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Encyclopedia > Hampstead
Hampstead

Hampstead shown within Greater London
OS grid reference TQ265855
London borough Camden
Ceremonial county Greater London
Region London
Constituent country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town LONDON
Postcode district NW3
Dialling code 020
Police Metropolitan
Fire London
Ambulance London
European Parliament London
UK Parliament Hampstead and Highgate
London Assembly Barnet and Camden
List of places: UKEnglandLondon

Coordinates: 51°33′15″N 0°10′28″W / 51.5541, -0.1744 Places named Hampstead include: Hampstead, Hampstead Heath and Hampstead Garden Suburb all in London In Canada: Hampstead, Quebec In the United States of America: Hampstead, Maryland Hampstead, New Hampshire Hampstead, North Carolina not to be confused with: Hempstead, New York and Hempstead, Texas This is a disambiguation page — a navigational... Image File history File links Greater_london_outline_map_bw. ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... The London Borough of Camden ( ) is a borough of London, England, which forms part of Inner London. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... Greater London is the top-level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ... // Constituent country is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a historical, currently non-legally officially recognised country makes up a part of a larger entity or grouping. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This list of sovereign states, alphabetically arranged, gives an overview of states around the world with information on the extent of their sovereignty. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... The London postal districts are divisions of the London post town in England and are primarily used for the direction of mail. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The NW (North Western) postcode area, also known as the London NW postcode area, is a group of postal districts in north west London, England. ... +44 redirects here. ... (Redirected from 020) The Motorola 68020 is a microprocessor from Motorola. ... There are a number of policing agencies in the United Kingdom. ... Metropolitan Police redirects here. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... The London Fire Brigade (LFB) is the statutory fire and rescue service for London, England. ... Emergency medical services in England are almost all provided by the National Health Service - the public health service in England. ... The London Ambulance Service (LAS) is the largest ambulance service in the world that does not directly charge its patients for its services. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... London is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Hampstead & Highgate is a parliamentary constituency covering the northern half of the London Borough of Camden which includes the villages of Hampstead and Highgate. ... Greater London is divided into a number of constituencies for London Assembly elections. ... Barnet and Camden is a constituency represented in the London Assembly. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in England Lists of places within counties List of places in Bedfordshire List of places in Berkshire List of places in Buckinghamshire List of places in Cambridgeshire List of places in Cheshire List of places in Cleveland List of places... This is a partial list of places in London, England. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Hampstead is an area of London, England, located 4 miles (6.4 km) north-west of Charing Cross. It is part of the London Borough of Camden. It is situated within Inner London. It is known for its intellectual, artistic, musical and literary associations and for the large and hilly parkland Hampstead Heath. It is also home to some of the most expensive housing in the London area, or indeed anywhere in the world, with large houses regularly listed for sale at over twenty million pounds sterling (about US$40 million in 2008). The village of Hampstead has more millionaires within its boundaries than any other area of Britain.[1] This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Victorian Eleanor Cross at Charing Cross The name Charing Cross, now given to a district of central London in the City of Westminster, comes from the original hamlet of Charing, where King Edward I placed a memorial to his wife, Eleanor of Castile. ... The London Borough of Camden ( ) is a borough of London, England, which forms part of Inner London. ... Inner London is the name for the group of London boroughs which form the central part of Greater London and are surrounded by Outer London. ... Highgate model boating pond near Parliament Hill Hampstead Heath (locally known as the Heath) is Londons largest ancient parkland, covering 3. ...

Contents

History

Although early records of Hampstead can be found in a grant by King Ethelred the Unready to the monastery of St. Peter’s at Westminster (AD 986) and it is referred to in the Domesday Book (1086), the history of Hampstead is generally traced back to the 17th century. Ethelred II (c. ... A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ...


Trustees of the Well started advertising the medicinal qualities of the chalybeate waters (water impregnated with iron) in 1700. Although Hampstead Wells was initially most successful and fashionable, its popularity declined in the 1800s due to competition with other fashionable London spas. The spa was demolished in 1882, although a water fountain was left behind. The Calybeate Spring Tunbridge Wells Chalybeate water was early in the 17th century said to have health-giving properties and many people have promoted their qualities. ...


Hampstead started to expand following the opening of the North London Railway in the 1860s (now the London Overground with passenger services operated by Transport for London), and expanded further after the Charing Cross, Euston & Hampstead Railway opened in 1907 (now part of London Underground's Northern Line) and provided fast travel to central London. Originally called the East & West India Docks & Birmingham Junction Railway and opened between 1850 and 1852, the railway linked the docks at Blackwall to Camden Town. ... London Transport Portal London Overground[2] is a train operating company that provides railway services concentrated in north London. ... Transport For London (TfL) is a local government body responsible for most aspects of the transport system throughout Greater London in England. ... The Charing Cross, Euston and Hampstead Railway (CCE&HR), was a deep-level tube railway constructed in London by the Underground Electric Railways Company of London Limited. ... The London Underground is a rapid transit system that serves a large part of Greater London and some neighbouring areas of Essex, Hertfordshire and Buckinghamshire. ... For other uses, see Northern Line (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


Much luxurious housing was created during the 1870s and 1880s, in the area that is now the political ward of Frognal & Fitzjohns. Much of this housing remains to this day.


During the 20th Century, a number of notable buildings were created. These include:

Of these, the Hampstead Theatre relocated in 2003 to the present Swiss Cottage site (increasing capacity from 140 to 325 seats) and the Swiss Cottage leisure centre was closed for rebuilding in 2003 and reopened in 2006. Hampstead tube station is a London Underground station in Hampstead village in north London. ... The Isokon building in Lawn Road, Hampstead, London is a concrete block of 34 flats designed by architect Wells Coates for Jack and Molly Pritchard. ... Hillfield Court on a winters morning Hillfield Court is a famous art deco residential mansion block in Belsize Park, in the London Borough of Camden, built in 1932. ... 1-3 Willow Road 2 Willow Road is a house in Hampstead, London that was designed by architect Ernö Goldfinger and built in 1938. ... Hampstead Theatre is a theatre in Hampstead, London, England. ... The central library of the public library service in the London Borough of Camden is housed in an architectural landmark building designed by Sir Basil Spence and first opened in 1964 at 88 Avenue Road, London NW3 3HA External links Website Grid reference TQ275841 Categories: UK buildings and structures stubs... The Royal Free Hospital is a large and modern London teaching hospital, United Kingdom. ... Hampstead Theatre is a theatre in Hampstead, London, England. ... The original Swiss Cottage Ye Olde Swiss Cottage pub Swiss Cottage is a landmark of North-west London in the London Borough of Camden. ...


Cultural attractions in the area include the Freud Museum, Keats' House, Kenwood House, Fenton House, The Isokon building, and the Camden Arts Centre. The large Victorian Hampstead Library and Town Hall was recently converted and extended as a creative industries centre. Sigmund Freuds couch used during psychoanalytic sessions can be found at the Freud Museum In 1938, the founder of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud, left Vienna after the Nazi annexation of Austria and moved to London, taking up residence at 20 Maresfield Gardens in Hampstead, Londons most intellectual suburb. ... Keats House Keats House is a museum in Hampstead in North London, England. ... Kenwood House Kenwood House (also known as the Iveagh Bequest) is a former stately home in Hampstead Heath in London. ... Fenton House is a 17th century merchants house in Hampstead in North London which belongs to the National Trust. ... The Isokon building in Lawn Road, Hampstead, London is a concrete block of 34 flats designed by architect Wells Coates for Jack and Molly Pritchard. ... The Camden Arts Centre is a Grade II listed building sited in the London Borough of Camden, London, England, between the areas of Hampstead and Kilburn. ...


Though now considered an integral part of London, Hampstead has retained much of its village atmosphere and charm, with Hampstead High Street playing a vital role in the day to day life of a Hampsteadian.


On 14 August 1975 Hampstead entered the UK Weather Records with the Highest 155-min total rainfall at 169 mm. As of July 2006 this record remains. is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events from the year 1975 in the United Kingdom. ... Boscastle after flooding in 2004 The UK Weather Records note the most extreme weather ever recorded in the United Kingdom, such as the most and least hours of sunshine and highest wind speed. ... In meteorology, precipitation is any kind of water that falls from the sky as part of the weather. ...


Mark Pevsner, the grandson of Sir Nicholas Pevsner, famously described Hampstead as "a large collection of roads and passages which don't go in straight lines, houses of different ages, many of them good architecture but more often it's just the way they fit together, full of nice vistas and surprises. Hampstead is a huge collection of twists and turns."[2] Sir Nikolaus Pevsner CBE (January 30, 1902 – August 18, 1983) was a German-born British historian of art and, especially, architecture. ...


Politics

Hampstead became part of the County of London in 1889 and in 1899 the Metropolitan Borough of Hampstead was formed. The borough town hall on Haverstock Hill, which was also the location of the Registry Office, can be seen in newsreel footage of many celebrity civil marriages. In 1965 the metropolitan borough was abolished and is former area merged with that of the Metropolitan Borough of Holborn and the Metropolitan Borough of St Pancras to form the modern-day London Borough of Camden. The County of London was an administrative county and ceremonial county of England from 1889 to 1965. ... The Metropolitan Borough of Hampstead was a metropolitan borough of the County of London from 1899 to 1965, when it was amalgamated with the Metropolitan Borough of St Pancras and the Metropolitan Borough of Holborn to form the London Borough of Camden. ... The Metropolitan Borough of Holborn was a metropolitan borough in the County of London between 1899 and 1965, when it was amalgamated with the Metropolitan Borough of St Pancras and the Metropolitan Borough of Hampstead to form the London Borough of Camden. ... The Metropolitan Borough of St Pancras was a metropolitan borough under London County Council between 1899 and 1965, when it was amalgated with the Metropolitan Borough of Hampstead and the Metropolitan Borough of Holborn to form the London Borough of Camden. ... The London Borough of Camden ( ) is a borough of London, England, which forms part of Inner London. ...


Hampstead is part of the Hampstead and Highgate constituency and since 1992 the member of parliament has been the former actress Glenda Jackson of the Labour Party. Hampstead & Highgate is a parliamentary constituency covering the northern half of the London Borough of Camden which includes the villages of Hampstead and Highgate. ... Glenda Jackson Glenda May Jackson, CBE, (born 9 May 1936) is a two-time Academy Award-winning British actress and politician, currently Labour Member of Parliament for the constituency of Hampstead and Highgate in the London Borough of Camden. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ...


The area has a significant tradition of educated liberal humanism, sometimes referred to (occasionally disparagingly) as "Hampstead Liberalism".


The area is also home to the left-wing Labour magazine, Tribune and the satirical magazine the Hampstead Village Voice. Tribune is a democratic socialist weekly, currently a magazine though in the past more often a newspaper, published in London. ...


Notable current and former residents

Hampstead has long been known as a residence of the intelligentsia, including writers, composers, and intellectuals, actors, artists and architects — many of whom created a bohemian community in the late 19th century. In the 1930s it became base to a community of avant garde artists and writers and was host to a number of émigrés and exiles from Nazi Europe.


Famous past inhabitants have included:


Hampstead is currently and has been recently home to: Sir Kingsley William Amis (April 16, 1922 – October 22, 1995) was an English novelist, poet, critic, and teacher. ... Photo of Martin Amis by Robert Birnbaum Martin Amis (born August 25, 1949) is an English novelist. ... Sir Kingsley William Amis (April 16, 1922 – October 22, 1995) was an English novelist, poet, critic, and teacher. ... Sir Alan Ayckbourn CBE (born April 12, 1939) is a popular and prolific English playwright. ... Alfred Jules Ayer (October 29, 1910 - June 27, 1989), better known as simply A. J. Ayer (and called Freddie by friends), was a British philosopher. ... Michael Ayrton (1921-1975), was a British artist and writer, known as a painter, printmaker and sculptor, and also as a critic, broadcaster and novelist. ... Nigel Balchin (December 3, 1908 - May 17, 1970) was an English novelist and scriptwriter, born in Wiltshire. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Sir Cecil Walter Hardy Beaton (January 14, 1904 – January 18, 1980) was an English fashion and portrait photographer and a stage and costume designer for films and the theatre. ... John Stewart Beckett (5 February 1927 - 5 February 2007), was an Irish musician, composer and conductor; cousin of the famous writer and playwright Samuel Beckett. ... Sybille von Schoenebeck (16 March 1911 – 17 February 2006) was a British author under her married name of Sybille Bedford. ... Sir Isaiah Berlin, OM (June 6, 1909 – November 5, 1997) was a political philosopher and historian of ideas, regarded as one of the leading liberal thinkers of the twentieth century. ... A collection of Betjemans poetry, published by John Murray in January 2006 Sir John Betjeman CBE (28 August 1906 – 19 May 1984) was an English poet, writer and broadcaster who described himself in Whos Who as a poet and hack. He was born to a middle-class family... For other persons named William Blake, see William Blake (disambiguation). ... Sir Arthur Edward Drummond Bliss, CH, KCVO (August 2, 1891 - March 27, 1975) was a British composer. ... Sir Derek Jules Gaspard Ulric Niven van den Bogaerde (28 March 1921 â€“ 8 May 1999), better known by his stage name Dirk Bogarde, was an actor and author. ... A tapestry which is a greatly enlarged version of Arthur Boyds painting hangs in the Great Hall of Parliament House, Canberra Arthur Merric Bloomfield Boyd AC OBE (20 July 1920 – 24 April 1999) was a member of the prominent Boyd artistic dynasty in Australia, with many relatives being painters... Marcel Lajos Breuer (May 21, 1902 Pécs, Hungary – July 1, 1981 New York City), architect and furniture designer, was an influential Hungarian-born modernist of Jewish descent. ... Richard Burton, portrait by Frederic Leighton, National Portrait Gallery, London Sir Richard Francis Burton (March 19, 1821 - October 19, 1890), British consul, explorer, translator, and Orientalist, was born at Barham House, Hertfordshire, England. ... For other persons named Richard Burton, see Richard Burton (disambiguation). ... Lord Byron, English poet Lord Byron (1803), as painted by Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, (January 22, 1788 – April 19, 1824) was the most widely read English language poet of his day. ... Elias Canetti, Nobel Laureate in Literature Canettis tomb-stone in Zürich, Switzerland Elias Canetti (Rousse, Bulgaria, 25 July 1905 – 14 August 1994, Zurich) was a Bulgaria-born novelist of Sephardi Jewish ancestry who wrote in German and won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1981. ... John le Carré is the pseudonym of David John Moore Cornwell (born October 19, 1931 in Poole, Dorset, England), an English writer of espionage novels. ... Agatha Christie Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie, DBE (September 15, 1890 – January 12, 1976), was a British crime fiction writer. ... Kenneth Clark presenting the BBC TV series Civilisation. ... Samuel Taylor Coleridge (October 21, 1772 – July 25, 1834) (pronounced ) was an English poet, critic, and philosopher who was, along with his friend William Wordsworth, one of the founders of the Romantic Movement in England and one of the Lake Poets. ... A self portrait by John Constable John Constable (11 June 1776 – 31 March 1837) was an English Romantic painter. ... For other persons named Peter Cook, see Peter Cook (disambiguation). ... Milein Cosman - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... This article is about the person. ... Dickens redirects here. ... Jacqueline Mary du Pré, O.B.E. (January 26, 1945 – October 19, 1987), was a British cellist, today acknowledged as one of the greatest exponents of the instrument. ... Daphne, Lady Browning DBE (13 May 1907–19 April 1989), commonly known as Dame Daphne du Maurier (IPA: ), was a famous British novelist, playwright and short story writer. ... Edward Elgar Sir Edward William Elgar, Bt OM GCVO (June 2, 1857 – February 23, 1934) was a British composer, born in the small Worcestershire village of Broadheath to William Elgar, a piano tuner and music dealer, and his wife Ann. ... For other persons named Thomas Eliot, see Thomas Eliot (disambiguation). ... William Empson Sir William Empson (27 September 1906 – 15 April 1984) was an English literary critic and poet, reckoned by some to be the greatest English literary critic after Samuel Johnson and William Hazlitt and fitting heir to their mode of witty, fiercely heterodox and imaginatively rich criticism. ... Marianne Evelyn Gabriel Faithfull[1][2](born 29 December 1946) is an English singer, songwriter, actress and diarist whose career spans over four decades. ... This article is about the author. ... This article is about the spy series. ... John Robert Fowles John Robert Fowles (March 31, 1926 – November 5, 2005) was an English novelist and essayist. ... Anna Freud and Sadie Burkard (December 3, 1895 - October 9, 1982) was the sixth and last child of Sigmund and Julia. ... Lucian Michael Freud, OM, CH (born 8 December 1922) is a British painter and printmaker. ... Sigmund Freud (IPA: ), born Sigismund Schlomo Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939), was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist who founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ... Naum Gabo KBE (August 5, 1890 - August 23, 1977) was a prominent Russian sculptor in the Constructivism movement and a pioneer of Kinetic Art. ... John Galsworthy OM (14 August 1867 – 31 January 1933) was an English novelist and playwright. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... Hugh Todd Naylor Gaitskell (April 9, 1906 – January 18, 1963) was a British politician, leader of the Labour Party from 1955 until his death in 1963. ... ErnÅ‘ Goldfinger (November 11, 1902 – November 15, 1987) was a Hungarian-born architect and designer of furniture, and a key member of the architectural Modern Movement after he had moved to the United Kingdom. ... Sir Ernst Hans Josef Gombrich, OM, CBE (30 March 1909 – 3 November 2001) was an Austrian-born art historian, who spent most of his working life in the United Kingdom. ... Walter Adolph Georg Gropius (May 18, 1883 – July 5, 1969) was a German architect and founder of Bauhaus. ... Thom Gunn (August 29, 1929 - April 25, 2004) was a British poet. ... Audrey Hepburn (May 4, 1929) – January 20, 1993) was an English Academy Award-, Tony Award-, Grammy Award-, and Emmy Award-winning film and stage actress, fashion icon, and humanitarian. ... Hepworths Family of Man in bronze, 1970, at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park. ... Alfred Thomas Highmore[1] (born February 14, 1992), known professionally as Freddie Highmore, is an English actor. ... Elizabeth Jane Howard is an English novelist. ... Andrew Huxley at Trinity College, Cambridge, July 2005 Family tree Sir Andrew Fielding Huxley, OM, FRS (born 22 November 1917, Hampstead, London) is an English physiologist and biophysicist, who won the 1963 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work with Alan Lloyd Hodgkin on the basis of nerve... Aldous Leonard Huxley (26 July 1894 – 22 November 1963) was an English writer and one of the most prominent members of the famous Huxley family. ... An artists rendering of James Henry Leigh Hunt James Henry Leigh Hunt (October 19, 1784 - August 28, 1859) was an English essayist and writer. ... Muhammad Ali Jinnah (Urdu: محمد على جناح)  (December 25, 1876 – September 11, 1948) was an Indian Muslim politician and leader of the All India Muslim League who founded Pakistan and served as its first Governor-General. ... For other persons named Samuel Johnson, see Samuel Johnson (disambiguation). ... Keats redirects here. ... Hans Keller (1919-1985) was an Austrian-born British musician and writer who made significant contributions to musicology and music criticism, and invented the method of Wordless Functional Analysis (in which a work is analysed in musical sound alone, without any words being heard or read). ... This article refers to Langtry, Lillie. ... Doris Lessing CH OBE (born Doris May Tayler in Kermanshah, Persia,[1] on 22 October 1919[2]) is a British writer, author of works such as the novels The Grass is Singing and The Golden Notebook. ... David Herbert Richards Lawrence (11 September 1885 – 2 March 1930) was an English writer of the 20th century, whose prolific and diverse output included novels, short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel books, paintings, translations, literary criticism, and personal letters. ... Berthold Lubetkin (1901-1990) was a Russian emigré architect who pioneered modernist design in Britain in the 1930s. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Mahler redirects here. ... James Ramsay MacDonald (12 October 1866 – 9 November 1937) was a British politician and three times Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... Yehudi Menuhin, Baron Menuhin, OM, KBE (April 22, 1916 – March 12, 1999) was an American violinist and conductor who spent most of his performing career in the United Kingdom. ... Alan Alexander Milne (IPA pronunciation: ) (January 18, 1882 – January 31, 1956), also known as A. A. Milne, was an English author, best known for his books about the teddy bear Winnie-the-Pooh and for various childrens poems. ... This article is about the British physician, theatre and opera director, and television presenter; for other people named Jonathan Miller, see Jonathan Miller (disambiguation). ... Lee Miller Elizabeth Lee Miller (23 April 1907 - 21 July 1977) was an American photographer. ... Piet Mondrian, 1924 Pieter Cornelis (Piet) Mondriaan, after 1912 Mondrian, (pronounced: Dutch IPA: , later IPA: ), (March 7, 1872–February 1, 1944) was a Dutch painter. ... This article is about the sculptor Henry Moore. ... Marie-Louise Von Motesiczky (October 24, 1906 – June 10, 1996) was an Austrian-Jewish painter. ... Embley Park, now a school, was the family home of Florence Nightingale. ... George Orwell is the pen name of Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903[1][2] – 21 January 1950) who was an English writer and journalist well-noted as a novelist, critic, and commentator on politics and culture. ... Peter Seamus OToole (born August 2, 1932, uncertain but presumed correct date[1]) is an eight-time Academy Award-nominated Irish actor. ... For the Olympic gymnast, see Anna Pavlova (gymnast). ... Sir Roger Penrose, OM, FRS (born 8 August 1931) is an English mathematical physicist and Emeritus Rouse Ball Professor of Mathematics at the Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford and Emeritus Fellow of Wadham College. ... University College School, known generally as UCS, is a British Independent school situated in Hampstead, north west London. ... Sir Roland Penrose (14 October 1900 – 23 April 1984)1 was an English artist, historian and poet. ... John Boynton Priestley, OM (born 13 September 1894, Bradford, West Riding of Yorkshire, died 14 August 1984, Warwickshire) was an English writer and broadcaster . ... Charles Saatchi Charles Saatchi (born June 9, 1943) was the co-founder with his brother Maurice of the global advertising agency Saatchi & Saatchi, which became the worlds biggest before the brothers were forced out of their own company in 1995. ... Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (née Godwin) (30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was an English romantic/gothic novelist and the author of Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. ... This article is about the 1818 novel. ... Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. ... Sir Percy Selwyn Selwyn-Clarke KBE, CMG, MC, MD, FRCP, DPH, DTM&H, CStJ Barrister at Law; (1893–1976). ... Sir Stephen Harold Spender CBE, (February 28, 1909, London – July 16, 1995) was an English poet, novelist and essayist who concentrated on themes of social injustice and the class struggle in his work. ... University College School, known generally as UCS, is a British Independent school situated in Hampstead, north west London. ... -1... Marie Stopes (October 15, 1880 - October 2, 1958) was a Scottish author, campaigner for womens rights and pioneer in the field of family planning. ... For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ... Eric Thompson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Sophie Thompson (born 1 January 1962) is an award-winning British actress, perhaps best known for playing Stella Crawford in EastEnders. ... Emma Thompson (born April 15, 1959) is an English actress, comedian, and screenwriter. ... Phyllida Law (born 8 May 1932) is a Scottish actress. ... Evelyn Waugh, as photographed in 1940 by Carl Van Vechten Arthur Evelyn St. ... Herbert George Wells (September 21, 1866 – August 13, 1946), better known as H. G. Wells, was an English writer best known for such science fiction novels as The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds, The Invisible Man, The First Men in the Moon and The Island of Doctor Moreau. ... Richard Wollheim (5 May 1923 – 4 November 2003) was a British philosopher. ... Wordsworth redirects here. ... Thierry Daniel Henry (pronounced , born 17 August 1977) is a French football player. ... Sir Neil Stanley Shields OBE MC (September 7, 1919 – September 12, 2002) was most notable as a merger broker in the United Kingdom, helping to facilitate mergers and acquisitions as a director of Chesham Amalgamations[1], and as the Chairman of the Commission for New Towns from 1982 to 1995... Saul Hudson, better known to the world as Slash, was one of the guitarists of hard rock band Guns N Roses. ...

Constantine of Greece, formerly Constantine II, King of the Hellenes (born June 2, 1940) was King of Greece from 1964 until the abolition of the monarchy in 1974. ... This is a list of the Kings of Greece, formally known by the title of King of The Hellenes. ... Alfred Brendel Alfred Brendel (born January 5, 1931) is an Austrian pianist, born in Czechoslovakia. ... Stephen Kovacevich (born October 17, 1940), who has also been known as Stephen Bishop and Stephen Bishop-Kovacevich is an American classical pianist and conductor. ... Johannes Brahms Johannes Brahms (May 7, 1833 – April 3, 1897) was a German composer of classical music. ... Rachel Weisz (born March 7, 1971) is an Academy Award-winning English film and television actress. ... Björk Guðmundsdóttir (born November 21, 1965 in Reykjavík, Iceland) is a singer/songwriter with a great expressive range and an interest in many kinds of music including popular, hip-hop, alternative-rock, torch songs, folk, and classical. ... Gwyneth Kate Paltrow (born September 27, 1972)[1] is an Academy Award-, Golden Globe- and two-time Screen Actors Guild Award-winning American actress. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Russell Ira Crowe (born 7 April 1964) is an Academy Award-, BAFTA-, Golden Globe-, and Screen Actors Guild Award -winning New Zealand-Australian actor[1]. His acting career began in the early 1990s with roles in Australian TV series such as Police Rescue and films such as Romper Stomper. ... Peter Seamus OToole (born August 2, 1932, uncertain but presumed correct date[1]) is an eight-time Academy Award-nominated Irish actor. ... Alfred Thomas Highmore[1] (born February 14, 1992), known professionally as Freddie Highmore, is an English actor. ... George Alan ODowd, better known as Boy George (born June 14, 1961 in Eltham, London) is a rock singer-songwriter and club DJ. He grew up in a large, working-class Irish family in Thurles, County Tipperary, Ireland. ... For other persons named Michael Foot, see Michael Foot (disambiguation). ... Stephen John Fry (born 24 August 1957) is an English comedian, writer, actor, humourist, novelist, columnist, filmmaker and television personality. ... Hugh John Mungo Grant (born September 9, 1960) is a Golden Globe-winning British actor and film producer. ... James Hugh Calum Laurie, OBE (born June 11, 1959) is an English actor, comedian, writer and musician. ... For other persons named George Michael, see George Michael (disambiguation). ... This article is about the British television presenter. ... Ricky Dene Gervais (born 25 June 1961) is a triple Golden Globe-, double Emmy- and seven-time BAFTA award-winning English comedian, writer, actor and former New Romantic musician from Reading, Berkshire. ... Timothy Tim William Burton (born August 25, 1958) is an Academy Award and Golden Globe-nominated American film director, writer and designer notable for the quirky and often dark gothic atmosphere in his high-profile films. ... Helena Bonham Carter (born 26 May 1966) is an Academy Award- and Golden Globe-nominated English actress, known for her portrayals of Bellatrix Lestrange in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Marla Singer in the film Fight Club, her Oscar-nominated performance as Kate Croy in The Wings... Stephen Merchant (born 24 November 1974 in Bristol) is an English Emmy, Golden Globe, British Comedy Award and BAFTA-award winning writer, director, and comedic actor. ... Jeremy John Irons (born September 19, 1948) is an Academy Award, Tony Award, Screen Actors Guild, two-time Emmy Award and Golden Globe Award-winning English film, television and stage actor. ... Sienna Rose Miller (born December 28, 1981) is a BAFTA and London Film Critics Circle Award nominated US-born English[1] actress and model. ... This article is about the TV chef. ... David Jude Law (born 29 December 1972) is an BAFTA Award-winning and Academy Award-nominated British actor. ... Fiona Bruce (born 25 April 1964 in Singapore) is a British journalist and television presenter in the United Kingdom. ... William Bradley Brad Pitt (born December 18, 1963) is an Academy award-nominated American actor, film producer, and social activist. ... Michael Edward Palin, CBE (born 5 May 1943), is an English comedian, actor, writer and television presenter best known for being one of the members of the comedy group Monty Python and for his travel documentaries. ... Tim Roth (born 14 May 1961, as Timothy Simon Smith in Dulwich, London) is an Academy Award-nominated English film actor and director. ... Gordon Matthew Thomas Sumner, CBE (born October 2, 1951), universally known by his stage name Sting, is an Academy Award-nominated sixteen time Grammy-winning English musician from Wallsend in North Tyneside. ... Freddie Ljungberg models Calvin Klein briefs. ... Ralph Nathaniel Fiennes, (IPA: ), born 22 December 1962) is a Tony Award-winning, Academy Award-nominated and Genie Award-nominated British actor. ... Aliaksandr PaÅ­lavič Hleb, sometimes referred to in English as Alexander Hleb or Alexander Gleb[1] (Belarusian: Аляксандр Паўлавіч Глеб, IPA: ; Russian: Александр Павлович Глеб, born May 1, 1981 in Minsk), is a Belarusian footballer who plays in midfield for Arsenal FC and the Belarus national team. ... For other persons named Elizabeth Taylor, see Elizabeth Taylor (disambiguation). ... Emma Thompson (born April 15, 1959) is an English actress, comedian, and screenwriter. ... Francesc Cesc Fàbregas Soler (born May 4, 1987 in Arenys de Mar, Catalonia, Spain), is a Spanish football midfielder, who currently plays for English club Arsenal. ... Kate Elizabeth Winslet (born October 5, 1975) is a five time Academy Award-nominated Emmy Award-nominated BAFTA, Grammy and Screen Actors Guild Award winning English actress. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Russell Edward Brand [1] (born June 4, 1975 in Grays, Essex)[2] is an English radio and television personality, comedian, actor, and newspaper columnist. ... Jonathan Peter Culshaw (born 2 June 1968 in Ormskirk, Lancashire) is a British impressionist and comedian. ... old Radio 4 logo BBC Radio 4 is a UK domestic radio station which broadcasts a wide variety of spoken-word programmes including news, drama, comedy, science and history. ... Rachel Lauren Stevens (born April 9, 1978) is an English singer, actress, and an occasional model. ... Jon Sopel presenting on BBC News 24 Jon Sopel is a television presenter and correspondent for the BBC. Starting his broadcasting career in local radio, he went on to become the chief political correspondent for BBC News 24 and later spent three years as the BBCs Paris correspondent. ... Robin van Persie (born August 6, 1983 in Rotterdam) is a Dutch footballer. ... Geraldine Estelle Geri Halliwell (born 6 August 1972) is a British pop singer-songwriter, childrens author, actress and Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations Population Fund. ... The Spice Girls are a BRIT Award-winning English pop group formed in 1994. ... Melanie Jayne Chisholm (born 12 January 1974 in Whiston, Lancashire), also known as Melanie C or Mel C, is an English singer, songwriter, and television personality best known as one of the five members of the English girl group Spice Girls, who was nicknamed Sporty Spice. As a solo artist... Emma Lee Bunton (born 21 January 1976) is an English pop singer, songwriter, and occasional actress. ... The Spice Girls are a BRIT Award-winning English pop group formed in 1994. ... Jake Maskall is a British actor who appeared in the TV soap opera EastEnders, in which he played ladies man and bad boy Danny Moon. ... Richard Wilson, OBE (born July 9, 1936) is a Scottish actor and theatre director, best known for playing Victor Meldrew in the popular BBC situation comedy One Foot in the Grave. ... Liam Gallagher (born William John Paul Gallagher on September 21, 1972, Burnage, Manchester, England) is an English singer and tambourine player of the band Oasis. ... Oasis are an English rock band that formed in Manchester in 1991. ... Mark Prince Charles Banin is a professional poker player and television presenter on Poker Night Live. ...

Sites

Bridge on Hampstead Heath

To the north and east of Hampstead, and separating it from Highgate, is London's largest ancient parkland, Hampstead Heath, which includes the well-known and legally-protected view of the London skyline from Parliament Hill. The Heath, a major place for Londoners to walk and "take the air", has three open-air public swimming ponds; one for men, one for women, and one for mixed bathing, which were originally reservoirs for drinking water and part of the River Fleet. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution‎ (3,008 × 2,000 pixels, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 532 pixelsFull resolution‎ (3,008 × 2,000 pixels, file size: 3. ... This article is on the London suburb. ... Highgate model boating pond near Parliament Hill Hampstead Heath (locally known as the Heath) is Londons largest ancient parkland, covering 3. ... Hampstead Ponds are actually known in London as Highgate Ponds (see the Corporation of Londons own official guide map to Hampstead Heath and see also Ordnance Survey and AtoZ mapping as well as references in local press, and also note that there are vastly more search results for Highgate... The Ashokan Reservoir, located in Ulster County, New York, USA. It is one of 19 that supplies New York City with drinking water. ... Entrance to the Fleet River, Samuel Scott, c. ...


Local activities include major open-air concerts on summer Saturday evenings on the slopes below Kenwood House, book and poetry readings, fun fairs on the lower reaches of the Heath, period harpsichord recitals at Fenton House, Hampstead Scientific Society and Hampstead Photographic Society. Kenwood House Kenwood House (also known as the Iveagh Bequest) is a former stately home in Hampstead Heath in London. ...


The largest single place of employment in Hampstead is the Royal Free Hospital in Pond Street, but many small businesses based in the area have international significance. George Martin's Air recording studios, in converted church premises in Lyndhurst Road, is a current example, as Jim Henson's Creature Shop was, before it relocated to California. The Royal Free Hospital is a large and modern London teaching hospital, United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see George Martin (disambiguation). ... Jim Hensons Creature Shop is a company founded in 1979 by puppeteer Jim Henson, creator of The Muppets. ...


The area has some remarkable examples of architecture, one being the Isokon building in Lawn Road, a Grade I listed experiment in collective housing, once home to the likes of Agatha Christie, Henry Moore, Ben Nicholson and Walter Gropius. It was recently restored by Notting Hill Housing Trust. The Isokon building in Lawn Road, Hampstead, London is a concrete block of 34 flats designed by architect Wells Coates for Jack and Molly Pritchard. ... Buckingham Palace, a Grade I listed building. ... Agatha Mary Clarissa, Lady Mallowan, DBE (15 September 1890 – 12 January 1976), commonly known as Agatha Christie, was an English crime writer of novels, short stories and plays. ... This article is about the sculptor Henry Moore. ... Benjamin Lauder Nicholson OM, (10 April 1894 – 6 February 1982), known as Ben Nicholson, was an English abstract painter Born at Denham, Buckinghamshire, Nicholson was the son of the painter Sir William Nicholson and the brother of Nancy Nicholson. ... Walter Adolph Georg Gropius (May 18, 1883 – July 5, 1969) was a German architect and founder of Bauhaus. ...


Museums

Fenton House is a 17th century merchants house in Hampstead in North London which belongs to the National Trust. ... Sigmund Freuds couch used during psychoanalytic sessions can be found at the Freud Museum In 1938, the founder of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud, left Vienna after the Nazi annexation of Austria and moved to London, taking up residence at 20 Maresfield Gardens in Hampstead, Londons most intellectual suburb. ... Keats House Keats House is a museum in Hampstead in North London, England. ... Kenwood House Kenwood House (also known as the Iveagh Bequest) is a former stately home in Hampstead Heath in London. ...

Places of Interest

The Everyman, Hampstead was first opened as a cinema on 26 December 1933. ... Hampstead Theatre is a theatre in Hampstead, London, England. ... The Pentameters Theatre was founded in 1968, and is still run, by artistic director Leonie Scott-Matthews. ...

Churches

  • St John-at-Hampstead
  • St John's Downshire Hill

St John-at-Hampstead is a Church of England church dedicated to St John the Evangelist (though the original dedication was only refined from St John to this in 1917 by the Bishop of London) in Hampstead, London. ...

Pubs

Hampstead is well known for its traditional pubs, such as the Holly Bush (which was gas lit until recently), the Spaniard's Inn (where highwayman Dick Turpin took refuge), The Old Bull and Bush and Ye Olde White Bear. Jack Straw's Castle on the edge of the Heath has now been converted into residential flats. Others include: An amusingly named pub (the Old New Inn) at Bourton-on-the-Water, in the Cotswold Hills of South West England A pub in the Haymarket area of Edinburgh, Scotland A public house, usually known as a pub, is a drinking establishment found mainly in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada... The Spaniards Inn lies on Hampstead Lane on the way from Hampstead to Highgate and on the edge of Hampstead Heath. ... For the British television series, see Dick Turpin (TV series). ... The Old Bull and Bush pub The Old Bull and Bush is a public house near Hampstead Heath in London which gave its name to the music hall song Down at the old Bull and Bush sung by Florrie Forde. ...

  • Freemasons Arms
  • The Duke of Hamilton
  • Ye Olde White Bear
  • The Holly Bush
  • The Three Horseshoes
  • King William IV
  • The Magdala, where Ruth Ellis killed her lover.

Freemasons Arms is a fairly common name for British pubs. ... William IV King of the United Kingdom William IV (William Henry) (21 August 1765–20 June 1837) was King of the United Kingdom and of Hanover from 26 June 1830 until his death. ... For the lesbian activist, see Ruth Ellis (American). ...

Restaurants

Hampstead has an eclectic mix of restaurants ranging from French to Thai. Notable and longstanding are The Gaucho Grill, Jin kichi, Tip Top Thai, Al Casbah and Le Cellier du Midi.


Schools

Hampstead underground station

Christ Church Primary School (Mixed, Voluntary Aided) Devonshire House Preparatory School (Mixed, Independent) Fitzjohns Primary School (Mixed, Community) Fleet Primary School (Mixed, Community) Hall School (Boys, Independent) Hampstead Hill School (Mixed, Independent) Hampstead Parochial Primary School (Mixed, Voluntary Aided, Church of England) Heathside Prep School (Mixed, Independent) Holy Trinity Primary... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1022 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Hampstead Hampstead tube station Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1022 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Hampstead Hampstead tube station Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner...

Transport

Nearest places

, Belsize Park is a suburb of North London in the London Borough of Camden, located 3. ... For other uses, see Chalk Farm (disambiguation). ... Childs Hill, now the southernmost ward of the London Borough of Barnet, although of historic origin, is a late-19th-century suburban development situated 5 miles (8 km) northwest of Charing Cross bordered by the A41 (Hendon Way) and Dunstan Road, and centred on the junction of Cricklewood Lane and... Frognal is a place in London in the London Borough of Camden between Hampstead and West Hampstead. ... , Finchley is a place in the London Borough of Barnet, London, England. ... , Golders Green is an area in the London Borough of Barnet in London, England. ... This article is on the London suburb. ... , Primrose Hill is a hill located on the north side of Regents Park in north London, and also the name for the surrounding district. ... This article is about Regents Park in London. ... This article, image, template or category should belong in one or more categories. ... St Johns Wood is a district of North London, England in the City of Westminster, near Regents Park. ... The original Swiss Cottage Ye Olde Swiss Cottage pub Swiss Cottage is a landmark of North-west London in the London Borough of Camden. ... West Hampstead is an area in northwest London, England, situated between Childs Hill to the north, Frognal and Hampstead to the east, Swiss Cottage to the south, and Kilburn to the west. ...

Nearest tube stations

Hampstead tube station is a London Underground station in Hampstead village in north London. ... Belsize Park tube station is a London Underground station on the Northern Line. ... Swiss Cottage tube station is a London Underground station at Swiss Cottage. ... North End (commonly referred to as Bull and Bush) was a proposed but never completed London Underground station, on the Northern Line, between Golders Green and Hampstead, near the site of the Bull and Bush public house (hence the nickname). ...

Nearest railway station

Hampstead Heath is a railway station in London on the Silverlink North London Line between Finchley Road & Frognal railway station and Gospel Oak railway station. ...

Nearest hospital

References

  1. ^ http://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/main.jhtml?xml=/property/2004/05/08/phamp08.xml "Whatever happened to Hampstead Man?" (Daily Telegraph: retrieved 11/16/2007)
  2. ^ http://www.findaproperty.com/areaguidebook.aspx?edid=00&salerent=0&storyid=0765&areaid=0242
  3. ^ The menage a trois that saved Kingsley Amis from despair | the Daily Mail
  4. ^ Arnold Bax (Composer, Arranger) - Short Biography
  5. ^ Cecil Beaton (1904-1980), Photographer, designer and writer
  6. ^ Sybille Bedford - Telegraph
  7. ^ [1]
  8. ^ http://www.intute.ac.uk/artsandhumanities/limelight/betjeman.html Limelight: Sir John Betjeman
  9. ^ Camden New Journal
  10. ^ The private world of Dirk Bogarde Independent 28 Mar 2007 accessed 28 Apr 2007
  11. ^ Arthur Boyd one of the most famous Australian artists
  12. ^ The Life of Sir Richard Burton, by Thomas Wright (chapter32)
  13. ^ What I've Learned: Peter O'Toole (Esquire Magazine: Personal Finance) at SmartMoney.com
  14. ^ Hampstead & West Hampstead Guide
  15. ^ Elias Canetti
  16. ^ John le Carre resources
  17. ^ Camden New Journal
  18. ^ London's Literary Village - New York Times
  19. ^ Biography - Victoria and Albert Museum
  20. ^ Camden New Journal
  21. ^ A Charles Dickens Journal - 1837
  22. ^ Camden New Journal
  23. ^ Whatever happened to Hampstead Man? - Telegraph
  24. ^ Camden New Journal
  25. ^ http://www.bl.uk/collections/sound-archive/pdf/playback37.pdf
  26. ^ [2]
  27. ^ Ian Fleming Centre: Welcome to Ian Fleming Centre
  28. ^ Camden Islington & West End - News Reviews Listings
  29. ^ Adoption History: Anna Freud (1895-1982)
  30. ^ Freud and his family moved to 20 Maresfield Gardens, Hampstead in June 1938. His daughter Anna Freud recreating his Vienna consulting room in the house that is now a museum to his memory. Freud died in 1939.
  31. ^ Naum Gabo
  32. ^ London's Literary Village - New York Times
  33. ^ Whatever happened to Hampstead Man? - Telegraph
  34. ^ Resident of 2 Willow Road
  35. ^ Ernst Gombrich: History man | By genre | guardian.co.uk Books
  36. ^ TATEetc. Peder Anker on László Moholy-Nagy
  37. ^ Poetry Foundation: The online home of the Poetry Foundation
  38. ^ Mondrian In London
  39. ^ The menage a trois that saved Kingsley Amis from despair | the Daily Mail
  40. ^ Andrew F. Huxley - Biography
  41. ^ Leigh Hunt
  42. ^ Jinnah of Pakistan, page 132, Stanley Wolpert
  43. ^ Alliance of Literary Societies, Gazetteer. London
  44. ^ Guide to Hampstead
  45. ^ Hans Keller: The Jerusalem Diary (excerpts)
  46. ^ Hampstead - St. John’s Wood | British History Online
  47. ^ Doris Lessing 'delighted' to win Nobel Prize - Times Online
  48. ^ London's Literary Village - New York Times
  49. ^ Communities - Themes - Exploring 20th Century London
  50. ^ Biography - Content
  51. ^ Whatever happened to Hampstead Man? - Telegraph
  52. ^ [3]
  53. ^ A. A. Milne
  54. ^ British Humanist Association
  55. ^ Observer review: Lee Miller by Carolyn Burke | By genre | guardian.co.uk Books
  56. ^ Mondrian In London
  57. ^ Henry Moore
  58. ^ [www.motesiczky.org]
  59. ^ Florence Nightingale: Part III. Strachey, Lytton. 1918. Eminent Victorians
  60. ^ 9.Booklover's Corner
  61. ^ What I've Learned: Peter O'Toole (Esquire Magazine: Personal Finance) at SmartMoney.com
  62. ^ Worldroots.com
  63. ^ Pavlova, Anna - Exploring 20th Century London
  64. ^ University College School
  65. ^ Observer review: Lee Miller by Carolyn Burke | By genre | guardian.co.uk Books
  66. ^ London's Literary Village - New York Times
  67. ^ What Charles did next | | guardian.co.uk Arts
  68. ^ London's Literary Village - New York Times
  69. ^ The hard boiled saint: Selwyn-Clarke in Hong Kong - Horder 311 (7003): 492 - BMJ
  70. ^ Hampstead - Frognal and the Central Demesne | British History Online
  71. ^ Camden New Journal
  72. ^ London's Literary Village - New York Times
  73. ^ Elizabeth Taylor Biography (1932-)
  74. ^ Evelyn Waugh - Penguin UK Authors - Penguin UK
  75. ^ Henry James and H.G. Wells (Rexroth)
  76. ^ Guide to Hampstead
  77. ^ French soccer star Thierry Henry quit Arsenal to "get away from everything English"
  78. ^ "Sir Neil Shields obituary - Times Online". The Times (London) (2002-11-01). Retrieved on 2007-08-26.
  79. ^ Ex-king of Greece is paid £7m for seized royal homes - Telegraph
  80. ^ New Statesman - A master of thoughtfulness
  81. ^ Stephen Kovacevich and friends play excellent Mozart and Brahms, enjoyed by Malcolm Miller
  82. ^ Rachel's Weisz guy | the Daily Mail
  83. ^ Whatever happened to Hampstead Man? - Telegraph
  84. ^ The Biography Channel - Helena Bonham Carter Biography

Anna Freud and Sadie Burkard (December 3, 1895 - October 9, 1982) was the sixth and last child of Sigmund and Julia. ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... Sigmund Freuds couch used during psychoanalytic sessions can be found at the Freud Museum In 1938, the founder of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud, left Vienna after the Nazi annexation of Austria and moved to London, taking up residence at 20 Maresfield Gardens in Hampstead, Londons most intellectual suburb. ... 1-3 Willow Road 2 Willow Road is a house in Hampstead, London that was designed by architect Ernö Goldfinger and built in 1938. ... For other uses, see Times. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Hampstead
  • Hampstead Village Online
  • London's Literary Village
  • The Heath and Hampstead Society
  • The Hampstead Scientific Society
  • Camden Council
  • Hampstead Theatre
This is a partial list of places in London, England. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
WELCOME TO HAMPSTEAD (107 words)
Business, Art & Crafts "Letter to Vendors" for Celebrate Hampstead Festival 2008
* Hampstead, our wonderful little wide spot in the road, is quickly becoming a destination community for many who choose to flee the hustle and bustle of the crowded city to seek the simpler, quieter lifestyle the gracious Southern coastal area offers.
Enjoy it while you can, because it looks like the hustle and bustle is racing our way.
Hampstead Heath (1510 words)
Hampstead Heath has been awarded the Green Flag Award for the seven consecutive years.
The Hampstead Heath orienteering course ranges all over the Heath and can be adapted for different levels of difficulty.
Charges are to be introduced for using the Hampstead Heath swimming ponds.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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