FACTOID # 11: Oklahoma has the highest rate of women in State or Federal correctional facilities.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Half rhyme

Half rhyme, sometimes called slant, sprung, lose or near rhyme, and less commonly eye rhyme (a term covering a broader phenomenon), is consonance on the final consonants of the words involved. It is widely used in Irish, Welsh, and Icelandic verse. Some examples are ill and shell and also dropped and wept. Eye rhyme is a similarity in spelling between words that are pronounced differently and hence, not an auditory rhyme. ... Consonance is a stylistic device, often used in poetry. ... The Chinese poem Quatrain on Heavenly Mountain by Emperor Gaozong (Song Dynasty) Poetry (from the Greek , poiesis, a making or creating) is a form of art in which language is used for its aesthetic and evocative qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its ostensible meaning. ...


The first English poet to use half rhyme was Henry Vaughan,[citation needed] but it was not until it was used in the works of W. B. Yeats and Gerard Manley Hopkins that half rhyme became popular among English-language poets. In the 20th century half-rhyme has been used widely by English poets. Often, as in most of Yeats's poems, it is mixed with other devices such as regular rhymes, assonance, and para-rhymes. In the following example the 'rhymes' are on/moon and bodies/ladies: Henry Vaughan (April 17, 1622 - April 28, 1695) was a Welsh Metaphysical poet and a doctor, the twin brother of the philosopher Thomas Vaughan. ... William Butler Yeats, 1933 photograph, author unknown. ... The Best ideal is the true/ And other truth is none. ... Assonance is the repetition of vowel sounds in non-rhyming words as in, some ship in distress that cannot live. ... Term coined by Edmund Blunden to describe a form of near rhyme where the consonants in two different words are exactly the same but the vowels vary. ...

When have I last looked on
The round green eyes and the long wavering bodies
Of the dark leopards of the moon?
All the wild witches, those most noble ladies,
(Yeats, "Lines written in Dejection")

American poet Emily Dickinson also used slant rhyme frequently in her work.[1] In her poem "Hope is the thing with feathers" the slant rhyme appears in the second and fourth lines: This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

When I was a boy they beat me,
So i can't rhyme.
Because of the blood on my brain,
I see things that arn't there.

References

  1. ^ http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/english/melani/cs6/dickinson.html

Also See


  Results from FactBites:
 
Guide to Verse Forms - Rhyme (2931 words)
Another form of internal rhyme has a word in the middle of one line rhyming with the the word at the end of a different line; this is sometimes called cross rhyme - which is liable to be confused with cross-rhyme, a particular kind of 4-line stanza.
One particular form of cross rhyme, in which the word at the end of one line rhymes with a line in the middle of the next, is common in Irish poetry, where it is known as aicill rhyme.
Rhyming a word in the middle of one line with a word in the middle of another is called interlaced rhyme.
Englyn - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (491 words)
It uses quantitative metres, involving the counting of syllables, and rigid patterns of rhyme and half rhyme.
This is identical to the englyn proest dalgron except that the half rhymes must use the ae, oe, wy, and ei diphthongs.
In the first line there must be a break after the seventh, eighth, or ninth syllable, and the rhyme with the second line comes at this break; but the tenth syllable of the first line must either rhyme or be in assonance with the middle of the second line.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m