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Encyclopedia > Hamburger
A fast food hamburger

A hamburger (or simply burger) is a sandwich that consists of a cooked patty of ground meat and is generally served with various garnish or condiments like ketchup, mustard, mayonnaise, lettuce, tomato, onion, relish, pickles and cheese toppings, placed inside a sliced bun, often baked specially for this purpose, or pieces of bread or toast. The meat patty is beef, unless otherwise noted.[1] A patty is a disc-shaped serving of meat or meat substitutes. ... Hamburger can mean: Hamburger, an native or inhabitant of the city of Hamburg Hamburger, a ground beef sandwich Hamburger Helper, a flavouring for hamburgers Hamburger Verkehrsverbund, the municipal transport authority for the city of Hamburg Hamburger SV, a football team in Hamburg Hamburger Schule, a musical style Der Hamburger und... Image File history File links Hamburger_sandwich. ... Image File history File links Hamburger_sandwich. ... Fast food is food prepared and served quickly at a fast-food restaurant or shop at low cost. ... For other uses, see Sandwich (disambiguation). ... A patty is a disc-shaped serving of meat or meat substitutes. ... For other uses, see Meat (disambiguation). ... A garnish is a substance used primarily as an embellishment or decoration to a prepared food or drink item. ... A condiment is a garnishment applied to food in the form of a sauce, powder, spread, or similar delivery medium. ... For other uses, see Ketchup (disambiguation). ... Look up Mustard in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For the song by The Smashing Pumpkins, see Mayonaise (song). ... Binomial name L. Lettuce and chicory output in 2005 Vit. ... For other uses, see Tomato (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Onion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Relish (disambiguation). ... Pickles may refer to Pickled cucumber Other vegetables that have been pickled Pickles (comic strip), a comic strip by Brian Crane Pickles (dog), the dog that found the World Cup trophy in 1966 Pickles (SpongeBob SquarePants episode) Eric Pickles (born 1952), British conservative politician James Pickles (born 1925), controversial British... Cheese is a solid food made from the milk of cows, goats, sheep, and other mammals. ... A Swedish-style saffron bun traditionally consumed en masse with Christmas at hand. ... For other uses, see Bread (disambiguation). ... This article is about the food. ...

Contents

Definition

Hamburger also refers to the cooked patty of ground meat by itself.[2] The patty alone is also known as a beefburger, or burger. Adding cheese makes it a cheeseburger. Hamburger is actually a distinct product from ground round and other types of ground meat. However, ground beef of any form is often commonly referred to as "hamburger." A recipe calling for 'hamburger' (the non-countable noun) would require ground beef or beef substitute- not a whole sandwich. The word hamburger comes from Hamburg steak, which originated in the German city of Hamburg. Contrary to what folk etymology might lead one to believe, there is no actual 'ham' in a hamburger. For other uses, see Cheeseburger (disambiguation). ... Salisbury steak is ground beef shaped to resemble a steak and usually served in brown sauce. ... For other uses, see Hamburg (disambiguation). ... Folk etymology is a term used in two distinct ways: A commonly held misunderstanding of the origin of a particular word, a false etymology. ...

A grilled patty of ground meat

According to the American Heritage Dictionary, the term "hamburger" comes from Hamburg steak, which was first recorded in English in 1884 but was probably used much earlier. A form of pounded beef called "Hamburg Steak" was common in Hamburg in the middle of the 19th century. The recipe was brought to North America by the large numbers of people immigrating from Germany at the time, many of whom passed through the port of Hamburg. There is indirect evidence for its use on an American menu in 1836. The form hamburger steak first appeared in a Washington state newspaper in 1889. The first recipe close to the current idea of a hamburger, using ground beef mixed with onion and pepper dates from 1902.[3] The Oxford English Dictionary of 1802, on the other hand, defines "Hamburg Steak" simply as cured beef. In a time without refrigerators, when it took weeks to travel from Europe to the USA, cured meat was a standard food for poor US immigrants, who often started from Hamburg (which was and is the biggest German seaport and one of the biggest in the world). In a tween deck, where cooking is nearly impossible, cutting tough cured beef into pieces and putting it between slices of bread may suggest itself.[4] Hamburger Photograph available under GFDL license. ... Hamburger Photograph available under GFDL license. ... Salt-cured meat or salted meat, for example ham, bacon or kippered herring, is meat or fish preserved or cured by salt or brine. ...


History

Modern history

The following people, or restaurants, claim to have either "invented" the hamburger, as it is known today, or a cooking method.

  • Charlie Nagreen 1885, Seymour, Wisconsin. According to one claim of the first hamburger, Charlie Nagreen served the world's first hamburger at the Seymour Fair (Outagamie County Fair) of 1885. "Hamburger" Charlie decided to flatten a meatball and place it between slices of bread to increase portability.
  • Menches brothers 1885, Hamburg, New York. Western New York history recorded that Frank and Charles Menches ran out of pork for their sausage patty sandwiches at the 1885 Erie County Fair. Their supplier, reluctant to butcher more hogs in the summer heat, suggested they use beef instead. The brothers fried some up, but found it bland. They added coffee, brown sugar, and other ingredients to create a taste which stands distinct without condiments. They christened their creation the "Hamburg Sandwich" after Hamburg, New York where the fair has been held since 1868; the name was probably later condensed by common use to the shorter contraction "hamburger" (and so explaining why a beef sandwich--which never contained any pork--bears this name). A little known fact is that the Original Hamburger indeed had its own recipe spiced with coffee and brown sugar - much different from what most Americans have tasted over the last one hundred years. The original recipe is featured at Menches Brothers Restaurants in Akron, Ohio.
  • Fletcher Davis late 1880s, Athens, Texas. In 1974, The New York Times ran a story about Louis' Lunch being a challenger to the title of inventing the hamburger. According to the McDonald's hamburger chain the inventor was an unknown food vendor at the St. Louis World's Fair in 1904. Newspaper columnist, Texas historian, and restaurateur Frank X. Tolbert said that this food vendor was Fletcher Davis. Davis operated a café at 115 Tyler Street on the north side of the courthouse square in Athens, Texas, in the late 1880s. Local lore holds that Davis was selling an unnamed sandwich of ground beef at his lunch counter at that time. During the 1980s Dairy Queen ran a commercial filmed in Athens, calling the town the birthplace of the hamburger.
  • Louis Lassen 1895, New Haven, Connecticut. Some believe the first hamburgers were served at Louis' Lunch, a sandwich shop established in 1895 in New Haven. The small lunch counter is credited by some with having invented this quick businessman's meal when Louis' sandwiched a hamburger between two pieces of white toast for a busy office worker in 1900. Louis' Lunch flame broils the hamburgers in the original 1898 Bridge & Beach vertical cast iron gas stoves using locally patented steel wire gridirons to hold the hamburgers in place while they cook. A page on the U.S. Library of Congress web site credits Louis' Lunch as the maker of America's first hamburger and steak sandwich [1].
  • White Castle, 1921, Wichita, Kansas. Due to widely prevalent anti-German sentiment in the U.S. during World War I, an alternative name for hamburgers was salisbury steak. Even after the war, hamburgers' popularity was severely depressed until the White Castle chain of restaurants created a business model featuring sales of large numbers of small hamburgers. White Castle holds a U.S trademark on "slyders".
  • Ted's Restaurant, 1959, Meriden, CT. Ted's Restaurant uses steam to cook their cheeseburgers. Some people believe that steam was used to cook hamburgers in the early 1900s in this part of Connecticut.

Year 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... There are also three Towns named Seymour Seymour is a city located in Outagamie County, Wisconsin. ... For other uses, see Meatball (disambiguation). ... Year 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Hamburg, New York may refer to the following locations in Erie County, New York: Hamburg (town), New York Hamburg (village), New York (within the Town of Hamburg) For other locations with a similar name see Hamburg (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pork (disambiguation). ... This article is about the prepared meat. ... The Erie County Fair and Exposition, also known as Americas Fair, is a fair held in Hamburg, NY every August. ... For other uses, see Coffee (disambiguation). ... Brown sugar typical of that bought in Western supermarkets Brown sugar is a sucrose sugar product with a distinctive brown color due to the presence of molasses. ... Hamburg, New York may refer to the following locations in Erie County, New York: Hamburg (town), New York Hamburg (village), New York (within the Town of Hamburg) For other locations with a similar name see Hamburg (disambiguation). ... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Nickname: The Rubber Capital of the World Location within the state of Ohio Country United States State Ohio County Summit Founded 1825 Incorporated 1835 (village) - 1865 (city) Government  - Mayor Don Plusquellic (D) Area  - City  62. ... // Development and commercial production of electric lighting Development and commercial production of gasoline-powered automobile by Karl Benz, Gottlieb Daimler and Maybach First commercial production and sales of phonographs and phonograph recordings. ... Athens is a city in Henderson County, Texas, in the United States. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ... Entrance to Creation Exhibit on the Pike Map of the St. ... Frank X. Tolbert (1912-1984) was a Texas historian and newspaper columnist. ... Athens is a city in Henderson County, Texas, in the United States. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... New Haven redirects here. ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... New Haven redirects here. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... A gridiron is a metal grate with parallel bars typically used for grilling meat or fish. ... Construction of the Thomas Jefferson Building, from July 8, 1888 to May 15, 1894. ... Year 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... City nickname: The River City or The Bluff City Location in the state of Tennessee County Shelby County, Tennessee Area  - Total  - Water 763. ... Deep frying is cooking food by submerging the whole food item in hot oil or fat, originating in Africa. ... A stainless steel frying pan. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... For other uses, see Wichita (disambiguation). ... This article is about the meat dish. ... A White Castle Cheeseburger box. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Incorporated (town) 1806 Incorporated (city) 1867 Consolidated 1922 Government  - Type Council-manager  - Council leaders Mark Benigni, Mayor Matthew C. Dominello, Deputy Mayor Stephen T. Zerio, Council Leader Keith Gordon, Deputy Leader Patricia D. Lynes, Deputy Leader  - City manager Lawrence J. Kendzior Area  - City... Teds Restaurant in Meriden, Connecticut is a hamburger restaurant that is known for their steamed cheeseburger. ... Steaming is cooking by steam. ... A cheeseburger is a hamburger with cheese on top of the meat. ... For other uses, see Steam (disambiguation). ... This article is about the decade starting in 1900 and ending in 1909. ...

Hamburgers today

Hamburger and its fries served in an American diner.

In 1906, Upton Sinclair published his book: "The Jungle" which exposed the lack of sanitation in the meat packing industry. As a result, many Americans developed a fear of eating processed beef. In the 1920s, Billy Ingram, (one of the founders of White Castle), began a public relations campaign to remake the image of the hamburgers sold in restaurants and to help make the burger a favorite food. In his book: "Selling them by the Sack: White Castle and the Creation of the American Food", David Gerald Hogan credits Billy Ingram and White Castle for making the hamburger the very popular food it is today, and leading the way for McDonald's and other franchises to follow. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 112 KB) Hamburger and fries served in an American dinner. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 112 KB) Hamburger and fries served in an American dinner. ... Upton Sinclair Jr. ... For the episode of The Twilight Zone, see The Jungle (The Twilight Zone). ... A White Castle Cheeseburger box. ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ...


The "cheese hamburger," now simply the cheeseburger, is said to have first appeared in 1924, and credited to grill chef Lionel Sternberger of The Rite Spot restaurant in Pasadena, California. This kind of burger is basically the same as a regular hamburger but with a slice of cheese (cheddar, American, Swiss, Pepper Jack, or processed) on top of the patty. Pasadena is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ...


The term "burger" has now become generic, and may refer to sandwiches that have ground meat, chicken, fish (or even vegetarian) fillings other than a beef patty, but share the characteristic round bun. By the mid 20th century both terms were commonly shortened to "hamburger" or simply "burger." However, these "burgers" are usually referred to as "chicken burgers", "fish burgers", etc. A "hamburger" today can also be made with finely chopped beef as well as ground beef. For animals adapted to eat primarily plants, sometimes referred to as vegetarian animals, see Herbivore. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the...


Hamburgers are usually a feature of fast food restaurants. However, the hamburgers prepared in major fast food establishments are mass-produced in factories and frozen for delivery to the site.[5] These hamburgers are thin and of uniform thickness, differing from the traditional American hamburger prepared in homes and conventional restaurants, which is thicker and prepared by hand from ground beef. Generally most American hamburgers are round, but some fast-food chains, such as Wendy's, sell square-cut hamburgers. Hamburgers in fast food restaurants are usually fried, but some firms, such as Burger King use a grilling process. At conventional American restaurants, hamburgers may be ordered "rare", but normally are served well-done for food safety reasons (see below). Fast food restaurants do not offer this option. Fast food is food prepared and served quickly at a fast-food restaurant or shop at low cost. ... For other uses, see Restaurant (disambiguation). ... Wendys is an international chain of fast food restaurants founded by Dave Thomas in 1969 in Columbus, Ohio. ... Burger King (NYSE: BKC), often abbreviated to BK, is a global chain of hamburger fast food restaurants. ...


The McDonald's fast-food chain sells a sandwich called the Big Mac that is one of the world's top selling hamburgers. Other major fast-food chains – including Burger King (also known as Hungry Jacks in Australia), A&W, Whataburger, Carl's Jr./Hardee's chain, Wendy's (known for their square patties), Jack in the Box, Cook Out, Harvey's, In-N-Out Burger, Five Guys, Fatburger, Burgerville, Back Yard Burgers,Lick's Homeburger, and Sonic – also rely heavily on hamburger sales. Fuddruckers and Red Robin are popular hamburger chains that specialize in mid-tier "restaurant-style" variety of hamburgers. The "slider" style of mini hamburger is still popular regionally in the White Castle and Krystal chains. McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ... For other uses, see Big Mac (disambiguation). ... Burger King (NYSE: BKC), often abbreviated to BK, is a global chain of hamburger fast food restaurants. ... Burger King (NYSE: BKC), often abbreviated to BK, is a global chain of hamburger fast food restaurants. ... A&W restaurant in Page, Arizona A&W Restaurants, Inc. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Carls Jr. ... Hardees is an American fast-food restaurant chain, located primarily in the Eastern half of the United States in Southern, Southeast, and East Coast regions. ... Wendys is an international chain of fast food restaurants founded by Dave Thomas in 1969 in Columbus, Ohio. ... A jack-in-the-box is a childrens toy that outwardly consists of a box with a crank. ... Cook Out is a fast food restaurant chain in North Carolina. ... A Harveys restaurant in Ottawa. ... In-N-Out headquarters at University Tower in Irvine In-N-Out Burger is a privately owned and operated fast food restaurant chain in the Western United States. ... Five Guys is a fast casual restaurant chain that originated in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. ... Fatburger is an American fast-food restaurant chain that uses the slogan The Last Great Hamburger Stand. ... Exterior of Burgerville, USA location in Beaverton, Oregon. ... Back Yard Burgers (NASDAQ: BYBI) is a regionalfranchise chain of quick serve restaurants. ... Licks is a privately-owned Canadian company founded by Denise Meehan, the President and sole shareholder. ... Sonic Corporation NASDAQ: SONC (operating name: Sonic Drive-In) is an American fast-food restaurant chain based in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, that recreates the drive-in diner feel of the 1950s, complete with carhops who often wear roller skates. ... Fuddruckers is an American fast casual franchised chain restaurant that specializes in hamburgers. ... This article is about the restaurant chain. ... White Castle can refer to different things: White Castle, a chain of US hamburger restaurants White Castle, an 11th-century castle in Wales White Castle, a town in Louisiana This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Krystal is a hamburger restaurant chain in the Southeastern United States. ...


Some American establishments offer a unique take on the hamburger beyond what is offered in the fast food restaurants. Notable is Father's Office in Santa Monica, California. The patty is composed of dry-aged sirloin mixed with New York Strip ends topped with applewood-smoked bacon compote. It is topped with maytag blue and Gruyère cheeses, caramelized onions, and arugula on a French roll. In lieu of ketchup, Father's Office serves a blue cheese aioli in a ramekin. Dyer's Burgers in Memphis Tennessee is famous for a deep-fried burger. The proprietors claim that they recycle and re-use the same grease used when the restaurant opened in 1912. The casual dining chain Ruby Tuesday claims to have many different varieties of hamburgers on its menu of various shapes, meat compositions, or grades of beef. Fast food is food prepared and served quickly at a fast-food restaurant or shop at low cost. ... For other uses, see Restaurant (disambiguation). ... Santa Monica Pier Santa Monica is a coastal city located in Los Angeles County, California USA, by the Pacific Ocean, south of Pacific Palisades and Brentwood, west of Westwood, Los Angeles, and north of Venice. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Maytag is a blue cheese produced on the Maytag Dairy Farms outside of Newton, Iowa (the home of the Maytag Corporation). ... Country of origin Switzerland Region, town Canton of Fribourg, Gruyères Source of milk Cows Pasteurized No Texture cooked, pressed, hard Aging time 5-12 months Certification Swiss AOC 2001 Gruyère is a hard yellow cheese made from cows milk, named after the town of Gruyères in... Caramel is a food which has a brown color and a pleasant toasted flavor, derived from the caramelization of sugar. ... Binomial name (L.) Cav. ... Cabrales bleu Cheese Blue cheese, known in French as bleu (blue), is a general classification of cows milk, sheeps milk, or goats milk cheeses that has had Penicillium cultures added so that the final product is spotted or veined throughout with blue or blue-green mold. ... Aioli of garlic, salt, egg, and olive oil in a mortar Aioli with olives Aioli (Provençal Occitan alhòli[1], Catalan allioli) is a sauce made of garlic, egg and olive oil. ... A Ramekin is a small, often white in colour, dish typically preferred for the preparation and serving of baked cheese recipes and deserts such as the classic Crème Brûlée. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Deep frying is cooking food by submerging the whole food item in hot oil or fat, originating in Africa. ... Year 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Ruby Tuesday is an American casual dining restaurant chain named after the Rolling Stones song of the same name. ...


Often, hamburgers are served as a common picnic and party food, cooked outdoors on barbecue grills. Hamburgers are also very good for backyard grilling and for home use. Hamburger patties are raw when first bought and may contain harmful bacteria that can produce food-borne illness such as Escherichia coli O157:H7, so caution is needed when handling them. Hamburgers patties can be cooked rare, medium rare, medium, medium well, or well done. These terms refer to how thoroughly the meat is cooked, ranging from having a little bit of pink coloring to being dark brown, cooked almost to a crisp. However because of the potential for food-borne illness, it is recommended that hamburgers should be cooked to an internal temperature of 170°F. If cooked to this temperature, they will be well done. In certain places and restaurants around the world, restaurants add their own sauces. Escherichia coli O157:H7 is an emerging cause of foodborne illness. ... Temperature, or doneness, is a description of how thoroughly cooked a cut of meat is based on the color, juiciness and internal temperature when served. ... Temperature, or doneness, is a description of how thoroughly cooked a cut of meat is based on the color, juiciness and internal temperature when served. ...


Ingredients and dietary aspects

Despite the "ham" implication of the name, a hamburger contains no ham or other pork products unless otherwise indicated except in the Far East (see below). A high-quality hamburger is made entirely of ground beef and seasonings. A hamburger that contains no major ingredients besides beef may be referred to as an "all beef hamburger" or "all beef patties" to distinguish them from inexpensive hamburgers made with added flour, texturized vegetable protein or other fillers to decrease their cost. In the 1930s ground liver was sometimes added to the patties. Some cooks prepare their patties with binders, such as eggs or bread crumbs, and seasonings, such as, parsley, onions, soy sauce, Thousand Island dressing, onion soup mix, or Worcestershire sauce. This article is about the cut of meat. ... For other uses, see Pork (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Flour (disambiguation). ... Dry TVP flakes are an inexpensive protein source when purchased in bulk and can be added to a variety of vegetarian dishes or used as a supplement to bulk out a meat dish. ... In processed animal foods, a filler is an ingredient added to provide dietary fiber or bulk. ... The liver is the largest internal organ in the human body, and is an organ present in vertebrates and some other animals. ... EGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGSEGGS This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Breadcrumbs or bread crumbs are small particles of dry or very dry bread, which are used for breading foods, topping casseroles, stuffing poultry, thickening stews, and adding inexpensive bulk to meatloaves and similar dishes. ... This article is about the herb. ... For the parody newspaper, see The Onion. ... Japanese name Kanji: Hiragana: Korean name Hangul: Vietnamese name Quoc Ngu: Soy sauce (US) or soya sauce is a fermented sauce made from soybeans (soya beans), roasted grain, water and salt. ... Thousand Island dressing, pink in color, is a variety of salad dressing, a variant of Russian dressing, commonly made of mayonnaise, ketchup, and a mixture of finely chopped vegetables, most often pickles, onions, bell peppers, and/or green olives; chopped hard-boiled egg is also common. ... A bowl of French onion soup. ... 1900 advertisement Worcestershire sauce (IPA: (wuster-shur or wuster-sheer)) is a widely used fermented liquid condiment originally manufactured by Lea & Perrins, in Midland Road, Worcester, England. ...


After cooking the patty and placing it on a bun, other ingredients are placed on top of the patty as toppings. Namely the most popular are ketchup, mustard, iceberg lettuce, tomatoes, white onions and pickles, though other ingredients, such as sauerkraut and guacamole are not uncommon. For other uses, see Ketchup (disambiguation). ... Look up Mustard in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Binomial name Lactuca sativa L. Lettuce is a temperate annual or biennial plant most often grown as a leaf vegetable. ... Binomial name Solanumlycopersicum Linnaeus ref. ... White Onion is a type of dry onion that has a pure white skin and a sweet, mild white flesh. ... Pickles may refer to Pickled cucumber Other vegetables that have been pickled Pickles (comic strip), a comic strip by Brian Crane Pickles (dog), the dog that found the World Cup trophy in 1966 Pickles (SpongeBob SquarePants episode) Eric Pickles (born 1952), British conservative politician James Pickles (born 1925), controversial British... Sauerkraut and sausage on a plate Pickled Eisbein, served with Sauerkraut Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Guacamole // Guacamole is an avocado-based relish or dip from the time of the Aztecs. ...


Recent years have seen the increasing popularity of new types of "burgers" in which alternatives to ground beef are used as the primary ingredient. For example, a turkey burger uses ground turkey meat, a chicken burger uses either ground chicken meat or chicken filets. A buffalo burger uses ground meat from a bison and some mix cow and buffalo meat, thus creating a "Beefalo burger" and an ostrich burger is made from ground seasoned ostrich meat. A Bambi burger uses ground venison from deer. [6] This article is about the domesticated animal raised for food. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Subspecies B. b. ... Beefalo are a fertile hybrid offspring of domestic cattle, Bos taurus, and the American Bison, Bison bison (generally called buffalo). ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 Distribution of Ostriches. ... Bambi is a 1942 animated feature produced by Walt Disney and originally released to theatres by RKO Radio Pictures on August 13, 1942. ... Leg of venison on apple sauce with dumplings and vegetables Venison is meat of the family Cervidae. ... This article is about the ruminent animal. ...


Veggie Burgers

A veggie burger, garden burger, or tofu burger uses a meat analogue, a meat substitute such as tofu, TVP, seitan (wheat gluten), quorn or an assortment of vegetables, ground up and mashed into patties. In the last several years Chili's and several frozen food distributors have created a burger made up of black beans that is supposed to taste like smokey beef. Throughout the years veggie burgers have become more popular among fastfood restaurants, appealing to vegetarians. A homemade veggie burger. ... A meat analogue, also called meat substitute, mock meat or veat, approximates the aesthetic qualities (primarily texture, flavor and appearance) and/or chemical characteristics of certain types of meat. ... For other uses, see Tofu (disambiguation). ... Dry TVP flakes are an inexpensive protein source when purchased in bulk and can be added to a variety of vegetarian dishes or used as a supplement to bulk out a meat dish. ... A piece of seitan Wheat gluten - also called seitan (pronounced SAY-tahn), wheat meat, wheat-meat, wheatmeat, gluten meat, or simply gluten - is a foodstuff made from the gluten of wheat. ... For other uses, see Quorn (disambiguation). ... Chilis Grill & Bar is a chain of over 1,000 casual dining restaurants, most located in the United States. ...


These burgers are usually lower in saturated fat or calories than traditional hamburgers. Many contain phytoestrogen (soy)[citation needed]. Saturated fat is fat that consists of triglycerides containing only saturated fatty acids. ... Phytoestrogens are plant compounds with effects similar to those of estrogen, although somewhat weaker. ... Binomial name Glycine max Soybeans (US) or soya beans (UK) (Glycine max) are a high-protein legume (Family Fabaceae) grown as food for both humans and livestock. ...


Cheeseburger

A Burger King Quad Stacker
Main article: Cheeseburger

A cheeseburger is a hamburger with cheese in addition to the meat. In 1924, Lionel Sternberger grilled the first cheeseburger in Pasadena, California. When Sternberger died in 1964, Time magazine noted in its February 7 issue that: Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 219 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Hamburger Cheeseburger BK... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 219 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Hamburger Cheeseburger BK... Burger King (NYSE: BKC), often abbreviated to BK, is a global chain of hamburger fast food restaurants. ... For other uses, see Cheeseburger (disambiguation). ... Cheese is a solid food made from the milk of cows, goats, sheep, and other mammals. ... Pasadena is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ...

"...at the hungry age of 16, [Sternberger] experimentally dropped a slab of American cheese on a sizzling hamburger while helping out at his father's sandwich shop in Pasadena, thereby inventing the cheeseburger..."

Serving style

Methods of serving hamburgers vary considerably in different countries. Many countries use a bun. Thickness in meat patties range depending on the restaurant. Some places serve hamburger patties that can weigh two pounds, and sometimes much more. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


North America

North American Burger

In North America burgers can be divided into two main types: fast food hamburgers and individually-prepared ones made in homes and sit down restaurants. The latter are traditionally prepared "with everything" (or "all the way," "deluxe," "the works," "through the garden," or in some regions "dressed"), which includes lettuce, tomato, onion, and often sliced pickles (or pickle relish). Cheese (usually processed cheese slices but often cheddar, Swiss, or blue, either melted on the meat patty or crumbled on top), is generally an option. Condiments are usually added to the hamburger, but they may be offered separately ("on the side"), with the two most common condiments being mustard and tomato ketchup. However, mayonnaise, other salad dressings, and barbecue sauce are also popular. Traditional "Texas" hamburgers and cheeseburgers usually omit other liquid condiments besides mustard. Other popular toppings include bacon, avocado or guacamole, sliced sautéed mushrooms, cheese sauce and/or chili (usually without beans). Heinz 57 sauce is popular among burger enthusiasts. Somewhat less common additions/ingredients include fried egg, scrambled egg, feta cheese,blue cheese, salsa and other kinds of chile peppers, anchovies, slices of ham, pastrami or teriyaki-seasoned beef, tartar sauce, french fries or potato chips. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixels, file size: 1. ... Binomial name L. Lettuce and chicory output in 2005 Vit. ... For other uses, see Tomato (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Onion (disambiguation). ... A deli pickle. ... Cheese is a solid food made from the milk of cows, goats, sheep, and other mammals. ... American process cheese Processed cheese, process cheese, or prepared cheese is a food product made from regular cheese and sometimes other unfermented dairy ingredients, plus emulsifiers, extra salt, food colorings and/or whey. ... Country of origin England Region, town Somerset, Cheddar Source of milk Cows, rarely Goats Pasteurised Frequently Texture hard/semi-hard Aging time 3–30 months depending on variety Certification West Country farmhouse Cheddar Only: PDO Cheddar cheese is a fairly hard, pale yellow to orange, sharp-tasting cheese originating from... Cabrales bleu Cheese Blue cheese, known in French as bleu (blue), is a general classification of cows milk, sheeps milk, or goats milk cheeses that has had Penicillium cultures added so that the final product is spotted or veined throughout with blue or blue-green mold. ... For other uses, see Mustard. ... For other uses, see Ketchup (disambiguation). ... For the song by The Smashing Pumpkins, see Mayonaise (song). ... The St. ... For other uses, see Bacon (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Mill. ... Guacamole // Guacamole is an avocado-based relish or dip from the time of the Aztecs. ... For other uses, see Mushroom (disambiguation). ... A pot of chili con carne with beans and tomatoes. ... This article is on the plant. ... Heinz 57 is a shortened, popular form of the 57 Varieties slogan of Pittsburghs H. J. Heinz Company. ... This article is about the food. ... Chicken egg (left) and quail eggs (right), the types of egg commonly used as food An egg is a body consisting of an ovum surrounded by layers of membranes and an outer casing of some type, which acts to nourish and protect a developing embryo. ... Feta (Greek φέτα, feminine gender) is a classic curd cheese in brine whose tradition dates back to Greece thousands of years ago. ... Cabrales bleu Cheese Blue cheese, known in French as bleu (blue), is a general classification of cows milk, sheeps milk, or goats milk cheeses that has had Penicillium cultures added so that the final product is spotted or veined throughout with blue or blue-green mold. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... The chile pepper, chili pepper, or chilli pepper, or simply chile, is the fruit of the plant Capsicum from the nightshade family, Solanaceae. ... The anchovies are a family (Engraulidae) of small but common fish. ... For other meanings of ham or Ham, see Ham (disambiguation). ... Pastrami Pastrami is a popular delicatessen meat made from chiefly red meat. ... Chicken teriyaki. ... Chicken with tartar sauce Tartar sauce or tartare sauce is a thick white sauce made from mayonnaise and finely chopped pickled cucumber, capers, onions (or chives), and fresh parsley. ... French fries in a bowl. ... Saratoga chips Potato chips (British English or Hiberno-English: crisps) are slim slices of potatoes deep fried or baked until crisp. ...


Standard toppings on hamburgers can vary by geographical region, particularly at restaurants that are not national or regional franchises. In the Upper Midwest, particularly Wisconsin, burgers are often made with a buttered bun, butter as one of the ingredients of the patty or with a pat of butter on top of the burger patty. This is called a "Butter Burger." In portions of the Carolinas, for instance, a Carolina-style hamburger "with everything" may be served with cheese, chili, onions, mustard, and cole slaw and national chain Wendy's sells a "Carolina Classic" burger with these toppings in these areas. In Hawaii hamburgers are often topped with teriyaki sauce, derived from the Japanese-American culture, and locally grown pineapple. Waffle House claims on its menus and website to offer 70,778,880 different ways of serving a hamburger. In portions of the Midwest and east coast, a hamburger served with lettuce, tomato, and onion is referred to as a "California burger." This usage is sufficiently widespread to appear on the menus of fast-food restaurants, most notably in locations of the Dairy Queen franchise. Coleslaw (or Cole Slaw) is a salad of finely-shredded raw cabbage and sometimes shredded carrots, dressed with a mayonnaise, milk, or vinegar_based dressing. ... Wendys is an international chain of fast food restaurants founded by Dave Thomas in 1969 in Columbus, Ohio. ... Chicken teriyaki. ... For other uses, see Pineapple (disambiguation). ... Waffle House is a restaurant chain with over 1700 stores found in 25 states in the United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Dairy Queen, abbreviated to DQ, is a global chain of ice-cream and fast-food restaurants. ...


A hamburger with two patties is a "double decker" or simply a "double," of which the Big Boy claims to be the first commercially sold, while a hamburger with three patties is a "triple," with the Wendy's restaurant chain being among the first to offer this as a regular product. Doubles and triples are often combined with cheese and occasionally with bacon as well, yielding a "double cheeseburger" or a "triple bacon cheeseburger," or alternatively, a "bacon double/triple cheeseburger." A hamburger with one patty, bacon, and cheese is a "bacon cheeseburger" or a "Banquet Burger"; hamburgers with bacon but no cheese are often called "bacon-burger"s. The Hardee's restaurant chain gained extensive publicity within the United States following its introduction of the Monster Thickburger, with two meat patties, three slices of cheese, six strips of bacon, 1,420 calories and 107 grams of fat. Other restaurants, such as In-N-Out, offer multiple patties and cheese on a burger (for example, 4 X 4 which is 4 meat patties and 4 slices of cheese). One could order as many meat patties as desired. The largest ordered was a 100X100 at the cost of about $400 for a special occasion. Big Boy is a restaurant chain started in 1936 by Bob Wian in Glendale, California as Bobs Big Boy. ... Wendys is an international chain of fast food restaurants founded by Dave Thomas in 1969 in Columbus, Ohio. ... Hardees is an American fast-food restaurant chain, located primarily in the Eastern half of the United States in Southern, Southeast, and East Coast regions. ... The Monster Thickburger is a type of double-bacon cheeseburger introduced by the East Coast-based Hardees chain of fast-food restaurants in the United States. ... In-N-Out restaurant in Pinole, California In-N-Out is a privately-owned fast food restaurant chain in the Western United States, especially in California, but also with locations in Arizona and Nevada. ...


A patty melt is a sandwich consisting of a hamburger patty, sautéed onions and cheese between two slices of rye bread. The sandwich is then grilled so that the cheese melts thoroughly. A patty melt is a type of hamburger sandwich consisting of a hamburger (or ground rabbit) patty and cheese between two slices of bread (traditionally rye, though sourdough, or Texas toast have recently been substituted. ... Sautéing is a method of cooking food using a small amount of fat in a shallow pan over relatively high heat. ... Rye bread is bread made with rye flour. ...


To decrease cooking and serving time, fast food hamburgers have thinner patties than their fancier counterparts. The Carl's Jr. restaurant chain acknowledged this with the introduction of the "Six Dollar Burger," featuring a patty the same size as those served by sit-down restaurants for a lower price. Hamburgers also tend to be described by their combined uncooked weight, with a single uncooked burger a nominal four ounces (a "quarter pounder" [113.5 grams]); so, instead of a "double hamburger" one might encounter a "half pounder" (i.e. eight ounces [227 grams]; burger weights are always specified in pounds). A Carls Jr. ...


Fast-food hamburgers are usually dressed with a variety of condiments, and in order to get a fast-food hamburger without one of these standard condiments a special order may be required.


Another variety of hamburger is the "slider", which is a very small hamburger patty served in an equally small bun. This is the kind of hamburger popularized by White Castle. Another purveyor of the slider is Krystal. White Castle can refer to different things: White Castle, a chain of US hamburger restaurants White Castle, an 11th-century castle in Wales White Castle, a town in Louisiana This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Krystal is a hamburger restaurant chain in the Southeastern United States. ...


In Alberta, a kubie burger is a hamburger made with a pressed Ukrainian sausage (kubasa).[7] For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ... Kovbasa (ковбаса) is the generic Ukrainian word for sausage. ...


United Kingdom

Hamburgers in the UK are very similar to their U.S. cousins, and the high-street is dominated by the same big two chains as in the U.S.—McDonald's and Burger King. The menus offered to both countries are virtually identical, although portion sizes tend to be smaller in the UK.


An original and indigenous rival to the big two U.S. giants was the quintessentially British fast-food chain Wimpy, originally known as Wimpy Bar, which served its burgers or cheeseburgers with British-style chips, served on a plate accompanied by flatware and delivered to the customer's table. Wimpy began to die out in the late 1980s, disappearing from most UK high-streets. However, it persists in some town centers and particularly at motorway service stations, resembling much more the U.S. style system of counter-service. Wimpy Logo Wimpy is the brand name of a chain of hamburger restaurants based in the United Kingdom. ... French fries in a bowl. ...


Hamburgers are also available from mobile kiosks, particularly at outdoor events such as football matches. Burgers from this type of outlet are usually served without any form of salad - only fried onions and a choice of tomato ketchup or brown sauce. a pagoda-like kiosk in Lausanne. ... Soccer redirects here. ...


Chip shops, particularly in the West Midlands, North-East and Scotland, serve battered hamburgers (along with many other battered food items). This is where the burger patty, by itself, is deep-fat-fried in batter and served with chips, but no bun.


Hamburgers and veggie burgers, usually of a better quality, served with chips and salad, are now standard pub grub menu items. Indeed, many pubs specialize in "gourmet" burgers. These are usually high quality minced steak patties, topped with items such as blue cheese, brie, avocado et cetera. Another variant is the curry burger, which seasons the meat with curry to provide a spicier alternative. The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... A pie, along with a pint, as served in a pub Pub grub is food that is typically found in a British or Australian pub. ... A curry burger is an innovative variant of the American hamburger which is seasoned with curry. ...


Many British pubs are also notable for their extreme fondness for burger patties made from more exotic meats - common examples include venison burgers (sometimes nicknamed Bambi Burgers), bison burgers, ostrich burgers and in some Australian themed pubs even kangaroo burgers can be purchased. All of these hamburgers are served in a similar way to the traditional hamburger but may come with a different condiment, redcurrant sauce, mint sauce and plum sauce being common examples. A public house, usually known as a pub, is a drinking establishment found mainly in the Great Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and other countries influenced by British cultural heritage. ...


In the early 21st century "premium" hamburger chain and independent restaurants have arisen, selling burgers produced from meat stated to be of high quality and often organic, usually served to eat on the premises rather than to take away. [2] Chains include Gourmet Burger Kitchen, Ultimate Burger, and Hamburger Union. Organic vegetables at a farmers market in Argentina. ... Gourmet Burger Kitchen is a restaurant chain in the south of England specializing in, as the name suggests, gourmet burgers. ...


In recent years Rustlers has sold pre-cooked hamburgers re-heatable in a microwave oven in the United Kingdom. Rustlers are a range of snacks prepared for use in the microwave oven. ... Microwave oven A microwave oven, or microwave, is a kitchen appliance employing microwave radiation primarily to cook or heat food. ...


Australia & New Zealand

Fast food franchises sell American style fast food hamburgers in both Australia and New Zealand. The traditional Australasian hamburgers are usually bought from fish and chip shops or milk bars. The hamburger meat is always ground beef. They almost always include tomato, lettuce, grilled onion, beetroot (canned slices), and meat as minimum, and can optionally include cheese, a fried egg (usually with a hard yolk)and bacon. If all these optional ingredients are included it is known as a "Hamburger with the lot". The only variance between the two countries' hamburgers is that New Zealand's "Hamburger with the lot" often contains a steak (beef) as well. The only condiments regularly used are tomato sauce, which is similar to ketchup but has less vinegar and more sugar, or BBQ sauce. Hamburgers in Australia and New Zealand tend to be less oily and fatty than their US counterparts, and are more likely to include a full salad if available. The McDonalds "McOz" Burger is partway between American and Australian style burgers, having beetroot and tomato in an otherwise typical American burger. Likewise McDonalds in New Zealand created a Kiwiburger which is similar to a Quarter Pounder, but features salad, beetroot and a fried egg. The Hungry Jack's (Burger King) "Aussie Burger" has tomato, lettuce, onion, cheese, bacon, beetroot, egg, ketchup and a meat patty. As with many issues between the two countries there is much debate over whether this burger (with beetroot being the defining factor) is, in fact, an Australian or a New Zealand creation, but the answer remains unclear. Australasia is the area that includes Australia, New Zealand, New Guinea, and the many smaller islands in the vicinity, most of which are the eastern part of Indonesia. ... Fish and chips in wrapping paper Fish and chips is deep-fried fish in batter with deep-fried potatoes, and is a popular take-away food. ... Binomial name Carolus Linnaeus Beta vulgaris, commonly known as beet is a flowering plant species in the family Chenopodiaceae. ... For other uses, see Ketchup (disambiguation). ... Barbecue sauce is a type of sauce which is frequently poured onto meat while being grilled or barbecued and/or used as a dipping condiment afterwards. ... This article deals with food. ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants [1]. Although McDonalds did not invent the hamburger or fast food, its name has become nearly synonymous with both. ... The Kiwiburger was a menu item once sold at McDonalds restaurants in New Zealand, reintroduced in 2007. ... Burger King (BK for short) is a large international food corporation that sells fast food in chain stores. ... Burger King (NYSE: BKC), often abbreviated to BK, is a global chain of hamburger fast food restaurants. ...


China

In China, restaurants such as McDonald's and KFC have been proliferating all across the country. In many parts of China, small hamburger chains have opened up to capitalize on the popularity of hamburgers with children. Restaurants such as Peter Burger attempt to copy McDonald's. McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ... KFC, also known as Kentucky Fried Chicken, is a food chain based in Louisville, Kentucky, known mainly for its fried chicken. ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ...


In supermarkets and corner stores, customers can buy "hamburgers" (hanbao) off the bread shelf. These unrefrigerated so-called "hamburgers" are nothing more than ultra-sweet buns cut open with a thin slice of pork or ham placed inside without any condiments or vegetables. These hanbao are a half-westernised form of the traditional Cantonese "hamburgers" called "char siu Bao" (BBQ Pork Bun). The Chinese word for hamburger (hanbao) often refers to all sandwiches containing cooked meat, regardless of the meat's origin. This includes chicken burgers, as KFC is very popular in China. Japanese name Kanji: Kana: Vietnamese name Vietnamese: Char siu ( or correctly spelled Cha Shao, also cha siu and char siew), otherwise known as barbecued pork, is a popular way to prepare pork in Cantonese cuisine. ... Bao redirects here. ... KFC, also known as Kentucky Fried Chicken, is a food chain based in Louisville, Kentucky, known mainly for its fried chicken. ...


Japan

In Japan, hamburgers can be served in a bun, called hanbāgā (ハンバーガー), or just the patties served without a bun, known as hanbāgu (ハンバーグ) or "hamburg", short for "hamburg steak". Image File history File linksMetadata Hamburg_steak. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Hamburg_steak. ... Salisbury steak is ground beef shaped to resemble a steak and usually served in brown sauce. ...


Hamburg steaks (served without buns) are similar to what is known as Salisbury steaks in the USA. They are made from minced beef, pork or a blend of the two, mixed with minced onions, egg, breadcrumbs and spices. They are served with brown sauce (or demi-glace in restaurants) with vegetable or salad sides, or occasionally in Japanese curries. It is a popular item at home, and in casual, western style suburban restaurant chains known in Japan as "family restaurants". It became popular in the 1960s. This article is about the meat dish. ... This article is about the meat dish. ... A bottle of brown sauce, as defined by British cuisine Brown sauce can refer to one of two different sauces: In French cuisine and other cuisines based on it, it generally refers to a meat stock-based gravy-like sauce. ... Demi-glace is a type of brown sauce common to the culinary industry. ... A serving of Japanese curry and rice Curry , sometimes called カリー karī) is one of the most popular dishes in Japan. ... A casual dining restaurant is a restaurant that serves moderately-priced food in a casual atmosphere. ...


Hamburgers in buns, on the other hand, are predominantly the domain of fast food chains. As well as American chains such as McDonald's and Wendy's, Japan has a few home grown hamburger chain restaurants such as MOS Burger and First Kitchen. Local varieties of burgers served in Japan include teriyaki burgers, katsu burgers (containing tonkatsu) and burgers containing shrimp korokke. Some of the more unusual examples include the "Rice Burger", where the bun is made of rice, and the luxury 1000-yen (US $10) "Takumi Burger" (meaning "artisan taste"), featuring avocados, freshly-grated wasabi, and other rare seasonal ingredients. In terms of the actual patty, there are burgers made with the famous Kobe beef, butchered from cows that are fed with beer and massaged daily. McDonald's Japan also recently launched a McPork burger, made with U.S. pork. McDonald's has been gradually losing market share in Japan to these local hamburger chains, due in part to the preference of Japanese diners for fresh ingredients and more refined, "upscale" hamburger offerings.[citation needed]Burger King once retreated from Japan, but re-entered the market in Summer 2007 in a cooperation with the Japanese/Korean fast-food chain Lotteria. Wendys is an international chain of fast food restaurants founded by Dave Thomas in 1969 in Columbus, Ohio. ... MOS Burger ), from the initial letters of Mountain Ocean Sun, is a fast-food restaurant chain (fast-casual) that originated in Japan. ... First kitchen (ファーストキッチン)is a fast-food restaurant. ... Chicken teriyaki. ... Typical Japanese Tonkatsu, served in Seoul, Korea. ... Korokke Korokke (Japanese: コロッケ) is a Japanese deep fried dish originally related to a French dish, croquette. ... Binomial name Mill. ... Binomial name Matsum. ... Kobe beef for sukiyaki Kobe beef ) refers to beef from the black Tajima-ushi breed of Wagyu cattle, raised according to strict tradition in Hyōgo Prefecture, Japan. ... For other uses, see Pork (disambiguation). ... Burger King (NYSE: BKC), often abbreviated to BK, is a global chain of hamburger fast food restaurants. ... Lotteria Furukawabashi Shop at Kadoma City Osaka Lotteria (Korean: 롯데리아, Japanese: ロッテリア) is an Asian fast food restaurant from Japan, and now with branches across East Asia. ...


Other countries

Chicken burger with rice bun (sold by McDonald's in Taiwan, Korea, Hong Kong, Macao, the Philippines, Thailand and Singapore). Notice that the "bun" is comprised of actual cooked rice

Rice burgers, mentioned above, are also available in several East Asian countries such as Taiwan and South Korea. Lotteria is a big hamburger franchise in Japan owned by the South Korean Lotte group, with outlets also in China, South Korea, Vietnam, and Taiwan. In addition to selling beef hamburgers, they also have hamburgers made from squid, pork, tofu, and shrimp. Variations available in Korea include bulgogi burgers and kimchi burgers. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1503x1126, 674 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Hamburger Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1503x1126, 674 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Hamburger Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Lotteria Furukawabashi Shop at Kadoma City Osaka Lotteria (Korean: 롯데리아, Japanese: ロッテリア) is an Asian fast food restaurant from Japan, and now with branches across East Asia. ... Bulgogi with Banchan Bulgogi is one of Koreas most popular beef dishes. ... Kimchi, also spelled gimchi or kimchee, is a traditional Korean fermented dish made of some select vegetables with varied seasonings, most commonly referring to the spicy baechu variety. ...


Not surprisingly, the Philippines, with American culinary influences going back to US political influence of the islands at the beginning of the 20th Century, retains a strong bond with American trends. A wide range of major US fast-food franchises are well represented, together with local imitators, often amended to the local palate. The famous chain McDonalds (locally nicknamed "McDo"), which is immensely popular with Filipinos, have a range of burger and chicken dishes often accompanied by plain steamed rice and/or french fries. Most popular of all with locals, the Philippines boasts its own burger-chain called Jollibee - which offers credible burger meals and chicken, including a signature burger called "The Big Champ". It is perhaps ironic, but very encouraging, that Jollibee now has a number of outlets in the United States. McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants [1]. Although McDonalds did not invent the hamburger or fast food, its name has become nearly synonymous with both. ... A Jollibee restaurant in Dumaguete City. ...


In India, burgers are usually made using a chicken or a vegetable patty, due to cultural taboos against eating beef. These taboos stem from the religious practices of Hindus and Muslims, respectively. Because of this, the majority of fast food chains and restaurants in India do not serve beef. Likewise, McDonalds restaurants in India do not serve beef, therefore the 'Big Mac' is replaced with the 'Maharaja Mac' which substitutes the beef patties with chicken.


Another version of the Indian vegetarian burger is the "Wada Pav" consisting deep-fried potato patty dipped in gramflour batter. It is usually served with mint chutney and fried green chili.


In Pakistan apart from American Fast food chains, burgers can be found on stalls near shopping areas. The most famous and inexpensive being 'Shami Burger' made from 'Shami Kebab'. It is a Kebab made by mixing lentil and Minced lamb meat. Onions, scrambled egg and ketchup are the most common toppings.


In Malaysia there are 300 Mc Donalds restaurants. The menu in Malaysia also includes eggs and fried chicken on top of the regular burgers. Burgers are also easily found at nearby mobile kiosks especially Ramly Burger. McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants [1]. Although McDonalds did not invent the hamburger or fast food, its name has become nearly synonymous with both. ... A Ramly Burger stall during Hari Raya festivities at Kampong Glam, Singapore. ...


In South Africa a mixture of hot mustard and mayonnaise is standard fare for a burger. Usually the mixture will be out, already mixed for partakers.


In Mexico, burgers can be accompanied by ham, and avocado. They also usually have shredded lettuce, onions, tomatoes, bacon, which can be fried or grilled along with the meat patty, cheese, and condiments like mustard, mayonnaise, and ketchup. Some restaurant's burgers also have barbecue sauce, and others also replace the ground patty with sirloin, meat "al pastor", barbacoa, and other "guisados", a fried chicken breast is also common. Many burger chains from the United States can be found all over Mexico, some are Carl's Jr, Sonic, and the already globalized, Mc Donald's, Burger King and Wendy's.


Cultural associations

In the 1930s (and TV re-runs through the 1970s), the best-known association to the hamburger was Wimpy, a moocher in the cartoon Popeye who would "gladly pay you Tuesday for a hamburger today." The character was the inspiration behind the name of the Wimpy hamburger chain. J. Wellington Wimpy, or just Wimpy, is one of the characters in the long-running comic strip, Thimble Theater, and in the Popeye cartoons based upon the strip. ... For other uses, see Popeye (disambiguation). ...


In the movie Pulp Fiction, the two assassins played by John Travolta and Samuel L. Jackson discuss with amusement the titles given to their beloved burgers in Europe. For instance they marvel that a quarter pounder is known as a "Royale with cheese". Samuel L Jackson's character gives a highly amusing speech to his soon-to-be victims (tucking into burgers before they are blown away) about the burger being "the cornerstone of any nutritious breakfast". Pulp Fiction is a 1994 film by director Quentin Tarantino, who cowrote the film with Roger Avary. ... John Joseph Travolta (born February 18, 1954) is an Academy Award-nominated and Golden Globe Award-winning American actor, dancer, and singer, best known for his leading roles in films such as Saturday Night Fever, Grease and Pulp Fiction. ... Samuel Jackson redirects here. ...


Another character associated with the hamburger is Jughead of Archie Comics. He would often beg his best friend Archie Andrews to buy him a hamburger and was constantly seen hanging out at Pop Tate's restaurant. At one point in the series, Jughead even entered a hamburger eating contest. After defeating his opponent, his only thoughts were to eat more hamburgers. Forsythe Pendleton Jughead Jones III is a fictional character in Archie Comics, first appearing in December 1941. ... Archie Comics is an American comic book publisher known for its many series featuring the fictional teenage Archie Andrews, Betty Cooper, Veronica Lodge, Reggie Mantle and Forsythe Jughead Jones characters created by Bob Montana. ... Archie Andrews is the name of the main fictional character in a American comic book series, and the title of a long-run radio series about that character, created by Bob Montana. ... Terry Pop Tate is a fictional character of the fictional Archie universe, is the owner and manager of the Chocklit Shoppe, a soda store and frequent hangout of Archies Gang. ...


In 1984, Wendy's aired a series of TV advertisements for its hamburgers in which an elderly woman (played by Clara Peller) commented, "Where's the beef?" when examining competitors' burgers. The quip became a national catchphrase in the United States. This article is about the year. ... Wendys is an international chain of fast food restaurants founded by Dave Thomas in 1969 in Columbus, Ohio. ... The picture sleeve of a Wheres the Beef single, recorded by Coyote McCloud and Clara Peller, based on her legendary advertisement Clara Peller (August 4, 1902 – August 11, 1987), was an American who, as a senior citizen, starred in the legendary Wheres the beef? advertisement for Wendys... The picture sleeve of a Wheres the Beef single, recorded by Coyote McCloud and Clara Peller, based on her legendary advertisement Wheres the beef? is a catch phrase best known in the United States and Canada. ... A catch phrase is a phrase or expression that is popularized, usually through repeated use, by a real person or fictional character. ...


In the mid-1990s, some American fast food restaurants such as Hardee's and Burger King began intensely marketing eating "large hamburgers" (of one half pounds [681 grams] of beef or more) as a sign of masculinity. Using scantily clad women and images of construction workers eating hamburgers, they introduced the notion that eating large hamburgers is a sign of manliness. Hardees is an American fast-food restaurant chain, located primarily in the Eastern half of the United States in Southern, Southeast, and East Coast regions. ... Manliness redirects here. ...


The Adventures of Brisco County Jr., as part of its running gag of showing the "true" origins of many turn-of-the-century inventions, features a waitress who comes up with the idea of serving a ground beef patty between two slices of bread as it is easier to eat than steak. She calls them cow pies, much to the cowboy heroes' discomfort. The Adventures of Brisco County, Jr. ... Beef rump steak on grill pan, cooked to medium rare A steak (from Old Norse steik, roast) is a slice of meat, typically beef, or fish. ...


Oprah Winfrey was sued for saying she would stop eating hamburgers when there was a mad cow disease scare, on the grounds that it was unsafe.[8][9][10] Oprah Winfrey, (born January 29, 1954) is a multiple-Emmy Award winning host of The Oprah Winfrey Show, the highest rated talk show in television history. ... Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or commonly mad cow disease) is a fatal, neurodegenerative disease of cattle, which infects by a mechanism that shocked biologists on its discovery in late 20th century and appears transmissible to humans. ...


The Video Game and anime character Viewtiful Joe loves to eat cheeseburgers, which are his favorite food. Everytime he sees a Hamburger Stand or Restaurant he says "Cheeseburger, please!" Another game, the 1982 arcade game Burgertime features a chef trying to make hamburgers while being chased by hot-dogs, pickles and eggs. Computer and video games redirects here. ... Animé redirects here. ... Viewtiful Joe is a video game developed by Capcoms Capcom Production Studio 4 design team Team Viewtiful. The other games in the series, including the PS2 port of the first game, have been made by Clover Studio. ... For other uses, see Cheeseburger (disambiguation). ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Centipede by Atari is a typical example of a 1980s era arcade game. ... Burgertime ( バーガータイム) is a 1982 Japanese arcade game created by Data East Corporation for its DECO Cassette System. ...


Pop performer Jimmy Buffett wrote the song "Cheeseburger in Paradise" in 1978. He was inspired to write it after discovering, to his surprise, a restaurant in the British Virgin Islands serving American cheeseburgers. Jimmy Buffett tours Pearl Harbor with United States Navy Admiral Jonathan Greenert, June 12, 2003 James William Jimmy Buffett (born December 25, 1946) is a singer, songwriter, author, businessman, and recently a film producer best known for his island escapism lifestyle and music including hits such as Margaritaville (No. ... This article deals with the popular song Cheeseburger in Paradise. ...


Floridian band The Monsters In The Morning made a song about a hamburger and the contents called "Mr. Hamburger". Promo Shot The Monsters in the Morning is a radio show on WTKS Real Radio in Orlando, Florida, USA and XM Radio Channel 152 for the first four hours. ...


Alternative meanings for "hamburger"

  • $100 hamburger---Aviation slang for a private general aviation flight for the sole purpose of dining at a non-local airport. It is most often used by pilots who are looking for any excuse to fly. A $100 hamburger trip usually involves flying a short distance (less than two hours,) eating at an airport restaurant, and flying home. [11]
  • "Hamburger helper" is a street-slang term for crack cocaine and "Hamburgers" for MDMA (Ecstasy)

Aviation encompasses all the activities relating to airborne devices created by human ingenuity, generally known as aircraft. ... A pile of crack cocaine ‘rocks’. Crack cocaine is a solid, smokeable form of cocaine and is a highly addictive drug popular for its intense psychoactive high. ... ecstasy and religious ecstasy MDMA, most commonly known today by the street name ecstasy, is a synthetic entactogen of the phenethylamine family whose primary effect is to stimulate the brain to rapidly secrete large amounts of serotonin, causing a general sense of openness, empathy, energy, euphoria, and well-being. ...

See also

In etymology, the process of back-formation is the creation of a neologism by reinterpreting an earlier word as a compound and removing the spuriously supposed affixes. ... For the journal, see Linguistics (journal). ... Etymologies redirects here. ... Bun Kabab is a popular sandwich in Pakistan. ... A burgerless burger, especially in Southern California, means a burger made without a meat patty. ... A Luther Burger as served at Googles cafeteria in New York A Luther Burger, also referred to as The Luther or simply a doughnut burger, is a hamburger, specifically a bacon cheeseburger, which employs a glazed donut (such as a Krispy Kreme) in place of each bun. ... Disassembled hand-powered grinder A meat grinder is a culinary tool for grinding (finely shredding into bits) meat. ... Pljeskavica (Serbian Cyrillic: Пљескавица) is a Serbian hamburger and national dish. ... Serbian cuisine is influenced by Mediterranean (especially Greek, Bulgarian), Turkish and Hungarian cuisines, which makes it a heterogeneous one. ... This article is about the meat dish. ... Jumbo Vada Pav Vada Pav (also spelled Wada Pav and pronounced WUH-daahh POW) is an Indian vegetarian fast food commonly eaten in Maharashtra, India, and is one of the most popular fast-foods in Mumbai. ... A homemade veggie burger. ...

References

  1. ^ "Hamburger" Oxford English Dictionary Online 2nd ed 1989
  2. ^ "hamburger." Webster's Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged. Merriam-Webster, 2002. http://unabridged.merriam-webster.com
  3. ^ Etymology of "hamburger". American Heritage Dictionary
  4. ^ Spiegel online from 2008, January 7th, http://einestages.spiegel.de/static/topicalbumbackground/1075/die_hamburger_hypothese.html
  5. ^ See for example the literature review in US Patent 5484625 for references.
  6. ^ Highland schools get Bambi burgers | UK news | The Guardian
  7. ^ The Canadian Oxford Dictionary has headwords for the Canadianisms kubasa, kubie (as a hot dog), and kubie burger, the latter two being specific to Alberta.
  8. ^ http://www.mad-cow.org/~tom/oprah.html "Cattlemen Condemn False and Misleading Oprah Show"
  9. ^ http://www.mcspotlight.org/media/television/oprah_transcript.html "Oprah's report on Mad Cow Disease"
  10. ^ http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Oprah_Winfrey_and_mad_cows "Oprah Winfrey and mad cows"
  11. ^ http://portlandhamburgers.blogspot.com/2007/11/burger-skills-hamburger-slang.html

Kovbasa (ковбаса) is the generic Ukrainian word for sausage. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... For other uses, see Alberta (disambiguation). ...

Bibliography

  • Barber, Katherine, editor (2004). The Canadian Oxford Dictionary, second edition. Toronto, Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-541816-6.
  • Edge, John T. (2005). Hamburgers & Fries : an American Story. G.P. Putnam's Sons. ISBN 0-399-15274-1.  - History and origins of the hamburger
  • Trage, (1997). The Food Chronology: A Food Lover's Compendium of Events and Anecdotes, From Prehistory to the Present. Owl Books. ISBN 0-805-05247-x. 
  • Allen, Beth (2004). Great American classics Cookbook. Hearst Books. ISBN 1-588-16280-X. 

External links

Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on
Hamburger
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Hamburgers
  • Library of Congress Local Legacies: Louis' Lunch
  • Library of Congress web page: Louis' Lunch
Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... Wikibooks logo Wikibooks, previously called Wikimedia Free Textbook Project and Wikimedia-Textbooks, is a wiki for the creation of books. ...

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