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Encyclopedia > Hammersmith Bridge
Hammersmith Bridge, seen from the Westminster to Kew tourist boat
Rowing crews racing under Hammersmith Bridge

Hammersmith Bridge is a crossing of the River Thames in west London, just south of the Hammersmith town centre area of the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham on the north side of the river. It allows road traffic and pedestrians to cross to Barnes (in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames) on the south side of the river. The current bridge is the second permanent bridge on the site. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2091x1456, 580 KB) Hammersmith Bridge, seen from the Westminster to Kew tourist boat. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2091x1456, 580 KB) Hammersmith Bridge, seen from the Westminster to Kew tourist boat. ... Download high resolution version (1847x1034, 391 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1847x1034, 391 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... Several places exist with the name Thames, and the word is also used as part of several brand and company names Most famous is the River Thames in England, on which the city of London stands Other Thames Rivers There is a Thames River in Canada There is a Thames... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Hammersmith is an urban centre in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham in West London, England, approximately 5 miles (8km) west of Charing Cross on the north bank of the River Thames. ... The front of Hammersmith and Fulham town hall is a mixture of styles, with a modern block bolted on to, and obscuring, what would have once been an architecturally consistent red-brick portico. ... Barnes is a suburb in south-west London in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. ... The London Borough of Richmond upon Thames is a London borough in South West London and part of Outer London. ... A log bridge in the French Alps near Vallorcine. ...


The construction of a bridge was first sanctioned by an Act of Parliament in 1824 and work on site began the following year. It was the Thames’ first suspension bridge and was designed by William Tierney Clark. An Act of Parliament or Act is law enacted by the parliament (see legislation). ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... A suspension bridge is a type of bridge that has been created since ancient times as early as 100 AD. Simple suspension bridges, for use by pedestrians and livestock, are still constructed, based upon the ancient Inca rope bridge. ... William Tierney Clark (23 August 1783–22 September 1852) was an English civil engineer particularly associated with the design and construction of bridges. ...


The bridge had a clear water-way of 688 feet 8 inches. Its suspension towers were 48 feet above the level of the roadway, where they were 22 feet thick. The roadway was slightly curved upwards, 16 feet above high water, and the extreme length from the back of the piers on shore was 822 feet 8 inches, supporting 688 feet of roadway. There were eight chains, composed of wrought-iron bars, each five inches deep and one thick. Four of these had six bars in each chain; and four had only three, making thirty-six bars, which form a dip in the centre of about 29 feet. From these, vertical rods were suspended, which supported the roadway, formed of strong timbers covered with granite. The width of the carriageway was 20 feet, with two footways of five feet. The chains passed over the suspension towers, and were secured to the piers on each shore. The suspension towers were of stone, and designed as archways of the Tuscan order. The approaches were provided with octagonal lodges, or toll-houses, with appropriate lamps and parapet walls, terminating with stone pillars, surmounted with ornamental caps. Construction of the bridge cost some £80,000. It was operated as a toll bridge. A wrought iron railing in Troy, New York. ... Paying toll on passing a bridge. ...

Engraving of the first Hammersmith Bridge, made in 1827

Plans for its replacement began to be made during the 1870s, during which time a temporary bridge allowed a more limited cross-river traffic. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 223 pixelsFull resolution (2674 × 745 pixel, file size: 85 KB, MIME type: image/png) Hammersmith Bridge 1827 - Project Gutenberg etext 12595 From The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Saturday, September 8, 1827, by Various... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 223 pixelsFull resolution (2674 × 745 pixel, file size: 85 KB, MIME type: image/png) Hammersmith Bridge 1827 - Project Gutenberg etext 12595 From The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Saturday, September 8, 1827, by Various...


The current suspension bridge was designed by noted civil engineer Sir Joseph Bazalgette and rests on the same pier foundations constructed for Tierney Clark’s structure. It was opened by the Prince of Wales on 11 June 1887. With much of the supporting structure built of wrought iron, it is 700ft long and 43ft wide and cost £82,117 to build. A civil engineer is a person who practices civil engineering. ... Memorial to Sir Joseph Bazalgette on Victoria Embankment Sir Joseph William Bazalgette (28 March 1819 – 15 March 1891) was one of the great Victorian civil engineers. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth Realms, and the Emperor of India. ... June 11 is the 162nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (163rd in leap years), with 203 days remaining. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ...


IRA attacks

In June 2000, the bridge was damaged by a terrorist bomb, four years after a previous bombing by the IRA, but following closure for repairs was reopened with weight restrictions in place.[1] 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Provisional Irish Republican Army (Irish name: Óglaigh na hÉireann) (PIRA; more commonly referred to as the IRA, the Provos, or by some of its supporters as the Army or the RA) is an Irish Republican left-wing paramilitary organisation that, until the Belfast Agreement, sought to end Northern Ireland...


The organisation's first attempt to destroy the 113-year-old bridge in 1939 was foiled by a quick-thinking member of the public. Maurice Childs, a hairdresser from Chiswick, west London, was walking home across the bridge in the early morning when he noticed smoke and sparks coming from a suitcase. He opened it to find a bomb. He threw the bag into the river and the explosion sent up a 60ft column of water.


Moments later, a second device exploded causing girders on the west side of the bridge to collapse and shattering windows in nearby houses. Mr Childs was awarded an MBE for his courage. Eddie Connell and William Browne were given jail sentences of 20 and 10 years respectively.


External links

  • London's Transport Museum Photographic Archive Partial view of William Tierney Clark's bridge, circa 1880

Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar). ...

See also



This is a list of crossings of the River Thames, downstream first, including bridges, tunnels and ferries. ...

Crossings of the River Thames
Upstream
Barnes Railway Bridge (railway)
Chiswick Bridge (road)
Hammersmith Bridge
Grid reference: TQ229780
Downstream
Putney Bridge

Coordinates: 51.48760° N 0.23129° W This is a list of crossings of the River Thames, downstream first, including bridges, tunnels and ferries. ... The Thames (pronounced //) is a river flowing through southern England, and one of the major waterways in England. ... Barnes Railway Bridge crosses the River Thames in London in a North-East to South-West direction. ... Chiswick Bridge crosses the River Thames in London in a North-East to South-West direction. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... Putney Bridge Putney Bridge is a bridge crossing of the River Thames in west London, linking Putney on the south side with Fulham to the north. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Hammersmith - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (627 words)
Hammersmith is a town in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham in west London.
Hammersmith's pedestrianised riverside is popular for its many pubs, and excellent views of the river and its annual Boat Race.
Hammersmith is served by two tube stations, one is the western terminus of the Hammersmith and City Line, the other by the Piccadilly and District Lines.
Hammersmith Bridge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (299 words)
Hammersmith Bridge is a crossing of the River Thames in west London, just south of the Hammersmith town centre area of the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham on the north side of the river.
It was a toll bridge with toll booths at either end; in between a timber deck some 30ft wide was supported by metal chains strung from two masonry towers.
In June 2000, the bridge was damaged by a terrorist bomb, on the 40th anniversary of a previous bombing by the IRA, but after closure for repairs was reopened with weight restrictions in place.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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