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Encyclopedia > Hampshire College
Hampshire College

Motto: Non satis scire
(To know is not enough)
Established 1965
Type: Private
Endowment: $39.5 Million (as of January 2007)
President: Ralph Hexter
Staff: 115
Undergraduates: 1430
Postgraduates: 0
Location: Amherst, Massachusetts, USA
Campus: Rural, 800 acres (3.2 km²)
Avg. Class Size: 16
Website: www.hampshire.edu

Hampshire College is an experimenting private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts. It was founded in 1965 as an experiment in alternative education by four other colleges in the Pioneer Valley: Amherst College, Smith College, Mount Holyoke College, and the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Together with Hampshire, they are now known as the Five Colleges. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Ralph J. Hexter is the current president of Hampshire College, a progressive alternative college in Amherst Massachusetts. ... This article is about work. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Hampshire County Settled 1703 Incorporated 1775 Government  - Type Representative town meeting Area  - Town  27. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas (also referred to as the country, countryside) are settled places outside towns and cities. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Hampshire County Settled 1703 Incorporated 1775 Government  - Type Representative town meeting Area  - Town  27. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Pioneer Valley and Connecticut River, looking southward toward the towns of Sunderland, Amherst and Whately. ... Amherst College is a private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ... Smith College is a private, independent womens liberal arts college located in Northampton, Massachusetts. ... Mount Holyoke College is a liberal arts womens college in South Hadley, Massachusetts. ... The University of Massachusetts Amherst (otherwise known as UMass Amherst or UMass) is a research and land-grant university in Amherst, USA. The University of Massachusetts Amherst offers over 90 undergraduate and 65 graduate areas of study. ... The Five Colleges are composed of four liberal arts colleges and one university in the Connecticut River Pioneer Valley of Western Massachusetts, belonging to a consortium called Five Colleges, Incorporated, which was established in 1965. ...


The College's alternative curriculum is very different from that of most traditional colleges. It is generally well-thought-of for its film, writing, and art programs. In some fields it is among the top undergraduate institutions in graduate-school enrollment: fifty-six percent of its alumni have at least one graduate degree and it is ranked 41st among all US institutions in the percentage of its graduates who go on to attain a doctorate degree.[1] Its School of Cognitive Science was the first interdisciplinary undergraduate program in cognitive science and still has few peers. A doctorate is an academic degree of the highest level. ... Cognitive science is usually defined as the scientific study either of mind or of intelligence (e. ...


Hampshire is also part of the SAT optional movement for undergraduate admission. Liberal arts colleges in the United States are institutions of higher education in the United States which are primarily liberal arts colleges. ...

Contents

Curriculum

Hampshire College describes itself as "experimenting" rather than "experimental" in order to emphasize the continually changing nature of its curriculum. However, from its inception the curriculum has generally had certain non-traditional features:

  • An emphasis on project work as well as, or instead of, courses.
  • Detailed written evaluations (as well as portfolio evaluations) for completed courses and projects, rather than letter or number grades.
  • A curriculum centered on student interests, with students taking an active role in designing their own concentrations and projects.
Emily Dickinson Hall, designed by the architecture firm of former faculty member Norton Juster, houses much of the humanities, creative writing, and theatre

The curriculum is divided into three "Divisions" rather than four years, and students complete these Divisions in varying amounts of time. The administration has recently made efforts to encourage students to stick more closely to the traditional 4 year model by requiring three semesters be spent in Division I, three semesters be spent in Division II, and that Division III be completed in two. Individual students may work with their advisors to finish Division I in only two semesters, but the increasing focus on computer databases and centralized governance is making this extremely difficult. Division II can last from 3 to 6 semesters. If a student does not finish his or her Division III in two semesters, the school charges at least $2,000 per month afterwards until the student has finished. In education, narrative evaluation is a form of performance measurement and feedback which can be used as an alternative or supplement to grading. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Emilydickinsonhall. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Emilydickinsonhall. ... From the daguerreotype taken at Mount Holyoke, December 1846 or early 1847. ... Norton Juster (born June 2, 1929) is an American architect and author. ...

  • Division I, the distribution stage, requires students to complete one course in each of the five "Schools of Thought" and three other courses, either on or off campus. (Until fall 2002, Division I required student-directed independent projects; the new system, designed with the goal of quicker and smoother student progress, has caused a great deal of controversy.)
  • Division II requires students to complete "two full years" of course work in their selected area(s) of study (which may or may not be traditional academic fields.) Most students combine related subject matter to form an interdisciplinary concentration such as "The chemistry of oil painting." Still, some choose to concentrate in multiple areas without drawing such connections, instead simply concentrating in "Chemistry and Oil Painting." Some students, but perhaps the minority, complete an in depth concentration in one field only. Each student is responsible for designing their own Division II in cooperation with a committee of at least two faculty members. Many students choose a faculty committee whose members represent their own interdisciplinary interests. The Division II requirements also include a community service project and a multicultural perspectives requirement.
  • Division III, the advanced project, requires students to complete an in-depth project in their field of choice (which is generally related to the Division II field). Division III usually lasts one year and is completed while taking few or no courses, but two "advanced learning activities," which might be courses, internships or specific independent studies, and may or may not be related to the Division III, are required. A Division III topic can be a long written academic paper (in which case it is best considered as something between a traditional college's "bachelor's" or "honors" thesis and a Master's or other graduate thesis), but it can also be a collection of creative work (writing, painting, photography, and film are popular choices) or a hands-on engineering, invention, or social organizing project.

The Hampshire College faculty are organized not in traditional departments but in broadly defined Schools. The Schools' names and definitions have varied over the College's history, but there have always been between three and five of them. As of 2005, the Schools are:

  • Cognitive Science (CS): includes linguistics, most psychology, some philosophy, neuroscience, and computer science.
  • Humanities, Arts, and Cultural Studies (HACU): includes film, some studio arts, literature, media studies, and most philosophy.
  • Social Science (SS): includes most sociology and anthropology, economics, history, politics, and some psychology.
  • Natural Science (NS): includes most traditional sciences, mathematics, and biological anthropology.
  • Interdisciplinary Arts (IA): includes performing arts, some studio arts, and creative writing.
Cole Science Center contains the School of Natural Science and administrative offices

Cognitive science is usually defined as the scientific study either of mind or of intelligence (e. ... For other uses, see Humanities (disambiguation). ... The Arts is a broad subdivision of culture, comprised of many expressive disciplines. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The social sciences are groups of academic disciplines that study the human aspects of the world. ... The Michelson–Morley experiment was used to disprove that light propagated through a luminiferous aether. ... Interdisciplinary work is that which integrates concepts across different disciplines. ... The Arts is a broad subdivision of culture, comprised of many expressive disciplines. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Colescience. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Colescience. ...

History

Though the college opened to students in 1970, its history dates to the immediate aftermath of World War II. The first The New College Plan was drafted in 1958 by the presidents of the then-Four Colleges; it was revised several times as the serious planning for the College began in the 1960s. Many original ideas for non-traditional ways of arranging the College's curriculum, campus, and life were discarded along the way, but many new ideas generated during the planning process were not described in the original documents. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The New College Plan resulted in the formation of two experimental American colleges. ...


For several years in the early 1970s, directly after its founding, Hampshire College was among the most selective undergraduate programs in the United States (Making of a College 307-310). Its selectivity declined thereafter, but the school's applications increased in the late 1990s, making admissions more difficult. The College's selectivity in admissions is now comparable to that of many other small liberal arts colleges.


The school has struggled with financial difficulties since its founding, and ceasing operations or folding into the University of Massachusetts Amherst were seriously considered at various points. Today the school is on more solid financial footing (though still without a sizable endowment), a condition often credited to the fundraising efforts of its most recent past presidents, Adele Simmons and Gregory S. Prince, Jr. The College has also distinguished itself recently with plans for the future including a "sustainable campus plan" and a "cultural village" through which organizations not directly affiliated with the school are located on its campus. Currently this "cultural village" includes the National Yiddish Book Center and the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art. The University of Massachusetts Amherst (otherwise known as UMass Amherst or UMass) is a research and land-grant university in Amherst, USA. The University of Massachusetts Amherst offers over 90 undergraduate and 65 graduate areas of study. ... The National Yiddish Book Center in the United States of America is a cultural institution dedicated to the preservation of books and documents in the Yiddish language. ... The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art is a museum devoted to the art contained in picture books and especially childrens books. ...

The 'H' logo of Hampshire College, used separately from the seal. The four colored bars represent the other four colleges that formed Hampshire.

On April 1, 2004, Prince announced his retirement, effective at the end of 2004-05 academic year. On April 5, 2005, the Board of Trustees named Ralph Hexter, formerly a dean at University of California, Berkeley's College of Letters and Science, as the college's next president, effective August 1, 2005. President Hexter was officially inaugurated in a ceremony on October 15, 2005. This appointment made Hampshire one of a small number of colleges and universities in the United States to have an openly gay president.[2] Image File history File links Hampshire_logo. ... Image File history File links Hampshire_logo. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ralph J. Hexter is the current president of Hampshire College, a progressive alternative college in Amherst Massachusetts. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Some of the most important founding documents of Hampshire College are collected in the book The Making of a College (MIT Press, 1967; ISBN 0-262-66005-9). The Making of a College is (as of 2003) out of print but available in electronic form from the Hampshire College Archives [1]. A new edition is rumored to be in progress.

Dakin House dormitory

In recent years however the school has taken several steps in an effort to expand the school and attract more academically conventional students. The most significant change was a revision of the Division I program for first year students. Before the fall of 2002, Division I traditionally consisted of four major exams, one in each of the academic departments and/or quantitative analysis. These exams took one of three forms: a "two-course option", where a student could take two sequential courses; a "one-plus-one", where a Hampshire course supplements an outside course (AP score of a four or five, or a summer college class); or a project, which usually consists of a primary or significant secondary research paper, or an art production (a short film, a sculpture, etc.), and which stems from previous coursework. Students were required to complete at least two project-based exams, while transfer students were usually waived one project requirement. In fall of 2002, the new first-year program was started in response to high numbers of second and third year students who had not completed Division I. The new program mandates eight courses in the first year, at least one in each of the five schools. This reduces the required work for passing Division I significantly, as up to 10 courses could be required under the older system. Image File history File linksMetadata Dakindorm. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Dakindorm. ...


Current issues

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...

Surveillance Camera Controversy

On November 6, 2007, the Community Council held an open discussion attended by students, staff, and faculty on the issue of installing surveillance cameras in the parking lots, and two main entrances to the college.[2] The event was attended by Michelle Green, the Dean of Students, and Delroy Patrick, the Director of Public Safety, both of whom spoke to the issue with the rest of the community. The discussion morphed from student body's general disagreement with the concept of installing surveillance cameras to a more directed dialogue about the student body's general mistrust and negative relationship with the administration of the college.


The controversy began when the meeting was recorded by a student, and posted on his website. Two days after the meeting on November 8, Delroy Patrick the Director of Public Safety at Hampshire College, approached the student demanding removal of any portions of the video in which he appears by midnight on November 10, all the while asserting that the student somehow broke the law.[3] Regardless of threats, the video remains available for download in full.


Because of the clear First Amendment and civil liberties issues at stake, the student sought aid from Bill Newman, the Director of the ACLU's Western Massachusetts' office, as well as the main ACLU of Massachusetts Legal Director, John Reinstein. Newman contacted Jim Wallace, the lawyer for Hampshire College, citing legal precedence:

"There was nothing surreptitious about the recording, made openly and in plain view, and there could be no expectation of privacy when a public official and public figure such as Mr. Patrick, as the Director of Public Safety, speaks at a public meeting on a topic of public concern to the community affected by his words. The recording was made legitimately and properly and in accord with state law, as Commonwealth v. Hyde makes clear, and the publication and broadcast of the web site is First Amendment protected as Jean v. Massachusetts State Police holds."

Official action from the college is forthcoming, although the video has been made available on YouTube in the meantime.[4]


Re-Radicalization

In the spring of 2004, a student group calling itself the Re-Radicalization of Hampshire College (Re-Rad) emerged with a manifesto called The Re-Making of a College, which critiques what they see as a betrayal of Hampshire's founding ideas in alternative education and student-centered learning. On May 3, 2004, the group staged a demonstration which packed the hall outside the President's office during an administrative meeting. Response from the community has generally been amicable and Re-Rad has made some progress. Look up manifesto in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

The Yurt is home to Hampshire's student radio station

The Re-Radicalization movement is responding in part to a new "First-Year Plan" entailing changes to the structure of the first year of study in the curriculum. Beginning in the Fall of 2002, the requirements for passing Division I were changed so that first-year students would no longer be required to complete independent projects (see Curriculum above). Though presently a major source of contention, this change is rapidly fading from memory as most of the students who entered into the old plan have graduated or are in their final year. Image File history File linksMetadata YURT.jpg‎ The Yurt, Hampshires student-run radio station. ... Image File history File linksMetadata YURT.jpg‎ The Yurt, Hampshires student-run radio station. ... A Yurt is a portable felt dwelling structure used by nomads in the steppes of Central Asia. ...


The Re-Radicalization of Hampshire College launched a pilot program in fall of 2005 in which ten third semester students were paired with Division III students with similar academic interests to complete a "mentored independent study". In this program, third semester students design an independent study and the Division III students act as mentors to assist them with problems or issues they may encounter in the independent learning process. The program was a success and has now been permanently institutionalized.


Furthermore, Re-Rad submitted a new Division I plan in fall 2006, which is under consideration. It calls for Division I to be more inquiry-based, centering around five higher-level questions, which develop throughout Division I. It also calls for an independent study in the first year and an improved advising system.


While some students worry about what they see as Hampshire's headlong plunge into normality, the circumstances of Hampshire's founding tends to perennially attract students who revive the questions about education on which the institution was founded and challenge the administration to honor them. Unsurprisingly, then, Re-Rad was not the first student push of its type. Efforts like it have sprung up at Hampshire with some regularity throughout the years, with varying degrees of impact. In 1996, for example, student Chris Kawecki spearheaded a similar push called the Radical Departure, calling for a more holistic, organic integration of education into students' lives. The most durable legacy of the Radical Departure was EPEC, a series of student-led non-credit courses.


A more detailed account of movements such as these can be found in the history of Hampshire student activities written by alum Timothy Shary, now a faculty member at Clark University. Statue at the center of campus of Sigmund Freud, commemorating his 1909 visit to the University Front Entrance to Clark Universitys Jonas Clark Hall, the main academic facility for undergraduate students For the university in Atlanta, see Clark Atlanta University. ...


In the media

Despite its small size and short history, Hampshire has made its own mark on pop culture and political activism. Its annual Halloween party, referred to by some as "Trip or Treat" for its historically widespread use of psychedelic drugs, was once profiled by Rolling Stone magazine. [3]
This article is about the holiday. ... This article is about the magazine. ...


Hampshire was the first college in the nation to decide to divest from apartheid South Africa in 1979 (with the nearby University of Massachusetts Amherst rapidly coming second). Legal and Financial research undertaken by student Michael Current and faculty member Kurtis Gordon was promoted nationally by business activists Douglas Tooley [5] and Debbie Knight. The University of Massachusetts Amherst (otherwise known as UMass Amherst or UMass) is a research and land-grant university in Amherst, USA. The University of Massachusetts Amherst offers over 90 undergraduate and 65 graduate areas of study. ...


In November 2001, a controversial All-Community Vote at Hampshire declared the school opposed to the recently-launched War on Terrorism, another national first which drew national media attention, including scathing reports from Rupert Murdoch's FOX News Channel and the New York Post ("Kooky College Condemns War"). Saturday Night Live had a regular sketch, "Jarrett's Room", starring Jimmy Fallon which purports to take place at Hampshire College but is grossly inaccurate, referring to non-existent buildings ("McGuin Hall") and featuring yearbooks, tests, seniors, fraternities, 3-person dorm rooms, and a football team, none of which have ever existed at the school (although in the Fall 2005 and 2007 semesters the college experienced a higher than expected number of freshmen and temporarily had to convert some of the common spaces into 3-person dorms). The sketch further seemed to think that the college was actually in New Hampshire (a common mistake). This article is about U.S. actions, and those of other states, after September 11 2001. ... Keith Rupert Murdoch AC, KCSG (born 11 March 1931) is an Australian born United States citizen who is a global media executive and is the controlling shareholder, chairman and managing director of News Corporation, based in New York. ... Fox News redirects here. ... The New York Post is the 13th-oldest newspaper published in the United States and the oldest to have been published continually as a daily. ... This article is about the American television series. ... James Thomas Fallon (born September 19, 1974 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American comedian, actor, musician, and Grammy nominee best known for his work on Saturday Night Live. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ...


Alumnus Ken Burns wrote of the college: "Hampshire College is a perfect American place. If we look back at the history of our country, the things we celebrate were outside of the mainstream. Much of the world operated under a tyrannical model, but Americans said, 'We will govern ourselves.' So, too, Hampshire asked, at its founding, the difficult questions of how we might educate ourselves... When I entered Hampshire, I found it to be the most exciting place on earth." Loren Pope wrote of Hampshire in the college guide Colleges That Change Lives: "Today no college has students whose intellectual thyroids are more active or whose minds are more compassionately engaged." In 2006, the Princeton Review named Hampshire College one of the nation’s "best value" undergraduate institutions in its book "America’s Best Value Colleges". Kenneth Lauren Burns (born July 29, 1953) is an American director and producer of documentary films known for his style of making use of original prints and photographs. ... Loren Pope is a nationally renown college advisor with several national publicatons on colleges and universities in the United States. ... Colleges That Change Lives (Penguin, 2000) is a best-selling book by nationally renowned college advisor Loren Pope. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in...


Alumni and faculty

Notable alumni

Xander Berkeley (born December 16, 1955) is a well-known American actor, who, despite having had few leading roles, has appeared in more than 80 motion pictures. ... Kenneth Lauren Burns (born July 29, 1953) is an American director and producer of documentary films known for his style of making use of original prints and photographs. ... The Civil War was a highly popular and acclaimed PBS documentary about the American Civil War created by Sam Sim, and released on PBS in September 1990. ... Baseball was an Emmy Award-winning 1994 documentary series by Ken Burns about the game of baseball. ... Chuck Collins (b. ... United for a Fair Economy (UFE) is a national Boston, Massachusetts-based movement support, economic justice organization. ... Kayo Dot is an avant-rock group that was formed in 2003 by Toby Driver. ... Kayo Dot is an American experimental rock group that was formed in 2003 by Toby Driver. ... maudlin of the Wells band logo maudlin of the Well was an American band that formed in 1996 and disbanded in 2003. ... An Emmy Award. ... St. ... Ill Fly Away (TV series) Ill Fly Away (hymn) Category: ... This article is about the TV series; there is also a mix album of the same name. ... Noah Falstein is a freelance game designer and producer who has been in the video game industry since 1980. ... Sinistar is an arcade game released by Williams in 1982. ... Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis is a graphical adventure game, originally released in 1992 and published by LucasArts. ... Tooker Gomberg was a Canadian politician and environmental activist. ... Neil Gust is an American musician. ... Benjamin Mako Hill (b. ... Free software is software that can be used, studied, and modified without restriction, and which can be copied and redistributed in modified or unmodified form either without restriction, or with restrictions only to ensure that further recipients can also do these things. ... The Free Culture Movement is a student led movement that supports freedom of speech on the Internet and objects to overly restrictive copyright laws, which, members of the movement argue, hinders creativity. ... Gary Hirshberg is Chairman, President and CE-Yo of Stonyfield Farm, an organic yogurt producer, based in Londonderry, New Hampshire. ... Stonyfield Farm is the worlds leading organic yogurt maker located in Londonderry, New Hampshire. ... Daniel Aaron Horowitz (born December 14, 1954) is a high-profile defense attorney and TV legal analyst with an extensive computer and business background. ... Edward Humes is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and published non-fiction writer. ... Jeph Jacques (b. ... Questionable Content (abbreviated QC or Q.C.) is a slice-of-life webcomic written and drawn by Jeph Jacques. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... Ampere is a DIY punk band based in Amherst, Massachusetts known for their short (10-15 minutes) but extremely loud and intense live shows. ... Jon Krakauer Jon Krakauer (born April 12, 1954), is an American non-fiction author and mountaineer, well-known for outdoor and mountain-climbing writing. ... Into Thin Air: A Personal Account of the Mt. ... For the 2007 film adaption of the book, see Into the Wild (film) Into the Wild (1996) by Jon Krakauer is a best-selling non-fiction book about the adventures of Christopher McCandless. ... Mike Ladd is a hip-hop MC and producer. ... Antipop Consortium was an alternative hip hop group that released several tape singles and two albums primarily on Dan the Automators experimental hip-hop label 75 Ark before being signed by Warp Records in 2000. ... Aaron Lansky (b. ... The National Yiddish Book Center in the United States of America is a cultural institution dedicated to the preservation of books and documents in the Yiddish language. ... lê thi diem thúy (pronounced LAY TEE YIM TWEE; all words uncapitalized) is an award-winning poet, novelist, and performer. ... Jeff Maguire (born in 1952) is an American screenwriter. ... In the Line of Fire is a 1993 film about a psychopath who attempts to assassinate the President of the United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... David Raphael Moscow (born 14 November 1974) is an American actor. ... John Reed (b. ... Snowballs Chance (Roof Books, 2002/03), was a controversial update of George Orwells Animal Farm, in which Snowball the pig returns to the Manor Farm, after many years absence, to install capitalism, which has its own pitfalls. ... Liev Schreiber (born October 4, 1967) is a Tony Award-winning American actor. ... The Manchurian Candidate is a 2004 U.S. American film based on the 1959 novel The Manchurian Candidate by Richard Condon, and a reimagining of the previous 1962 film. ... Everything Is Illuminated is a 2005 adventure/comedy/drama, written and directed by Liev Schreiber and starring Elijah Wood and Eugene Hutz. ... Jeff Sharlet (b. ... An issue of Harpers Magazine from 1905 Another issue, from November 2004 Harpers Magazine (or simply Harpers) is a monthly magazine of politics and culture. ... For the self-titled album, see Elliott Smith (album). ... Lee Smolin at Harvard. ... Theoretical physics employs mathematical models and abstractions of physics in an attempt to explain experimental data taken of the natural world. ... The Institute facing Waterloo Park The Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics is located in the city of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada (also home to the University of Waterloo). ... Barry Sonnenfeld American film maker Barry Sonnenfeld (born New York City, April 1, 1953) worked as cinematographer for the Coen Brothers, then later he directed and produced big budget films such as Men in Black. ... This article is about alleged secretive government departments. ... Daniel Paul Tamberelli (born February 8, 1982 in Wyckoff, New Jersey) is an actor who has appeared in numerous television shows and a few films. ... The Mighty Ducks alludes to a trilogy of movies released in the 1990s, written by Steven Brill, who also created the characters. ... All That was an American live-action, sketch comedy-variety show that aired on the Nickelodeon cable television network featuring short comedic sketches and weekly musical guests. ... Artie, Pete, and Pete The Adventures of Pete and Pete was an American television series about two brothers named Pete which aired on the Nickelodeon cable channel. ... Naomi Wallace is a poet and playwright from Prospect, Kentucky. ... One Flea Spare is a play written by Naomi Wallace that takes place in the era of the Black Plague. ... Jessamyn West in her office Jessamyn Charity West (born September 5, 1968) is a librarian and a former member of the American Library Association Council. ... Christopher Young (born April 28, 1957) is an award-winning music composer for film and television. ... Spider-Man 3 is a 2007 American superhero film written and directed by Sam Raimi, with a screenplay by Ivan Raimi and Alvin Sargent. ...

Fictional alumni

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Notable past and present faculty

Eqbal Ahmad (1933/34 - May 11, 1999) was a Pakistani writer, journalist, and anti-war activist. ... Leonard Baskin was an American sculptor and artist. ... James Arthur Baldwin (August 2, 1924 – November 30, 1987) was an American novelist, short story writer, playwright, poet, and essayist, best known for his novel Go Tell It on the Mountain. ... Bill Brand is a British television drama series produced by Thames Television for the ITV network in 1976. ... Mark Dresser (b. ... Marty Ehrlich (born May 31, 1955) is a multi-instrumentalist (saxophones, clarinets, flutes) and is considered one of the leading figures in experimental or avant-garde jazz. ... Lynne Hanley, is a feminist writer, literary critic, and professor of literature and writing at Hampshire College. ... Norton Juster (born June 2, 1929) is an American architect and author. ... Michael T. Klare is a Five Colleges professor of Peace and World Security Studies, whose department is located at Hampshire College, defense correspondent of The Nation magazine, and author of Resource Wars and Blood and Oil: The Dangers and Consequences of Americas Growing Petroleum Dependency (Metropolitan). ... Album cover of Eastern Sounds Dr. Yusef Lateef (born William Emanuel Huddleston, October 9, 1920) is an American jazz musician. ... Michael Lesy is a writer and professor of literary journalism at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts. ... Jerome Liebling (born 1924) is an American photographer and filmmaker. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Chase Twichell (1950 to present) was born in New Haven, CT and is an accomplished poet who owns her own publishing company, Ausable Press (). She lives in New York today, and has taught at Princeton University. ... Diane Arbus (March 14, 1923 – July 26, 1971) was an American photographer, noted for her portraits of people on the fringes of society, such as tranvestites, dwarves, giants, prostitutes, and ordinary citizens in poses and settings conveying a disturbing uncanniness. ... There are several people named David Roberts: David Roberts (mayor), the 36th mayor of Hoboken, New Jersey David Roberts (painter), a Scottish painter David Roberts (Risk Manager), a Risk Manager at a conglomerate Neal and Massy Holdings David Roberts (swimmer), a Welsh swimmer David Roberts (British diplomat), a British diplomat...

Presidents of the college

  • Franklin Patterson (1966 - 1971)
  • Charles R. Longsworth (1971 - 1977)
  • Adele Simmons (1977 - 1989)
  • Gregory S. Prince, Jr. (1989 - 2005)
  • Ralph Hexter (2005 - Present)

Charles R. Longsworth is the current director of Saul Centers, Inc. ... Ralph J. Hexter is the current president of Hampshire College, a progressive alternative college in Amherst Massachusetts. ...

See also

The Hampshire College Summer Studies in Mathematics (HCSSiM) is a residential program for mathematically talented high school students. ... Colleges That Change Lives (Penguin, 2000) is a best-selling book by nationally renowned college advisor Loren Pope. ...

Notes

  1. ^ For a summary of Hampshire's reputation and alumni accomplishments in various fields, see Colleges That Change Lives, 58-60.
  2. ^ The exact number is unclear, but there may be as few as eight openly gay college and university presidents as of 2007, and at the time Hexter was named president of Hampshire there were fewer still. Fain, Paul. "Openly Gay Presidents Say Chronicle Article Left Them Out." Chronicle of Higher Education News Blog, 7 August 2007. See also Hexter, Ralph J. "Being an 'Out' President." Inside Higher Ed 25 January 2007.
  3. ^ Roth, Melissa, "Party Mix", Rolling Stone 719 (October 19, 1995).

2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ...

References

  • Alpert, Richard M. "Professionalism and Educational Reform: The Case of Hampshire College." Journal of Higher Education 51:5 (Sept.-Oct. 1980), pp. 497-518.
  • Dressel, Paul L. Review of The Making of a College: Plans for a New Departure in Higher Education. Journal of Higher Education 38:7 (Oct. 1967), pp. 413-416.
  • Kegan, Daniel L. "Contradictions in the Design and Practice of an Alternative Organization: The Case of Hampshire College." Journal of Applied Behavioral Science 17:1 (1987), pp. 79-97.
  • Pope, Loren. "Hampshire College." In Colleges That Change Lives. New York: Penguin, 2006.

Loren Pope is a nationally renown college advisor with several national publicatons on colleges and universities in the United States. ... Colleges That Change Lives (Penguin, 2000) is a best-selling book by nationally renowned college advisor Loren Pope. ...

External links

  • Hampshire College
  • Hampshire College Archives, featuring PDF text of The Making of a College and documents from Hampshire College history
  • The Climax student newspaper
  • The Hampshire College Daily Jolt
  • The Princeton Review: Hampshire College
  • The student website hosting the video of the all-community surveillance camera discussion.
  • Hampshire College is at coordinates 42°19′30″N 72°31′51″W / 42.325079, -72.530837 (Hampshire College)Coordinates: 42°19′30″N 72°31′51″W / 42.325079, -72.530837 (Hampshire College)
Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Colleges That Change Lives - Hampshire College (361 words)
Hampshire believes that students are more intellectually engaged and better equipped for a complex, ever-changing world by taking full responsibility for their education.
Hampshire was chosen as a model of best practice for its emphasis on critical thinking about complex problems, effective communication, and making meaningful contributions to a diverse society.
IIn 2003, Hampshire was awarded a $1 million grant by the Foundation for Psycho-cultural Research to develop an interdisciplinary undergraduate program in "Culture, Brain, and Development" that is expected to become a model for colleges and universities.
Alumni - Hampshire College - Amherst, MA (348 words)
The Hampshire College Board of Trustees has named Ralph J. Hexter the fifth president of Hampshire College, effective August 1, 2005.
On Saturday, October 15, 2005, the board of trustees inaugurated Ralph J. Hexter as the fifth president of Hampshire College.
Hampshire professor emeritus, Jerome Liebling, will exhibit 55 pieces of both known and unseen works from the course of his half-century of image making at the Minnesota Center for Photography.
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