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Encyclopedia > Halifax, West Yorkshire
Halifax

Halifax shown within West Yorkshire
Population 82,056 (2001 Census)
OS grid reference SE335205
Metropolitan borough Calderdale
Metropolitan county West Yorkshire
Region Yorkshire and the Humber
Constituent country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town HALIFAX
Postcode district HX1-7
Dialling code 01422
Police West Yorkshire
Fire West Yorkshire
Ambulance Yorkshire
European Parliament Yorkshire and the Humber
UK Parliament Halifax
List of places: UKEnglandYorkshire

Coordinates: 53°43′30″N 1°51′47″W / 53.725, -1.863 Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Halifax can refer to any of several things: // Australia Halifax Bay, North Queensland Canada Halifax Regional Municipality City of Halifax (dissolved city) Halifax County, Nova Scotia (dissolved county) Halifax (electoral district) Halifax International Airport Namibia Halifax Island United Kingdom Halifax, West Yorkshire Halifax (UK Parliament constituency) Halifax bank (formerly building... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... Coat of Arms of South Yorkshire West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county within the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, that has a population of 2. ... UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Calderdale is a metropolitan district of the metropolitan county of West Yorkshire, England, through which the upper part of the Calder flows. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are one of the four levels of English administrative division used for the purposes of local government. ... Coat of Arms of South Yorkshire West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county within the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, that has a population of 2. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... Yorkshire and the Humber is one of the regions of England. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping, concerning these countries; thus the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has used the phrase in reference to the parts of former Yugoslavia... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The HX postcode area, also known as the Halifax postcode area[2], is a group of postal districts around Elland, Halifax, Hebden Bridge and Sowerby Bridge in England. ... +44 redirects here. ... There are a number of policing agencies in the United Kingdom. ... West Yorkshire Police is the police force covering West Yorkshire in the United Kingdom. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... The West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service is the county-wide, statutory emergency fire and rescue service for the Metropolitan county of West Yorkshire, England. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... Yorkshire and the Humber is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Halifax is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in England Lists of places within counties List of places in Bedfordshire List of places in Berkshire List of places in Buckinghamshire List of places in Cambridgeshire List of places in Cheshire List of places in Cleveland List of places... This is a list of cities, towns and villages in the historic English county of Yorkshire. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Halifax is a town within the Metropolitan Borough of Calderdale, in West Yorkshire, England, with a population of 82,056.[1] It is well-known as a centre of England's woollen manufacture from the 15th century onward. Calderdale is a metropolitan district of the metropolitan county of West Yorkshire, England, through which the upper part of the Calder flows. ... Coat of Arms of South Yorkshire West Yorkshire is a metropolitan county within the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, that has a population of 2. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...

Contents

History

"Except The Lord Keep the City"

The name Halifax is said to be a corruption of the Old English words for Holy and Face, part of the local legend that the head of John the Baptist was buried here after his execution. The legend is almost certainly medieval rather than ancient, though the town's coat of arms still carries an image of the saint. (The oldest written mentions of the town have the spelling Haliflax, apparently meaning "holy flax (field)", the second l having been subsequently lost by dissimilation.[2]) Halifax Parish Church, parts of which go back to the 12th century, has always been dedicated to St John the Baptist. The church's first organist, in 1765, was William Herschel, who went on to discover the planet Uranus. Image File history File links Halifax_Coat_of_Arms. ... Image File history File links Halifax_Coat_of_Arms. ... St. ... For other uses, see Flax (disambiguation). ... Dissimilation, in the context of phonology, is a phenomenon whereby similar consonant sounds in a word have a tendency to become different over time, so as to ease pronunciation. ... The Parish church of Halifax, England, dedicated to St John the Baptist. ... For other persons named William Herschel, see William Herschel (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Uranus (disambiguation). ...


Halifax was incorporated as a municipal borough in 1848 under the Municipal Corporations Act 1835, and with the passing of the Local Government Act 1888 became a County Borough in 1889. Since 1974, Halifax has been the centre of the Metropolitan District of Calderdale, part of the metropolitan county of West Yorkshire. Halifax has given its name to a bank, Halifax plc which started as a building society in the town. Nowadays Halifax is a trading name of Bank of Scotland plc, as part of the HBOS Group. Halifax is a twin town with Aachen in Germany. The A58 has a stretch called Aachen Way, with a plaque on the town-bound side of the road.
A borough is a political division originally used in England. ... The Municipal Reform Act 1835 required members of town councils (municipal corporations) to be elected by ratepayers and councils to publish their financial accounts. ... The Local Government Act 1888 (51 & 52 Vict. ... County borough was a term introduced in 1889 in the United Kingdom to refer to a borough or a city independent of county administration. ... Calderdale is a metropolitan district of the metropolitan county of West Yorkshire, England, through which the upper part of the Calder flows. ... The Halifax bank (then Halifax plc) was created in the mid-1990s when the Halifax Building Society was demutualised and shares were sold on the London Stock Exchange. ... A building society is a financial institution, owned by its members, that offers banking and other financial services, especially mortgage lending. ... Bank of Scotland plc is a commercial and clearing bank, based in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Group headquarters on The Mound, Edinburgh HBOS Office at Trinity Road, Halifax HBOS plc (LSE: HBOS) is a banking and insurance group in the United Kingdom, the holding company for Bank of Scotland plc, which operates the Bank of Scotland and Halifax brands; HBOS Australia, owner of BankWest; and HBOS... This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. ... Oche redirects here; in darts the oche is the line from which players must throw. ... The A58 is a major road in England. ...


Geography

Topographically, Halifax is located in the south-eastern corner of the moorland region called the South Pennines. Halifax is situated about 4 miles from the M62 motorway close to Huddersfield, Bradford and Rochdale. The Tees-Exe line passes through the A641 road, which links nearby Brighouse with Bradford and Huddersfield, The town lies 65 miles from Liverpool and Kingston upon Hull, and about 200 miles from the cities of London, Edinburgh, Belfast, Dublin and Cardiff as the crow flies. The major waterway is the River Calder. Typical South Pennines scenery: moors, pylons and a reservoir The South Pennines are a region of moorland and hill country in the North of England. ... The M62 motorway is a west-east trans-Pennine motorway in northern England, connecting the cities of Liverpool and Hull. ... , Huddersfield is a large town within the Metropolitan Borough of Kirklees, in West Yorkshire, England, near the confluence of the River Colne and the River Holme. ... For other uses, see Bradford (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rochdale (disambiguation). ... The Tees-Exe line is an imaginary line that can be draw on a map of the British mainland which roughly divides the lowland and upland regions of the country. ... , Brighouse is the second largest town in the metropolitan district of Calderdale in the county of West Yorkshire, England. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... Hull or Kingston upon Hull is a British city situated on the north bank of the Humber estuary. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Edinburgh (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital city of Wales. ... The River Calder is a river flowing through the predominantly urban areas of West Yorkshire, England, and gives its name to the borough of Calderdale. ...


Demographics

As of 2004[1], Calderdale had a population of 192,405, of which 82,500 live in Halifax. The main ethnic group in Halifax is Caucasian (87%), followed by Pakistani (10%). Over 90% of people aged 16-74 were employed, mostly full-time. 64% of residents had qualifications. For the peoples actually from the Caucasus, see Peoples of the Caucasus. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


In the 2001 census[1], 5% stated they were Muslim, 16.3% of no religion, and 63.8 % of Christian background. 12.8% did not disclose their religion. The population density of Halifax is 530/km². There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ...


Law enforcement

Halifax was also notorious for the 'Halifax Gibbet', an early form of the guillotine used to execute criminals by decapitation, it was last used in 1650 . A replica of the gibbet has been erected on the original site in Gibbet Street. The original gibbet blade is on display at Bankfield Museum, Halifax. Punishment in Halifax was notoriously harsh, as remembered in the Beggar's Litany, a prayer whose text was "From Hull, Hell, and Halifax, Good Lord deliver us!". The Halifax Gibbet in the town of Halifax, West Yorkshire, was an early guillotine, or decapitating machine. ... This article is about the decapitation device. ... Decapitation (from Latin, caput, capitis, meaning head), or beheading, is the removal of a living organisms head. ... Hull shown within England The unitary authorities of the Ceremonial East Riding. ...


Education

Halifax is home to the only two selective schools in West Yorkshire, which are the coeducational North Halifax Grammar School in Illingworth[3] and Crossley Heath Grammar School, near Skircoat Green[4]. Both schools achieve excellent GCSE and A-level results with both schools achieving a large proportion of A* to C grades at GCSE level. In 2005, the Crossley Heath School was the highest ranking co-educational school in the North of England. The Crossley Heath School was formed when Heath Grammar School, an all boys school given its charter by Elizabeth I of England, and The Crossley and Porter School, a mixed school founded with his brothers by Sir Francis Crossley, 1st Baronet which started as an orphanage, were combined in 1985. There are other schools in the area, including the Holy Trinity Church of England Senior School and St Catherine's Catholic High school Halifax, both of which are located in Holmfield. In January 2006 Holy Trinity was designated a Specialist College for Business and Enterprise, whilst St Catherine's, was designated a Specialist Technology College. The North Halifax Grammar School (NHGS) is a grammar school and specialist science college in Illingworth, Halifax, West Yorkshire. ... The Crossley Heath School is a grammar school located in Savile Park, Halifax, United Kingdom. ... Skircoat is a District of Calderdale to the south of Halifax. ... “GCSE” redirects here. ... The A-level, short for Advanced Level, is a General Certificate of Education qualification in the United Kingdom, usually taken by students during the optional final two years of secondary school (Years 12 & 13, commonly called the Sixth Form), or at a separate sixth form college or further education college... School Blazer Badge Heath Grammar School, Free School Lane, Halifax, West Yorkshire was founded in 1585 by Dr John Favour. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... Sir Francis Crossley, 1st Baronet, of Halifax (26 October 1817 – 5 January 1872), was a British carpet manufacturer, philanthropist and Liberal Party politician. ... The Holy Trinity Church of England Senior School, is the only church aided co-educational comprehensive school in the Diocese of Wakefield, founded in the 1815 by the then Vicar of Halifax. ...


Calderdale College is the local further education college on Francis Street just off King Cross Road, to the west of the town.


Educational development

In December 2006 it was announced that Calderdale College, in partnership with the University of Leeds, would open a new higher education institution in January 2007 called 'University Centre Calderdale'. The University of Leeds is a major teaching and research university, one of the largest in the United Kingdom with over 32,000 full-time students. ...


Culture

Victoria Theatre, Halifax

Halifax is home to a vibrant South Asian community mainly of Pakistani Muslims from the Kashmir region. The majority of the community lives in the west central Halifax region of the town, which was previously home to immigrant Irish communities who have since moved to the outer suburbs. Image File history File links Halifax, Yorkshire 2nd August 2005 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Halifax, Yorkshire 2nd August 2005 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article is about the geographical region of greater Kashmir. ...


North Halifax is noted for its local support of the far-right British National Party; the suburb of Mixenden became the first area in West Yorkshire to popularly vote in a BNP councillor, with Illingworth soon to follow. It is also home to the prestigious North Halifax Grammar and Crossley Heath Grammar schools. North Halifax, in contrast to west central Halifax's ethnic diversity, consists mostly of white Protestant residents. The British National Party (BNP) is a white nationalist political party in the United Kingdom. ... Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ...


Halifax has benefited from SRB and URBAN money through Action Halifax who have a vision for "a prosperous, vibrant and safe centre where all sections of the community can access opportunities to enhance their quality of life."


Dean Clough, a refurbished worsted spinning mill, is the home of Barrie Rutter's Northern Broadsides Theatre Company and the IOU theatre company as well as providing space for eight art galleries. Dean Clough in Halifax, West Yorkshire, England, was built 1840-60 for Crossleys Carpets and was the largest carpet factory in the world (two thirds of a mile long). ... Worsted is the name of a dick the cloth made from this yarn, as well as a yarn weight category. ... Barrie Rutter founded the Northern Broadsides theatre company in 1992. ... Northern Broadsides is a theatre company formed in 1992 and based at Dean Clough Mill in Halifax, West Yorkshire, England. ...


Halifax town centre has a busy night life with lots of clubs and bars. To help with those who become vulnerable whilst enjoying and using Halifax's night life, Street Angels was launched in November 2005. Street Angels patrol the town centre on Fridays and Saturdays between 9pm and 3am. In the first year police report violent crime has fallen by 42%. Street Angels work in partnership with St John Ambulance, Nightlife Marshals, Police Community Support Officers, Police and doorstaff as well as the Halifax Ambassadors who patrol in the daytime.


Halifax, and in particular the Victoria Theatre (originally the Victoria Hall) is home to the oldest continually running amateur choral society in the country and possibly the world. Halifax Choral Society was founded in 1817 and has an unbroken record of performances. The Choral Society has a strong rivalry with the equally eminent choral society of neighbouring town, Huddersfield. The Victoria Theatre contains a large concert organ originally built by William Hill & Sons, installed in 1901 and rebuilt after internal modifications were carried out in the building in the early 1960s. The idea for the Halifax Quarterly Choral Society, later to become the Halifax Choral Society, was first mooted in 1817 by founder William Priestley, an eminent local musician, antiquary and literary gentleman. ...

The Playhouse, Halifax‎

There is plenty to occupy lovers of amateur theatre. Halifax Thespians and the Actors' Workshop present plays of all kinds, and musical theatre is represented by Halifax Amateur Operatic Society, Halifax Light Opera Society, Halifax Gilbert and Sullivan Society, and All Souls Amateur Operatic Society. Halifax YMCA Pantomime Society presents its annual show in late January each year. Young people interested in drama are catered for by Halifax AOS and Halifax LOS, which each have a junior section, and another group, Stagedoor Theatre Co, specialises in dramatic activities and performances by children and young people. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,280 × 960 pixels, file size: 531 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Halifax Playhouse seen by Andrew Stopford in July 2002 File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,280 × 960 pixels, file size: 531 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Halifax Playhouse seen by Andrew Stopford in July 2002 File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that...


The Halifax & District Organists' Association, is one of the oldest organists' fellowships in the country.


As well as conventional cultural attractions, the Calderdale area has also become a centre for folk and traditional music. The Traditions Festival, held at the Piece Hall in Halifax town centre, is a celebration of traditional music and dance from around the world, whilst the Rushbearing, held in Sowerby Bridge and the surrounding villages, is a traditional festival which was restarted to celebrate the Queen's Silver Jubilee and attracts Morris dancers from all around the country. Sowerby Bridge is a town in the county of West Yorkshire, England, southwest of Halifax, at the junction between the Rochdale Canal and the Calder and Hebble Navigation, and on the Leeds and Liverpool Canal. ... Elizabeth IIs Silver Jubilee and her domestic and international visits proved very popular with her subjects. ... Cotswold morris with handkerchiefs A morris dance is a form of English folk dance usually accompanied with music. ...


Commercial enterprise

Joseph Crossley's Almshouses, Halifax

As well as the unforgettable significance of the Halifax Building Society (which merged with the Bank of Scotland in 2001), the town has associations with confectionery. John Mackintosh and his wife, Violet, opened a toffee shop in King Cross Lane in 1890. Violet formulated the toffee's recipe. John became known as The Toffee King. A factory was opened on Queens Road in 1898. A new factory at Albion Mill, at the current site near the train station, opened in 1909. John died in 1920, and his son Harold not only continued the business but took it to the present size and range of confectionery it has today. Their famous brands, including Rolo, Toffee Crisp and Quality Street of chocolate and confectionery are not just popular in the UK, but around the world including the USA. It was merged with Rowntree in 1969, which was then bought by Nestlé in 1988. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,280 × 960 pixels, file size: 191 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,280 × 960 pixels, file size: 191 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Halifax is a commercial bank in the United Kingdom, one of the trading names of the Bank of Scotland plc which is part of the HBOS Group. ... -1... English Toffee (the chewy sort) in cellophane wrapping Toffee is a confection made by boiling molasses or sugar along with butter, milk and occasionally flour. ... Rolo original chocolate coated caramels, as sold in the UK (September 2006) Rolos are a brand of cylindrical chocolates, with caramel centers, made by Nestle, and produced under licence (from Rowntree Mackintosh) by The Hershey Company in the United States since 1969. ... Toffee Crisp chocolate bar, as sold in the UK (September 2006) The Toffee Crisp is a chocolate bar produced by Nestlé consisting of puffed rice embedded in soft toffee and shaped into a cylinder, the whole being covered by milk chocolate. ... Nestlé Quality Street Quality Street is a popular selection box of individual sweets manufactured in Halifax, in the United Kingdom by Nestlé. // History Quality Street was launched in 1936, the name being inspired by a play of the same name by J. M. Barrie. ... For other uses, see Chocolate (disambiguation). ... This article is about the company. ...


As well as producing confectionery, Halifax was in the past a busy heavy industrial town dealing in and producing wool, carpets, machine tools, and beer. The Crossley family began carpet manufacture in modest premises at Dean Clough, on the banks of the Hebble Brook. The family was philanthropic and Joseph and Sir Francis Crossley, 1st Baronet built and endowed Almshouses for their workers, which exist to this day and are run by volunteer trustees. Sir Francis Crossley, 1st Baronet, of Halifax (26 October 1817 – 5 January 1872), was a British carpet manufacturer, philanthropist and Liberal Party politician. ... Categories: Stub ...


Transportation

The transportation in Halifax is managed by the West Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive. The West Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive (WYPTE) is the Passenger Transport Executive for the county of West Yorkshire, England. ...


Buses

First Calderdale & Huddersfield operate most of the services in Halifax, while Arriva operate services that link Halifax with Dewsbury and Wakefield. Halifax is well connected to the nearby towns of Bradford, Leeds and Huddersfield, with the First services 576, 508 and 503, serving these destinations every 10-20 minutes during Monday to Saturday daytimes. First also run services into other counties, including 528 to Rochdale via Ripponden and Littleborough, 590 to Rochdale via Todmorden and Littleborough and 592 to Burnley via Todmorden. Autobus redirects here. ... First Calderdale & Huddersfield is one of the bus companies serving the area of West Yorkshire, England. ... An Arriva train in Denmark Arriva plc is a UK-based international public transport operator and vehicle rental company, headquartered in Sunderland. ... Dewsbury is a town in the county of West Yorkshire, England, to the west of Wakefield, in the borough of Kirklees. ... For other uses, see Wakefield (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Leeds (disambiguation) and Leeds City (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rochdale (disambiguation). ... Ripponden is a village in the county of West Yorkshire, England, near Halifax, on the River Ryburn. ... , Littleborough is a town within the Metropolitan Borough of Rochdale, in Greater Manchester, England. ... , Todmorden is a town and civil parish,[1] within the Metropolitan Borough of Calderdale, in West Yorkshire, England. ... For other meanings see Burnley (disambiguation) , Burnley is a large town in the borough of Burnley in Lancashire, England, with a population of about 73,021. ...


Other bus operators in the town include T.J. Walsh (Also known as The Halifax Bus Company) and Halifax Joint Committee which use the livery of the old Halifax Corporation buses, used on the town's buses until 1974. Unlike many other bus stations, Halifax is noted for having much character, with many listed buildings being incorporated on the site. Halifax Joint Committee Heritage vehicles on charter work Halifax Joint Committee is an independent bus company operating in and around Halifax, West Yorkshire, UK. Its buses are painted in the livery of the former County Borough of Halifax bus undertaking which was taken over by the West Yorkshire Passenger Transport...


Trains

Halifax is a railway station on the Caldervale Line. 200 yards from the station south, the line diverges for a link to Huddersfield. Trains operate to Manchester every 30 minutes, Bradford and Leeds every 15 minutes, Blackpool hourly and Brighouse and Huddersfield hourly Monday to Saturday daytimes. All services are operated by Northern Rail and are branded as MetroTrain. Passenger representation is organized by the local users' group, the Halifax and District Rail Action Group ("HADRAG"). Halifax railway station serves the town of Halifax, West Yorkshire. ... The Caldervale Line is the name given to rail services in the West Yorkshire Metro area of northern England. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... This article is about the town in England. ... Northern Rail is a train operating company that has operated local services in the north of England since 2004. ... A rapid transit, underground, subway, tube, elevated, or metro(politan) system is a railway — usually in an urban area — with a high capacity and frequency of service, and grade separation from other traffic. ...


The railway constructed by the Great Northern Railway in the mid 1870s across and indeed partly in tunnel beneath the exceptionally hilly terrain from Halifax via Queensbury, where there was a highly unusual triangular station, to both Bradford in the east and Keighley (for Skipton, Carlisle and Morecambe) to the north-west, was unfortunately closed in stages from 1955 onwards although many of its spectacular engineering features remain. The route has lately been adopted and to an extent brought back into public use and attention by Sustrans as a walking and cycle route. The principal structure on the line, Queensbury Tunnel, was, at its opening, the longest on the GNR system at 1 mile 751 yards. It is currently derelict, partially flooded and impassible. Several Great Northern Railways have existed: Great Northern Railway of Australia. ... Canal boat decked in Sustrans logo Sustrans is a British charity which promotes sustainable transport. ...


The Halifax High Level Railway was a related branch line leading from Holmfield near Ovenden, on the line to Queensbury, running through a half-mile tunnel through the ridge and across the Wheatley Valley on a ten arch viaduct past Samuel Webster's brewery, to Pellon, where there were sizeable goods facilities and then to St Paul's railway station in Queens Road. This branch line gradually fell into disuse, losing its regular passenger service as early as 1917. The last goods train ran in 1960 and the line was then dismantled, leaving the spectacular viaduct standing as a reminder of a once useful freight link. Ovenden is a village in the county of West Yorkshire, England. ... Samuel Webster & Sons Limited, Fountain Head Brewery, Ovenden Wood opened in 1838, with an office in Union Cross Yard, Halifax, England. ...


Notable attractions

Halifax Piece Hall

The cloth hall was where the trading of the woollen cloth pieces was done. Opened on January 1, 1779, it was only open for business for two hours on a Saturday morning, and contained 315 merchant trading rooms. After the mechanisation of the cloth industry, the Piece Hall was and continues to be used as a public market. The former Calderdale Industrial Museum (now closed) was housed within the Piece Hall. In winter 2006-07 the Piece Hall hosted an outdoor temporary ice rink. Outside Piece Hall, Halifax August 2005 Piece Hall August 2005 The Halifax Piece Hall is a building in the town centre of Halifax, England, originally built as a sales center for woollen handloom weavers. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1779 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Mechanization is the use of machines to replace manual labour or animals and can also refer to the use of powered machinery to help a human operator in some task. ...

The Assembly Rooms and Trinity Church in Halifax from A Complete History of the County of York by Thomas Allen (1828-30)

Image File history File links The Assembly Rooms and Trinity Church in Halifax from A Complete History of the County of York by Thomas Allen (1828-30). ... Image File history File links The Assembly Rooms and Trinity Church in Halifax from A Complete History of the County of York by Thomas Allen (1828-30). ...

Town Hall

This was built by Charles Barry, who also built the Houses of Parliament, in 1863. The Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster, Barrys most famous building. ... “Houses of Parliament” redirects here. ...


Wainhouse Tower

An elaborate factory chimney or folly, built for a dye house that was never used, which dates from 1871. It was designed by Isaac Booth, and is now capped with an observation platform reached by an interior spiral staircase. Wainhouse Tower from Wainhouse Terrace Wainhouse Tower is a folly in the town of Halifax, West Yorkshire. ... For other uses, see Folly (disambiguation). ...


Museums

Laying up of 1981 stand of Regimental Colours of the 1st Battalion Duke of Wellington's Regiment

The Yorkshire Regiment's 3rd Battalion (Duke of Wellington's) formerly The Duke of Wellington's Regiment (West Riding) Halifax Area Headquarters is based at Wellesley Park, on the junction of Gibbet Street and Spring Hall Road, in the former Wellesley Barracks museum and education centre building. The Regimental Museum has been re-located within the Bankfield House Textile Museum on Haley Hill. The former Barracks was converted into an educational school in 2005 . Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 541 pixelsFull resolution (1400 × 946 pixel, file size: 240 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 541 pixelsFull resolution (1400 × 946 pixel, file size: 240 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... The Yorkshire Regiment (14th/15th, 19th and 33rd/76th Foot) is one of the large infantry regiments of the British Army. ... Official name The Duke of Wellingtons Regiment (West Riding) Colonel-in-Chief Brigadier His Grace Arthur Valerian Wellesley KG LVO OBE MC BA DL, 8th Duke of Wellington Colonel-of-the-Regiment Major-General Sir Evelyn John Webb-Carter KCB Nicknames The Dukes, The Havercake Lads, The Pattern, The... A barracks housing conscripts of Norrbottens regemente in Boden, Sweden. ...


Former Regimental Colours of the 'Dukes' are laid up in the Halifax Parish Church. The 1981 set of colours, were taken out of service, in 2002. They were marched through the town from the Town Hall to the Parish church accompanied by two escorts of 40 troops, the Regimental Drums and the Heavy Cavalry and Cambrai Band on Sunday the 31 March 2007 from the Town Hall to the Parish Church. The troops were then inspected by The Lord Lieutenant of West Yorkshire, Dr Ingrid Roscoe BA, PhD, FSA and the Mayor of Halifax Cllr Colin Stout making a total of eight stands of colours within the Regimental Chapel. The Regiment was presented with the 'Freedom of Halifax' on 18 June 1945. // Origins The practice of carrying standards, to act both as a rallying point for troops, and to mark the location of the commander, is thought to have originated in Egypt some 5,000 years ago. ... City Hall is a 1996 film directed by Harold Becker. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For the railway station in Sydney, Australia, see Town Hall railway station, Sydney. ... The office of Lord Lieutenant of West Yorkshire was created in 1974 Kenneth Hargreaves (1974-1978, previously West Riding Lieutenant since 1970) William Bulmer (1978-1985) John Taylor, Baron Ingrow (1985-1992) John Lyles (1992-2004) Ingrid Roscoe (2004-) External link Lieutenancy web page Categories: Lord Lieutenancies | West Yorkshire ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Eureka! children's museum

This notable attraction was inspired and opened by Prince Charles in the summer of 1992, and is located in part of the railway station. Eureka! is an interactive educational museum for for children in Halifax, West Yorkshire. ... Prince Charles may refer to: Prince Charles, Prince of Wales, current heir-apparent to the British throne Any of the previous British royals named Charles, Prince of Wales The former Belgian regent, Prince Charles of Belgium This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might...


Shibden Hall

Once home to the diarist Anne Lister, Shibden Hall is located just outside Halifax in the neighbouring Shibden Valley. Shibden Hall is a historic hall in Halifax, West Yorkshire dating back to around 1420, when it was recorded as being inhabited by one William Oates. ... Anne Lister (1791–1840), called Fred by her lover and Gentleman Jack by Halifax residents, was a well-off Yorkshire landowner and self-conscious lesbian. ...


Churches

The fifteenth century Parish Church, dedicated to St John the Baptist did not achieve cathedral status when a new diocese was being considered for the West Riding (Wakefield Parish Church became the cathedral in 1888. It was drastically altered and enlarged). There is a collection of rare Commonwealth white glass as well as a series of Victorian windows. Another feature is the complete array of Jacobean box pews. The pair of gothic organ cases by John Oldrid Scott now house the four-manual instrument by Harrison & Harrison. The tower contains fourteen bells and an angelus.


The currently mothballed mid-Victorian All Souls' Church by Sir George Gilbert Scott standing part way up Haley Hill to the north of the main town centre is now vested in the Historic Churches Preservation Trust. Its lofty (236 feet) spire and white magnesian limestone exterior stand as a very personal statement in 13th century French style of the mill owner Colonel Sir Edward Akroyd, who paid solely for its construction as the centrepiece of a purpose-built model village ("Akroydon"). All Souls' boasts an unusually complete sequence of windows by the leading artists of the 1850s, including William Wailes, John Hardman and Clayton & Bell. The large organ by Forster & Andrews inserted in 1868, ten years after the building was completed, is currently unplayable and many of its surviving parts are in store, awaiting restoration. The tower houses a ring of eight bells. The chapel of St Johns College, Cambridge is characteristic of Scotts many church designs Sir George Gilbert Scott (July 13, 1811 – March 27, 1878) was an English architect of the Victorian Age, chiefly associated with the design, building and renovation of churches, cathedrals and workhouses. ...


Former churches include the Georgian Holy Trinity Church (now converted to office use), and the late neo-gothic (1911) St Paul's King Cross, by Sir Charles Nicholson. St Paul's is known for the unusual and highly colourful west window, specified by Nicholson, showing the apocalyptic vision of the Holy City descending upon the smoky mills and railway viaducts of Halifax as it was before the First World War.


The eye catching spire of Square Church, not far from the Parish Church at the bottom of the town, paid for by the carpet manufacturing Crossley family, is all that remains of a mighty gothic congregational church built by Joseph James in 1856-8 as a rival design to All Souls' Haley Hill. The building was closed in the late 1960s and arsonists caused severe damage to the building several years later, leading to its partial demolition. The rather comic story of the rival spires runs that the two buildings' towers were nearing completion simultaneously; the architects were ordered to stop work within a few feet of the top of the spires to see who would finish first. After some time, the Crossleys lost patience and finished their spire at 235 feet, prompting the immediate completion of the rival building one foot higher. Today, they still stand as the second and third highest spires in Yorkshire.[citation needed] The neighbouring and earlier (Georgian) Square Chapel survived a hundred years of use as a church hall and Sunday School for the larger church.


Other attractions

The Square Chapel Centre for the Arts offers music, dance, plays, comedy as well as community events such as tea dances. The Victoria Theatre, opened in 1901 and seating 1568 people, or 1860 for a standing concert, hosts a variety of performances. The Square Chapel, Halifax, West Yorkshire was designed by Thomas Bradley and James Kershaw at the instigation of Titus Knight a local preacher. ... A tea dance or thé dansant is an afternoon or early evening dance. ...


Sports

The town has relatively successful sport teams. Its rugby league team, Halifax RLFC (formerly the "Blue Sox"), plays in League One, and the town's football team, Halifax Town A.F.C., currently plays in the Blue Square Premier (formerly the Conference League) after twice being relegated from League One. Both teams share The Shay football ground, which is the largest ground used by a non-league football club in England. In the 1960s Halifax Town played Millwall in a Fourth Division match that had the lowest attendance ever recorded for a professional match in England. Rugby league football is a full-contact team sport played with a prolate spheroid-shaped ball by two teams of thirteen on a rectangular grass field. ... Halifax RLFC is one of the most historic rugby league clubs in the game, formed over a century ago, in 1873 in the Yorkshire town of Halifax. ... The Rugby League National Leagues (currently known as the LHF Healthplan National Leagues as a result of sponsorship) form the basis for rugby league competition in Great Britain below Super League. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Halifax Town Association Football Club are an English football team currently playing in the Conference National. ... The Football Conference is a football league at the top of the National League System of non-League football in England. ... Area of Halifax, West Yorkshire, the site of a football stadium where Halifax RLFC and Halifax Town both play their home games. ... This is a partial list of English football stadia, ranked in descending order of capacity. ... Millwall Football Club are an English professional football team based at the New Den Stadium in Bermondsey, South East London. ...


The Crossley Heath Grammar School normally excel in nationwide school rugby union competitions.[5][6][7]


Motorcycle speedway racing has been staged at two venues in Halifax. In the pioneer days of 1928 to 1930 a track operated at Thrum Hall. A Halifax team took part in the English Dirt Track League of 1929. Speedway returned to Halifax at The Shay Stadium in 1949 and operated until 1951. The team operated as the Halifax Nomads in 1948 racing three away fixtures. The Halifax Dukes, the name they took once The Shay was opened, operated in the National League Third Division in 1949 before moving up to the Second Division in 1950. Riders including Arthur Forrest, moved on to Bradford. More in depth details of the 1948 - 1951 era can be found on the free access Speedway Researcher website.[8] The Dukes re-emerged in 1965 as founder members of the British League and operated there for many years before the team moved en bloc to Odsal Stadium in Bradford. The steeply banked bends of the track at The Shay have been buried under stands at either end when the spectator facilities were squared off. Odsal Stadium is a stadium situated in Bradford in the northern English county of West Yorkshire. ...


Famous Haligonians

Phyllis Bentley, OBE 1894-1977, was an English novelist. ... John Bromley (born June 22, 1947 in Manchester) is a songwriter and musician. ... John Reginald Halliday Christie (April 8, 1898–July 15, 1953) was an English serial killer active in the 1940s and 1950s. ... Keith Clifford is a British actor who plays Billy Hardcastle on the British sitcom Last of the Summer Wine. ... Daniel Coll is an English actor who currently stars as DS Frank Blackmore in ITVs Emmerdale. ... Shirley Crabtree, better known as Big Daddy (November 14, 1930 – December 2, 1997) was an English professional wrestler. ... Sir George Dyson (1883–1964) was a well-known english musician and composer. ... Stuart Fielden (born September 14, 1979 in Halifax, West Yorkshire) is an English rugby league player. ... Barrie Ingham was born in Halifax, West Yorkshire, February 10. ... Patrick Kenny (born May 17, 1978 in Halifax, West Yorkshire) is an Irish football player, who currently plays as a goalkeeper for Sheffield United. ... John Kettley is a freelance weatherman. ... Nick Lawrence is a radio presenter, currently the host of the BBCs regional programme for the east of England between 7pm and 10pm every weekday. ... Anne Lister (b. ... Shibden Hall is a historic hall in Halifax, West Yorkshire dating back to around 1420, when it was recorded as being inhabited by one William Oates. ... Rowntrees is a historic brand of Nestlé SA that is used to market a range of fruit gums and pastilles formerly owned by Rowntree Mackintosh. ... Viscount Mackintosh of Halifax is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. ... Thomas Nettleton (1683-1742) was an English physician who carried out some of the earliest systematic programmes of smallpox vaccination and who went on to statistical investigation of the outcomes. ... The smallpox vaccine was the first successful vaccine ever to be developed and remains the only effective preventive treatment for the deadly smallpox disease. ... John Noakes (born 6 March 1934, in Shelf, Halifax, Yorkshire, England) is a British actor, presenter and television personality, best known for co-presenting the BBC childrens magazine programme Blue Peter in the 1960s and 1970s. ... Paradise Lost are a death/doom and later gothic metal band formed in 1987 in Halifax, England. ... Judge James Pickles (born 18 March 1925) is a former English Circuit judge, now a tabloid columnist. ... Wilfred Pickles (13 October 1904 - 26 March 1978) was an English actor and radio presenter. ... Eric Portman (born Halifax, West Yorkshire on 13 July 1901 and died St Veep, Cornwall on 7 December 1969) was a distinguished English stage and film actor. ... Jesse Ramsden (October 6, 1735 - November 5, 1800) was an English astronomical instrument maker. ... The Ramsden theodolite was used in the first Ordnance Survey of Southern Britain. ... Percy Shaw was born in Halifax in West Yorkshire in 1890, the son of Jimmy Shaw, a dyer’s labourer, who worked at a local mill. ... A regular white cats eye of the kind invented by Shaw, marking the middle of the road. ... Herbert Akroyd-Stuart (January 28, 1864, Halifax Yorkshire, England - February 19, 1927) Inventor of the hot bulb oil engine. ... 1939 Lanz Bulldog tractor with hot bulb engine. ... Diesel engines in a museum Diesel generator on an oil tanker A diesel engine is an internal combustion engine which operates using the Diesel cycle. ... Brian Turner (born 7 May 1946 in Morley, Leeds, Yorkshire) is a British celebrity chef, based in London. ... Séan Michael Walsh born 3rd July 1802 in Ogden, Halifax (West Yorkshire). ... John Frederick Wolfenden, Baron Wolfenden, KB, CBE (1906 — 1985) was a British education figure probably most famous for chairing the Wolfenden report recommending the legalisation of homosexuality, which was published in 1957. ... Frank Stewart Worthington (born November 23, 1948 in Shelf near Halifax, Yorkshire) is a former English footballer. ...

See also

Halifax College, York Halifax College is the largest and newest college of the University of York. ... This article is about the British university. ... The Halifax Gibbet in the town of Halifax, West Yorkshire, was an early guillotine, or decapitating machine. ... Halifax railway station serves the town of Halifax, West Yorkshire. ... The Handley Page Halifax was one of the British front-line, four-engine heavy bombers of the Royal Air Force during the Second World War. ... HMS Halifax, British Royal Navy. ... Walterclough Hall, sometimes known as Water Clough Hall or Upper Walterclough, lies in the Walterclough Valley southeast of Halifax and northeast of the village of Southowram in the West Riding of Yorkshire, along side the Red Beck. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b c 2004 Calderdale Ward Digest - Census 2001 (August 2004) (PDF). Calderdale Council (August 2004). Retrieved on 2007-05-14.
  2. ^ Eilert Ekwall (1936). The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Place-Names, Fourth edition 1960. 
  3. ^ League Tables: The North Halifax Grammar School. BBC News (2007-01-11). Retrieved on 2007-05-16.
  4. ^ League Tables: The Crossley Heath School. BBC News (2007-01-11). Retrieved on 2007-05-16.
  5. ^ "Crossley Heath upset Warwick", Daily Mail, 2005-02-09. Retrieved on 2007-05-16. 
  6. ^ "In Focus: Crossley Heath", Daily Mail, 2005-02-23. Retrieved on 2007-05-16. 
  7. ^ Jim Hooley. "Channing chips in", Daily Mail, 2005-04-25. Retrieved on 2007-05-16. 
  8. ^ The Speedway Researcher website

PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... August 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: August 2004 in sports Deaths in August 2004 • 30 Fred Whipple • 26 Laura Branigan • 24 Elisabeth Kübler-Ross • 18 Elmer Bernstein • 15 Amarsinh Chaudhary • 14 CzesÅ‚aw MiÅ‚osz • 13 Julia Child • 8... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC News is the department within the BBC responsible for the corporations news-gathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Daily Mail is a British newspaper and the oldest tabloid, first published in 1896. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Daily Mail is a British newspaper and the oldest tabloid, first published in 1896. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Daily Mail is a British newspaper and the oldest tabloid, first published in 1896. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Street Angels Halifax
  • Action Halifax Regeneration Partnership
  • Halifax Town Online
  • Halifax Today
  • Tourist Information
  • Crossley Heath Grammar School website
  • North Halifax Grammar School 2005 Ofsted Report (PDF Format)

Arts

  • Dean Clough - Arts, business, education and design complex
  • Square Chapel Centre for the Arts
  • Northern Broadsides Theatre Company
  • Halifax Thespians
  • Halifax Gilbert & Sullivan Society

Museums

  • Museums in Calderdale - Bankfield Museum
  • Eureka! The Museum for Children

  Results from FactBites:
 
Halifax, West Yorkshire - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2077 words)
West Central Halifax has older stone terrace houses which have stood the test of time and are still standing, while North Halifax has many ex-council houses built in the 1950s and 1960s of varying standards; in recent years many houses in North Halifax have been demolished due to their uninhabitable conditions.
North Halifax is noted for its local support of the far-right British National Party; the suburb of Mixenden became the first area in West Yorkshire to popularly vote in a BNP councillor, with Illingworth soon to follow.
Halifax town centre has a busy night life with lots of clubs and bars such as The Acapulco (commonly referred to as the "Acca"), The Coliseum ("The Colly"), Edisons, Bar 11, Barracuda and the Tramshed Zoo Bar that was raided at the end of 2005 causing it to be shut down.
Halifax (bank) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (648 words)
Halifax plc is a commercial bank in the United Kingdom, part of the HBOS Group.
Halifax pioneered an innovative approach to bank adverts in 2000, when it allowed its staff to star in adverts, singing popular songs with the words changed to reflect financial services products.
Halifax worker, Howard Brown is the regular star of the adverts.
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