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Encyclopedia > Hampton University

Hampton University

Motto "My Home by the Sea"
Established April 1, 1868
Type Private coeducational
President Dr. William R. Harvey
Staff 16:1
Undergraduates 4,565
Postgraduates 552
Location Hampton, Virginia, USA
Campus Suburban
Athletics 15 sports teams
Mascot Pirate
Website www.hamptonu.edu

Hampton University (formerly Hampton Institute) is an American University located in Hampton, Virginia. The campus overlooking the northern edge of the harbor of Hampton Roads was founded on the grounds of "Little Scotland", a former plantation in Elizabeth City County not far from Fort Monroe and the Grand Contraband Camp, each tangible symbols of freedom for former slaves shortly after the end of the American Civil War. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Motto: Americas First Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: County Independent City Mayor Ross Kearney II Area    - City 352. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Motto: Americas First Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: County Independent City Mayor Ross Kearney II Area    - City 352. ... This view from space in July 1996 shows portions of each of the Seven Cities of Hampton Roads which generally surround the harbor area of Hampton Roads, which framed by the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel visible to the east (right), the Virginia Peninsula subregion to the north (top), and the... Elizabeth City County was located at the eastern tip of the Virginia Peninsula. ... Satellite Photo of Fort Monroe Fort Monroe, Virginia (also known as Fortress Monroe) is a military installation located at Old Point Comfort on the tip of the Virginia Peninsula at the mouth of Hampton Roads on the Chesapeake Bay in eastern Virginia in the United States. ... Grand Contraband Camp was located in Elizabeth City County near Fort Monroe and the downtown section of the present-day independent city of Hampton, Virginia during and immediately after the American Civil War. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


First led by former Union General Samuel C. Armstrong, among the school's famous alumni is educator Dr. Booker T. Washington. Under what is now called the Emancipation Oak tree, Mary Smith Peake taught the first classes on September 17, 1861, in defiance of a Virginia law against teaching slaves, free blacks and mulattos to read or write, a law which had cut her own education short years earlier. Several years later, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation was read to local freedmen under the same historic tree, which is still located on the campus today, and also serves as a symbol for the modern City of Hampton. The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... Samuel Chapman Armstrong (January 30, 1839-May 11, 1893) was an American educator and a commissioned Union officer in the American Civil War. ... Booker Taliaferro Washington (April 5, 1856 – November 14, 1915) was an American educator, author and leader of the African American community. ... On September 17, 1861, Mrs. ... On September 17, 1861, Mrs. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Civil War

During the American Civil War (1861-1865), Union-held Fort Monroe in southeastern Virginia at the mouth of Hampton Roads became a gathering point and safe haven of sorts for fugitive slaves. These individuals were labeled "contraband of War by the commander, General Benjamin F. Butler, and thereby safe from return to slave owners. As large numbers of individuals sought status as contrabands, they built the Grand Contraband Camp nearby from materuials reclaimed from the ruins of Hampton, which had been burned by retreating Confederates. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Satellite Photo of Fort Monroe Fort Monroe, Virginia (also known as Fortress Monroe) is a military installation located at Old Point Comfort on the tip of the Virginia Peninsula at the mouth of Hampton Roads on the Chesapeake Bay in eastern Virginia in the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This view from space in July 1996 shows portions of each of the Seven Cities of Hampton Roads which generally surround the harbor area of Hampton Roads, which framed by the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel visible to the east (right), the Virginia Peninsula subregion to the north (top), and the... In the history of slavery in the United States, a fugitive slave was a slave who had escaped his or her masters often with the intention of traveling to a place where the state of his or her enslavement was either illegal or not enforced. ... Contraband was the terminology used by Brigadier General Benjamin Butler, commander at Fort Monroe in southeastern Virginia, at the outset of the American Civil War to describe a new status for certain escaped slaves. ... Benjamin Franklin Butler (November 5, 1818 – January 11, 1893) was an American lawyer and politician who represented Massachusetts in the United States House of Representatives and later served as its governor. ...


Hampton University can trace its roots to the work of Mary S. Peake of Norfolk which began in 1861 with outdoor classes taught under the landmark Emancipation Oak in the nearby area of Elizabeth City County adjacent to the old sea port of Hampton. The newly-issued Emancipation Proclamation was first read to a gathering under the historic tree there in 1863. On September 17, 1861, Mrs. ... On September 17, 1861, Mrs. ... Elizabeth City County was located at the eastern tip of the Virginia Peninsula. ... Motto: Americas First Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: County Independent City Mayor Ross Kearney II Area    - City 352. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Emancipation Proclamation Reproduction of the Emancipation Proclamation at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, Ohio The Emancipation Proclamation consists of two executive orders issued by United States President Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War. ...

A class in mathematical geography

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1501x1176, 200 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Hampton University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1501x1176, 200 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Hampton University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to...

Beginnings after the War: teaching teachers

After the War, a normal school ("normal" meaning to establish standards or norms while educating teachers) was formalized in 1868, with former Union Brigadier General Samuel C. Armstrong (1839-1893) as its first principal. The new school was established on the grounds of a former plantation named "Little Scotland" which had a view of the great harbor of Hampton Roads. It was legally chartered in 1870 as a land grant school, and was first known as "Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute." A normal school is an institution for training teachers. ... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... Samuel Chapman Armstrong (January 30, 1839-May 11, 1893) was an American educator and a commissioned Union officer in the American Civil War. ... Fundamentally, a plantation is usually a large farm or estate, especially in a tropical or semitropical country, on which cotton, tobacco, coffee, sugar cane, or trees and the like is cultivated, usually by resident laborers. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are American institutions which have been designated by a Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ...


Typical of traditionally Indian, Mulatto and Black colleges and universities, Hampton received much of its financial support in the years following the Civil War from church groups and former officers and soldiers of the Union Army. One of the many Civil War veterans who gave substantial sums to the school was General William Jackson Palmer, a Union cavalry commander from Philadelphia, who later built the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad, and founded Colorado Springs, Colorado. As the Civil War began in 1861, although his Quaker upbringing made Palmer abhor violence, his passion to see the slaves free compelled him to enter the war. He was awarded the Medal of Honor for bravery in 1894. (The current Palmer Hall on the campus is named in his honor.) William Jackson Palmer (1836-1909) civil engineer, soldier, builder of the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad and founder of Colorado Springs, Colorado William Jackson Palmer (September 17, 1836 – March 13, 1909) was an American civil engineer, soldier, industrialist, and philanthropist. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ... The Denver and Rio Grande Railroad (AAR reporting mark DRG and DRGW) generally referred to as the Rio Grande, became the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad in 1920, and is today a fallen flag (a railroad that has been absorbed into a larger system -- Union Pacific -- as the result... It has been suggested that History of Colorado Springs, Colorado be merged into this article or section. ... The Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as Quakers, or Friends, is a religious community founded in England in the 17th century. ... Slave redirects here. ... The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States. ...

Students in a bricklaying class

Unlike the wealthy Palmer, Sam Armstrong was the son of a missionary to the Sandwich Islands (which later became the U.S. state of Hawaii). However, he also had dreams and aspirations for the betterment of the newly freed slaves. He patterned his new school in the manner of his father, who had overseen the teaching of reading, writing and arithmetic to the Polynesians. He also felt it was important to add the skills necessary to be self-supporting in the impoverished South. Under his guidance, a Hampton-style education became well-known as an education that combined cultural uplift with moral and manual training, or as Armstrong was fond of saying, an education that encompassed "the head, the heart, and the hands." Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1498x1162, 188 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Hampton University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1498x1162, 188 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Hampton University Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Two Mormon missionaries A missionary is traditionally defined as a propagator of religion who works to convert those outside that community; someone who proselytizes. ... The Sandwich Islands was the name given to Hawaii by Captain James Cook on his discovery of the islands on January 18, 1778. ... Official language(s) English, Hawaiian Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  Ranked 43rd  - Total 10,931 sq mi (29,311 km²)  - Width n/a miles (n/a km)  - Length 1,522 miles (2,450 km)  - % water 41. ...


At the close of its first decade, the school reported a total admission in the ten years of 927 students, with 277 graduates, all but 17 of whom had become teachers. Many of them had bought land and established themselves in homes; many were farming as well as teaching; some had gone into business. Only a very small proportion had failed to do well. By another 10 years, there had been over 600 graduates. In 1888, of the 537 of them alive, three-fourths were teaching, and about half as many undergraduates were also currently teaching. It was estimated that 15,000 children in community schools were being taught by Hampton's students and alumni that year. [1]


Booker T. Washington: spreading the educational work

Among Hampton's earliest students was Booker T. Washington, who arrived from West Virginia in 1872 at the age of 16. He worked his way through Hampton, and then went on to attend Wayland Seminary in Washington D.C. After graduation there, he returned to Hampton and became a teacher. Upon recommendation of Sam Armstrong to founder Lewis Adams and others, in 1881, Washington was sent to Alabama at age 25 to head another new normal school. This new Institution eventually became Tuskegee University. Embracing much of Armstrong's philosophy, Washington built Tuskegee into a substantial school and became nationally famous as an educator, orator, and fund-raiser as well. He started work which ultimately caused over 5,000 small community schools to be built for the betterment of black education in the South. Booker Taliaferro Washington (April 5, 1856 – November 14, 1915) was an American educator, author and leader of the African American community. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... Wayland Seminary was the Washington, D.C. branch of the National Theological Institute. ... Lewis Adams was an African American former slave in Macon County, Alabama who is best-remembered for helping found the normal school which grew to become Tuskegee University in Tuskegee, Alabama. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Tuskegee University is an American institution of higher learning located in Tuskegee, Alabama. ...

For more details on this topic, see Booker T. Washington.

Booker Taliaferro Washington (April 5, 1856 – November 14, 1915) was an American educator, author and leader of the African American community. ...

Name changes, expansion, community

Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute became simply Hampton Institute in 1930 and gained university status in 1984. Originally located in Elizabeth City County, it was long-located in the town of Phoebus, which was incorporated in 1900. Phoebus and Elizabeth City County were consolidated with the neighboring City of Hampton to form a much larger independent city in 1952. The City of Hampton uses the Emanicipation Oak on its official seal. Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Elizabeth City County was located at the eastern tip of the Virginia Peninsula. ... Phoebus was an incorporated town located in Elizabeth City County on the Virginia Peninsula in eastern Virginia. ... Motto: Americas First Location in the State of Virginia Coordinates: County Independent City Mayor Ross Kearney II Area    - City 352. ... An independent city is a city that does not form part of another general-purpose local government entity. ...


Native Americans

In 1878, Hampton established a formal education program for Native Americans, beginning the Institute's lasting commitment to serving a multicultural population. Recent initiatives have proven unsuccessful in renewing the interest of indigenous people in Hampton. (Virginia has two reservations, and a growing number of recognized Native American tribes). There are a number of grave markers in the university cemetery that display the diversity of tribes that attended the school. This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Multiculturalism or cultural pluralism is a policy, ideal, or reality that emphasizes the unique characteristics of different cultures in the world, especially as they relate to one another in immigrant receiving nations. ...


Athletics

Hampton's colors are blue and white, and their nickname is the "The Pirates". Hampton sports teams participate in NCAA Division I (I-AA for football) in the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC). In 2001, the Hampton basketball team won its first NCAA Tournament game, when they beat Iowa State 58-57, in one of the largest upsets of all time. Image File history File links HamptonU.jpg‎ http://www. ... For other uses, see Blue (disambiguation). ... This article is about the color. ... A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force. ... The Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) is a collegiate athletic conference which consists of historically black colleges in the southeastern United States. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the sport. ... The NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship is held each spring featuring 65 of the top college basketball teams in the United States. ... Iowa State University of Science and Technology (ISU) is a public land-grant and space-grant university located in Ames, Iowa, USA. Until 1959 it was known as Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. ... Look up Upset in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Famous Alumni

  • Booker T. Washington
  • Alberta Williams King,mother of Martin Luther King jr.
  • Angela Burt-Murray, Editor-in-Chief of Essence Magazine
  • Michael K. Fauntroy, Professor and political commentator
  • Edwin S. Shirley,III, Managing Director Fairview Capital Partners Private equity firm
  • Wanda Sykes, comedienne
  • Spencer Christian, weatherman for Good Morning America
  • Charles Phillips, President, Oracle Corporation
  • Rick Mahorn, former NBA Player Detroit Pistons
  • Jerome Mathis, NFL Football Player, Houston Texans
  • Justin Durant, NFL Football Player, Jacksonville Jaguars
  • Nicole Bailey-Williams, author
  • Hon. Vanessa Gilmore, US District Court (S.D. Texas)
  • Hon. Theodore Theopolis Jones II, New York Supreme Court, Brooklyn
  • Douglas Palmer, Mayor of Trenton, New Jersey
  • Adeeb Shabazz, Metaphysical Author, and Georgia Libertarian Party official
  • Darrilyn Vassar Jackson, 2000 Maryland Social Worker of the Year
  • Sadhana Jackson, 2005 AMA Scholar, Pediatrician
  • Sammy L. Brunson Jr.
  • William Skinner Jr.
  • Kimberly Oliver, 2006 National Teacher of the Year
  • Brett Pulley, Author
  • Robi Reed-Humes, Hollywood casting agent
  • Zachary Hines, II, Actor, Philosopher
  • Yasmin Shiraz, Author
  • Allyson Kay Duncan, 4th Cir US Circuit Court Judge
  • Emil Wilbekin, Former Editor-In-Chief Vibe Magazine
  • Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, President of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County
  • Dr. Dianne Boardley Suber, President of Saint Augustine's College
  • Christopher C. Moore, President of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Incorporated, Pi Upsilon Lambda Chapter
  • Harry Smith, part-owner Treyball Development (Real Estate Investment Firm), Los Angeles, CA also brother of actor Will Smith
  • Tyren B. Sutton, Theologian & National Vice President of Mu Omicron Gamma, Inc.

Booker Taliaferro Washington (April 5, 1856 – November 14, 1915) was an American educator, author and leader of the African American community. ... Alberta Christine Williams King (September 13, 1904 – June 30, 1974) was Martin Luther King, Jr. ... Angela Burt-Murray is the Editor-in-Chief of Essence Magazine. ... Essence Magazine is an American fashion and lifestyle magazine. ... Michael K. Fauntroy (born April 11, 1966) is an American public policy professor, columnist, and political commentator. ... Wanda Sykes (born March 7, 1964), also known as Wanda Sykes-Hall or Adriana Bedoya, is an American stand-up comedian and actress. ... Spencer Christian (born on July 23, 1947 in Charles City, Virginia) is an American television broadcaster, best known as the former weather forecaster for ABCs Good Morning America from 1986 to 1998. ... Good Morning America is a weekday morning news show that is broadcast on the ABC television network. ... Charles Phillips is President of Oracle Corporation and a member of the companys Board of Directors. ... Oracle Corporation (NASDAQ: ORCL) is one of the major companies developing database management systems (DBMS), tools for database development, middle-tier software, enterprise resource planning software (ERP), customer relationship management software (CRM) and supply chain management (SCM) software. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... The Detroit Pistons are a team in the National Basketball Association based in the Detroit metropolitan area. ... Jerome Alvon Mathis (born July 26, 1983 in Petersburg, Virginia) is an American football wide receiver for the Houston Texans of the NFL. He was selected with the 13th pick of the fourth round of the 2005 NFL Draft out of Hampton University. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... This article is about the current National Football League team. ... Justin Durant (born November 21, 1985) is a linebacker that graduated from Wilson High School in 2003 and attended Hampton University and is a prospect for the 2007 NFL Draft[1]. Player Profile Category: ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... City Jacksonville, Florida Team colors Teal, Black, White, and Gold Head Coach Jack Del Rio Owner Wayne Weaver General manager James Harris Mascot Jaxson de Ville League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1995–present) American Football Conference (1995-present) AFC Central (1995-2001) AFC South (2002-present) Team history Jacksonville... Vanessa Gilmore is a judge on the United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas. ... Douglas Palmer was the first African-American mayor of Trenton, New Jersey. ... Nickname: Location of Trenton inside of Mercer County Coordinates: , Country State County Mercer Incorporated November 13, 1792 Government  - Mayor Douglas H. Palmer Area  - City  8. ... Allyson Kay Duncan (born September 5, 1951, in Durham, North Carolina) is a federal judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. ... Harry Smith might refer to: In sports: Harry Smith (boxer), a bare-knuckle boxer Harry Smith (infielder) (1856–1898), American baseball player Harry Smith (manager) (1874–1933), British-born baseball catcher and manager Harry Smith (ice hockey) (1883-1953), Canadian hockey player Harry Smith (pitcher) (1889–1964), American baseball player... “W. S.” redirects here. ...

Trivia

  • The school is informally called simply "Hampton" or "HU" by many students, faculty and supporters.
  • Hampton and Howard constantly claim the title, "Real HU". (Hampton Institute became "Hampton University" in 1984.)
  • Students informally refer to the school as "HIU", or Hampton Institute and University. The "Institute" refers to the undergraduate program, while the "University" is the graduate program.
  • The campus, known for its beauty, contains several buildings that contribute to its National Historic Landmark district: Virginia-Cleveland Hall (freshman female dormitory, as well as home to the school's two cafeterias), Wigwam building (home to administrative offices), Academy Building (administrative offices), Memorial Chapel (religious services) and the President's Mansion House.[2][3] The Emancipation Oak was cited by the National Geographic Society as one of the 10 great trees in the world.
  • In 1995, Hampton joined the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference, commonly referred to as the MEAC. Since joining, Hampton has won dozens of MEAC titles in football, men's and women's basketball, men's and women's track, and men's and women's tennis. In March 2001, the men's basketball team made NCAA Tournament history, becoming only the fourth 15th-seeded team to defeat a 2nd-seeded team. Hampton defeated Iowa State, 58-57 on March 15, but lost to Georgetown two days later. The win still makes SportsCenter's Top 10 NCAA tournament upsets.

Norfolk State University (NSU) is a four-year, state-supported, coed, liberal arts institution, founded in 1935 as the Norfolk State Unit of Virginia Union University (VUU). ... Howard University is a university located in Washington, D.C., USA. An historically black university, Howard was established in 1867 by congressional order and named for Oliver O. Howard. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Hampton University is a historically black university located in Hampton, Virginia. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... The Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) is a collegiate athletic conference which consists of historically black colleges in the southeastern United States. ... This article is about the American ESPN show. ...

References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ Hampton University - Admissions. Retrieved on 2007-05-03.
  3. ^ National Historic Landmarks Survey: Listing of National Historic Landmarks by State:Virginia. Retrieved on 2007-05-03.
  • Template:Http://www.treyballdevelopment.com/ bin/aboutUs/About Harry Smith.cfm

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Official website
  • Information on Hampton University from Virginia African Heritage Program

  Results from FactBites:
 
Hampton University - Search Results - MSN Encarta (158 words)
Hampton University, Hampton University, Graduate College, Hampton University, School of Nursing, Hampton University, School of Pharmacy, Hampton...
Hampton University, private, coeducational institution in Hampton, Virginia.
Hampton, independent city in southeastern Virginia, a port on the waterway Hampton Roads opposite Norfolk.
Hampton University (1189 words)
Hampton University is a four-year, private, coed liberal arts institution that was founded in 1868 as Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute to educate former slaves who had gathered behind the Union line on the Virginia Peninsula.
Hampton University is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and master’s degrees.
Hampton University is a member of the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA Division I), and the I-AA (for football).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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