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Encyclopedia > Hampton Roads Beltway
A map of the Hampton Roads Beltway (from the Virginia Department of Transportation)
A map of the Hampton Roads Beltway (from the Virginia Department of Transportation)

Hampton Roads Beltway is a loop of Interstate 64 and Interstate 664 highways which link the communities of the Virginia Peninsula and South Hampton Roads which surround the body of water known as Hampton Roads in the southeastern portion of Virginia in the United States. Image File history File links Ct-tunnels-bridges. ... Interstate 64 (abbreviated I-64) is an Interstate Highway in the eastern United States. ... Interstate 664 (abbreviated I-664) is an interstate highway located in the Hampton Roads area of Virginia in the eastern United States. ... The Virginia Peninsula is a peninsula in southeast Virginia, bounded by the York River, James River, Hampton Roads and Chesapeake Bay. ... South Hampton Roads is a region located in the extreme southeastern portion of Virginia in the United States. ... Hampton Roads, from state map of pre-civil war Virginia circa 1858 Hampton Roads is the name of both a body of water and the land areas which surround it in southeastern Virginia in the United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq. ...


In January, 1997, a 56-mile-long I-64/I-664 loop was designated by the Virginia Department of Transportation (and signed) as the Hampton Roads Beltway. This was chosen instead of renumbering the whole road to Interstate 864. 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


I-64, the portion which was completed first, makes a huge 35 mile long arc around the area, from Hampton through portions of Norfolk, Virginia Beach, and Chesapeake and around Portsmouth to reach Bower's Hill at the edge of the Great Dismal Swamp. Norfolk County, Virginia (from 1895 map), existed from 1691-1963, now extinct Bowers Hill is a community located in the independent city of Chesapeake, Virginia (fomerly Norfolk County) in the United States. ... The Great Dismal Swamp is located in southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina in the United States on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean. ...


The newer I-664 portion of 21 miles connects with I-64 at Bowers' Hill in Chesapeake and crosses through Suffolk and Newport News to reconnect with I-64 in Hampton, completing the loop.


The beltway has the clockwise direction (as looking down at a map of the area) signed as the Inner Loop, and the counter-clockwise direction signed as the Outer Loop. Essentially, I-64 forms the eastern portion and I-664 the western portion of the beltway.

Contents


History

I-64 on the Hampton Roads Beltway, north of I-264
I-64 on the Hampton Roads Beltway, north of I-264

Building of Interstate 64 was the first priority in the region, and a portion of Interstate 264 through Portsmouth was completed even as I-64 finally reached its eastern terminus at Bower's Hill in Norfolk County (now the City of Chesapeake). Even before I-64 was built, from some of the earliest planning stages, there were hopes of a circumferential highway to interstate standards for Hampton Roads. Some proposals envisioned state and local and/or toll funding if necessary to achieve that goal. However, the Interstate 664 projects eventually were successful in reaching the goal in 1992. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (346x664, 81 KB) Summary I took this picture on I-64 in the Hampton Roads area and I release it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (346x664, 81 KB) Summary I took this picture on I-64 in the Hampton Roads area and I release it. ... Interstate 64 (abbreviated I-64) is an Interstate Highway in the eastern United States. ... Interstate 264 (abbreviated I-264) is an unusual 3-digit interstate that contains both a bypass and a spur off Interstate 64 in the Hampton Roads area of Virginia. ... Norfolk County, Virginia (from 1895 map), existed from 1691-1963, now extinct Bowers Hill is a community located in the independent city of Chesapeake, Virginia (fomerly Norfolk County) in the United States. ... Norfolk County, Virginia (from 1895 map), existed from 1691-1963, now extinct Norfolk County is an extinct political subdivision in eastern Virginia. ... Chesapeake is an independent city located in the South Hampton Roads region of eastern Virginia in the United States. ...


At one time, a proposal was floated to renumber Interstate 64 south of Interstate 664 in Hampton as Interstate 864, the Hampton Roads Beltway. However, this proposal was rejected by business leaders in the area who did not want to have an established two-digit Interstate replaced with a new three-digit Interstate. Had this proposal come to pass, Interstate 64 would have ended at its junction with Interstate 664. However, as a compromise, Interstate 64 southeast of Interstate 664 was signed as part of the Hampton Roads Beltway (Interstates 64 and 664), and it is easier to describe direction of travel as "inner" (clockwise) or "outer" (counterclockwise).


Bridge-Tunnels across Hampton Roads

A major aspect of the Interstate Highway system in the Hampton Roads area are the two bridge-tunnels, each of which cross the harbor of Hampton Roads and form a portion of the Hampton Roads Beltway. They are the only direct crossings of Hampton Roads. Hampton Roads, from state map of pre-civil war Virginia circa 1858 Hampton Roads is the name of both a body of water and the land areas which surround it in southeastern Virginia in the United States. ... Aerial view of parallel trestles and one of four man-made islands which anchor tunnel portions of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel in Virginia, longest in the world A bridge-tunnel is a water crossing facility which uses a combination of bridge and tunnel structures. ...


Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel

Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel (HRBT) is the 3.5-mile-long Hampton Roads crossing for Interstate 64. It is comprised of bridges, trestles, man made islands, and tunnels under the main shipping channels at the mouth of Hampton Roads harbor leading to the Chesapeake Bay. It connects the independent cities of Hampton and Norfolk. Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel (HRBT) is the 3. ... This article is about the edifice. ... An underground pedestrian tunnel between buildings at MIT. Note the utility pipes running along the ceiling. ... On September 17, 1861, Mrs. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel has two 12-foot-wide lanes each way, on separately built structures. The original two-lane structure replaced a ferry system and opened November 1, 1957 at a cost of $44 million dollars. Initially signed as Route 168 and U.S. Route 60, the construction of the original Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel was funded with toll revenue bonds. Although the I-64 designation was added, it operated as a two-lane toll facility for almost twenty years. The bonds were paid off by 1976. The Pride of Rotterdam, One of the P&O Ferriess Flagships operating the Hull-Rotterdam Route A ferry is a boat or a ship carrying passengers, and sometimes their vehicles, on scheduled services. ... November 1 is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 60 days remaining. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. Highway 60 is an east-west United States highway, running 2,670 miles (4,300 km) from Virginia to Arizona. ... A toll revenue bond is a financial promissory note usually issued to generate funds for the construction and/or operation of a public accommodation such as an expressway, bridge, or tunnel. ... Paying toll on passing a bridge. ...


The construction of the $95 million second portion of the HRBT was funded as part of the Interstate Highway System as authorized under the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956, as a portion of I-64, which means that it was funded with 90% FHWA funds from the Highway Trust Fund and 10% state DOT funds. When the second span was opened to traffic in 1976, the tolls were removed.


Monitor-Merrimac Memorial Bridge-Tunnel

Monitor-Merrimac Memorial Bridge-Tunnel (MMMBT) is the 4.6 mile-long Hampton Roads crossing for Interstate 664. It is comprised of bridges, trestles, man made islands, and tunnels under the main shipping channels for Hampton Roads harbor. It connects the independent cities of Newport News and Suffolk. Monitor-Merrimac Memorial Bridge-Tunnel (MMMBT) is the 4. ... Newport News, Hampton, Portsmouth and Norfolk, Virginia from space, July 1996 (Newport News is seen in the lower left quadrant) Newport News is an independent city located in Virginia. ... Motto: Nickname: Map Political Statistics Founded 1742 Incorporated Independent city Mayor Bobby L. Ralph Geographic Statistics Area  - Total  - Land  - Water 1,111. ...


The MMMBT cost $400 million to build, and it includes a four-lane tunnel that is 4,800 feet long, two man-made portal islands, and 3.2 miles of twin trestle. It was named for the two ironclad warships which engaged in the famous Battle of Hampton Roads in 1862 during the American Civil War. The battle took place within approximately one mile of the current bridge-tunnel structure. Ironclad warships, frequently shortened to just ironclads, were wooden ships or ships of composite construction (wooden planking on iron frames) sheathed with thick iron plates for protection against gunfire. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders John L. Worden Franklin Buchanan Catesby R. Jones Strength 1 ironclad, 3 wooden warships 1 ironclad, 2 wooden warships, 1 gunboat, 2 tenders Casualties 2 wooden warships sunk, 1 wooden warship damaged 261 killed 108 wounded 1 ironclad damaged 7... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederate) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties Killed in action: 110,000 Total dead: 360,000 Wounded: 275,200 Killed in action: 93,000 Total dead: 258...


Major Cities Along the Route

Chesapeake is an independent city located in the South Hampton Roads region of eastern Virginia in the United States. ... On September 17, 1861, Mrs. ... Newport News, Hampton, Portsmouth and Norfolk, Virginia from space, July 1996 (Newport News is seen in the lower left quadrant) Newport News is an independent city located in Virginia. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Map Political Statistics Founded 1752 County Independent city Mayor Dr. James W. Holley III Geographic Statistics Area  - Total  - Land  - Water 120. ... Motto: Nickname: Map Political Statistics Founded 1742 Incorporated Independent city Mayor Bobby L. Ralph Geographic Statistics Area  - Total  - Land  - Water 1,111. ... Official website: http://www. ...

References

  • 2005 Rand McNally "The Road Atlas 2005" - newest feature- interstate mileage by state
  • Virginia Department of Transportation Travel Center - Hampton Roads Tunnels and Bridges 1

External links

  • Roads to the Future website
  • Kurumi's website about 3 digit interstates connecting with I-64, including I-864
  • Interstate Guide I-64 in Virginia
  • Interstate Guide I-664 in Virginia
  • Virginia Department of Transportation

  Results from FactBites:
 
Hampton Roads - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4743 words)
The water area known as Hampton Roads (informally "the harbor") is one of the world's greatest natural harbors, and incorporates the mouths of the Elizabeth River and James River with several smaller rivers and itself empties into the Chesapeake Bay near its mouth leading to the Atlantic Ocean.
Hampton Roads is notable for U.S. naval and air force facilities, shipbuilding and repair yards, coal piers, miles of waterfront property and beaches, all of which contribute to the diversity and stability of the area's economy.
The harbor of Hampton Roads is an important highway of commerce, especially for the cities of Norfolk, Portsmouth, and Newport News.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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