in Britain were used for public hangings (Rodger 2006). ...

External links

  • Hanging injuries and strangulation
  • A Case Of Strangulation Fabricated As Hanging
  • Obliquity vs. Discontinuity of ligature mark in diagnosis of hanging - a comparative study
  • Homicidal Hanging - Case Report (Bias In Premise Of Hanging)
  • Post-mortem Lividity on Soles: A Case of Partial Hanging
  • Suicide among teenagers and young adults in the Transkei. Case reports

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hanging (5564 words)
A drop of this distance was rarely sufficient to break the prisoner's neck and they died by strangulation although in a lot of cases were knocked unconscious by the force of the drop and the impact of the knot against the side of the neck.
The last public hanging was that of Rainey Bathea, at Owensboro, Kentucky on the morning of August 14, 1936 for the murder and rape of a 70 year old white woman.
Hanging with no or insufficient drop typically produces death by strangulation (asphyxia) due to the weight of the person's body pulling down on the noose, causing it to tighten and constrict the trachea (air passage) and applying pressure to the large blood vessels in the neck.
Hanging - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1817 words)
Hanging is the common method of execution in capital punishment cases in Japan, although the punishment is rarely carried out.
For this reason hanging is especially popular in prisons.
The last public hanging legally conducted in the United States (and also the last public execution in the United States) was that of Rainey Bethea, who was publicly hanged on August 14, 1936, in Owensboro, Kentucky.
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