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Encyclopedia > Hallux
Toes on foot. The innermost toe (bottom-left in image) which is normally called the big toe, is the hallux.
Look up big toe in
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The hallux, big toe, or great toe is the innermost toe of the foot, counted as digit I. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 533 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2089 × 2351 pixel, file size: 253 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 533 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2089 × 2351 pixel, file size: 253 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Foot (disambiguation). ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... Toes on foot. ... For other uses, see Foot (disambiguation). ...


In humans, the hallux is longer than the second or pointer toe for a majority of people. This is an inherited trait in humans, where the dominant gene causes the normal length hallux while the homozygous recessive geneotype presents with a longer second toe. Mendelian inheritance (or Mendelian genetics or Mendelism) is a set of primary tenets relating to the transmission of hereditary characteristics from parent organisms to their children; it underlies much of genetics. ... It has been suggested that dominant allele be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ...


The human big toe has limited grasping ability. The big toe was once opposable (like the thumb) to human ancestors (and still is to other apes), but it lost that ability so humans can walk up-right on two legs (but, humans still carry the gene for an opposable toe). // This digit is one of the five fingers (though the word finger can also refer exclusively to the non-thumb digits). ...


In birds with anisodactyl or heterodactyl feet, the hallux is opposed or directed backwards and allows for grasping and perching. “Aves” redirects here. ... In biology, dactyly is the arrangement of digits (fingers and toes) on the hands, feet, or sometimes wings of an animal. ... In biology, dactyly is the arrangement of digits (fingers and toes) on the hands, feet, or sometimes wings of an animal. ...


Diseases

People with the rare genetic disease fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva characteristically have short big toes. Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), is a rare disease of the connective tissue. ...


The big toe is the most common focus of gout attacks.


Trivia

  • The Hallux or Big Toe often serves as the little piggy who went to the market. (This has fueled wild speculation that the roast beef consumed by the third piggy was actually purchased by the first)
  • In foot fetishism, the hallux is commonly the toe that is sucked, kissed, licked, and/or tickled.

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
NORMAL VERSUS PATHOLOGIC ANATOMY OF HALLUX ABDUCTO VALGUS < (2337 words)
Hallux abducto valgus (HAV) is a progressive degeneration of the 1st metatarsal phalangeal joint (MPJ) which demonstrates all the classic features of osteoarthritis.
Gray (2000) describes that due to the lateral deviation of the hallux on the metatarsal disuse atrophy of the articular cartilage occurs and the subchondral bone erodes.
The lateral deviation of the hallux and the sesamoid apparatus, aswell as the medial deviation of the first meatarsal., change the momentary forces of the otherwise supportive musculature and ligaments.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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